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Isavuconazole – Basilea reports positive results from study

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Isavuconazole structure.svg
Isavuconazole
4-{2-[(1R,2R)-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-1-methyl-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl]-1,3-thiazol-4-yl}benzonitrile
[(2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol;
(2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol
241479-67-4 CAS
946075-13-4 cas of SULPHATE (USAN)  in phase 3Aspergillosis, Infection, candidal, RO-0098557
ROCHE Originator
 ChemSpider 2D Image | Isavuconazole | C22H17F2N5OS
30 September 2013
StockMarketWire.com – Basilea Pharmaceutica has revealed positive topline data from the isavuconazole phase 3 invasive aspergillosis study (SECURE). http://www.stockmarketwire.com/article/4677530/Basilea-reports-positive-results-from-study.htmlThe antifungal agent isavuconazole is being co-developed with Astellas Pharma Inc.The randomized, double-blind isavuconazole study (SECURE) achieved its primary objective in demonstrating non-inferiority versus voriconazole for the primary treatment of invasive fungal disease caused by Aspergillus species or certain other filamentous fungi.

This post is updated in sept 2015……..

 

BAL-4815, 241479-67-4, Bal4815, AC1OCFHQ, UNII-60UTO373KE, , BAL 4815, FT-0670421
Molecular Formula: C22H17F2N5OS   Molecular Weight: 437.465086

Isavuconazole (BAL4815; trade name Cresemba) is a triazole antifungal drug. Its prodrug, isavuconazonium sulfate (BAL8557), was granted approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on March 6, 2015[1]

During its Phase III drug trials, Astellas partnered with Basilea Pharmaceutica, the developer of the drug, for rights to co-development and marketing of isavuconazole. [2]

On May 28, 2013, Basilea Pharmaceutica announced it had been granted orphan drug status by the FDA for treatment of aspergillosis.[3] Since then, it has also been granted orphan drug status for the treatment of invasive candidiasis.[4]

 

Isavuconazonium sulfate (BAL8557)—a prodrug of isavuconazole.

Isavuconazium chloride hydrochloride (BAL-8557), a prodrug of Basilea Pharmaceutica’s BAL-4815 (isavuconazole), is a triazole in phase III clinical trials for the oral and intravenous treatment of severe fungal infections, including candidemia and other invasive Candida infections and invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Additional phase III trials are ongoing for the treatment of invasive fungal infections caused by rare fungi. Phase II trials are ongoing for the treatment of candidal esophageal infection. Isavuconazole is water-soluble, highly bioavailable and can be administered in convenient once-daily or once-weekly dosing regimens.Originally developed at Roche, the drug candidate was subsequently acquired by Basilea. In May 2006, isavuconazium received fast track designation from the FDA for the treatment of infections caused by yeasts and molds, including fluconazole-resistant Candida strains, Aspergillus and zygomycetes in patients with weakened immune systems. In 2010, the product was licensed to Astellas Pharma by Basilea Pharmaceutica for codevelopment and copromotion worldwide, including an option for Japan, for the treatment of fungal infection. In 2013, FDA designated isavuconazium as a Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designation for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis.

ISAVUCONAZOLE

CLINICAL TRIALS…LINK

PATENTS

6-27-2012
Process for the manufacture of enantiomerically pure antifungal azoles as ravuconazole and isavuconazole
11-18-2011
Antifungal Composition
9-29-2010
PROCESS FOR PREPARATION OF WATER-SOLUBLE AZOLE PRODRUGS
12-3-2008
N-substituted carbamoyloxyalkyl-azolium derivatives
3-14-2007
N-phenyl substituted carbamoyloxyalkyl-azolium derivatives
11-3-2004
N-substituted carbamoyloxyalkyl-azolium derivatives
10-10-2001
Azoles for treatment of fungal infections

Several azoles are currently used for systemic mycoses. However, none of them fulfills the needs of clinical requirement in full extent, particularly with regard 0 to broad antifungal spectrum including aspergillus fumigatus, less drug-drug interaction, and appropriate plasma half-life for once a day treatment. Other clinical requirements which are not fulfilled by the azoles currently used, are efficacy against major systemic mycoses including disseminated aspergillosis, safety, and oral or parenteral formulations. Particularly, demand of a 5 parenteral administration of the azoles is increasing for the treatment of serious systemic mycoses. Most of the azoles on the market as well as under development are highly lipophilic molecules that make the parenteral formulation difficult.

Figure US08207352-20120626-C00001

Isavuconazole [(2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol; formula I, Rand Rrepresent fluorine and Rrepresents hydrogen] as well as Ravuconazole [(2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol; formula I, Rand Rrepresent fluorine and Rrepresents hydrogen] are useful antifungal drugs as reported in U.S. Pat. No. 5,648,372 from Feb. 1, 1995 or in U.S. Pat. No. 5,792,781 from Sep. 18, 1996 or in U.S. Pat. No. 6,300,353 from Oct. 9, 2001 (WO99/45008).

Since compounds of general formula I contain two adjacent chiral centers, synthesis of enantiomerically pure compound is complex and until now, all patented syntheses are not efficient enough and do not allow cost effective manufacturing on a technical scale:

Thus, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,648,372 or 5,792,781 describe enantioselective synthesis of compounds of formula I (specifically Ravuconazole) from chiral 3-hydroxy-2-methyl propionic acid in 12 steps with overall yield lower than 5%. In another approach including 13 steps and low overall yield, (R)-lactic acid was used as the starting material (Chem. Pharm. Bull. 46(4), 623 (1998) and ibid. 46(7), 1125 (1998)).

Because both starting materials contain only one chiral center, in a number of inefficient steps, the second, adjacent chiral center has to be created by a diastereoselective reaction (using either Corey or Sharpless epoxidation method) which is not sufficiently selective leading mostly to a mixture of two diastereomers which have to be separated.

The second approach, based on (R)-methyl lactate, was recently very thoroughly optimized by BMS on a multi kilogram scale but it still does not fulfill requirements for cost effective manufacturing process (Organic Process Research & Development 13, 716 (2009)). The overall yield of this optimized 11 steps process is still only 16% (Scheme 1).

Figure US08207352-20120626-C00002

The manufacturing process for Isavuconazole is similar: Since Isavuconazole differentiates from Ravuconazole by only another fluorine substitution on the aromatic ring (2,5- instead of 2,4-difluorophenyl), the identical synthesis has been used (U.S. Pat. No. 6,300,353 from Oct. 9, 2001 and Bioorg. & Med. Chem. Lett. 13, 191 (2003)). Consequently, also this manufacturing process, based on (R)-lactic acid, faces the same problems: to many steps, extremely low overall yield and in addition to U.S. Pat. No. 6,300,353 claims even already known step as novel (claim 36).

Recent attempts to improve this concept as reported in WO 2007/062542 (Dec. 1, 2005), using less expensive, natural configured (S)-lactic acid, also failed: As already reported in U.S. Pat. No. 6,133,485 and in US 2003/0236419, the second chiral center was formed from an optically active allyl alcohol prepared in a few steps from (S)-lactic acid.

This allyl alcohol was subjected to Sharpless diastereoselective epoxidation providing first an opposite configured, epimeric epoxy alcohol which had to be then epimerized in an additional inversion step yielding finally the desired epoxy alcohol as the known precursor for Isavuconazole (U.S. Pat. No. 6,300,353). It is obvious that this process using less expensive (S)-lactic acid makes the entire process with an inversion step even more complex than the original approach.

Elegant and more efficient process has been claimed in US 2004/0176432 from Jun. 26, 2001) in which both chiral centers have been formed simultaneously, diastereo- and enantio-selectively pure in one single reaction step using chiral (R)-2-butynol as a chiral precursor in the presence of Pd(II)-catalyst and diethyl zinc (Scheme 2).

Figure US08207352-20120626-C00003

Since water soluble, (R)-2-butynol is expensive, recently identical process has been published, in which instead of (R)-2-butynol less water soluble and therefore, less expensive (R)-4-phenyl-3-butyn-2-ol was used (Synthetic Commun. 39, 1611 (2009)). Nevertheless, as incorrectly stated there, this process does not provide better diastereoselectivity than the original process using (R)-2-butynol: On the contrary disadvantage of this process is a very bad atom economy because huge phenyl group of (R)-4-phenyl-3-butyn-2-ol has to be “disposed” in oxidation step by the conversion of triple bond into carboxylic acid function.

All known processes for enantiomerically pure compounds of formula I have definitely too many operation steps and specifically very low overall yield. The chiral starting materials used, either 3-hydroxy-2-methyl propionic acid or (S)- or (R)-methyl lactate, contain only one chiral center and consequently, in number of steps, the second adjacent chiral center has to be ineffectively generated which makes the entire process long and expensive. The only known process, which generates both chiral centers simultaneously, requires again expensive chiral starting material (R)-2-butynol.

ISAVUCONAZOLE

…………………………………………….

US6812238

synthetic scheme A, starting from 4-[(2R)-2-(3,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yloxy)-propionyl]morpholine [which can be prepared by a same procedure as described in Chem. Pharm. Bull. 41, 1035, 1993.]. This synthesis route has been described for example in European Patent Application No. 99101360.8.

Figure US06812238-20041102-C00020
Figure US06812238-20041102-C00021

(a)

………………………………………………………………………

US8207352

Example 1 (2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol

To a solution of racemic 3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol (43.7 g) in acetone (800 ml) a solution of (1R)-10-camphorsulfonic acid (23 g) in methanol (300 ml) was added and the mixture was heated under reflux until a clear solution was obtained. The solution was slowly cooled to rt, seeded with crystals of the title enantiomeric salt and let overnight. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with acetone and dried to provide (2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol (1R)-10-camphorsulfonate as white solid. This crude salt was then taken up in methylenechloride (100 ml) and water (ca. 100 ml) and the mixture was basified with aqueous sodium hydroxide solution. The organic layer was separated and the aqueous phase washed twice with methylenechloride (50 ml) and combined. The organic phases were then washed twice with water (2×50 ml), dried with sodium sulfate, filtrated and the solvent removed under reduced pressure. The crude product was then mixed with isopropanol (ca. 150 ml), heated for 10 min, cooled to 0° C. and stirred for ca. 2 hrs. The product was collected, washed with isopropanol and dried under reduced pressure to provide the enantiomerically pure title compound (17.5 g, 41% yield, 99.1% ee);

m.p. 164-166° C.; [α]=−30° (c=1, methanol, 25° C.);

NMR (CDCl3): 1.23 (3H, d, J=8 Hz), 4.09 (1H, q, J=8 Hz), 4.26 (1H, d, J=14 Hz), 4.92 (1H, d, J=14 Hz), 5.75 (1H, s), 6.75-6.85 (2H, m), 7.45-7.54 (2H, m), 7.62 (1H, s), 7.69 (1H, s), 7.75 (1H, d, J=8 Hz), 7.86 (1H, s), 8.03 (1H, d, J=8 Hz).

The analytical data were identical with published (U.S. Pat. No. 5,648,372 and Chem. Pharm. Bull. 1998, 46, 623-630).

Example 2 (2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol

Racemic 3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol (44 g) and (1R)-10-camphorsulfonic acid (20 g) were suspended in methanol (ca. 300 ml), the slurry was stirred intensively, warmed up to ca. 70° C. and a small addition of acetic acid was added to obtain a clear solution. After cooling of the solution to rt and then to 0° C., the mixture was seeded with enantiomerically pure salt and stirred for another 2 hrs. The crystalline solid was collected by filtration, washed with cooled methanol and dried under reduced pressure. The crystals were partitioned between methylenechloride (300 ml) and saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (200 ml). The organic layer was washed twice with water (50 ml), dried with magnesium sulphate, filtrated and evaporated under reduced pressure to give the title compound (16.9 g, 38% yield, 95% ee). The analytical data were identical with published (U.S. Pat. No. 5,648,372 or Chem. Pharm. Bull. 1998, 46, 623).

Example 3 (2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol

To a solution of racemic 3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol (10 g) in acetone (ca. 200 ml) a solution of (1R)-10-camphorsulfonic acid (3.9 g) in methanol (50 ml) was added and the mixture was heated shortly under reflux until a clear solution was obtained. The solution was then slowly cooled to rt, seeded with crystals of the desired enantiomeric salt and let overnight. The solid precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with acetone and dried to provide (2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol (1R)-10-camphorsulfonate as white solid. This salt was then taken up in methylenechloride and water and basified with aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution. The organic layer was separated and the aqueous phase washed twice with methylenechloride. The organic phases were combined, dried with sodium sulphate, filtrated and the solvent removed under reduced pressure. The crude product was then dissolved in ethanol, the slurry heated for 20 min, small amount of water was added, the solution slowly cooled to 0° C. and stirred for ca. 2 hrs. The product was collected, washed with cold ethanol and dried under reduced pressure to provide the title enantiomerically pure compound (3.9 g, 39% yield, 96% ee). The analytical date were identical with published in U.S. Pat. No. 6,300,353 B1 and WO 99/45008.

Example 4 (2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol

To a solution of racemic 3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol (100 g) in acetone (1000 ml) a solution of (1R)-10-camphorsulfonic acid (47 g) in methanol (500 ml) was added at rt, then slurry was heated under stirring to almost reflux for ca. 30 min, then cooled slowly to rt, seeded with the pure enantiomeric salt and stirred over night. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with methanol/acetone mixture, dried under reduced pressure. The residue was taken up with a solvent mixture of methylenechloride/water and after addition of saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution the organic phase was separated and aqueous phase washed twice with methylenechloride. The combined organic phases were filtrated, the solvent removed under reduced pressure. Recrystallization of the crude product from aqueous ethanol provided enantiomerically pure title compound: 39 g (39% yield, 92% ee). The analytical data were identical with published: U.S. Pat. No. 6,300,353 and WO 99/45008.

Example 5 (2R,3R)-3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol

A solution of the racemic 3-[4-(4-cyanophenyl)thiazol-2-yl]-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-butan-2-ol (4.4 g) and (1R)-10-camphorsulfonic acid (2 g) in toluene (40 ml) containing glacial acetic acid (0.6 ml) was warmed up to approximately 70° C., then allowed to cool slowly to 20° C., seeded with the pure enantiomeric salt whereupon the pure enantiomeric salt start to crystallize out. After ca. 2 hrs at this temperature the solid was collected, washed with cold toluene and dried. The crystals were taken with a solvent mixture of methylenechloride/water and after addition of aqueous saturated sodium bicarbonate solution the organic phase was separated and aqueous phase washed twice with methylenechloride. The combined organic phases were filtrated and the solvent removed under reduced pressure. Recrystallization of the crude product from aqueous ethanol provided enantiomerically pure title compound: 2 g (45% yield, 99% ee). The analytical data were identical with published: U.S. Pat. No. 6,300,353 and WO 99/45008.

…………………………………..

WO 1999045008

US6300353

The following synthetic scheme 1 illustrates the manufacture of one of the compounds of formula I′:

Figure US06300353-20011009-C00009
Figure US06300353-20011009-C00011
Figure US06300353-20011009-C00012

……………………………….

Bioorganic and medicinal chemistry letters, 2003 ,  vol. 13,   2  p. 191 – 196

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960894X02008922

A highly potent water soluble triazole antifungal prodrug, RO0098557 (1), has been identified from its parent, the novel antifungal agent RO0094815 (2). The prodrug includes a triazolium salt linked to an aminocarboxyl moiety, which undergoes enzymatic activation followed by spontaneous chemical degradation to release 2. Prodrug 1 showed high chemical stability and water solubility and exhibited strong antifungal activity against systemic candidiasis and aspergillosis as well as pulmonary aspergillosis in rats.


A highly potent water soluble triazole antifungal prodrug, RO0098557 (1), has been identified from its parent, the novel antifungal agent RO0094815 (2). The prodrug includes a triazolium salt linked to an aminocarboxyl moiety, which undergoes enzymatic activation followed by spontaneous chemical degradation to release 2. Prodrug 1 showed high chemical stability and water solubility and exhibited strong antifungal activity against systemic candidiasis and aspergillosis as well as pulmonary aspergillosis in rats.

Full-size image (2 K)
Full-size image (8 K)
Scheme 1.
Full-size image (4 K)

Figure 1.

Structure of RO0098557 and RO0094815.


Chemistry

Full-size image (8 K)

Scheme 1.

We synthesized a series of new triazolium derivatives of Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1. CompoundsScheme 1 and Scheme 2, 6, 9, 10 and 11 were first prepared as outlined in Scheme 2 in order to analyze their stability and ability to release Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1. Next, aromatic analogues 18, 19, 20,21 and Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 3 were synthesized for optimization of 11 to increase its water solubility and conversion rate. Compounds in the second series had sarcosine esters6 to make them water soluble, and they were also designed to generate acetaldehyde7 instead of formaldehyde for a better safety profile. The synthetic procedures for the second series of the derivatives are outlined in Scheme 3.

Full-size image (9 K)

Scheme 2.

(a) ClCOOCH2Cl, diisopropylethylamine, CH2Cl2, rt (quant); (b) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, CH3CN, 80 °C (60%); (c) (1) ClCOOCH2Cl, Et3N, CH2Cl2, rt; (2) Ac2O, pyridine, rt (30%, two steps); (d) (1) NaI, CH3CN, 50 °C ; (2) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, CH3CN, 50 °C (88%, two steps); Synthesis of Scheme 1 and Scheme 2: (1) N-3-hydroxypropyl-N-methylamine, ClCOOCH2Cl, Et3N, CH2Cl2, rt; (2) AcCl, Et3N, CH2Cl2, rt (20%, two steps); (3) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, NaI, CH3CN, 50 °C (82%); Synthesis of 10: (1) l-prolinol, ClCOOCH2Cl, Et3N, CH2Cl2, rt; (2) Ac2O, pyridine, rt (<10%, 2 steps); (3) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, NaI, CH3CN, 50 °C (92%); Synthesis of 11: (1) 2-hydroxymethyl-N-methylaniline, ClCOOCH2Cl, diisopropylethylamine, CH2Cl2, rt; (2) Ac2O, diisopropylethylamine, rt (20%, two steps); (3)Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, cat. NaI, CH3CN, reflux (63%).

Figure options

Full-size image (14 K)

Scheme 3.

(a) (1) oxalyl chloride, DMF, 0 °C; (2) KOtBu, THF, −5 °C (97%, two steps); (b) CH3NH2, MeOH, rt (90%); (c) LiAlH4, THF, 0 °C (80%); (d) (1) ClCOOCH(CH3)Cl, diisopropylethylamine, CH2Cl2, 0 °C; (2) Boc-Sarcosine, WSCI, DMAP, CH2Cl2, 0 °C (84%, two steps); (e) (1) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, NaI, CH3CN, 50 °C; (2) DOWEX-1 Cl form, aqueous MeOH, rt (65%, two steps); (f) (1) HCl, EtOAc, rt; (2) lyophilization (69%, two steps); Synthesis of 18: (1) (i) (4,5-difluoro-2-methylaminophenyl)methanol, ClCOOCH(CH3)Cl, diisopropylethylamine, CH2Cl2, 0 °C; (ii) Boc-Sarcosine, WSCI, DMAP, CH2Cl2, 0 °C (quant, two steps); (2) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, cat. NaI, CH3CN, 80 °C; (50%,); (3) HCl, EtOAc, rt (90%); Synthesis of 19: (1) (i) 2-fluoro-6-methylaminophenyl)methanol, ClCOOCH(CH3)Cl, diisopropylethylamine, CH2Cl2, 0 °C; (ii) Boc-Sarcosine, WSCI, DMAP, CH2Cl2, 0 °C (74%, two steps); (2) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, cat. NaI, CH3CN, reflux; (3) HCl, EtOAc, rt (29%, two steps); Synthesis of 20: (1) (i) (5-fluoro-2-methylaminophenyl)methanol, ClCOOCH(CH3)Cl, diisopropylethylamine, CH2Cl2, 0 °C; (ii) Boc-Sarcosine, WSCI, DMAP, CH2Cl2, 0 °C (91%, two steps); (2) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, cat. NaI, CH3CN, 70 °C (72%); (3) HCl, EtOAc, rt (88%); Synthesis of 21: (1) (i) (4-chloro-2-methylaminophenyl)methanol, ClCOOCH(CH3)Cl, diisopropylethylamine, CH2Cl2, 0 °C; (ii) Boc-Sarcosine, WSCI, DMAP, CH2Cl2, 0 °C (71%, two steps); (2) Figure 1, Figure 3 and Scheme 1, CH3CN, 65 °C; (3) HCl, EtOAc, rt (65%, two steps).

read more at

Boyd, B.; Castaner, J.   BAL-4815/BAL-8557
Drugs Fut 2006, 31(3): 187

Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 2008 ,  vol. 52,   4  p. 1396 – 1400

Ohwada, J.; Tsukazaki, M.; Hayase, T.; Oikawa, N.; Isshiki, Y.; Umeda, I.; Yamazaki, T.; Ichihara, S.; Shimma, N.Development of novel water antifungal, RO0098557
21st Med Chem Symp (November 28-30, Kyoto) 2001, Abst 1P-06

Ohwada, J.; Tsukazaki, M.; Hayase, T.; et al.
RO0098557, a novel water soluble azole prodrug for parenteral and oral administration (I). Design, synthesis, physicochemical properties and bioconversion42nd Intersci Conf Antimicrob Agents Chemother (ICAAC) (September 27-30, San Diego) 2002, Abst F-820

Tasaka et al., Chem. Pharm. Bull. 41(6) pp. 1035-1042 (1993).

 

Clinical trials

There have been three phase III clinical trials of isavuconazole, ACTIVE, VITAL and SECURE. As of June 2015, SECURE and VITAL have been presented in abstract form and results from ACTIVE have not been released.[9]

The SECURE trial compared voriconazole and isavuconazole in invasive fungal infections due to aspergillus. Isuvaconazole was found to be non-inferior to voriconazole, anothertriazole antifungal, with all cause mortality at 18.6%, compared to 20.2% in the voriconazole group. It additionally demonstrated a similar side effect profile.[10]

Data from the VITAL study showed that isavuconazole could be used in treatment of invasive mucormycosis, but did not evaluate its clinical efficacy for this indication.[11]

The ACTIVE trial is a comparison of isuvaconazole and caspofungin for invasive candida infections and results are anticipated in the second half of 2015.[12][13]

References

  1.  [1]
  2.  Saboo, Alok. “Basilea Announces Global Partnership With Astellas for Its Antifungal Isavuconazole.” FierceBiotech. N.p., 24 Feb. 2010. Web.
  3.  “Basilea reports isavuconazole orphan drug designation by U.S. FDA.” Market Wired. 28 May 2013.
  4.  “FDA Grants Orphan Drug Designation to Astellas for Isavuconazole for the Treatment of Invasive Candidiasis.” News Releases. Astellas. 3 Nov 2014.
  5.  Cresemba (isovuconazole sulfate) [prescribing information]. Astella Pharma US, Inc. Revised March 2015.
  6. Jump up^ “Aspergillosis.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 08 Sept. 2014.
  7. Jump up^ “Astellas Receives FDA Approval for CRESEMBA® (isavuconazonium Sulfate) for the Treatment of Invasive Aspergillosis and Invasive Mucormycosis.” PR Newswire. N.p., 6 Mar. 2015.
  8. Jump up^ “Isavuconazonium.” Micromedex Solutions. Truven Health Analytics, n.d. Web. <www.micromedexsolutions.com>.
  9. Jump up^ Pettit, Natasha N.; Carver, Peggy L. (2015-07-01). “Isavuconazole A New Option for the Management of Invasive Fungal Infections”. Annals of Pharmacotherapy 49 (7): 825–842.doi:10.1177/1060028015581679. ISSN 1060-0280. PMID 25940222.
  10.  Mujais, A. “2014: M-1756. A Phase 3 Randomized, Double-Blind, Non-Inferiority Trial Evaluating Isavuconazole (ISA) vs. Voriconazole (VRC) for the Primary Treatment of Invasive Fungal Disease (IFD) Caused by Aspergillus spp. or other Filamentous Fungi (SECURE): Outcomes by Malignancy Status”. http://www.icaaconline.com. Retrieved 2015-06-19.
  11.  “Abstract: An Open-Label Phase 3 Study of Isavuconazole (VITAL): Focus on Mucormycosis (IDWeek 2014)”. idsa.confex.com. Retrieved 2015-06-19.
  12.  Ltd., Basilea. “Basilea Pharmaceutica – Portfolio – Isavuconazole”. http://www.basilea.com. Retrieved 2015-06-19.
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Isavuconazole
Isavuconazole structure.svg
Isavuconazole ball-and-stick model.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
4-{2-[(1R,2R)-(2,5-Difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-1-methyl-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl]-1,3-thiazol-4-yl}benzonitrile
Clinical data
Trade names Cresemba (prodrug form)
AHFS/Drugs.com entry
Pregnancy
category
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Legal status
Routes of
administration
Oral, intravenous
Identifiers
ATC code None
PubChem CID: 6918485
ChemSpider 5293682 
UNII 60UTO373KE 
ChEBI CHEBI:85979 Yes
ChEMBL CHEMBL409153 
NIAID ChemDB 416566
Chemical data
Formula C22H17F2N5OS
Molecular mass 437.47 g/mol

/////


5 Comments

  1. medchemnintabelle says:

    Reblogged this on MedCheminAustralia.

  2. LRpeyton says:

    Anyone know where to find a real synthetic procedure for this?

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DR ANTHONY CRASTO

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 29 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 29 year tenure till date Aug 2016, Around 30 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 25 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 13 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 212 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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