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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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BI-882370


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BI-882370

XP-102

N-(3-(5-((1-ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-1-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane-1-sulfonamide

CAS 1392429-79-6
Chemical Formula: C28H33F2N7O2S
Molecular Weight: 569.68
Elemental Analysis: C, 59.03; H, 5.84; F, 6.67; N, 17.21; O, 5.62; S, 5.63

N-(3-(5-((1-ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-1-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane-1-sulfonamide

N-(3-{5-[(1-Ethylpiperidin-4-Yl)(Methyl)amino]-3-(Pyrimidin-5-Yl)-1h-Pyrrolo[3,2-B]pyridin-1-Yl}-2,4-Difluorophenyl)propane-1-Sulfonamide

N-[3-[5-[(1-ethylpiperidin-4-yl)-methylamino]-3-pyrimidin-5-ylpyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-1-yl]-2,4-difluorophenyl]propane-1-sulfonamide

BI 882370 is a highly potent and selective RAF inhibitor that binds to the DFG-out (inactive) conformation of the BRAF kinase. BI 882370 inhibits proliferation of human BRAF-mutant melanoma cells with 100× higher potency (1-10 nmol/L) than vemurafenib.

Xynomic, under license from Boehringer Ingelheim , is investigating for treating BRAF mutant cancers, including colorectal cancer and melanoma; in October 2017, preclinical data were reported in the melanoma and colorectal cancer settings.

  • Originator Boehringer Ingelheim
  • Developer Boehringer Ingelheim; Xynomic Pharmaceuticals
  • Class Antineoplastics; Piperidines; Pyridines; Pyrimidines; Pyrroles; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Proto oncogene protein b raf inhibitors
  • Preclinical Colorectal cancer; Malignant melanoma
  • 20 Dec 2018 Xynomic Pharma plans a phase Ib trial for Colorectal cancer (in combination with BI 860585) in third quarter of 2019
  • 01 Jun 2018 Xynomic Pharmaceuticals plans a phase I trial for Colorectal cancer and Malignant melanoma in 2018 or 2019
  • 06 Nov 2017 Chemical structure information added
  • US8889684

PATENT

WO2012104388

PATENT

WO-2019084459

Novel crystalline salts (monosuccinate salt), designated as Form A, of BI-882370 and their substantially anhydrous and non-solvated, processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them. Also claimed are their use as a RAF kinase Inhibitor, for the treatment of cancers and other diseases, such as infections, inflammations and autoimmune diseases.

The compound N-(3-(5-((l -ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)andno)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrolo [3, 2-Z>]pyri din- l-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane-l -sulfonamide (BI 882370), having Formula I:

I

is a RAF kinase inhibitor useful in the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The compound of Formula I, as well as its preparation and use, have been described in

WO/2012/104388, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

The RAS-RAF-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway plays a critical role in transmitting proliferation signals generated by the cell surface receptors and cytoplasmic signaling elements to the nucleus. Constitutive activation of this pathway is involved in malignant transformation by several oncogenes. Activating mutations in RAS

occur in approximately 15 % of cancers, and recent data has shown that B-RAF is mutated in about 7% of cancers (Wellbrock et al, “The RAF proteins take centre stage”, Nature Rev. Mol. Cell Biol., 2004, 5, 875-885), identifying it as another important oncogene in this pathway. In mammals, the RAF family of serine/threonine kinases comprises three members: A-RAF, B-RAF and C-RAF. However, activating mutations have so far been only identified in B-RAF underlining the importance of this isoform. It is believed that B-RAF is the main isoform that couples RAS to MEK, and that C-RAF and A-RAF signal to ERK only to fine-tune cellular responses (Wellbrock et al. Nature Rev. Mol. Cell Biol, 2004, 5, 875-885). The most common cancer mutation in B-RAF results in a valine to glutamic acid exchange at position 600 of the protein (V600E), which dramatically enhances B-RAF activity, presumably because its negative charge mimics activation loop phosphorylation (Wan et al , “Mechanism of activation of the RAF-ERK signaling pathway by oncogenic mutations of B-RAF”, Cell, 2004, 116, 855-867). The highest incidence of B-RAF V600 mutations occurs in malignant melanoma (39%), thyroid cancer (46%), colorectal cancer (10%), biliary tract cancer (10%), prostate cancer (4%), ovary cancer (3%) and non-small cell lung cancer (2%), but they also occur at a low frequency in a wide variety of other cancers (frequencies of mutations according to COSMIC (Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) release v.53, 15th May 2011 ;

http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/CGP/cosmic/). Literature supported the hypothesis that B-RA 600E mutated tumor cells seem to rely heavily on the continued activation of this pathway – a phenomenon termed “oncogene addiction” – whereas normal B-RAFwt cells use a broader range of signals. This provides an Achilles’ heel that can be exploited

therapeutically by treating patients with somatically mutated B-RAFV600E using orally available B-RAF inhibitors.

The key role of B-RAF V600E in aberrant ERK signaling and consequently oncogenesis has been demonstrated in several independent experimental approaches such as

overexpression of oncogenic/mutated B-RAF in vitro and in vivo (Wan et al., Cell, 2004, 116, 855-867; Wellbrock et al, Cancer Res. 2004, 64: 2338-2342), siRNA knock-down in vitro (Karasarides et al., Oncogene, “V599EB-RAF is an oncogene in melanocytes”, 2004, 23, 6292-6298) or in inducible short-hairpin RNA xenograft models where gain-of-function B-RAF signaling was found to be strongly associated with in vivo tumorigenicity (Hoeflich et al, “Oncogenic BRAF is required for tumor growth and maintenance in melanoma models”, Cancer Res., 2006, 66, 999-1006).

Treatment of B-RAFV600E mutated melanoma or colon carcinoma cells induces a B-RAF inhibition phenotype (e.g. reduction of phospho-MEK and phospho-ERK levels, reduction of cyclin D expression and induction of p27 expression). Consequently, these cells are locked in the Gl -phase of the cell cycle and do not proliferate.

Clinical proof of mechanism and proof of concept has been established for treating in cancer in B-RAFV600E mutated melanoma patients treated with Zelboraf®, B-RAF inhibitor (PLX-4032, vemurafenib, from Plexxikon/Daiichi Sankyo/Roche. Bollag et al., “Clinical efficacy of a RAF inhibitor needs broad target blockade in BRAF-mutant melanoma”, Nature, 2010, 467(7315), 596-9.; Flaherty et al, New Engl. J. Med., “Inhibition of Mutated, Activated BRAF in Metastatic Melanoma”, 2010, 363, 809-819; Chapman et al. “Improved Survival with Vemurafenib in Melanoma with BRAF V600E Mutation”, New Engl. J. Med, 2011, 364:2507-2516. Favorable response rates were observed in both Phase I and Phase III clinical trials. It was reported, that melanoma patients carrying a B-RAFV600K mutation also do respond to therapy (Rubinstein et al, “Incidence of the V600K mutation among melanoma patients with BRAF mutations, and potential therapeutic response to the specific BRAF inhibitor PLX4032”, J. Transl. Med , 2010, 8, 67).

The most frequent B-RAF mutation is the exchange at amino acid position 600 from valine to glutamate with more than 90% frequency of all B-RAF mutations (Wellbrock et al. Nature Rev. Mol. Cell Biol, 2004, 5, 875-885), the second most frequent mutation is an alteration from valine to lysine, other mutations were found with lower frequency at that position (Wellbrock et al. Nature Rev. Mol. Cell Biol, 2004, 5, 875-885 and frequencies of mutations according to COSMIC (Catalogue Of Somatic Mutations In Cancer; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) release v53, 15th May 2011 ;

http://www.sanger.ac.uk/genetics/CGP/cosmic/). Additional mutations were found at e.g. the glycine rich loop (Wellbrock et al. Nature Rev. Mol. Cell Biol, 2004, 5, 875-885). Not all of these rather rare mutations seem to lead to direct activation of B-RAF (Wan et al. ,

“Mechanism of activation of the RAF-ERK signaling pathway by oncogenic mutations of B-RAF”, Cell, 2004, 116, 855-867).

The compound of Formula I is a highly potent and selective RAF inhibitor that binds to the DFG-out (inactive) conformation of the B-RAF kinase. The compound inhibited proliferation of human B-RAF-mutant melanoma cells with 100 times higher potency (1-10 nmol/L) than vemurafenib, whereas wild-type cells were not affected at 1,000 nmol/L. A solution of the compound administered orally was efficacious in mouse models of B-RAF-mutant melanomas and colorectal carcinomas, and at 25 mg/kg twice daily showed superior efficacy compared with vemurafenib, dabrafenib, or trametinib. The compound was also active in A375 melanoma-bearing mice that were resistant to vemurafenib, particularly when dosed in combination with trametinib. Mice treated with the compound did not show any body weight loss or clinical signs of intolerability, and no pathologic changes were observed in several major organs investigated, including skin. Furthermore, in a pilot study in rats (up to 60 mg/kg daily for 2 weeks), the compound lacked toxicity in terms of clinical chemistry, hematology, pathology, and toxicogenomics. These results are described in Waizenegger et al., Mol. Cancer Ther., 2016, 75(3); 354-65, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

For the manufacture, purification, and formulation of a drug, it may be advantageous to employ a form of the drug having superior stability or other desirable formulation property exhibited by, for example, one or more salt or crystalline forms of the drug. Formation of salts of basic or acidic drugs can sometimes provide forms of the drug that have

advantageous properties such as solubility, non-hygroscopicity, crystallinity, and other physical properties that advantageous for formulating the drug. On the other hand, discovering a suitable salt or other crystalline form that is suitable for formulation is difficult, since there are numerous variables in the formation of a salt or crystalline form. These include the existence of numerous possible acids and bases that might be used as a counter-ion, various stoichiometric ratios that may be possible for combining a given basic or acid drug with an acid or base counter-ion, a wide variety of solvents and solvent systems

(including combinations of solvents) that potentially can be used to attempt to form salts or crystalline forms, and a variety of conditions (such as temperature or heating or cooling conditions) under which salts or crystalline forms may be generated. All of these variables of which may affect the properties of the salts or crystalline forms that might be obtained. Salts or solid forms may also have a variety of properties that render them unsuitable for drug development and formulation such as lack of crystallinity (amorphous forms), the presence or formation of multiple crystalline forms, which may interconvert and/or have different properties (polymorphism), lack of aqueous solubility, hygroscopicity, or stickiness of the solid. Furthermore, the formation of salts and crystalline forms and their properties are generally very unpredictable.

Accordingly, the crystalline salt forms of the compound of Formula I provided herein help satisfy the ongoing need for the development of a RAF kinase inhibitor for the treatment of serious diseases.

Preparation of A^-(3-(5-((l-ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrolo[3,2-Z>]pyridin-l- amide (BI 882370)

Step 1. 4-(6-Methyl-5-nitro-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-l-carboxylic acid tert-butyi ester

(3)

1 2 3

DIPEA (62.82 mL, 0.435 mol) is added to the solution of 6-chloro-3-nitro-2-methylpyridine (1) (50 g, 290 mmol) and N-Boc-piperazine (2) (53.95 g, 290 mmol) in dry MeCN (200 mL) and stirred for 4 h at 50 °C. After the reaction is finished the reaction mixture is diluted with MeCN and water and stirred for 30 min. The precipitated product is collected by filtration, washed with water and the solid is dried in vacuo.

Step 2. 4- [6-((£’)-2-Dimethylamino-vinyl)-5-nitro-pyridin-2-yl] -piperazine- 1-carboxylic acid

To a stirred solution of 4-(6-methyl-5-nitro-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine- 1-carboxylic acid tert-butyl ester (3) (13 g, 40.3 mmol) in DMF (35 mL) is added N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal (14.47 g, 121 mmol) and stirred in argon atmosphere for 36 h at 90 °C.

Additional 1.5 eq. of N^V-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal is added and stirred for 12 h at 90 °C. The reaction mixture is poured into water and extracted with DCM. The combined organic layers are washed with water, dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue is used without further purification for the next step.

Step -(lH-pyrrolo[3,2-Z>]pyridin-5-yl)piperazine-l-carboxylic acid tert-butyl ester (5)

4 5

4-[6-((i?)-2-Dimethylairdno-vinyl)-5-nitro-pyridin-2-yl]-piperazine-l-carboxylic acid tert-butyl ester (36.4 g, 96 mmol) is taken up in MeOH, Pd/C (0.56 g, 10 %) is added and the mixture is hydrogenated in an autoclave at 60 psi for 16 h. The reaction mixture is filtered and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue is purified by column chromatography viaNP MPLC. The product containing fractions of compound (5) (HPLC-MS method B: tRet. = 1.55 min.; MS (M+H)+ = 303) are combined and evaporated in vacuo.

Step 4. N- -Amino-2,6-difluorophenyl)acetamide (7)

6 7

Compound (6) (55.0 g, 254 mmol) is taken-up in MeOH (1.0 L). Pd/C (10.0 g, 10 %) is added and the mixture is hydrogenated in an autoclave at 200 psi for 3 h. The reaction mixture is filtered and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue is purified by NP-MPLC on silica gel using DCM/MeOH (96:4) as eluent. The product containing fractions of the aniline intermediate (HPLC-MS method B: tRet. = 0.25 min.; MS (M-H) = 185) are combined and evaporated.

Step 5. N- -Difluoro-3-(propylsulfonamido)phenyl)acetamide (9)

To the aniline intermediate (35.0 g, 188 mmol) in DCM (100 mL) pyridine (6.6 mL, 75 mmol) and ^-propane sulfonyl chloride (8) (29.5 mL, 263 mmol) are added and the mixture is stirred at rt for 16 h. The reaction mixture is diluted with EtOAc (200 mL), washed with H2O and HC1 (aq., 1 N) and the layers are separated, dried over MgS04 and evaporated to yield the sulfonamide (9) which was used without further purification.

Step 6. N-

9 10

The sulfonylated aniline (9) (38.0 g, 130 mmol) is taken-up in EtOH (250 mL), H2O (200 mL) and concentrated hydrochloric acid (200 mL) and heated to 80 °C for 2 h. The reaction mixture is concentrated under reduced pressure, aqueous NaOH (4 N) is added until pH = 6 is reached and the mixture is extracted 2 x with DCM. The combined organic layer is washed with brine, dried over MgS04, filtered and evaporated to yield the deacylated aniline (10) (HPLC-MS method B: tRet. = 0.22 min.; MS (M-H) = 249) as a hydrochloride which was used without further purification.

Step 7. N-(2 -Difluoro-3-iodophenyl)propane-l-sulfonamide (11)

10 11

The hydrochloride of compound (10) is taken-up in DCM and extracted with NaHCCb solution. The organic layer is dried over MgSCn, filtered and evaporated. To the free base (10) (3.55 g, 14.21 mmol) in TFA (80 mL) at 0 °C is added NaNC (1.96 g, 28.4 mmol) in small portions and the mixture is stirred for 30 min. KI (23.83 g, 142 mmol) is added and stirring is continued for additional 15 min. The reaction mixture is diluted with Et^O and stirred for 1 h. Na2S203 solution (semiconc.) is added and the mixture is extracted 3 x with Et20. The combined organic layer is dried over MgSCn, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The residue is purified by column chromatography via NP-MPLC. The product containing fractions of compound (11) (HPLC-MS method A: tRet. = 1.58 min.; MS (M-H) = 360) are combined and evaporated in vacuo.

Step 8. 4-((l-(2,6-Difluoro-3-(propylsulfonamido)phenyl)-lH-pyrrolo [3,2-b] pyridin-5-yl)

12

The lH-pyrrolo [3,2-*] pyridine (5) (10.0 g, 30.27 mmol), sulfonamide (11) (16.4 g,

45.4 mmol), Cul (576 mg, 3.03 mmol), ^^-(l ^^^-^N’-bismethyl-l^-cyclohexandiamine

(1.91 mL, 12.1 mmol) and CS2CO3 (29.6 g, 90.85 mmol) are taken-up in dry toluene (3 mL) and the resulting mixture is flushed with argon and stirred for 16 h at 120 °C. After the addition of further Cul (576 mg, 3.03 mmol), trans-(\R,2R)-N,N’-bismet y 1-1,2-cyclohexandiamine (1.91 mL, 12.1 mmol) and CS2CO3 (20.0 g, 60.0 mmol) the reaction mixture is stirred for further 24 h. The solvent is removed in vacuo, the residue is taken up in DCM and extracted with NaHCC solution (semiconc). The organic layer is dried over MgS04, filtered, the solvent is removed in vacuo and the residue is purified viaNP-MPLC. The product containing fractions of (12) (HPLC-MS method C: teet. = 1.62 mia; MS (M+H)+ = 564) are combined and the solvent is removed in vacuo.

Step 9. 4-((l-(2,6-Difluoro-3-(propylsulfonamido)phenyl)-3-iodo-lH-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-5 3)

To a solution of sulfonamide (12) (1.078 g, 1.9 mmol) in DMF (4 mL)/THF (100 μί) is added NIS (474 mg, 2.1 mmol) and the mixture is stirred for 1 h at rt. The reaction mixture is diluted with 30 mL DCM and extracted with NaHCCb solution (semiconc). The combined organic layer is dried over MgSCn, filtered and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue is purified by column chromatography via RP HPLC. The product containing fractions of (13) (HPLC-MS method B: tRet. = 2.035 mia; MS (M+H)+ = 688) are freeze dried.

Step 10. 4-((l-(2,6-Difluoro-3-(propylsulfonamido)phenyl)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-5-yl)(methyl)amino)piperidine-l-carboxylic acid tert-butyi ester (15)

13 15

Sulfonamide (13) (770 mg, 1.12 mmol), pyrimidin-5-yl-boronic acid (14) (194 mg, 1.57 mmol), Pd(dppf)Cl2 (82 mg, 0.11 mmol), LiCl (142 mg, 3.35 mmol) and Na2C03 (294 mg, 2.8 mmol) are taken-up in dioxane/LhO (2: 1 mixture, 12 mL), and the resulting mixture is flushed with argon and stirred for 1 h at 100 °C. The reaction mixture is diluted with DCM and extracted with NaHCCb solution (semi-concentrated). The organic layer is dried over MgS04, filtered, Isolute® is added, the solvent is removed in vacuo and the residue is purified via RP HPLC. The product containing fractions of (15) (HPLC-MS method C: tRet. = 2.149 min.; MS (M+H)+ = 642) are freeze dried.

Step 11. N-(2,4-Difluoro-3-(5-(methyl(piperidin-4-yl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)- 1H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-l-yl)phenyl)propane-l-sulfonamide

15 16

To a solution of example compound (15) (154 mg, 0.24 mmol) in DCM/MeOH (1 : 1, 4 mL) is added HC1 (in dioxane, 4 N, 2 mL) and the mixture is stirred for 3 h at rt. The solvent is removed in vacuo. Obtained compound (16) (HPLC-MS method B: tRet. = 1.02 min.; MS (M+H)+ = 542) is used without further purification.

Step 12. ^-(3-(5-((l-Ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrolo [3,2-Z>] pyridin- l-yl)-2,4-diflu

Compound I was obtained from compound (16) by reductive alkylation with acetaldehyde (40% in iPrOH) in the presence of 1.5 eq. sodium acetoxyborohydride in iPrOH. The crude product was recrystallized from ethanol to obtain the title compound in 84% yield.

Scale-Up Synthesis of A/-(3-(5-((l-ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrolo[3,2-Z>]pyridin-l-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane- 1-sulfonamide (BI 882370)

Step 1. N-(2,4-Difluoro-3-(5-(methyl(piperidin-4-yl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrolo[

15 16

Isopropanol (8.83 kg) and compound (15) (1.80 kg, 2.8 mol) were added into a reactor, and the mixture was stirred and heated to 55-60 °C. Concentrated hydrochloric acid (2.76 kg, 28 mol) was dropped into the reactor over than 20 min. at 60-65 °C. Then, the reaction mass was heated to 60-70 °C and held for 1 h. The conversion was monitored by HPLC, and reached about 99.5% after about 1 h.

The reaction mass was cooled and the isopropanol was removed by distillation under reduced pressure at not more than 50 °C. A brown oil was obtained, dissolved into water (6.75 kg) and washed by extraction with ethyl acetate (2.02 kg) at 20-30 °C. The water-phase was cooled to 15-20 °C. The pH was adjusted to 8.0-8.5 with 10% aqueous NaOH solution (-8.0 kg) at 20-30°C. The mixture was stirred for 3-4h at 20-30°C with the pH adjusted to 8.0-8.5 by addition of 10% NaOH solution every half-hour. The product was isolated by filtration and the cake washed with water (3.6 kg). The solid was dried under vacuum at 45-50 until the water content was not more than 5.5%. This provided about 1.64 kg of crude compound (16) (yield 108% of theoretical; the crude product containing water and NaCl detected). The crude product was used directly).

Step 12. ^-(3-(5-((l-Ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrr -Z>] pyridin- l-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane- 1-sulfonamide (I)

Bl 878426 Bl 882370 

Process:

Dichloromethane (19.88 kg) and compound (16) (1.5kg, 2.77mol) were added into a reactor, and the mixture was stirred and cooled to 0-10°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. Sodium triacetoxyborohydride (95%, 0.93 kg, 4.16 mol) was added into the mixture at 0-10°C. The mixture was stirred for 20-30 min. at 0- 10°C. Acetaldehyde in DCM (40%,

1.07 kg, 9.71 mol) added into the mixture slowly over 2 h at 0-10 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 0-10 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere for 0.5-lh. The conversion was monitored by HPLC, and reached about 99.5% after about 0.5-1 h.

Water (15 kg) was added into the reaction mass at a temperature below 15 °C. The mixture was stirred at 15-30 °C for 20-30 min. Aqueous ammonia (25%, 1.13 kg, 16.61 mol) was added into the mixture and the mixture was then stirred for 0.5 h. The organic phase was separated and then washed by extraction with water (15 kg) at 20-25 °C. Activated charcoal (0.15 kg) was added into the organic phase. The mixture was stirred for 1 h and then filtered. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure at not more than 40°C, and compound (I) (1.58 kg, 100% yield) was obtained as a foamy solid.

Investigation of the Crystallinity of iV-(3-(5-((l-Ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)- lH-pyrrolo [3,2-Z>] pyridin- l-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane- 1-sulfonamide Free Base

Investigation of the crystallinity of N-(3-(5-((l-ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(py rimidin-5-y 1)- lH-pyrrolo[3 ,2-b] pyridin- 1 -y l)-2,4-difluoropheny l)propane- 1 -sulfonamide free base, obtained by recrystallization from aqueous ethanol, which was used as a starting material to investigate salt formation showed that the compound had low crystallinity, as seen in FIG. 1.

Investigation of Salt forms of iV-(3-(5-((l-Ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)amino)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)- lH-pyrrolo [3,2-Z>] pyridin- l-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane- 1-sulfonamide

The compound N-(3-(5-((l-ethylpiperidin-4-yl)(methyl)andno)-3-(pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrolo [3 ,2-Z>]pyri din- l-yl)-2,4-difluorophenyl)propane-l -sulfonamide was combined with various acids in various solvent systems.

A 96-well master plate was charged by dosing compound in MeOH (stock solution) with a concentration of approx. 40 mg/mL. This plate was placed in a vacuum oven for liquid removal to obtain the same amount of solid material in each well. Subsequently different solvents/solvent mixtures and the acids were added to the solid material in each well (approx. 500μί) and the whole plate was heated up to 50 °C for 2 hours while stirring (using a small stirring bar added to each well).

The acids used were as shown in Table 1. The solvents used were as shown in Table 2. Crystallinity of salts obtained either by the slurry experiment or crystallization by evaporation.

To investigate crystal formation by a slurry experiment, the plate was allowed to cool and the crystallinity of the resulting salts was investigated by XRPD. An image of the master plate showing the salts obtained is shown in FIG. 2A and images of XRPD performed on the salt from each of the master plate wells, showing the crystallinity of the salts formed, is shown in FIG. 2B.

To investigate crystal formation by an evaporation experiment, after the heating period, the solutions were filtered at the same temperature (50 °C) using a preheated filter plate to ensure that no non-dissolved material can be transferred into the other crystallization plates. The filtrate was dispensed into an evaporation plate (approx.. 200μί). The solvents were allowed to evaporate, and the crystallinity of the resulting salts was investigated by XRPD. An image of the master plate showing the salts obtained is shown in FIG. 3A and images of XRPD performed on the salt from each of the evaporation plate wells, showing the crystallinity of the salts formed, is shown in FIG. 3B.

Table 1. Salts Used for Salt Form Investigation

Table 2. Solvents Used for Salt Form Investigation

REFERENCES

1: Waizenegger IC, Baum A, Steurer S, Stadtmüller H, Bader G, Schaaf O, Garin-Chesa P, Schlattl A, Schweifer N, Haslinger C, Colbatzky F, Mousa S, Kalkuhl A, Kraut N, Adolf GR. A Novel RAF Kinase Inhibitor with DFG-Out-Binding Mode: High Efficacy in BRAF-Mutant Tumor Xenograft Models in the Absence of Normal Tissue Hyperproliferation. Mol Cancer Ther. 2016 Mar;15(3):354-65. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-15-0617. Epub 2016 Feb 25. PubMed PMID: 26916115.

/////////////// BI-882370,  BI 882370,  BI882370, XP-102, Boehringer Ingelheim, Xynomic Pharmaceuticals, Preclinical,  Colorectal cancer, Malignant melanoma

CCN1CCC(CC1)N(C)c3ccc4n(cc(c2cncnc2)c4n3)c5c(F)ccc(NS(=O)(=O)CCC)c5F

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SRT 1720


img

SRT-1720 diHCl

CAY10559

CAS: 1001645-58-4 (di HCl) , 925434-55-5 (free base)   1001645-58-4 (HCl)
Chemical Formula: C25H25Cl2N7OS
Molecular Weight: 542.483
Elemental Analysis: C, 55.35; H, 4.65; Cl, 13.07; N, 18.07; O, 2.95; S, 5.91

SRT-1720 HCl, SRT-1720 hudrochloride; SRT1720; SRT-1720; SRT 1720; CAY10559; CAY-10559; CAY 10559; SIRT-1933; SIRT 1933; SIRT1933.

 N-(2-(3-(piperazin-1-ylmethyl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazol-6-yl)phenyl)quinoxaline-2-carboxamide dihydrochloride

SRT1720.svg

  • Molecular FormulaC25H23N7OS
  • Average mass469.561 Da

SRT-1720, also known as CAY10559 and is a drug developed by Sirtris Pharmaceuticals intended as a small-molecule activator of the sirtuin subtype SIRT1. It has similar activity in the body to the known SIRT1 activator resveratrol, but is 1000x more potent. In animal studies it was found to improve insulin sensitivity and lower plasma glucose levels in fat, muscle and liver tissue, and increased mitochondrial and metabolic function. A study of SRT1720 conducted by the National Institute on Aging found that the drug may extend the lifespan of obese mice by 44% .

SRT1720 is an experimental drug that was studied by Sirtris Pharmaceuticals intended as a small-molecule activator of the sirtuinsubtype SIRT1. The compound has been studied in animals, but safety and efficacy in humans have not been established.

Animal research

In animal models of obesity and diabetes SRT1720 was found to improve insulin sensitivity and lower plasma glucose levels in fat, muscle and liver tissue, and increase mitochondrial and metabolic function.[1] In mice rendered obese and diabetic by feeding a high-fat, high-sugar diet, a study performed at the National Institute of Aging found that feeding chow infused with the highest dose of SRT1720 beginning at one year of age increased mean lifespan by 18%, and maximum lifespan by 5%, as compared to other short-lived obese, diabetic mice; however, treated animals still lived substantially shorter lives than normal-weight mice fed normal chow with no drug.[2] In a later study, SRT1720 increased mean lifespan of obese, diabetic mice by 21.7%, similar to the earlier study, but there was no effect on maximum lifespan in this study.[3] In normal-weight mice fed a standard rodent diet, SRT1720 increased mean lifespan by just 8.8%, and again had no effect on maximum lifespan.[3]

Since the discovery of SRT1720, the claim that this compound is a SIRT1 activator has been questioned[4][5][6] and further defended.[7][8]

Although SRT1720 is not currently undergoing clinical development, a related compound, SRT2104, is currently in clinical development for metabolic diseases.[9]

PAPER

Letters in Drug Design & Discovery, 10(9), 793-797; 2013

The Identification of the SIRT1 Activator SRT2104 as a Clinical Candidate

Author(s): Pui Yee Ng, Jean E. Bemis, Jeremy S. Disch, Chi B. Vu, Christopher J. Oalmann, Amy V. Lynch,David P. Carney, Thomas V. Riera, Jeffrey Song, Jesse J. Smith, Siva Lavu, Angela Tornblom, Meghan Duncan, Marie Yeager, Kristina Kriksciukaite, Akanksha Gupta, Vipin Suri, Peter J. Elliot, Jill C. Milne, Joseph J. Nunes, Michael R. Jirousek, George P. Vlasuk, James L. Ellis, Robert B. Perni.

Journal Name: Letters in Drug Design & Discovery

Volume 10 , Issue 9 , 2013

Paper

Milne, J.C.; Lambert, P.D.; Schenk, S.; Carney, D.P.; Smith, J.J.; Gagne, D.J.; Jin, L.; Boss, O.; Perni, R.B.; Vu, C.B.; Bemis, J.E.; Xie, R.; Disch, J.S.; Ng, P.Y.; Nunes, J.J.; Lynch, A.V.; Yang, H.; Galonek, H.; Israelian, K.; Choy, W.; Iffland, A.; Lavu, S.; Medvedik, O.; Sinclair, D.A.; Olefsky, J.M.; Jirousek, M.R.; Elliott, P.J.; Westphal, C.H.
Small molecule activators of SIRT1 as therapeutics for the treatment of type 2 diabetes
Nature 2007, 450(7170): 712

PATENT

WO 2007019417

WO 2007019416

WO 2007019345

WO 2007019344

WO 2007019346

WO 2008115518

PAPER

Vu, Chi B.; Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 2009, VOL 52(5), PG 1275-1283 

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm8012954

Abstract Image

A series of imidazo[1,2-b]thiazole derivatives is shown to activate the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1, a potential new therapeutic target to treat various metabolic disorders. This series of compounds was derived from a high throughput screening hit bearing an oxazolopyridine core. Water-solubilizing groups could be installed conveniently at either the C-2 or C-3 position of the imidazo[1,2-b]thiazole ring. The SIRT1 enzyme activity could be adjusted by modifying the amide portion of these imidazo[1,2-b]thiazole derivatives. The most potent analogue within this series, namely, compound 29, has demonstrated oral antidiabetic activity in the ob/ob mouse model, the diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, and the Zucker fa/fa rat model.

Discovery of Imidazo[1,2-b]thiazole Derivatives as Novel SIRT1 Activators

Sirtris Pharmaceuticals, 200 Technology Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
J. Med. Chem.200952 (5), pp 1275–1283
DOI: 10.1021/jm8012954

* To whom correspondence should be addressed. Phone: (617)-252-6920, extension 2129. Fax: (617)-252-6924. E-mail: cvu@sirtrispharma.com., †

Present address: Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of California—San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093.

Preparation of N-(2-(3-(Piperazin-1-ylmethyl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazol-6-yl)phenyl)quinoxaline-2-carboxamide (29)

Essentially the same procedure as detailed in the preparation of 3,4,5-trimethoxy-N-(2-(3-(piperazin-1-ylmethyl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazol-6-yl)phenyl)benzamide was employed except that 2-quinoxaloyl chloride was used.
Mp: dec (HCl salt), 221.4 °C (freebase).
 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 9.60 (br s, 1 H), 8.88 (d, 1 H, J = 8 Hz), 8.60 (br s, 1 H), 8.50 (s, 1 H), 8.0−8.30 (m, 5 H), 7.78 (d, 1 H, J = 8 Hz), 7.10−7.33 (m, 4 H), 3.90 (br s, 2 H), 3.00−3.10 (m, 4H), 2.60−2.80 (m, 4 H).
13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 47.49, 49.88, 111.45, 120.47, 121.84, 124.02, 127.04, 128.10, 129.20, 129.23, 131.39, 132.15, 135.39, 139.54, 143.03, 143.80, 144.36, 144.62, 147.76, 161.57.
High resolution MS, calcd for C25H23N7OS [M + H]+ 470.1763; found, 470.1753.

References

  1. ^ Milne JC; Lambert PD; Schenk S; Carney DP; Smith JJ; Gagne DJ; Jin L; Boss O; Perni RB; Vu CB; Bemis JE; Xie R; Disch JS; Ng PY; Nunes JJ; Lynch AV; Yang H; Galonek H; Israelian K; Choy W; Iffland A; Lavu S; Medvedik O; Sinclair DA; Olefsky JM; Jirousek MR; Elliott PJ; Westphal CH (November 2007). “Small molecule activators of SIRT1 as therapeutics for the treatment of type 2 diabetes”Nature450(7170): 712–6. doi:10.1038/nature06261PMC 2753457PMID 18046409.
  2. ^ Minor RK; Baur JA; Gomes AP; Ward TM; Csiszar A; Mercken EM; Abdelmohsen K; Shin YK; Canto C; Scheibye-Knudsen M; Krawczyk M; Irusta PM; Martín-Montalvo A; Hubbard BP; Zhang Y; Lehrmann E; White AA; Price NL; Swindell WR; Pearson KJ; Becker KG; Bohr VA; Gorospe M; Egan JM; Talan MI; Auwerx J; Westphal CH; Ellis JL; Ungvari Z; Vlasuk GP; Elliott PJ; Sinclair DA; de Cabo R (Aug 2011). “SRT1720 improves survival and healthspan of obese mice”Scientific Reports1 (70): 70. doi:10.1038/srep00070PMC 3216557PMID 22355589. Retrieved 1 March 2014.
  3. Jump up to:a b Mitchell SJ; Martin-Montalvo A; Mercken EM; et al. (Feb 2014). “The SIRT1 Activator SRT1720 Extends Lifespan and Improves Health of Mice Fed a Standard Diet”Cell Reports6 (4): 836–43. doi:10.1016/j.celrep.2014.01.031PMC 4010117PMID 24582957. Retrieved 1 March 2014.
  4. ^ Pacholec M; Chrunyk BA; Cunningham D; Flynn D; Griffith DA; Griffor M; Loulakis P; Pabst B; Qiu X; Stockman B; Thanabal V; Varghese A; Ward J; Withka J; Ahn K (January 2010). “SRT1720, SRT2183, SRT1460, and resveratrol are not direct activators of SIRT1”J Biol Chem285 (11): 8340–8351. doi:10.1074/jbc.M109.088682PMC 2832984PMID 20061378.
  5. ^ Beher D; Wu J; Cumine S; Kim KW; Lu SC; Atangan L; Wang M (December 2009). “Resveratrol is not a direct activator of SIRT1 enzyme activity”. Chem Biol Drug Des74 (6): 619–24. doi:10.1111/j.1747-0285.2009.00901.xPMID 19843076.
  6. ^ Zarse, K.; Schmeisser, S.; Birringer, M.; Falk, E.; Schmoll, D.; Ristow, M. (2010). “Differential Effects of Resveratrol and SRT1720 on Lifespan of AdultCaenorhabditis elegans”. Hormone and Metabolic Research42 (12): 837–839. doi:10.1055/s-0030-1265225PMID 20925017.
  7. ^ Callaway E (2010-08-16). “GlaxoSmithKline strikes back over anti-ageing pills: Drugs do work as thought, says pharmaceutical giant”Naturedoi:10.1038/news.2010.412.
  8. ^ Dai H; Kustigian L; Carney D; Case A; Considine T; Hubbard BP; Perni RB; Riera TV; Szczepankiewicz B; Vlasuk GP; Stein RL (August 2010). “SIRT1 activation by small molecules – kinetic and biophysical evidence for direct interaction of enzyme and activator”J Biol Chem285 (43): 32695–32703. doi:10.1074/jbc.M110.133892PMC 2963390PMID 20702418.
  9. ^ “Sirtuin Pipeline”Sirtris Pharmaceuticals.
SRT1720
SRT1720.svg
Identifiers
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
ChemSpider
CompTox Dashboard(EPA)
Chemical and physical data
Formula C25H23N7OS
Molar mass 469.560 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

////////////SRT-1720 DI HCl, obesity, diabetes, SRT 1720,  Sirtris Pharmaceuticals,  CAY10559,  CAY 10559, Preclinical

O=C(NC1=CC=CC=C1C2=CN3C(SC=C3CN4CCNCC4)=N2)C5=NC6=CC=CC=C6N=C5.[H]Cl.[H]Cl

K-8986


Figure

YNRQDEGURLSOGN-BTJKTKAUSA-N.png

K-8986

(Z)-but-2-enedioic acid;7-[3-[4-[[1-(2-ethoxyethyl)benzimidazol-2-yl]methyl]piperazin-1-yl]propoxy]-4H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one

cas 1335112-55-4 mono maleate

cas 1335112-57-6  di maleate

cas 219741-69-2 free form

C27 H35 N5 O3 S . C4 H4 O4
2H-1,4-Benzothiazin-3(4H)-one, 7-[3-[4-[[1-(2-ethoxyethyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]methyl]-1-piperazinyl]propoxy]-, (2Z)-2-butenedioate (1:1)
7-[3-[4-[[1-(2-Ethoxyethyl)benzimidazol-2-yl]methyl]-1-piperazinyl]propoxy]-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one monomaleate
KOWA CO., LTD.
福田 友昭 FUKUDA, Tomoaki; JP
纐纈 章泰 KOKETSU, Akiyasu; JP
金児 佳生 KANEKO, Yoshio; JP
芦川 由香 ASHIKAWA, Yuka; JP

Image result for KOWA CO., LTD.

Mono maleate

1H NMR (396 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1.03 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 3H), 2.04–2.08 (m, 2H), 3.10 (br, 8H), 3.18 (br, 2H), 3.38 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 2H), 3.42 (s, 2H), 3.71 (t, J = 7.9 Hz, 2H), 3.95 (s, 2H), 4.01 (t, J = 5.9 Hz, 2H), 4.51 (t, J = 5.2 Hz, 2H), 6.06 (s, 2H), 6.79 (dd, J = 9.1, 2.7 Hz, 1H), 6.90–6.92 (m, 2H), 7.17–7.26 (m, 2H), 7.58–7.61 (m, 2H), 10.43 (s, 1H);

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 15.0, 23.8, 29.0, 43.5, 49.7 (×2), 51.3 (×2), 53.2, 53.4, 65.3, 65.7, 68.7, 110.7, 112.8, 113.9, 118.2, 118.8, 120.3, 121.6, 122.2, 131.3, 135.6, 135.8 (×2), 141.8, 150.6, 153.7, 164.7, 167.3 (×2);

HRMS (FD) calcd for C27H36N5O3S [(MH – maleic acid)+] 510.2539, found 510.2558.

Allergic conjunctivitis, which can be classified into seasonal allergic conjunctivitis and perennial allergic conjunctivitis, is a type I hypersensitivity to allergens. Symptoms such as itching, redness, eyelid swelling, and chemosis are common among afflicted patients and are caused by the release of chemical mediators such as histamine from activated mast cells through cross-linking of antigen-specific immunoglobulin E. The binding of histamine to its receptors plays a central role in the induction of allergic symptoms. K-8986 (1), a histamine H1-receptor antagonist, was developed as a potential therapeutic for treatment of allergic conjunctivitis

SYN

Clip

Development of a Synthetic Process for K-8986, an H1-Receptor Antagonist

Tomoaki Fukuda* Takeaki HaraShinji InaTetsuhiro Nemoto , and Takeshi Oshima*

 Tokyo New Drug Research Laboratories, Pharmaceutical DivisionKowa Company, Ltd.2-17-43, Noguchicho, Higashimurayama, Tokyo 189-0022, Japan
 Graduate School of Pharmaceutical SciencesChiba University1-8-1, Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675, Japan
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.8b00380
This article is part of the Japanese Society for Process Chemistry special issue.
Abstract Image

This article describes the development of a robust and scalable synthetic process for K-8986 (1). To solve the problems in terms of the physicochemical properties of 6 (a free base unit of 1), we have screened the suitable salt forms of the target. The monomaleate salt was the most suitable form for the API. To overcome challenges regarding the unremovable impurity Imp B caused by the carryover of piperazine in the medicinal chemistry route, we designed and developed a novel synthetic route. This route furnished more opportunities to purify the synthetic intermediates after introduction of the piperazine unit. Both impurities and co-products in each step of the revised synthesis could be easily removed via filtration, leveraging the low solubility of benzothiazine derivatives. The newly established process was applied to the synthesis of 1 (the monomaleate salt of 6) on a practical scale, achieving high purity and reproducibility.

1H NMR (396 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1.03 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 3H), 2.04–2.08 (m, 2H), 3.10 (br, 8H), 3.18 (br, 2H), 3.38 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 2H), 3.42 (s, 2H), 3.71 (t, J = 7.9 Hz, 2H), 3.95 (s, 2H), 4.01 (t, J = 5.9 Hz, 2H), 4.51 (t, J = 5.2 Hz, 2H), 6.06 (s, 2H), 6.79 (dd, J = 9.1, 2.7 Hz, 1H), 6.90–6.92 (m, 2H), 7.17–7.26 (m, 2H), 7.58–7.61 (m, 2H), 10.43 (s, 1H);

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 15.0, 23.8, 29.0, 43.5, 49.7 (×2), 51.3 (×2), 53.2, 53.4, 65.3, 65.7, 68.7, 110.7, 112.8, 113.9, 118.2, 118.8, 120.3, 121.6, 122.2, 131.3, 135.6, 135.8 (×2), 141.8, 150.6, 153.7, 164.7, 167.3 (×2);

PATENT

WO2011115173

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=CB6FAC725A85FC9DDE6D08A63CD4B038.wapp1nB?docId=WO2011115173&tab=FULLTEXT&queryString=ALL%3A%28%25E7%2582%258E%25E7%2597%2587%25E6%2580%25A7%25E8%2585%25B8%25E7%2596%25BE%25E6%2582%25A3%29&recNum=236&maxRec=6346

Example 1-1 Production of 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin- Production of On (1a) (Manufacture of Free Body)

[Chemical Formula 5]

 a) 65 g (359 mmol) of 7-hydroxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one obtained by the method described in JP-A-60-4176 and JP-A-59-70675, Was suspended in tetrahydrofuran (194 mL) under an argon atmosphere, 104 g (397 mmol) of triphenylphosphine and 32 mL (379 mmol) of 3-chloropropanol were added and the mixture was cooled to 0 ° C. Next, 78 mL (396 mmol) of azodicarboxylic acid diisopropyl ester was added dropwise to the obtained reaction solution at 30 ° C. or less, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour. The solvent was distilled off from the resulting solution under reduced pressure, methanol (390 mL) was added thereto, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and then dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to obtain 59 g (yield 64%) of 7- (3-chloropropoxy) -3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin- ) As blue-white crystals.
[Chemical Formula 6]
1 H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d 6 ) δ: 2.12 (2H, quint, J = 6.2 Hz), 3.28 (2H, s), 3.76 (2H, t, J = (2H, t, J = 5.8 Hz), 6.78 (1 H, dd, J = 2.8, 8.8 Hz), 6.88 (1 H, d, J = 8.8 Hz ), 6.90 (1 H, d, J = 2.8 Hz), 10.38 (1 H, s)
 57 g (221 mmol) of 7- (3-chloropropoxy) -3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one was suspended in dimethylformamide (172 mL), 49 g (355 mmol) of potassium carbonate, 40 g (241 mmol) of potassium iodide and 43 g (231 mmol) of Nt-butoxycarbonylpiperazine were added and the mixture was heated to 100 ° C. and stirred for 4 hours. Water (344 mL) was added to the reaction solution, and the mixture was cooled to 0 ° C. and further stirred at the same temperature for 1 hour. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and then dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to give 7- [3- (Nt-butoxycarbonylpiperazinyl) propoxy] -3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazine -3-one (89% yield) as bluish-white crystals.
[Chemical Formula 7]
1 H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d 6 ) δ: 1.39 (9 H, s), 1.83 (2 H, quint, J = 6.8 Hz), 2.31 (4 H, t, J = 4. 3.30 (2H, t, J = 4.6 Hz), 3.41 (2H, s), 3.95 (2H, t, J = 6.4 Hz), 6.78 (1 H, dd, J = 2.8, 8.8 Hz), 6.88 (1 H, d, J = 8.8 Hz), 6.89 (1 H, s) 10.38 (1 H, s)
 c) 87 g (214 mmol) of 7- {3- (Nt-butoxycarbonylpiperazinyl) propoxy} -3,4-dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin-3-one was suspended in ethanol (174 mL) , 6N hydrochloric acid aqueous solution (174 mL) was added dropwise at 50 ° C., and the mixture was stirred at the same temperature for 1 hour. Ethanol (522 mL) was added to the reaction solution, followed by cooling to 0 ° C. and further stirring at the same temperature for 1 hour. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and then dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to give 7- {3- (piperazin-1-yl) propoxy} -3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin- · Hydrochloride salt 75 g (yield 92%) was obtained as blue-white crystals.
[Chemical Formula 8]
1 H-NMR (400 MHz, D 2 O) [delta]: 2.13 (2H, td, J = 5.9,15.6Hz), 3.34 (2H, s), 3.35 (2H, t, J = 8.0 Hz), 3.44-3.64 (8H, m), 4.02 (2H, t, J = 5.6 Hz), 6.74 (1H, dd, J = 2.4, 6.85 (1 H, d, J = 8.8 Hz), 6.90 (1 H, d, J = 2.4 Hz)
 d) 1- (2-ethoxyethyl) -2-chloromethyl-1H-benzimidazole obtained by the method described in Journal of Heterocyclic Chemistry (1987), 24 (1), 31-37 was dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (293 mL) and Was dissolved in a mixture of water (147 mL), and 7- {3- (Nt-butoxycarbonylpiperazinyl) propoxy} -3,4-dihydro-2H- 73 g (192 mmol) of 1,4-benzothiazin-3-one was added. Then, 117 mL (673 mmol) of diisopropylethylamine and 35 g (211 mmol) of potassium iodide were added, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 15 hours. Ethyl acetate (293 mL) and water (147 mL) were added to the reaction solution and extracted, and the organic layer was washed with 20% brine (147 mL). The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure to give 115 g (2 steps, quantitative) of the title compound (1a) as a brown oil.
1 H-NMR (400 MHz, CDCl 3 ) δ: 1.13 (3H, t, J = 7.0 Hz), 1.93 (2H, quint, J = 6.9 Hz), 2.40-2.70 (2H, s), 3.42 (2H, q, J = 6.8 Hz), 3.76 (2H, t, J = 7.2 Hz), 2.51 5. 2 (t, J = 6.0 Hz), 3.88 (2H, s), 3.97 (2H, t, J = 6.2 Hz), 4.51 (2H, t, J = 5.8 Hz), J = 8.8 Hz), 6.85 (1 H, d, J = 2.4 Hz), 7.24 (1 H, d, -7.28 (2H, m), 7.39 (1 H, ddd, J = 1.2, 6, 6.8 Hz), 7.73 (1 H, ddd, J = 1.2, 6.0 , 6.8 Hz) 8.35 (1H, s)
Example 1-2: 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin- Production of On Monomaleate (2a) (Production of Seed Crystal)
[Chemical Formula 9]
 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin-3-one (1a) 0 g (1.96 mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (8 mL) and warmed to 60 ° C. After adding 211 mg (1.80 mmol) of maleic acid and stirring at 50 ° C. for 1 hour, the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 16 hours and further stirred at 0 ° C. for 3 hours. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and then dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to obtain 1.02 g (yield 91%) of the monomaleate (2a) as bluish white crystals (melting point: 148 ° -151 ° C.).
Examples 1-3: 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin- Preparation of on-monomaleate (2a)
 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin-3-one (1a). After dissolving 0 g (13.7 mmol) in ethanol (56 mL) and heating to 60 ° C., 1.46 g (12.6 mmol) of maleic acid was added and the mixture was cooled to 50 ° C. to obtain 0.035 g (0.056 mmol) of seed crystals was added. The reaction solution was stirred at 50 ° C. for 1 hour, then stirred at room temperature for 1 hour, and further stirred at 0 ° C. for 3 hours. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and then dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to obtain 7.08 g (yield 90%) of monomaleate (2a) as bluish-white crystals.
1 H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d 6 ) δ: 1.02 (3H, t, J = 7.2 Hz), 2.00-2.07 (2H, m), 2.80-3.61 J = 5.2 Hz), 3.93 (2H, q, J = 6.9 Hz), 3.42 (2H, s), 3.71 (2H, (2H, t, J = 5.2 Hz), 6.03 (2H, s), 6.78 (1 H, dd, J = 2.4, 8.8 Hz), 6.88 (1 H, s), 6.91 (1 H, dd, J = 2.4, 2.4 Hz), 7.18 (1 H, ddd, J = 1 (2H, d, J = 8.4 Hz), 7.24 (1H, ddd, J = 1.4, 7.5, 7.5 Hz), 7.59 10.40 (1 H, s)
 Elementary analysis value of the  monomaleate (2a) obtained in Example 1-3: C 31 H 39 N 5 O 7 S
: theoretical value: C 59.50%; H 6.28%; N 11.19 %
Found: C 59.33%; H 6.29%; N 11.10%
 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazine obtained in Example 1-3 -3-one monomaleate (2a) was subjected to thermal analysis measurement. In the thermal analysis measurement, approximately 5 mg of a sample was accurately weighed in an aluminum pan for thermal analysis, Al 2 O 3 was used as a reference substance , and the temperature was raised at a heating rate of 10 ° C./min in the presence of an atmosphere of N 2 gas (150 mL / min) (DTA) and thermogravimetry (TG) using a Thermo Plus 2 system (manufactured by Rigaku) as a thermal analyzer. The results of the thermal analysis measurement are shown in FIG. The melting point of the monomaleate (2a) was 147-150 ° C. (B – 545, manufactured by BUCHI).
 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazine obtained in Example 1-3 -3-one monomaleate (2a) by infrared spectrophotometer (manufactured by Thermo Nicolet Co., Ltd., AVATAR 370; ATR method) shows the pattern shown in FIG. 2, and it is in the vicinity of 1669 cm -1 , 1492Cm -1 around, 1231Cm -1 around, 1208Cm -1around, 868Cm -1 and around 754Cm -1 had an absorption peak specific to the vicinity.
 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazine obtained in Example 1-3 -3-one monomaleate (2a) was measured by powder X-ray diffraction (Miniflex manufactured by Rigaku Denki Kogyo Co., Ltd.). Measurement of powder X-ray crystal diffraction was carried out by filling the sample in the sample holder part of the silicon non-reflecting sample plate for X-ray diffraction and measuring with a desktop X-ray diffractometer: MiniFlex (Rigaku) a scanning range of diffraction angle 2θ; 3.00 ° to 40.00 °, sampling width: 0.02 °, and scanning speed: 2.00 ° / min. The obtained diffraction pattern is shown in FIG. 3. The monomaleate (2a) had specific diffraction angles and relative intensities shown in Table 1
[table 1]
Examples 1-4: 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin-3- Preparation of On Monomaleate (2a) (Study of Reproducibility on Large Scale)
 (1a) (115 g) was added to a solution of 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin- 226 mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (293 mL), activated charcoal 5.5 g was added, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour, then filtered through celite and washed with ethanol (147 mL) and washed. Ethanol (147 mL) was added to the filtrate, and after heating to 60 ° C., 18.9 g (163 mmol) of maleic acid was added and cooled to 50 ° C. 0.58 g (0.93 mmol) of the seed crystals of the monomaleate (2a) obtained in Example 1-3 was added and stirred at 50 ° C. for 1 hour, followed by stirring at room temperature for 15 hours and further at 0 ° C. And the mixture was stirred for 3 hours. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to obtain 75.2 g (yield 63%) of monomaleate (2a) as white crystals (melting point: 147 ° -149 ° C.).
 Elementary analysis value of the  monomaleate (2a) obtained in Examples 1-4: C 31 H 39 N 5 O 7 S
: theoretical value: C 59.50%; H 6.28%; N 11.19 %
Found: C 59.41%; H 6.29%; N 11.08%
Comparative Example 1 Synthesis of 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin- Preparation of dimaleate
 15. 9 g (31 (3-ethoxyethylbenzoimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4- benzothiazin- . 1 mmol) was dissolved in 70 mL of ethanol, the solution was heated to 60 ° C., 8.0 g (68.9 mmol) of maleic acid was added, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 15 hours. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and then dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to give 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- 13.3 g of dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one / dimaleate was obtained. The obtained compound was dissolved in methanol (13 mL), heated to 60 ° C., THF (52 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 20 hours. The obtained crystals were collected by filtration and dried under reduced pressure at 50 ° C. for 5 hours to give 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4 -Dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one · dimaleate was obtained as blueish white crystals.
1 H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d 6 ) δ: 1.01 (3H, t, J = 7.0 Hz), 2.00-2.07 (2H, m), 3.00 (4H, m) , 3.20 (2H, m), 3.37 (2H, q, J = 6.9 Hz), 3.41-3.47 (4H, m), 3.70 (2H, t, J = 5. (2H, t, J = 5.8 Hz), 4.50 (2H, t, J = 5.0 Hz), 6.14 (4H, s), 3.95 (2H, s) , 6.76 (1 H, dd, J = 2.4, 8.8 Hz), 6.88 (1 H, s), 6.90 (1 H, m), 7.19 – 7.27 (2 H, m) , 7.60 (2H, d, J = 7.6 Hz), 10.40 (1 H, s)
Comparative Example 2 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin-3-one Production of monofumarate
 6.81 g of 13- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) – 1 – piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin- . 3 mmol) was dissolved in a mixed solvent of ethanol (60 mL) and (water 6 mL), and the mixture was heated to 60 ° C. To the mixed solution was added a mixed solution of ethanol (14 mL) containing 1.55 g (13.3 mmol) of fumaric acid and water (1.5 mL), the mixture was stirred at 40 ° C. for 30 minutes, and further stirred at room temperature for 20 hours . The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and dried under reduced pressure at 40 ° C. for 53.5 hours to give 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] 6.16 g (yield: 74%) of 4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one monofumarate was obtained as slightly yellow crystals.
1 H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d 6 ) δ: 1.01 (3H, t, J = 7.0 Hz), 1.81 (2H, quint, J = 6.6 Hz), 2.40-2. J = 5.6 Hz), 3.78 (2H, s), 3.93 (2H, m), 3.72 (2H, J = 6.4 Hz), 4.47 (2H, t, J = 5.2 Hz), 6.60 (2H, s), 6.75 (1 H, dd, J = 3.0, 9.0 Hz , 6.87 (1 H, d, J = 8.8 Hz), 6.89 (1 H, s), 7.15 (1 H, t, J = 7.6 Hz), 7.20 (1 H, t, J = 7.4 Hz), 7.54 (2H, t, J = 7.6 Hz), 10.36 (1 H, s)
Comparative Example 3 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin-3-one Production of disulfate

 8.28 g (16 parts) of 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzoimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4-dihydro-2H- 1,4-benzothiazin- . 2 mmol) was dissolved in a mixed solvent of ethanol (104 mL) and water (11 mL) and cooled to 0 ° C. A solution of 3.19 g (16.2 mmol) of sulfuric acid in water (11 mL) was added dropwise and the mixture was stirred at 40 ° C. for 30 minutes, and further stirred at room temperature for 20 hours. The precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and dried under reduced pressure at 40 ° C. for 53.5 hours to give 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] (86% yield) of 4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3-one disulfate as slightly yellow crystals.

1 H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d 6 ) δ: 1.02 (3H, t, J = 6.8 Hz), 2.03 (2H, m), 2.65 (2H, m), 3.00 (4H, m), 3.26 (2H, m), 3.37 (2H, q, J = 6.8 Hz), 3.41-3.47 (4H, m), 3.75 , J = 5.0 Hz), 4.01 (2H, t, J = 5.8 Hz), 4.21 (2H, brs), 4.65 (2H, t, J = 5.0 Hz), 6.78 J = 8.8 Hz), 6.90 (1 H, d, J = 3.2 Hz), 7.50 – (1 H, d, J = 2.8, 9.2 Hz), 6.89 7.55 (2H, m), 7.79 (1H, d, J = 8.4 Hz), 7.91 (1H, d, J = 6.0 Hz), 10.41 (1H, s)

Presence or Absence of Crystallization of Each Product]

 The monomaleate (2a) obtained in Example 1-3 and the comparative compound obtained in Comparative Examples 1 to 3 (the dimaleate of the title compound (1a) , Monofumarate, disulfate) were obtained as crystals as described above. On the other hand, salts of hydrochloric acid, boric acid, phosphoric acid and citric acid were prepared as a comparative example using the title compound (1a) in the same manner as in Comparative Example 2, and crystallization of each compound was attempted. Upon crystallization of each product, methanol or ethanol was used as a crystallization solvent. The results are shown in Table 2.

[Table 2]

 Crystallization studies gave crystalline salts for sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, maleic acid and fumaric acid. On the other hand, the borate, phosphate and citrate of the title compound (1a) did not crystallize, the monoborate was an oily substance and the monophosphate and the monocitrate were amorphous. For the maleate, hydrochloride and sulfate of the title compound (1a), a double salt was obtained in addition to the 1-fold salt. The hydrochloride salt of the title compound (1a) showed clear deliquescence for both monohydrochloride salt and dihydrochloride salt.
[Comparison of Purification Efficiency of Monomeric Acid Salt and Dimaleate Salt of
Title Compound (1a) ] Monomaleate and dimaleate of the title compound (1a) were synthesized under the same conditions using the same means to give crystals Was obtained. Means of synthesis of each product is shown below.
(A) Synthesis of
Monomeric Salt of Title Compound (1a) 7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- -1,4-benzothiazin-3-one (1a) (8.26 g, 16.2 mmol) was added to 71.74 g of ethanol and heated to 60 ° C., 1.79 g (15.40 mmol) of maleic acid was added , Cooled to 50 ° C. and 40 mg (0.064 mmol) of seed crystals was added. The reaction solution was stirred at 50 ° C. for 1 hour and then stirred overnight at room temperature. Subsequently, the reaction solution was stirred at 3 ° C. or less for 5 hours. After completion of the stirring, the precipitated crystals were collected by filtration to obtain 6.26 g (yield 62%) of the monomaleic acid salt of the title compound (1a).
(B) Synthesis of Dimaleate of Title Compound (1a)
7- [3- {4- (N-ethoxyethylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) -1-piperazinyl} propoxy] -3,4- dihydro-2H- 8.26 g (16.2 mmol) of 1,4-benzothiazin-3-one (1a) was added to 71.74 g of ethanol and heated to 60 ° C., and 4.7 g (40.48 mmol) of maleic acid was added. After confirming that the maleic acid was completely dissolved in the solution, it was stirred overnight at room temperature. Subsequently, the reaction solution was stirred at 3 ° C. or less for 5 hours. After completion of the stirring, the precipitated crystals were collected by filtration to obtain 8.04 g (yield 67%) of the dimaleic acid salt of the title compound (1a).

[0114]
 Crystals of the monomaleate and dimaleate obtained by means (a) and (b) above were each dissolved in a small amount of solvent and the purity of each substance was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC conditions are as follows and charts showing the HPLC measurement results are shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. Table 3 summarizes the HPLC measurement results.
 Column: A stainless steel tube having an inner diameter of 4.6 mm and a length of 5 cm was
charged
with 3.5 μm of phenylhexylsilylated silica gel for liquid chromatography (HPLC) .
(  B%) 20% → <10 minutes> → 60% (10 minutes) → <10 minutes>
Column temperature: constant temperature around 40 ° C.
Gradient condition (B%) 20% → 85% (10 min)
A solution: 0.01 mol / L phosphate buffer, pH 6.0
B: methanol
flow rate: 1.0 mL / min
area measurement range: 40 minutes
injection volume: 3 [mu] L
sample concentration: 1 mg / mL

PATENT

 JP 2013035773

JP 2013049632

1.(a) Fukuda, T.Koketsu, A.Kaneko, Y.Ashikawa, Y. Monomaleate of Benzothiazine CompoundWO20111151732011.

(b) Fukuda, T.Koketsu, A. Method for Producing Benzothiazine CompoundWO20111151502011.
(b) Fukuda, T.Koketsu, A. Method for Producing Benzothiazine CompoundWO20111151502011.

//////////K-8986, K 8986, 

O=C(O)/C=C\C(=O)O.CCOCCn4c5ccccc5nc4CN1CCN(CC1)CCCOc2ccc3NC(=O)CSc3c2

BMS-986169


imgUNVYDSCXINFREZ-BHDDXSALSA-N.pngBDBM198728.png

BMS-986169

CAS 1801151-08-5 Related CAS : 1801151-09-6   1801151-08-5
Chemical Formula: C23H27FN2O2
Molecular Weight: 382.4794
Elemental Analysis: C, 72.23; H, 7.12; F, 4.97; N, 7.32; O, 8.37

(R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one

(3R)-3-[(3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl]-1-[(4-methylphenyl)methyl]pyrrolidin-2-one

Preclinical

BMS-986169 is a Novel, Intravenous, Glutamate N-Methyl-d-Aspartate 2B Receptor Negative Allosteric Modulator with Potential in Major Depressive Disorder. BMS-986169 showed high binding affinity for the GluN2B subunit allosteric modulatory site (Ki = 4.03-6.3 nM) and selectively inhibited GluN2B receptor function in Xenopus oocytes expressing human N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subtypes (IC50 = 24.1 nM). BMS-986169 weakly inhibited human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel activity (IC50 = 28.4 μM) and had negligible activity in an assay panel containing 40 additional pharmacological targets.

Chemical structures of BMS-986169 and the phosphate prodrug BMS-986163.

Chemical structures of BMS-986169 and the phosphate prodrug BMS-986163. 
Image result for BMS-986169

 

PAPER

Evolution of a Scale-Up Synthesis to a Potent GluN2B Inhibitor and Its Prodrug

 Discovery Chemistry and Molecular TechnologiesBristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, United States
 Drug Product Science & Technology, Materials Science & EngineeringBristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, United States
§ Department of Discovery SynthesisBiocon Bristol-Myers Squibb Research Center (BBRC), Bangalore 560099, India
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.8b00120
Abstract Image

This paper describes the efficient scale-up synthesis of the potent negative allosteric glutamate N2B (GluN2B) inhibitor 1 (BMS-986169), which relies upon a stereospecific SN2 alkylation strategy and a robust process for the preparation of its phosphate prodrug 28 (BMS-986163) from parent 1 using POCl3. A deoxyfluorination reaction employing bis(2-methoxyethyl)aminosulfur trifluoride (Deoxo-Fluor) is also used to stereospecifically introduce a fluorine substituent. The optimized routes have been demonstrated to provide APIs suitable for toxicological studies in vivo.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acs.oprd.8b00120/suppl_file/op8b00120_si_001.pdf

PAPER

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsmedchemlett.8b00080

BMS-986163, a Negative Allosteric Modulator of GluN2B with Potential Utility in Major Depressive Disorder

 Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, Connecticut 06492, United States
 Biocon Bristol-Myers Squibb Research Center, Bangalore, India
§ Bristol-Myers Squibb Research and Development3551 Lawrenceville Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08648, United States
ACS Med. Chem. Lett.20189 (5), pp 472–477
DOI: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.8b00080
*Phone 203-677-6701. E-mail: lawrence.marcin@bms.com.

 

Abstract Image

There is a significant unmet medical need for more efficacious and rapidly acting antidepressants. Toward this end, negative allosteric modulators of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subtype GluN2B have demonstrated encouraging therapeutic potential. We report herein the discovery and preclinical profile of a water-soluble intravenous prodrug BMS-986163 (6) and its active parent molecule BMS-986169 (5), which demonstrated high binding affinity for the GluN2B allosteric site (Ki = 4.0 nM) and selective inhibition of GluN2B receptor function (IC50 = 24 nM) in cells. The conversion of prodrug 6 to parent 5 was rapid in vitro and in vivo across preclinical species. After intravenous administration, compounds 5 and 6 have exhibited robust levels of ex vivo GluN2B target engagement in rodents and antidepressant-like activity in mice. No significant off-target activity was observed for 56, or the major circulating metabolites met-1 and met-2. The prodrug BMS-986163 (6) has demonstrated an acceptable safety and toxicology profile and was selected as a preclinical candidate for further evaluation in major depressive disorder.

Image result for BMS-986169

Image result for BMS-986169

 

 

(S)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-
methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (compound 23) and (R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-
hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (BMS-986169, compound
5)……https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acsmedchemlett.8b00080/suppl_file/ml8b00080_si_001.pdf

Analytical data for BMS-986169 (compound 5): LCMS (C23H27FN2O2, MW 382.2, ESAPI),
observed 383.2 m/z (M+H)+; []D20 = +6.09 (c = 1.15, MeOH); Anal. Calcd for
C23H27FN2O2 (382.21): C, 72.22; H, 7.12; N, 7.32. Found: C, 72.26; H, 7.05; N, 7.31; HRMS
(ESI) Calcd for C23H27N2O2, 383.2118. Found, 383.2129;

13C NMR (126 MHz, chloroformd)
172.4, 155.0, 137.5, 133.0, 132.8, 129.4, 128.6, 128.2, 115.6, 91.6 (d, J=173.5 Hz),
65.0, 54.5 (d, J=25.4 Hz), 48.3, 47.7 (d, J=17.3 Hz), 46.7, 43.6, 31.5, 21.1, 19.2;(500 MHz, chloroform-d) 7.23 – 7.11 (m, 5H), 6.92 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 2H), 6.18 (br. s., 1H),
4.79 – 4.55 (m, 1H), 4.57 – 4.33 (m, 2H), 3.72 (t, J=8.7 Hz, 1H), 3.46 – 3.30 (m, 1H), 3.30 –
3.09 (m, 2H), 2.82 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1H), 2.73 – 2.56 (m, 2H), 2.49 (d, J=2.5 Hz, 1H), 2.36 (s,
3H), 2.21 – 1.98 (m, 2H), 1.87 (br. s., 2H). The corresponding 1H NMR spectrum for
compound 5 is shown below

1H NMR

 

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/US9221796B2/und

InventorDalton KingLorin A. Thompson, IIIJianliang ShiSrinivasan ThangathirupathyJayakumar Sankara WarrierImadul IslamJohn E. Macor

Current Assignee Bristol-Myers Squibb Co

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2015105772A1/und

N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ion channels which are gated by the binding of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. They are thought to play a key role in the development of a number of neurological diseases, including depression, neuropathic pain, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. Functional NMDA receptors are tetrameric structures primarily composed of two NRl and two NR2 subunits. The NR2 subunit is further subdivided into four individual subtypes: NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, and NR2D, which are differentially distributed throughout the brain. Antagonists or allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors, in particular NR2B subunit-containing channels, have been investigated as therapeutic agents for the treatment of major depressive disorder (G. Sanacora, 2008, Nature Rev. Drug Disc. 7: 426-437).

The NR2B receptor contains additional ligand binding sites in additon to that for glutamate. Non-selective NMDA antagonists such as Ketamine are pore blockers, interfering with the transport of Ca++ through the channel. Ketamine has demonstrated rapid and enduring antidepressant properties in human clinical trials as an i.v. drug. Additionally, efficacy was maintained with repeated, intermittent infusions of Ketamine (Zarate et al., 2006, Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 63: 856-864). This class of drugs, though, has limited therapeutic value because of its CNS side effects, including dissociative effects.

An allosteric, non-competitive binding site has also been identified in the N-terminal domain of NR2B. Agents which bind selectively at this site, such as

Traxoprodil, exhibited a sustained antidepressant response and improved side effect profile in human clinical trials as an i.v. drug (Preskorn et al., 2008, J. Clin.

PsychopharmacoL, 28: 631-637, and F. S. Menniti, et al, 1998, CNS Drug Reviews, 4, 4, 307-322). However, development of drugs from this class has been hindered by low bioavailability, poor pharmacokinetics, and lack of selectivity against other pharmacological targets including the hERG ion channel. Blockade of the hERG ion channel can lead to cardiac arrythmias, including the potentially fatal Torsades de pointe, thus selectivity against this channel is critical. Thus, in the treatment of major depressive disorder, there remains an unmet clinical need for the development of effective NR2B-selective negative allosteric modulators which have a favorable tolerability profile.

NR2B receptor antagonists have been disclosed in PCT publication WO 2009/006437.

The invention provides technical advantages, for example, the compounds are novel and are ligands for the NR2B receptor and may be useful for the treatment of various disorders of the central nervous system. Additionally, the compounds provide advantages for pharmaceutical uses, for example, with regard to one or more of their mechanism of action, binding, inhibition efficacy, target selectivity, solubility, safety profiles, or bioavailability.

Synthetic Scheme 1

The l-phenyl/benzyl-3-bromo-pyrrolidinones/piperidinones V may be reacted with (4-oxy-phenyl)cyclic amines VI in the presence of base to produce protected products VII, which may be subjected to cleavage conditions appropriate for the protecting group (PGi) to generate final products I, which may be separated into individual enantiomers/diastereomers I*, as shown in synthetic scheme 2.

Synthetic Scheme 2

I I*

Compounds la may be prepared by condensing l-phenyl/benzyl-3-bromo-pyrroli-dinones/piperidinones V with substituted 4(4-oxyphenyl)piperidines Vllla-c to generate protected intermediates IX, which may be subjected to cleavage conditions appropriate for the protecting group (PGi) to generate final products la, which may be separated into individual enantiomers/diastereomers la*, as shown in synthetic scheme 3.

Synthetic Scheme 3

The 4(4-oxyphenyl)piperidines Vllla-c may be synthesized in turn by a sequence starting with a protected tetrahydropiperidine X, which can be hydroxylated via hydroboration/oxidation to give the protected hydroxypiperidine XI, which may be either directly transformed into the protected fluoropiperidine XII by treatment with DAST or oxidized into the protected 3-oxopiperidine XIII, which may be further transformed into protected 3,3-difluoropiperidines XIV via treatment with DAST. XI, XII, and XIV may be transformed into Villa, Vlllb, and VIIIc, respectively, by employing cleaving conditions appropriate for the protecting group (PG2), as shown in synthetic scheme 3 a.

S nthetic scheme 3 a

Chiral

Cleavage Individual enantiomers/

G2P-N diastereomers

separation

conditions

OH 
Villa*

Villa

XI

Chiral

Cleavage Individual enantiomers/

HN

G2P-N diastereomers

%_\J> PQ separation

PG1 conditions

R F

F Vlllb*

Vlllb

XII

Chiral

Individual enantiomers/

G2P- diastereomers separation

Vlllc*

For tetrahydropyridines X which are not commercially available may be synthesized by coupling protected bromophenols XV with protected unsaturated

piperidineboronic acids XVI, as shown in synthetic scheme 4a.

Synthetic scheme 4a:

For tetrahydropyridines X which are not commercially available may be synthesized by adding the anion generated from protected bromophenols XV to a protected 4-piperidinone XVII to yield 4-phenyl-4-piperidinol XVIII, which may be dehydrated under acid conditions to yield the desired X, as shown in synthetic scheme 4b.

Synthetic scheme 4b:

l-Phenyl/benzyl-3-bromo-pyrroli-dinones/piperidinones V may be condensed with isolated individual enantiomers VIIIa-c*, which results in diastereomers 1- phenyl/benzyl-3-bromo-pyrroli-dinones/piperidinones IX*, which may be deprotected and separated to give final products la*, as shown in scheme 5.

Alternatively, the backbone scaffold may be synthesized by condensing 1- phenyl/benzyl-3-bromo-pyrroli-dinones/piperidinones V with hydroxypiperidines Villa to yield the protected 3-fluoropiperidines IXa, which may themselves be converted to the protected 3-fluoropiperidines IXb or oxidized to the ketones XIX, which may be converted to the 3,3-difluoropiperidines Ixc, as shown in scheme 6. The final compounds can then be isolated after the deprotection of IXa-c.

Scheme 6

Example 46, P-1 Example 46, P-2

(S)-3-((3S,4S)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one and (R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one.

Example 46, P-3 Example 46, P-4

Step A. (±)-rel-(3S,4S)- 1 -benzyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol.

To a suspension of sodium tetrahydroborate (2.7 g, 72 mmol) in THF (200 mL) at 0 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere was added dropwise boron trifluoride etherate (8.8 mL, 70 mmol) and the resulting mixture was stirred for 30 minutes. Then 1-benzyl- 4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-l,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (10 g, 36 mmol, from S. Halazy et al WO 97/28140 (8/7/97)) dissolved in 100 mL of tetrahydrofuran was added. The mixture was allowed to warm to rt and stirred for 2 h. The reaction was then quenched by the dropwise addition of 100 mL of water. Next were added

sequentially 100 mL of ethanol, 100 mL of a 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, and 30%> hydrogen peroxide (18 mL, 180 mmol) and the mixture was stirred at reflux temperature overnight. The reaction mixture was then allowed to cool, diluted with saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (200 mL), and extracted with ethyl acetate (500 mL). The organic layer was dried over Na2S04, filtered, and evaporated under reduced pressure to give (±)-rel-(3S,4S)- 1 -benzyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (8.5 g, 24.6 mmol, 69%> yield) which was used without further purification. LCMS (Method K) RT 1.99 min; m/z 298.0 (M+H+).

Step B. (±)-re -(3S,4S)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol.

To a solution of (±)-re/-(35′,45)-l-benzyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (9 g, 30 mmol) in methanol (150 mL) was added 10 % Pd/C (4.8 g) and the reaction mixture was stirred overnight under a hydrogen atmosphere. The catalyst was then removed by filtration through Celite and the solvent was evaporated under reduced pressure to give (±)-re/-(3S,4S)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (5.1 g, 24.6 mmol, 81% yield) which was used without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ ppm 7.10 – 7.15 (m, 2 H) 6.80 – 6.86 (m, 2 H) 4.30 (d, J=5.27 Hz, 1 H) 3.37 – 3.43 (m, 1 H) 3.04 (dd, J=11.58, 4.36 Hz, 1 H) 2.86 (d, J=12.17 Hz, 1 H) 2.43 (td, J=12.09, 2.67 Hz, 1 H) 2.22 – 2.35 (m, 2 H) 1.57 – 1.63 (m, 1 H) 1.43 – 1.54 (m, 1 H).

To a solution of (±)-re/-(3S,4S)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (4.5 g, 21.7 mmol) in DCM (150 mL) at -10°C under nitrogen was added a 1 M solution of boron tribromide in DCM (109 mL, 109 mmol). The reaction mixture was allowed to warm to rt, stired for 2 h, and then rechilled to 0 °C and quenched by the addition of a saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (300 mL). The aqueous layer was washed with 250 mL of DCM and then to it was added 200 mL 10% aqueous NaOH, followed by 9.5 g (43.5 mmol) of di-t-butyl dicarbonate and the resulting mixture was stirred for an additional 2 h. The mixture was then extracted with 200 mL ethyl acetate and the organic layer was separated, dried over Na2S04,filtered, and evaporated under reduced pressure to (±)-re/-(35′,45)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(tert-butoxycarbonyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-l-carboxylate (6.5 g, 12 mmol, 56 % yield) which was used without further purification. LCMS (Method K) RT 2.33 min, m/z 282 (M+H+ -2 t-butyl), 370; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 7.27 (d, J=8.66 Hz, 2 H) 7.08 (d, J=8.66 Hz, 2 H) 4.85 (d, J=5.65 Hz, 1 H) 4.13 (d, J=8.41 Hz, 1 H) 3.97 (d, J=10.48 Hz, 1 H) 3.45 (tt, J=10.27, 5.19 Hz, 1 H) 1.67 (d, J=3.39 Hz, 1 H) 1.50 – 1.59 (m, 1 H) 1.49 (s, 11 H).

Step D. (±)-re/-(35′,45)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-carboxylate.

To a solution of (±)-re/-(35′,45)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(tert-butoxycarbonyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-l-carboxylate (6.5 g, 16.5 mmol) in 100 mL of methanol was added 11.42 g of potassium carbonate (83 mmol) and the reaction mixture was stirred at rt for 5 h. The organic solvent was removed under reduced pressure and the residue was partitioned between IN HC1 (300 mL) and ethyl acetate (300 mL). The layers were separated and the organic layer was dried over Na2S04 and evaporated under reduced pressure to give (±)-re/-(35′,45)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-carboxylate (5 g, 15 mmol, 92 % yield) which was used without further purification. LCMS (method F) RT 1.85 min, m/z 238 (M+H+ – 1-butyl), 279 (M+H+ – t-butyl+CH3CN), 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 7.01 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 2 H) 6.66 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 2 H) 4.70 (d, J=5.02 Hz, 1 H) 4.09 (br. s., 1 H) 3.94 (d, J=11.55 Hz, 1 H) 3.35 – 3.41 (m, 1 H) 2.66 – 2.77 (m, 1 H) 2.29 – 2.39 (m, 1 H) 1.63 (dd, J=13.30, 3.26 Hz, 1 H) 1.44 – 1.52 (m, 1 H) 1.42 (s, 9 H).

Step E. (3S,4S)-tert-Butyl 3 -hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l -carboxylate and (3R, -tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-carboxylate.

E-1 E-2

(±)-rel-(3S,4S)-tert-Butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine- 1 -carboxylate (5 g, 17 mmol, from step D) was subjected to chiral SFC separation (method C-5) to yield enantiomers E-1 (1.9 g, 6.48 mmol, 38.0 % yield) and E-2 (2.4 g, 8.18 mmol, 48.0 % yield). Data for E-1 : chiral HPLC (method A5 ) retention time 3.42 min. Data for E-2: chiral HPLC (method A5) retention time 4.2 min.

Step F. (3R,4R)-tert-Butyl 4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-l-carboxylate.

A mixture of (3R,4R)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-carboxylate (620 mg, 2.1 mmol, E-2 from step E), potassium carbonate (584 mg, 4.2 mmol), and benzyl bromide (0.25 mL, 2.1 mmol) in DMF (5 mL) was stirred at rt for 16 h. The solvent was removed by evaporation and the residue was treated with 50 mL of water. The aqueous mixture was then extracted 4 times with 50 mL of chloroform. The combined organic phases were dried over anhydous Na2S04, filtered, and evaporated to yield 750 mg of (3R,4R)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-l -carboxylate which was used without further purification. LCMS (method F) RT 2.28 min, m/z = 310 (M+H+ – t-butyl -water), 328 (M+H+ -t-butyl).

Step G. (3i?,4i?)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)piperidin-3-ol hydrochloride.

A mixture of (3R,4R)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-1-carboxylate (750 mg, 2 mmol), dioxane (4 mL) and 4.9 mL of 4 M HCI in dioxane was stirred at rt for 2h. The reaction was then evaporated to dryness to yield 550 mg of (3i?,4i?)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)piperidin-3-ol hydrochloride which was used without further purification. LCMS (method J) RT 0.70 min, m/z 284 (M+H+).

Step H. 3-((3i?,4i?)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidin-l -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one .

A mixture of 3-bromo-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (Intermediate 2, 220 mg, 0.82 mmol), (3i?,4i?)-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)piperidin-3-ol hydrochloride (262 mg, 0.82 mmol, from step G) and triethylamine (11 mL, 8.2 mmol) was stirred at 60 °C for lh, 80 °C for 1 h, 100 °C for 1 h and 120 °C for 1 h. The reaction mixture was then allowed to cool, diluted with 40 mL of water and extracted four times with 50 mL of chloroform. The combined organic layers were washed with 60 mL brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered, and evaporated to yield 382 mg of 3-((3 ?,4i?)-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one which was used without further purification. LCMS (method J) (main component of a mixture) RT 2.23 min, m/z 471 (M+H+).

Step I. 3-((3R, 4R)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-fluoropiperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one .

A solution of 3-(-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (382 mg, 0.81 mmol) in DCM (5 mL) cooled to 0 °C was treated dropwise with DAST (0.32 mL, 2.4 mmol) over 3 min. The reaction mixture was then allowed to warm to rt and was stirred for 2 h. The reaction was then quenched with 50 mL of 10% aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution and extracted 4 times with 40 mL of DCM. The combined organic layers were washed with 50 mL of brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated under vacuum to yield 382 mg of 3-((3i?,4i?)-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-fluoropiperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one as a mixture of two diastereomers and rearrangement products which was used without further purification. LCMS (method J) (main component of a mixture) RT 0.9 min, m/z 473 (M+H+).

Step J. 3-((3i?,4i?)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)-l -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one .

A mixture of 3-((Ji?,4i?)-(4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-fluoropiperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (382 mg, 0.81 mmol) and methanol (4 mL) was flushed with nitrogen, followed by the addition of 172 mg of 10% Pd/C. Then the mixture was stirred at rt overnight under 25-99 psi hydrogen pressure. The reaction was then transferred to a 100 mL autoclave and stirred at 7 kg/cm2 hydrogen pressure for 4 days. The catalyst was removed by filtration through Celite and the solvent was evaporated off. The crude product was subjected to HPLC purification (method B) to yield 77.3 mg 3-((Ji?,4i?)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-piperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (diastereomeric pair) LCMS (method Q) RT 1.15 min, m/z 383.0 (M+H+).

Step K. (5)-3-((3i?,4i?)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl>

methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one and (i?)-3-((3i?,4i?)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one.

The diastereomeric mixture from step J was separated by SFC method C-7 to yield homochiral Examples 46 P-l (29.3 mg) and P-2 (32.8 mg). Data for P-l (S)-3-((3R, 4R)-3 -fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (method F) RT 2.10 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+), 405.2 (M+Na+); HPLC (method B) RT 8.24 min (98.8% AP); HPLC (method C) RT 6.52 min (99.1% AP); Chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 4.1 min; 1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.76 – 1.86 (m, 2 H) 2.07 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 1 H) 2.13 – 2.21 (m, 1 H) 2.34 (s, 3 H) 2.43 (s, 0 H) 2.55 – 2.60 (m, 1 H) 2.65 – 2.70 (m, 1 H) 2.75 (br. s., 1 H) 3.20 – 3.30 (m, 2 H) 3.38 – 3.45 (m, 1 H) 3.70 (t, J=8.78 Hz, 1 H) 4.44 (t, J=79.81 Hz, 3 H) 4.63 – 4.71 (m, 1 H) 6.70 – 6.80 (m, 2 H) 7.07 – 7.15 (m, 2 H) 7.07 – 7.12 (m, 1 H) 7.13 – 7.22 (m, 4 H); 19F NMR δ ppm -184.171. Data for P-2: (R)-3-((3R,4R)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (method F) RT 2.10 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+), 405.2 (M+Na+); HPLC (method B) RT 8.29 min (99.7% AP); HPLC (method C) RT 6.52 min (99.8% AP); Chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 6.92 min; 1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.80 – 1.90 (m, 2 H) 2.07 (d, J=8.03 Hz, 1 H) 2.19 (s, 1 H) 2.34 (s, 3 H) 2.41 – 2.48 (m, 1 H) 2.66 (d, J=4.52 Hz, 2 H) 2.95 – 3.03 (m, 1 H) 3.10 – 3.18 (m, 1 H) 3.20 – 3.30 (m, 2 H) 3.68 – 3.78 (m, 1 H) 4.38 (s, 1 H) 4.51 (d, J=14.56 Hz, 2 H) 6.70 – 6.80 (m, 2 H) 7.05 – 7.13 (m, 2 H) 7.13 – 7.22 (m, 4 H); 19F NMR δ ppm -184.311.

(3S,4S)-tert-Butyl 3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-carboxylate.

To a solution of (3S,4S)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-carboxylate (400 mg, 1.36 mmol, the first eluting enantiomer E-l from step E) in DCM (5 mL) cooled to 0 °C was added dropwise DAST (0.54 mL, 4.1 mmol) over 10 min. The mixture was allowed to warm up to rt and was stirred for 2h. The reaction was slowly quenched with 50 mL of a 10%> aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution and extracted four times with 50 mL of DCM. The combined organic layerss were washed with 75 mL of brine, dried, and concentrated under vacuum to yield 390 mg of {3S,4S)-tert-bvXy\ 3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-

carboxylate which was used without further purification. LCMS (Method Q) RT 0.92 min, m z 240.1(M+H+).

Step M. 4-((3S’,4S)-3-Fluoropi ridin-4-yl)phenol hydrochloride.

A mixture of (3S,4S)-tert-butyl 3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-l-carboxylate (390 mg, 1.3 mmol) and 4M HC1 in dioxane (3.3 mL, 13.2 mmol) in dioxane (4 mL) was stirred at rt for 2 hr. It was then concentrated to dryness, washed with 10 mL of 5% DCM/diethyl ether mixture and the solid was isolated by filtration. Yield: 260 mg of 4-((J£4S)-3-fluoropiperidin-4-yl)phenol hydrochloride; LCMS

(method Q) RT 0.46 min, mz 196.1(M+H+) 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ = 9.57 (br. s., 4 H), 8.92 – 8.68 (m, 1 H), 7.14 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 1 H), 7.06 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 2 H), 6.82 – 6.73 (m, 2 H), 5.07 – 4.85 (m, 1 H), 3.77 – 3.36 (m, 9 H), 3.32 – 3.22 (m, 2 H), 3.13 – 2.85 (m, 5 H), 2.06 – 1.88 (m, H).

Step N. 3-((3S,4S)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one.

A mixture of 3-bromo-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (200 mg, 0.75 mmol), triethylamine (0.52 mL, 3.7 mmol) and 4-((3S,4S)-3-fluoropiperidin-4-yl)phenol hydrochloride (173 mg, 0.75 mmol) in DMF (3 mL) was heated to 120 °C in a microwave reactor for 1.5 h. The mixture was allowed to cool and was then mixed with 60 mL water and extracted 5 times with 40 mL of DCM. The combined organic extracts were washed with 80 mL of brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered, and evaporated to give 265 mg of 3-((3 4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)piperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one as a mixture of 2 diastereoisomers. LCMS (method P) RT 0.92 min m/z 383.4 (M+H+).

Step O. (5)-3-((3lS,45)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one and (i?)-3-((35,,45)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one.

A portion of the diasteromer mixture from step N (130 mg) was subjected to chiral purification via SFC (method C-7) to give homochiral Examples 46 P-3 (37.7 mg) and P-4 (60.7 mg). Data for P-3 (S)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin- 1 -yl)- 1 -(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (Method F) RT = 2.10 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+); HPLC (Method C) RT 6.54 min, (Method D) RT 8.20 min; chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 3.42 min;1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.76 – 1.86 (m, 2 H) 2.06 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 1 H) 2.10 – 2.21 (m, 1 H) 2.34 (s, 3 H) 2.40 – 2.48 (m, 1 H) 2.53 – 2.60 (m, 1 H) 2.61 – 2.70 (m, 2 H) 2.95 -3.01 (m, 1 H) 3.01 (s, 2 H) 3.10 – 3.16 (m, 1 H) 3.18 – 3.28 (m, 2 H) 3.72 (s, 1 H) 4.35 – 4.41 (m, 1 H) 4.46 – 4.70 (m, 2 H) 6.72 – 6.80 (m, 2 H) 7.05 – 7.23 (m, 6 H). Data for P-4 (R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fiuoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-l-yl)-l-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (Method F) RT 2.11 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+);; HPLC (Method C) RT 6.50 min, (Method D) RT 8.21 min; chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 6.31 min; 1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.81 (dd, J=7.28, 2.76 Hz, 2 H) 2.06 (d, J=9.04 Hz, 2 H) 2.33 (s, 3 H) 2.43 (s, 1 H) 2.55 (br s, 1 H) 2.66 (d, J=40.16 Hz, 2 H) 2.75 – 2.80 (m, 1 H) 2.96 – 3.10 (m, 2 H) 3.20 – 3.28 (m, 2 H) 3.41 (d, J=5.52 Hz, 1 H) 3.66 – 3.75 (m, 1 H) 4.31 – 4.41 (m, 1 H) 4.46 – 4.71 (m, 2 H) 6.76 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 2 H) 7.05 – 7.23 (m, 6 H).

PATENT

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Example 46 (Peak-1, Peak-2, Peak-3, Peak-4)

(S)-3-((3R,4R)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one and (R)-3-((3R,4R)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one


(S)-3-((3S,4S)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one and (R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one


Step A. (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-1-benzyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol

      To a suspension of sodium tetrahydroborate (2.7 g, 72 mmol) in THF (200 mL) at 0° C. under a nitrogen atmosphere was added dropwise boron trifluoride etherate (8.8 mL, 70 mmol) and the resulting mixture was stirred for 30 minutes. Then 1-benzyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (10 g, 36 mmol, from S. Halazy et al WO 97/28140 (8/7/97)) dissolved in 100 mL of tetrahydrofuran was added. The mixture was allowed to warm to rt and stirred for 2 h. The reaction was then quenched by the dropwise addition of 100 mL of water. Next were added sequentially 100 mL of ethanol, 100 mL of a 10% aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, and 30% hydrogen peroxide (18 mL, 180 mmol) and the mixture was stirred at reflux temperature overnight. The reaction mixture was then allowed to cool, diluted with saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (200 mL), and extracted with ethyl acetate (500 mL). The organic layer was dried over Na2SO4, filtered, and evaporated under reduced pressure to give (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-1-benzyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (8.5 g, 24.6 mmol, 69% yield) which was used without further purification. LCMS (Method K) RT 1.99 min; m/z 298.0 (M+H+).

Step B. (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol


      To a solution of (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-1-benzyl-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (9 g, 30 mmol) in methanol (150 mL) was added 10% Pd/C (4.8 g) and the reaction mixture was stirred overnight under a hydrogen atmosphere. The catalyst was then removed by filtration through Celite and the solvent was evaporated under reduced pressure to give (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (5.1 g, 24.6 mmol, 81% yield) which was used without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 7.10-7.15 (m, 2H) 6.80-6.86 (m, 2H) 4.30 (d, J=5.27 Hz, 1H) 3.37-3.43 (m, 1H) 3.04 (dd, J=11.58, 4.36 Hz, 1H) 2.86 (d, J=12.17 Hz, 1H) 2.43 (td, J=12.09, 2.67 Hz, 1H) 2.22-2.35 (m, 2H) 1.57-1.63 (m, 1H) 1.43-1.54 (m, 1H).

Step C. (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(tert-butoxycarbonyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-1-carboxylate


 (
      To a solution of (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperidin-3-ol (4.5 g, 21.7 mmol) in DCM (150 mL) at −10° C. under nitrogen was added a 1 M solution of boron tribromide in DCM (109 mL, 109 mmol). The reaction mixture was allowed to warm to rt, stirred for 2 h, and then rechilled to 0° C. and quenched by the addition of a saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (300 mL). The aqueous layer was washed with 250 mL of DCM and then to it was added 200 mL 10% aqueous NaOH, followed by 9.5 g (43.5 mmol) of di-t-butyl dicarbonate and the resulting mixture was stirred for an additional 2 h. The mixture was then extracted with 200 mL ethyl acetate and the organic layer was separated, dried over Na2SO4, filtered, and evaporated under reduced pressure to (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(tert-butoxycarbonyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-1-carboxylate (6.5 g, 12 mmol, 56% yield) which was used without further purification. LCMS (Method K) RT 2.33 min, m/z 282 (M+H+-2 t-butyl), 370; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 7.27 (d, J=8.66 Hz, 2H) 7.08 (d, J=8.66 Hz, 2H) 4.85 (d, J=5.65 Hz, 1H) 4.13 (d, J=8.41 Hz, 1H) 3.97 (d, J=10.48 Hz, 1H) 3.45 (tt, J=10.27, 5.19 Hz, 1H) 1.67 (d, J=3.39 Hz, 1H) 1.50-1.59 (m, 1H) 1.49 (s, 11H).

Step D. (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate


      To a solution of (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(tert-butoxycarbonyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-1-carboxylate (6.5 g, 16.5 mmol) in 100 mL of methanol was added 11.42 g of potassium carbonate (83 mmol) and the reaction mixture was stirred at rt for 5 h. The organic solvent was removed under reduced pressure and the residue was partitioned between 1N HCl (300 mL) and ethyl acetate (300 mL). The layers were separated and the organic layer was dried over Na2SOand evaporated under reduced pressure to give (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (5 g, 15 mmol, 92% yield) which was used without further purification. LCMS (method F) RT 1.85 min, m/z 238 (M+H+-t-butyl), 279 (M+H+-t-butyl+CH3CN), 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 7.01 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 2H) 6.66 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 2H) 4.70 (d, J=5.02 Hz, 1H) 4.09 (br. s., 1H) 3.94 (d, J=11.55 Hz, 1H) 3.35-3.41 (m, 1H) 2.66-2.77 (m, 1H) 2.29-2.39 (m, 1H) 1.63 (dd, J=13.30, 3.26 Hz, 1H) 1.44-1.52 (m, 1H) 1.42 (s, 9H).

Step E. (3S,4S)-tert-Butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate and (3R,4R)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate


      (±)-rel-(3S,4S)-tert-Butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (5 g, 17 mmol, from step D) was subjected to chiral SFC separation (method C-5) to yield enantiomers E-1 (1.9 g, 6.48 mmol, 38.0% yield) and E-2 (2.4 g, 8.18 mmol, 48.0% yield). Data for E-1: chiral HPLC (method A5) retention time 3.42 min. Data for E-2: chiral HPLC (method A5) retention time 4.2 min.

Step F. (3R,4R)-tert-Butyl 4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-1-carboxylate


      A mixture of (3R,4R)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (620 mg, 2.1 mmol, E-2 from step E), potassium carbonate (584 mg, 4.2 mmol), and benzyl bromide (0.25 mL, 2.1 mmol) in DMF (5 mL) was stirred at rt for 16 h. The solvent was removed by evaporation and the residue was treated with 50 mL of water. The aqueous mixture was then extracted 4 times with 50 mL of chloroform. The combined organic phases were dried over anhydrous Na2SO4, filtered, and evaporated to yield 750 mg of (3R,4R)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-1-carboxylate which was used without further purification. LCMS (method F) RT 2.28 min, m/z=310 (M+H+-t-butyl -water), 328 (M+H+-t-butyl).

Step G. (3R,4R)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)piperidin-3-ol hydrochloride


      A mixture of (3R,4R)-tert-butyl 4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidine-1-carboxylate (750 mg, 2 mmol), dioxane (4 mL) and 4.9 mL of 4 M HCl in dioxane was stirred at rt for 2 h. The reaction was then evaporated to dryness to yield 550 mg of (3R,4R)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)piperidin-3-ol hydrochloride which was used without further purification. LCMS (method J) RT 0.70 min, m/z 284 (M+H+).

Step H. 3-((3R,4R)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one


      A mixture of 3-bromo-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (Intermediate 2, 220 mg, 0.82 mmol), (3R,4R)-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)piperidin-3-ol hydrochloride (262 mg, 0.82 mmol, from step G) and triethylamine (11 mL, 8.2 mmol) was stirred at 60° C. for 1 h, 80° C. for 1 h, 100° C. for 1 h and 120° C. for 1 h. The reaction mixture was then allowed to cool, diluted with 40 mL of water and extracted four times with 50 mL of chloroform. The combined organic layers were washed with 60 mL brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered, and evaporated to yield 382 mg of 3-((3R,4R)-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one which was used without further purification. LCMS (method J) (main component of a mixture) RT 2.23 min, m/z 471 (M+H+).

Step I. 3-((3R,4R)-4-(4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-fluoropiperidin-1l-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one


      A solution of 3-(-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (382 mg, 0.81 mmol) in DCM (5 mL) cooled to 0° C. was treated dropwise with DAST (0.32 mL, 2.4 mmol) over 3 min. The reaction mixture was then allowed to warm to rt and was stirred for 2 h. The reaction was then quenched with 50 mL of 10% aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution and extracted 4 times with 40 mL of DCM. The combined organic layers were washed with 50 mL of brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated under vacuum to yield 382 mg of 3-((3R,4R)-4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-fluoropiperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one as a mixture of two diastereomers and rearrangement products which was used without further purification. LCMS (method J) (main component of a mixture) RT 0.9 min, m/z 473 (M+H+).

Step J. 3-((3R,4R)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one


      A mixture of 3-((3R,4R)-(4-(4-(benzyloxy)phenyl)-3-fluoropiperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (382 mg, 0.81 mmol) and methanol (4 mL) was flushed with nitrogen, followed by the addition of 172 mg of 10% Pd/C. Then the mixture was stirred at rt overnight under 25-99 psi hydrogen pressure. The reaction was then transferred to a 100 mL autoclave and stirred at 7 kg/cmhydrogen pressure for 4 days. The catalyst was removed by filtration through Celite and the solvent was evaporated off. The crude product was subjected to HPLC purification (method B) to yield 77.3 mg 3-((3R,4R)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (diastereomeric pair) LCMS (method Q) RT 1.15 min, m/z 383.0 (M+H+).

Step K. (S)-3-((3R,4R)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one and (R)-3-((3R,4R)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one

      The diastereomeric mixture from step J was separated by SFC method C-7 to yield homochiral Examples 46 P-1 (29.3 mg) and P-2 (32.8 mg). Data for P-1 (S)-3-((3R,4R)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (method F) RT 2.10 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+), 405.2 (M+Na+); HPLC (method B) RT 8.24 min (98.8% AP); HPLC (method C) RT 6.52 min (99.1% AP); Chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 4.1 min; 1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.76-1.86 (m, 2H) 2.07 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 1H) 2.13-2.21 (m, 1H) 2.34 (s, 3H) 2.43 (s, 0H) 2.55-2.60 (m, 1H) 2.65-2.70 (m, 1H) 2.75 (br. s., 1H) 3.20-3.30 (m, 2H) 3.38-3.45 (m, 1H) 3.70 (t, J=8.78 Hz, 1H) 4.44 (t, J=79.81 Hz, 3H) 4.63-4.71 (m, 1H) 6.70-6.80 (m, 2H) 7.07-7.15 (m, 2H) 7.07-7.12 (m, 1H) 7.13-7.22 (m, 4H); 19F NMR δ ppm −184.171. Data for P-2: (R)-3-((3R,4R)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (method F) RT 2.10 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+), 405.2 (M+Na+); HPLC (method B) RT 8.29 min (99.7% AP); HPLC (method C) RT 6.52 min (99.8% AP); Chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 6.92 min; 1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.80-1.90 (m, 2H) 2.07 (d, J=8.03 Hz, 1H) 2.19 (s, 1H) 2.34 (s, 3H) 2.41-2.48 (m, 1H) 2.66 (d, J=4.52 Hz, 2H) 2.95-3.03 (m, 1H) 3.10-3.18 (m, 1H) 3.20-3.30 (m, 2H) 3.68-3.78 (m, 1H) 4.38 (s, 1H) 4.51 (d, J=14.56 Hz, 2H) 6.70-6.80 (m, 2H) 7.05-7.13 (m, 2H) 7.13-7.22 (m, 4H); 19F NMR δ ppm −184.311.

Step L. (3S,4S)-tert-Butyl 3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate


      To a solution of (3S,4S)-tert-butyl 3-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (400 mg, 1.36 mmol, the first eluting enantiomer E-1 from step E) in DCM (5 mL) cooled to 0° C. was added dropwise DAST (0.54 mL, 4.1 mmol) over 10 min. The mixture was allowed to warm up to rt and was stirred for 2 h. The reaction was slowly quenched with 50 mL of a 10% aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution and extracted four times with 50 mL of DCM. The combined organic layers were washed with 75 mL of brine, dried, and concentrated under vacuum to yield 390 mg of (3S,4S)-tert-butyl 3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate which was used without further purification. LCMS (Method Q) RT 0.92 min, m/z 240.1 (M+H+).

Step M. 4-((3S,4S)-3-Fluoropiperidin-4-yl)phenol hydrochloride


      A mixture of (3S,4S)-tert-butyl 3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (390 mg, 1.3 mmol) and 4M HCl in dioxane (3.3 mL, 13.2 mmol) in dioxane (4 mL) was stirred at rt for 2 hr. It was then concentrated to dryness, washed with 10 mL of 5% DCM/diethyl ether mixture and the solid was isolated by filtration. Yield: 260 mg of 4-((3S,4S)-3-fluoropiperidin-4-yl)phenol hydrochloride; LCMS (method Q) RT 0.46 min, mz 196.1 (M+H+)1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ=9.57 (br. s., 4H), 8.92-8.68 (m, 1H), 7.14 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1H), 7.06 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 2H), 6.82-6.73 (m, 2H), 5.07-4.85 (m, 1H), 3.77-3.36 (m, 9H), 3.32-3.22 (m, 2H), 3.13-2.85 (m, 5H), 2.06-1.88 (m, H).

Step N. 3-((3S,4S)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one


      A mixture of 3-bromo-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one (200 mg, 0.75 mmol), triethylamine (0.52 mL, 3.7 mmol) and 4-((3S,4S)-3-fluoropiperidin-4-yl)phenol hydrochloride (173 mg, 0.75 mmol) in DMF (3 mL) was heated to 120° C. in a microwave reactor for 1.5 h. The mixture was allowed to cool and was then mixed with 60 mL water and extracted 5 times with 40 mL of DCM. The combined organic extracts were washed with 80 mL of brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered, and evaporated to give 265 mg of 3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxy-phenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one as a mixture of 2 diastereoisomers. LCMS (method P) RT 0.92 min m/z 383.4 (M+H+).

Step O. (S)-3-((3S,4S)-3-Fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one and (R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one

      A portion of the diastereomer mixture from step N (130 mg) was subjected to chiral purification via SFC (method C-7) to give homochiral Examples 46 P-3 (37.7 mg) and P-4 (60.7 mg). Data for P-3 (S)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (Method F) RT=2.10 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+); HPLC (Method C) RT 6.54 min, (Method D) RT 8.20 min; chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 3.42 min; 1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.76-1.86 (m, 2H) 2.06 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 1H) 2.10-2.21 (m, 1H) 2.34 (s, 3H) 2.40-2.48 (m, 1H) 2.53-2.60 (m, 1H) 2.61-2.70 (m, 2H) 2.95-3.01 (m, 1H) 3.01 (s, 2H) 3.10-3.16 (m, 1H) 3.18-3.28 (m, 2H) 3.72 (s, 1H) 4.35-4.41 (m, 1H) 4.46-4.70 (m, 2H) 6.72-6.80 (m, 2H) 7.05-7.23 (m, 6H). Data for P-4 (R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrrolidin-2-one: LCMS (Method F) RT 2.11 min, m/z 383.2 (M+H+); HPLC (Method C) RT 6.50 min, (Method D) RT 8.21 min; chiral HPLC (method C-6) RT 6.31 min; 1H NMR (400 MHz, methanol-d4) δ ppm 1.81 (dd, J=7.28, 2.76 Hz, 2H) 2.06 (d, J=9.04 Hz, 2H) 2.33 (s, 3H) 2.43 (s, 1H) 2.55 (br s, 1H) 2.66 (d, J=40.16 Hz, 2H) 2.75-2.80 (m, 1H) 2.96-3.10 (m, 2H) 3.20-3.28 (m, 2H) 3.41 (d, J=5.52 Hz, 1H) 3.66-3.75 (m, 1H) 4.31-4.41 (m, 1H) 4.46-4.71 (m, 2H) 6.76 (d, J=8.53 Hz, 2H) 7.05-7.23 (m, 6H).

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Intravenous administration of BMS-986169 or BMS-986163 dose-dependently increased GluN2B receptor occupancy and inhibited in vivo [3H](+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ([3H]MK-801) binding, confirming target engagement and effective cleavage of the prodrug. BMS-986169 reduced immobility in the mouse forced swim test, an effect similar to intravenous ketamine treatment. Decreased novelty suppressed feeding latency, and increased ex vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation was also seen 24 hours after acute BMS-986163 or BMS-986169 administration. BMS-986169 did not produce ketamine-like hyperlocomotion or abnormal behaviors in mice or cynomolgus monkeys but did produce a transient working memory impairment in monkeys that was closely related to plasma exposure. Finally, BMS-986163 produced robust changes in the quantitative electroencephalogram power band distribution, a translational measure that can be used to assess pharmacodynamic activity in healthy humans. Due to the poor aqueous solubility of BMS-986169, BMS-986163 was selected as the lead GluN2B NAM candidate for further evaluation as a novel intravenous agent for TRD.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Intravenous administration of BMS-986169 or BMS-986163 dose-dependently increased GluN2B receptor occupancy and inhibited in vivo [3H](+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ([3H]MK-801) binding, confirming target engagement and effective cleavage of the prodrug. BMS-986169 reduced immobility in the mouse forced swim test, an effect similar to intravenous ketamine treatment. Decreased novelty suppressed feeding latency, and increased ex vivo hippocampal long-term potentiation was also seen 24 hours after acute BMS-986163 or BMS-986169 administration. BMS-986169 did not produce ketamine-like hyperlocomotion or abnormal behaviors in mice or cynomolgus monkeys but did produce a transient working memory impairment in monkeys that was closely related to plasma exposure. Finally, BMS-986163 produced robust changes in the quantitative electroencephalogram power band distribution, a translational measure that can be used to assess pharmacodynamic activity in healthy humans. Due to the poor aqueous solubility of BMS-986169, BMS-986163 was selected as the lead GluN2B NAM candidate for further evaluation as a novel intravenous agent for TRD.

 

REFERENCES

1: Bristow LJ, Gulia J, Weed MR, Srikumar BN, Li YW, Graef JD, Naidu PS, Sanmathi
C, Aher J, Bastia T, Paschapur M, Kalidindi N, Kumar KV, Molski T, Pieschl R,
Fernandes A, Brown JM, Sivarao DV, Newberry K, Bookbinder M, Polino J, Keavy D,
Newton A, Shields E, Simmermacher J, Kempson J, Li J, Zhang H, Mathur A, Kallem
RR, Sinha M, Ramarao M, Vikramadithyan RK, Thangathirupathy S, Warrier J, Islam
I, Bronson JJ, Olson RE, Macor JE, Albright CF, King D, Thompson LA, Marcin LR,
Sinz M. Preclinical Characterization of
(R)-3-((3S,4S)-3-fluoro-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)piperidin-1-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)pyrr
olidin-2-one (BMS-986169), a Novel, Intravenous, Glutamate N-Methyl-d-Aspartate
2B Receptor Negative Allosteric Modulator with Potential in Major Depressive
Disorder. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2017 Dec;363(3):377-393. doi:
10.1124/jpet.117.242784. Epub 2017 Sep 27. PubMed PMID: 28954811.

2. BMS-986163, a Negative Allosteric Modulator of GluN2B with Potential Utility in Major Depressive Disorder
Lawrence R. Marcin, Jayakumar Warrier, Srinivasan Thangathirupathy, Jianliang Shi, George N. Karageorge, Bradley C. Pearce, Alicia Ng, Hyunsoo Park, James Kempson, Jianqing Li, Huiping Zhang, Arvind Mathur, Aliphedi B. Reddy, G. Nagaraju, Gopikishan Tonukunuru, Grandhi V. R. K. M. Gupta, Manjunatha Kamble, Raju Mannoori, Srinivas Cheruku, Srinivas Jogi, Jyoti Gulia, Tanmaya Bastia, Charulatha Sanmathi, Jayant Aher, Rajareddy Kallem, Bettadapura N. Srikumar, Kumar Kuchibhotla Vijaya, Pattipati S. Naidu, Mahesh Paschapur, Narasimharaju Kalidindi, Reeba Vikramadithyan, Manjunath Ramarao, Rex Denton, Thaddeus Molski, Eric Shields, Murali Subramanian, Xiaoliang Zhuo, Michelle Nophsker, Jean Simmermacher, Michael Sinz, Charlie Albright, Linda J. Bristow, Imadul Islam, Joanne J. Bronson, Richard E. Olson, Dalton King, Lorin A. Thompson, and John E. Macor
Publication Date (Web): April 13, 2018 (Letter)
DOI: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.8b00080

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9221796 Selective NR2B antagonists
2015-01-05
2015-12-29

//////////////////BMS-986169, BMS-986169, BMS 986169, BMS986169

 O=C1N(CC2=CC=C(C)C=C2)CC[C@H]1N3C[C@@H](F)[C@H](C4=CC=C(O)C=C4)CC3

BMS-986118, for treatment for type 2 diabetes( GPR40 agonists with a dual mechanism of action, promoting both glucose-dependent insulin and incretin secretion)


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GKIUHMMLGAMMOO-OITFXXTJSA-N.png
BMS-986118
BMS compd for treatment for type 2 diabetes( GPR40 agonists with a dual mechanism of action, promoting both glucose-dependent insulin and incretin secretion)
Cas 1610562-74-7
1H-Pyrazole-5-acetic acid, 1-[4-[[(3R,4R)-1-(5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-pyridinyl)-3-methyl-4-piperidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-, (4S,5S)-
Molecular Weight, 540.96, C25 H28 Cl F3 N4 O4

2-((4S,5S)-1-(4-(((3R,4R)-1-(5-Chloro-2-methoxypyridin-4-yl)-3-methylpiperidin-4-yl)oxy)phenyl)-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)acetic acid

(-)-[(4S,5S)-1-(4-[[(3R,4R)-1-(5-Chloro-2-methoxypyridin-4-yl)-3-methylpiperidin-4-yl]oxy]phenyl)-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]acetic acid

  • (4S,5S)-1-[4-[[(3R,4R)-1-(5-Chloro-2-methoxy-4-pyridinyl)-3-methyl-4-piperidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazole-5-acetic acid
  • 2-[(4S,5S)-1-[4-[[1-(5-Chloro-2-methoxypyridin-4-yl)-3-methylpiperidin-4-yl]oxy]phenyl]-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]acetic acid isomer 2

BMS-986118 is a GPR40 full agonist. GPR40 is a G-protein-coupled receptor expressed primarily in pancreatic islets and intestinal L-cells that has been a target of significant recent therapeutic interest for type II diabetes. Activation of GPR40 by partial agonists elicits insulin secretion only in the presence of elevated blood glucose levels, minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia

Image result for bms

NOTE CAS OF , 1H-Pyrazole-5-acetic acid, 1-[4-[[(3S,4S)-1-(5-chloro-2-methoxy-4-pyridinyl)-3-methyl-4-piperidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-4,5-dihydro-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-, (4S,5S)- IS 1610562-73-6

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Image result for BMS-986118,

SYNTHESIS

WO 2014078610

PAPER

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b00982

Discovery of Potent and Orally Bioavailable Dihydropyrazole GPR40 Agonists

Abstract

Abstract Image

G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) has become an attractive target for the treatment of diabetes since it was shown clinically to promote glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Herein, we report our efforts to develop highly selective and potent GPR40 agonists with a dual mechanism of action, promoting both glucose-dependent insulin and incretin secretion. Employing strategies to increase polarity and the ratio of sp3/sp2 character of the chemotype, we identified BMS-986118 (compound 4), which showed potent and selective GPR40 agonist activity in vitroIn vivo, compound 4 demonstrated insulinotropic efficacy and GLP-1 secretory effects resulting in improved glucose control in acute animal models.

Compound 4

2-((4S,5S)-1-(4-(((3R,4R)-1-(5-Chloro-2-methoxypyridin-4-yl)-3-methylpiperidin-4-yl)oxy)phenyl)-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)acetic acid (4)

To a stirred solution of methyl 2-((4S,5S)-1-(4-(((3R,4R)-1-(5-chloro-2-methoxypyridin-4-yl)-3-methylpiperidin-4-yl)oxy)phenyl)-4-methyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)acetate (5.5 g, 9.9 mmol) in THF (90 mL) and water (9 mL) at room temperature was added 2 N LiOH solution (12 mL, 24 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 16 h, and 1 N HCl (25 mL, 25 mmol) was added at 0 °C to pH = 4–5. The solvent was evaporated, and the residue was extracted three times with EtOAc. The organic extracts were dried over Na2SO4; the solution was filtered and concentrated. The residue was recrystallized from isopropanol to give 4(neutral form) as white solid (4.3 g, 7.7 mmol, 78% yield).
1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 12.52 (br s, 1H), 8.01 (s, 1H), 7.05 (d, J = 9.1 Hz, 2H), 6.96 (d, J = 9.1 Hz, 2H), 6.40 (s, 1H), 4.49–4.33 (m, 1H), 4.02 (td, J = 8.8, 4.1 Hz, 1H), 3.80 (s, 3H), 3.56–3.39 (m, 2H), 3.37–3.29 (m, 1H), 2.94–2.85 (m, 1H), 2.72–2.66 (m, 1H), 2.64 (dd, J = 16.1, 2.9 Hz, 1H), 2.49–2.41 (m, 1H), 2.22–2.05 (m, 1H), 2.01–1.86 (m, 1H), 1.68–1.50 (m, 1H), 1.25 (d, J = 7.2 Hz, 3H), 1.03 (d, J = 6.9 Hz, 3H).
 
13C NMR (126 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 171.5, 163.7, 157.1, 152.5, 146.3, 139.7 (q, J = 34.7 Hz), 136.2, 121.7 (q, J = 269.3 Hz), 117.3, 117.2, 116.0, 100.4, 78.9, 65.6, 54.2, 53.4, 47.8, 44.2, 36.0, 34.9, 29.5, 17.4, 15.3. 19F NMR (471 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ −61.94 (s, 3F).
 
Optical rotation: [α]D(20)−11.44 (c 2.01, MeOH).
 
HRMS (ESI/HESI) m/z: [M + H]+ Calcd for C25H29ClF3N4O4 541.1824; Found 541.1813. HPLC (Orthogonal method, 30% Solvent B start): RT = 11.9 min, HI: 97%. m/zobs 541.0 [M + H]+.
 
Melting point = 185.5 °C.
PAPER

Palladium-Catalyzed C–O Coupling of a Sterically Hindered Secondary Alcohol with an Aryl Bromide and Significant Purity Upgrade in the API Step

Chemical and Synthetic DevelopmentBristol-Myers Squibb CompanyOne Squibb Drive, New Brunswick, New Jersey08903, United States
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.8b00022

Abstract

Abstract Image

The final two steps used to prepare greater than 1 kg of a compound evaluated as a treatment for type 2 diabetes are reported. The application of a palladium-catalyzed C–O coupling presented significant challenges due to the nature of the reactants, impurities produced, and noncrystalline coupling intermediate. Process development was able to address these limitations and enable production of kilogram quantities of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in greater efficiency than a Mitsunobu reaction for formation of the key bond. The development of a sequence that telescopes the coupling with the subsequent ester hydrolysis to yield the API and the workup and final product crystallization necessary to produce high-quality drug substance without the need of column chromatography are discussed.

Bruce Ellsworth

Bruce Ellsworth, Director, Head of Fibrosis Discovery Chemistry at Bristol-Myers Squibb

Rick EwingRick Ewing, Head, External Partnerships, Discovery Chemistry and Molecular Technologies at Bristol-Myers Squibb
str1 str2
PATENT
WO 2014078610
Original Assignee Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
Patent
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9133163 DIHYDROPYRAZOLE GPR40 MODULATORS
2013-11-15
2014-05-22
US9604964 Dihydropyrazole GPR40 modulators
2013-11-15
2017-03-28
REF
1: Li Z, Qiu Q, Geng X, Yang J, Huang W, Qian H. Free fatty acid receptor
agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: drugs in preclinical to phase II
clinical development. Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2016 Aug;25(8):871-90. doi:
10.1080/13543784.2016.1189530. PubMed PMID: 27171154.
2
Discovery of BMS-986118, a dual MOA GPR40 agonist that produces glucose-dependent insulin and GLP-1 secretion
248th Am Chem Soc (ACS) Natl Meet (August 10-14, San Francisco) 2014, Abst MEDI 31
MEDI John Macor Sunday, August 10, 2014
Oral Session
General Oral Session – PM Session
Organizers: John Macor
Presiders: John Macor
Duration: 1:30 pm – 5:15 pm
1:55 pm 31 Discovery of BMS-986118, a dual MOA GPR40 agonist that produces glucose-dependent insulin and GLP-1 secretion
Bruce A Ellsworth, Jun Shi, Elizabeth A Jurica, Laura L Nielsen, Ximao Wu, Andres H Hernandez, Zhenghua Wang, Zhengxiang Gu, Kristin N Williams, Bin Chen, Emily C Cherney, Xiang-Yang Ye, Ying Wang, Min Zhou, Gary Cao, Chunshan Xie, Jason J Wilkes, Heng Liu, Lori K Kunselman, Arun Kumar Gupta, Ramya Jayarama, Thangeswaran Ramar, J. Prasada Rao, Bradley A Zinker, Qin Sun, Elizabeth A Dierks, Kimberly A Foster, Tao Wang, Mary Ellen Cvijic, Jean M Whaley, Jeffrey A Robl, William R Ewing.

///////////BMS-986118, Preclinical, BMS, Bruce A. Ellsworth,  Jun Shi,  William R. Ewing,  Elizabeth A. Jurica,  Andres S. Hernandez,  Ximao Wu, DIABETES,

COc1cc(c(Cl)cn1)N4CCC(Oc2ccc(cc2)N3N=C([C@@H](C)C3CC(=O)O)C(F)(F)F)[C@H](C)C4

COc1cc(c(Cl)cn1)N4CC[C@@H](Oc2ccc(cc2)N3N=C([C@H](C)[C@@H]3CC(=O)O)C(F)(F)F)[C@@H](C)C4

COc1cc(c(Cl)cn1)N4CC[C@@H](Oc2ccc(cc2)N3N=C([C@@H](C)[C@@H]3CC(=O)O)C(F)(F)F)[C@H](C)C4

LY 3104607


imgChemSpider 2D Image | LY3104607 | C27H25N3O3
FDIWCHYTKOPHPS-QFIPXVFZSA-N.png
 LY3104607
(3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic Acid
(3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic acid
CAS: 1795232-22-2
Chemical Formula: C27H25N3O3
Molecular Weight: 439.515
(3S)-3-(4-{[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy}phenyl)-4-hexinsäure
Benzenepropanoic acid, 4-[[2-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]-β-1-propyn-1-yl-, (βS)-

[+]Enlarge

Structure of LY3104607.
Credit: Tien Nguyen/C&EN

Presented by: Chafiq Hamdouchi, founder at Hamdouchi Pharmaceutical Consulting

Target: G-protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40), a receptor that modulates insulin secretion in cells

Disease: Type 2 diabetes

Reporter’s notes: Developed by Eli Lilly, LY3104607 joins the handful of GPR40 agonists recently offered by the company. The compound is not exactly a first disclosure as its structure was revealed in a January publication that describes its discovery and pharmacokinetic properties (J. Med. Chem. 2018, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b01411). Hamdouchi, who worked on the molecule while at Eli Lilly, presented what the team learned about GPR40 and suggested that allosteric binding, binding which happens at a location other than the active site, may be a viable mode of action for GPR40 agonists.

Image result for LY3104607

Chafiq Hamdouchi

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STR OF TITLE LY 3104607

str1 str2 str3

Paper

Discovery of LY3104607: A Potent and Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor 40 (GPR40) Agonist with Optimized Pharmacokinetic Properties to Support Once Daily Oral Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

 Lilly Research Laboratories, A Division of Eli Lilly and Company, Lilly Corporate Center, DC: 0540, Indianapolis, Indiana 46285, United States
 Jubilant Biosys Research Center, Bangalore, India
J. Med. Chem.201861 (3), pp 934–945
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b01411
Publication Date (Web): December 13, 2017
Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society
*E-mail: hamdouchi_chafiq@lilly.comchafiq.hamdouchi@gmail.com. Phone: 317-797-4751.

Abstract

Abstract Image

As a part of our program to identify potent GPR40 agonists capable of being dosed orally once daily in humans, we incorporated fused heterocycles into our recently disclosed spiropiperidine and tetrahydroquinoline acid derivatives 12, and 3 with the intention of lowering clearance and improving the maximum absorbable dose (Dabs). Hypothesis-driven structural modifications focused on moving away from the zwitterion-like structure. and mitigating the N-dealkylation and O-dealkylation issues led to triazolopyridine acid derivatives with unique pharmacology and superior pharmacokinetic properties. Compound 4 (LY3104607) demonstrated functional potency and glucose-dependent insulin secretion (GDIS) in primary islets from rats. Potent, efficacious, and durable dose-dependent reductions in glucose levels were seen during glucose tolerance test (GTT) studies. Low clearance, volume of distribution, and high oral bioavailability were observed in all species. The combination of enhanced pharmacology and pharmacokinetic properties supported further development of this compound as a potential glucose-lowering drug candidate.

(3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic Acid (4)

Compound 4 (LY3104607)

title compound as white solid (35.76 kg, 91%). LCMS m/z [M + H]+: calcd, 439.5; found, 439.2.
1H NMR (399.80 MHz, DMSO, δ): 12.22 (s, 1H), 9.13 (dd, J = 0.8, 1.5 Hz, 1H), 7.88 (dd, J = 0.8, 9.2 Hz, 1H), 7.75 (dd, J = 1.7, 9.2 Hz, 1H), 7.29–7.24 (m, 3H), 7.14–7.12 (m, 2H), 7.01–6.99 (m, 2H), 5.18 (s, 2H), 3.96–3.91 (m, 1H), 2.58 (d, J = 7.7 Hz, 2H), 2.06 (s, 6H), 1.75 (d, J = 2.4 Hz, 3H).
PATENT
WO 2015088868
Applicants: ELI LILLY AND COMPANY [US/US]; Lilly Corporate Center Indianapolis, Indiana 46285 (US)
Inventors: HAMDOUCHI, Chafiq; (US)

A Novel Triazolo-Pyridine Compound

This invention relates to triazolo-pyridine compounds or pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof, and for use of compounds in therapy. Triazolo-pyridine compounds of this invention are activators of GPR-40.

GPR-40, also known as Free Fatty Acid Receptor 1 (FFA1 or FFAR1), is reported as predominately expressed at high levels in rodent pancreatic beta cells, insulinoma cell lines, and human islets. The glucose modulation of insulin secretion is an important feature of activating GPR-40. Compounds that effectuate GPR-40 activation are associated with stimulation of insulin secretion in a patient with type II diabetes (T2D). Compounds that are GPR-40 activators are desired for use in treatment of GPR-40 mediated conditions.

WO2004/041266 discloses GPR-40 receptor function regulators comprising a compound having an aromatic ring and a group capable of releasing a cation.

The present invention rovides compounds of the Formula la below:

la

Example 1

(3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6- yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic acid

To a solution of ethyl (3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoate (0.22 g, 0.47 mmol) in EtOH (20 mL) is added 5 N NaOH (0.3 mL) and the reaction mixture is stirred at 80 °C in a microwave instrument for 30 minutes. The reaction mixture is evaporated to dryness, diluted with water, and acidified with 6 N HC1 solution to pH ~ 3. The precipitated solid is filtered, washed with n-pentane, and dried to give the title compound as a white solid (0.155 g, 75%). LCMS m/z 440 (M+H)+.

Alternate Preparation, Example 1

To a solution of ethyl (3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoate (16 g, 34.22 mmol) in ethanol (160 mL) is added aqueous 5 N NaOH (2.73 g, 68.44 mmol in 16 mL water) drop wise at room temperature and the reaction mixture is stirred for 16 hours. The reaction mixture is evaporated to dryness, the residue is dissolved in water (300 mL), washed with diethyl ether (2 χ 200 mL), and the organic extract is discarded. The aqueous layer is cooled to 10 °C- 15 °C, acidified with saturated citric acid solution to pH~5, and extracted with DCM (2 x 300 mL). The combined organic extracts are washed with water (2 x 500 mL), brine solution (500 mL), dried over Na2S04, filtered, and evaporated to dryness to give the title compound as an off-white solid (14 g, 93%). LCMS m/z 440 (M+H)+.

The products from other batches, prepared as in Alternate Preparation of Example 1, are mixed with the product from Alternate Preparation Example 1 DCM (5 L) and warmed to 40 °C to get a clear solution. Then the solvent is evaporated to give an off-white solid. The possibility of trapped DCM is a concern, thus EtOAc (7.5 L) is charged and the resulting mixture is warmed to 65 °C to get a clear solution (-30 minutes). The solvent is evaporated and the resulting solid is dried under vacuum at 50 °C to obtain the desired product as an off-white solid. LCMS m/z 440 (M+H)+.

Form II Seed Crystal, Example 1

A saturated ethanol solution of (3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic acid is filtered through 0.22 μιη nylon syringe filter into a clean vessel. Slow solvent evaporation at 25°C results in Form II seed crystals of Example 1.

Crystalline Form II (3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin- 6-yl] methoxy] phenyl] hex-4-ynoic acid

(3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic acid can be prepared as a crystalline anhydrous Form II by dissolving (3S)-3-[4-[[2-(2,6-Dimethylphenyl)-[l,2,4]triazolo[l,5-a]pyridin-6-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic acid (580 mg, 132 mmol) in EtOH (1.2 mL) while stirring the mixture at 80 °C for 10 minutes. The solution is filtered and cooled to 70 °C at which point seeds of Form II are introduced. The mixture is then slowly cooled to ambient temperature while stirring overnight. The resulting solid plug is loosened with the addition of heptane (600 μΐ.) and the solids are recovered by vacuum filtration and dried under vacuum at 60 °C to give the crystalline title product (438 mg, 75.5%).

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9120793 Triazolo-pyridine compound
2014-12-04
2015-09-01
US2015166535 NOVELTRIAZOLO-PYRIDINE COMPOUND
2014-12-04
2015-06-18

/////////LY3104607, LY-3104607, LY 3104607, PRECLINICAL

CC#C[C@H](C1=CC=C(OCC2=CN3C(C=C2)=NC(C4=C(C)C=CC=C4C)=N3)C=C1)CC(O)=O

Pfizer’s Monobactam PF-?


STR1

Pfizer’s monobactam PF-?

1380110-34-8, C20 H24 N8 O12 S2, 632.58

Propanoic acid, 2-​[[(Z)​-​[1-​(2-​amino-​4-​thiazolyl)​-​2-​[[(2R,​3S)​-​2-​[[[[[(1,​4-​dihydro-​1,​5-​dihydroxy-​4-​oxo-​2-​pyridinyl)​methyl]​amino]​carbonyl]​amino]​methyl]​-​4-​oxo-​1-​sulfo-​3-​azetidinyl]​amino]​-​2-​oxoethylidene]​amino]​oxy]​-​2-​methyl-

2-((Z)-1-(2-Aminothiazol-4-yl)-2-((2R,3S)-2-((((1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-1,4-dihydropyridin-2-yl)methoxy)carbonylamino)methyl)-4-oxo-1-sulfoazetidin-3-ylamino)-2-oxoethylideneaminooxy)-2-methylpropanoic Acid

2-[[(Z)-[1-(2-Amino-4-thiazolyl)-2-[[(2R,3S)-2-[[[[[(1,4-dihydro-1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-2-pyridinyl)methyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]methyl]-4-oxo-1-sulfo-3-azetidinyl]amino]-2-oxoethylidene]amino]oxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid

Monobactams are a class of antibacterial agents which contain a monocyclic beta-lactam ring as opposed to a beta-lactam fused to an additional ring which is found in other beta-lactam classes, such as cephalosporins, carbapenems and penicillins. The drug Aztreonam is an example of a marketed monobactam; Carumonam is another example. The early studies in this area were conducted by workers at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research, Cimarusti, C. M. & R.B. Sykes: Monocyclic β-lactam antibiotics. Med. Res. Rev. 1984, 4, 1 -24. Despite the fact that selected

monobacatams were discovered over 25 years ago, there remains a continuing need for new antibiotics to counter the growing number of resistant organisms.

Although not limiting to the present invention, it is believed that monobactams of the present invention exploit the iron uptake mechanism in bacteria through the use of siderophore-monobactam conjugates. For background information, see: M. J. Miller, et al. BioMetals (2009), 22(1 ), 61-75.

The mechanism of action of beta-lactam antibiotics, including monobactams, is generally known to those skilled in the art and involves inhibition of one or more penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), although the present invention is not bound or limited by any theory. PBPs are involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan, which is a major component of bacterial cell walls.

WO 2012073138

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2012073138A1?cl=en

Inventors Matthew Frank BrownSeungil HanManjinder LallMark. J. Mitton-FryMark Stephen PlummerHud Lawrence RisleyVeerabahu ShanmugasundaramJeremy T. Starr
Applicant Pfizer Inc.

Example 4, Route 1

2-({[(1Z)-1 -(2-amino-1 ,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-({(2f?,3S)-2-[({[(1 ,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-1 ,4- dihydropyridin-2-yl)methyl]carbamoyl}amino)methyl]-4-oxo-1 -sulfoazetidin-3- yl}amino)-2-oxoethylidene]amino}oxy)-2-methylpropanoic acid, bis sodium salt

(C92-Bis Na Salt).

Figure imgf000080_0001

C92-bis Na salt

Step 1 : Preparation of C90. A solution of C26 (16.2 g, 43.0 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (900 mL) was treated with 1 , 1 ‘-carbonyldiimidazole (8.0 g, 47.7 mmol). After 5 minutes, the reaction mixture was treated with a solution of C9 (15 g, 25.0 mmol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (600 mL) at room temperature. After 15 hours, the solvent was removed and the residue was treated with ethyl acetate (500 mL) and water (500 mL). The layers were separated and the aqueous layer was back extracted with additional ethyl acetate (300 mL). The organic layers were combined, washed with brine solution (500 mL), dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The crude product was purified via chromatography on silica gel (ethyl acetate / 2-propanol) to yield C90 as a yellow foam. Yield: 17.44 g, 19.62 mmol, 78%. LCMS m/z 889.5 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 1 1 .90 (br s, 1 H), 9.25 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.40 (br s, 1 H), 7.98 (s, 1 H), 7.50-7.54 (m, 2H), 7.32-7.47 (m, 8H), 7.28 (s, 1 H), 6.65 (br s, 1 H), 6.28 (br s, 1 H), 5.97 (s, 1 H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.8, 5 Hz, 1 H), 4.99 (s, 2H), 4.16-4.28 (m, 2H), 3.74-3.80 (m, 1 H), 3.29-3.41 (m, 1 H), 3.13-3.23 (m, 1 H), 1.42 (s, 9H), 1.41 (s, 3H), 1.39 (br s, 12H).

Step 2: Preparation of C91. A solution of C90 (8.5 g, 9.6 mmol) in anhydrous N,N- dimethylformamide (100 mL) was treated sulfur trioxide /V,/V-dimethylformamide complex (15.0 g, 98.0 mmol). The reaction was allowed to stir at room temperature for 20 minutes then quenched with water (300 mL). The resulting solid was collected by filtration and dried to yield C91 as a white solid. Yield: 8.1 g, 8.3 mmol, 87%. LCMS m/z 967.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1 1.62 (br s, 1 H), 9.29 (d, J=8.8 Hz, 1 H), 9.02 (s, 1 H), 7.58-7.61 (m, 2H), 7.38-7.53 (m, 9H), 7.27 (s, 1 H), 7.07 (s, 1 H), 6.40 (br d, J=8 Hz, 1 H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.20 (dd, J=8.8, 5.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.46 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17, 5 Hz, 1 H), 4.38 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17, 6 Hz, 1 H), 3.92-3.98 (m, 1 H), 3.79-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.07-3.17 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 9H), 1 .39 (s, 3H), 1 .38 (s, 12H).

Step 3: Preparation of C92. A solution of C91 (8.1 g, 8.3 mmol) in anhydrous dichloromethane (200 mL) was treated with 1 M boron trichloride in p-xylenes (58.4 mL, 58.4 mmol) and allowed to stir at room temperature for 15 minutes. The reaction mixture was cooled in an ice bath, quenched with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (61 mL), and the solvent was removed in vacuo. A portion of the crude product (1 g) was purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.1 % formic acid modifier) to yield C92 as a white solid. Yield: 486 mg, 0.77 mmol. LCMS m/z 633.3 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 9.22 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.15 (s, 1 H), 7.26-7.42 (br s, 2H), 7.18-7.25 (m, 1 H), 6.99 (s, 1 H), 6.74 (s, 1 H), 6.32-6.37 (m, 1 H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.33 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.94-4.00 (m, 1 H), 3.60-3.68 (m, 1 H), 3.19-3.27 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 3H), 1.39 (s, 3H).

Step 4: Preparation of C92-Bis Na Salt. A flask was charged with C92 (388 mg, 0.61 mmol) and water (5.0 mL). The mixture was cooled in an ice bath and treated dropwise with a solution of sodium bicarbonate (103 mg, 1.52 mmol) in water (5.0 mL). The sample was lyophilized to yield C92-Bis Na Salt as a white solid. Yield: 415 mg, 0.61 mmol, quantitative. LCMS m/z 633.5 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, D20) δ 7.80 (s, 1 H), 6.93 (s, 1 H), 6.76 (s, 1 H), 5.33 (d, J=5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.44 (ddd, J=6.0, 6.0, 5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.34 (AB quartet, JAB=17.7 Hz, ΔνΑΒ=10.9 Hz, 2H), 3.69 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.7, 5.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.58 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.7, 6.2 Hz, 1 H), 1.44 (s, 3H), 1.43 (s, 3H).

Alternate preparation of C92

Figure imgf000082_0001

Step 1 : Preparation of C93. An Atlantis pressure reactor was charged with 10% palladium hydroxide on carbon (0.375 g, John Matthey catalyst type A402028-10), C91 (0.75 g, 0.77 mmol) and treated with ethanol (35 mL). The reactor was flushed with nitrogen and pressurized with hydrogen (20 psi) for 20 hours at 20 °C. The reaction mixture was filtered under vacuum and the filtrate was concentrated using the rotary evaporator to yield C93 as a tan solid. Yield: 0.49 g, 0.62 mmol, 80%. LCMS m/z 787.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1 1.57 (br s, 1 H), 9.27 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1 H), 8.16 (s, 1 H), 7.36 (br s, 1 H), 7.26 (s, 1 H), 7.00 (s, 1 H), 6.40 (br s, 1 H), 5.18 (m, 1 H), 4.35 (m, 2H), 3.83 (m, 1 H), 3.41 (m, 1 H), 3.10 (m, 1 H), 1.41 (s, 6H), 1.36 (s, 18H).

Step 2: Preparation of C92. A solution of C93 (6.0 g, 7.6 mmol) in anhydrous dichloromethane (45 mL) at 0 °C was treated with trifluoroacetic acid (35.0 mL, 456 mmol). The mixture was warmed to room temperature and stirred for 2 hours. The reaction mixture was cannulated into a solution of methyl ferf-butyl ether (100 mL) and heptane (200 mL). The solid was collected by filtration and washed with a mixture of methyl ferf-butyl ether (100 mL) and heptane (200 mL) then dried under vacuum. The crude product (~5 g) was purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.1 % formic acid modifier) and lyophilized to yield C92 as a pink solid. Yield: 1.45 g, 2.29 mmol. LCMS m/z 631.0 (M-1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 9.20 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1H), 8.13 (s, 1H), 7.24-7.40 (br s, 2H), 7.16-7.23 (m, 1H), 6.97 (s, 1H), 6.71 (s, 1H), 6.31-6.35 (m, 1H), 5.15 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1H), 4.31 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.92-3.98 (m, 1H), 3.58-3.67 (m, 1H), 3.17-3.25 (m, 1H), 1.37 (s, 3H), 1.36 (s, 3H).

Example 4, route 2

2-({[(1Z)-1-(2-amino-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-({(2 ?,3S)-2-[({[(1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-^ dihydropyridin-2-yl)methyl]carbamoyl}amino)methyl]-4-oxo-1-sulfoazetidin-3- yl}amino)-2-oxoethylidene]amino}oxy)-2-methylpropanoic acid (C92).

lt

Figure imgf000083_0001

single

enantiomer

Figure imgf000083_0002

Step 1. Preparation of C95. A solution of C94 (50.0 g, 189.9 mmol) in

dichloromethane (100 mL) was treated with trifluoroacetic acid (50.0 mL, 661.3 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 24 hours. The dichloromethane and trifluoroacetic acid was displaced with toluene (4 x 150 mL) using vacuum, to a final volume of 120 mL. The solution was added to heptane (250 mL) and the solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with a mixture of toluene and heptane (1 : 3, 60 mL), followed by heptane (2 x 80 mL) and dried under vacuum at 50 °C for 19 hours to afford C95 as a solid. Yield: 30.0 g, 158 mmol, 84%. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 9.66 (s, 1 H), 7.86 – 7.93 (m, 2H), 7.73 – 7.80 (m, 2H), 4.57 (s, 2H). HPLC retention time 5.1 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1.5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1.5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes.

Step 2: Preparation of C96-racemic. A solution of C95 (32.75 g; 173.1 mmol) in dichloromethane (550 mL) under nitrogen was cooled to 2 °C. The solution was treated with 2,4-dimethoxybenzylamine (28.94 g, 173.1 mmol) added dropwise over 25 minutes, maintaining the temperature below 10 °C. The solution was stirred for 10 minutes at 2 °C and then treated with molecular sieves (58.36 g, UOP Type 3A). The cold bath was removed and the reaction slurry was stirred for 3 hours at room temperature. The slurry was filtered through a pad of Celite (34.5 g) and the filter cake was rinsed with dichloromethane (135 mL). The dichloromethane filtrate (imine solution) was used directly in the following procedure.

A solution of A/-(ferf-butoxycarbonyl)glycine (60.6 g, 346.1 mmol) in

tetrahydrofuran (622 mL) under nitrogen was cooled to -45 °C and treated with triethylamine (38.5 g, 380.8 mmol). The mixture was stirred for 15 minutes at -45 °C and then treated with ethyl chloroformate (48.8 g, 450 mmol) over 15 minutes. The reaction mixture was stirred at -50 °C for 7 hours. The previously prepared imine solution was added via an addition funnel over 25 minutes while maintaining the reaction mixture temperature below -40 °C. The slurry was treated with triethylamine (17.5 g, 173 mmol) and the reaction mixture was slowly warmed to room temperature over 5 hours and stirred for an additional 12 hours. The reaction slurry was charged with water (150 mL) and the volatiles removed using a rotary evaporator. The reaction mixture was charged with additional water (393 mL) and the volatiles removed using a rotary evaporator. The mixture was treated with methyl ferf-butyl ether (393 mL) and vigorously stirred for 1 hour. The solid was collected by vacuum filtration and the filter cake was rinsed with a mixture of methyl ferf-butyl ether and water (1 : 1 , 400 mL). The solid was collected and dried in a vacuum oven at 50 °C for 16 hours to afford C96- racemic. Yield: 55.8 g, 1 13 mmol, 65%. 1H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 7.85 (s, NH), 7.80 (s, 4H), 6.78 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1 H), 6.25 (m, 1 H), 6.10 (m, 1 H), 4.83 (m, 1 H), 4.38 (d, J=9.5 Hz, 1 H), 3.77-3.95 (m, 3H), 3.62 (s, 3H), 3.45 (m, 1 H), 3.40 (s, 3H), 1.38 (s, 9H). HPLC retention time 6.05 minutes; XBridge C8 column (4.6 x 75 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 2.0 mL/minute; detection UV 210 nm, 230 nm, and 254 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = methanesulfonic acid (5%) in 10 mmol sodium octylsulfonate, solvent B = acetonitrile (100%); gradient elusion: 0-1.5 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%), 1.5-8.5 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 8.5- 10.0 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 10.01 -12.0 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%); total run time 12.0 minutes.

Step 3: Preparation of C97-racemic. A solution of C96-racemic (15.0 g, 30.3 mmol) in ethyl acetate (150 mL) under nitrogen was treated with ethanolamine (27.3 mL, 454.1 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at 90 °C for 3 hours and then cooled to room temperature. The mixture was charged with water (150 mL) and the layers separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (75 mL) and the combined organic layers washed with water (2 x 150 mL) followed by saturated aqueous sodium chloride (75 mL). The organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and the filtrate concentrated to a volume of 38 mL. The filtrate was treated with heptane (152 mL) and the solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with heptane and dried at 50 °C in a vacuum oven overnight to yield C97-racemic as a solid. Yield: 9.68 g, 26.5 mmol, 88%. LCMS m/z 967.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 7.64 (d, J=9.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.14 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 6.56 (s, 1 H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.20, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.78 (dd, J=9.37, 5.1 Hz, 1 H), 4.30 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 4.14 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.75 (s, 3H), 3.45 – 3.53 (m, 1 H), 2.65 – 2.75 (m, 1 H), 2.56 – 2.64 (m, 1 H), 1.38 (s, 9H), 1.30 – 1.35 (m, 2H). HPLC retention time 5.1 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μΐη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute;

detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1 .5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes. Step 4: Preparation of C97-(2R,3S) enantiomer. A solution of C97-racemic (20.0 g, 54.7 mmol) in ethyl acetate (450 mL) was treated with diatomaceous earth (5.0 g) and filtered through a funnel charged with diatomaceous earth. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (150 mL). The filtrate was charged with diatomaceous earth (20.0 g) and treated with (-)-L-dibenzoyltartaric acid (19.6 g, 54.7 mmol). The slurry was heated at 60 °C for 1.5 hours and then cooled to room temperature. The slurry was filtered and the solid washed with ethyl acetate (90 mL). The solid was collected and dried at 50 °C in a vacuum oven for 17 hours to yield C97-(2R,3S) enantiomer as a solid (mixed with diatomaceous earth). Yield: 17.3 g, 23.9 mmol, 43.6%, 97.6% ee. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 7.89 – 7.91 (m, 4H), 7.59 – 7.65 (m, 3H), 7.44 – 7.49 (m, 4H), 7.09 (d, J=8.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.53 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.3, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 5.65 (s, 2H), 4.85 (dd, J=9.3, 4.9 Hz, 1 H), 4.30 (d, J=15.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.10 (d, J=15.3 Hz, 1 H), 3.74 (s, 3H), 3.72 (s, 3H), 3.68 – 3.70 (m, 1 H), 2.92 – 2.96 (dd, J=13.6, 5.4 Hz, 1 H), 2.85 – 2.90 (dd, J=13.6, 6.3 Hz, 1 H), 1.36 (s, 9H). HPLC retention time 5.1 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1.5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes. Chiral HPLC retention time 9.1 minutes; column: Chiralcel OD-H column (250 mm x 4.6 mm); column temperature 40 °C; flow rate 1 .0 mL / minute; detection UV 208 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = ethanol (18%), solvent B = heptane (85%); isocratic elusion; total run time 20.0 minutes.

Step 5: Preparation of C98-(2R,3S) enantiomer. A solution of C97-(2R,3S) enantiomer. (16.7 g, 23.1 mmol) in ethyl acetate (301 mL) was treated with diatomaceous earth (18.3 g) and 5% aqueous potassium phosphate tribasic (182 mL). The slurry was stirred for 30 minutes at room temperature, then filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with ethyl acetate (2 x 67 mL). The filtrate was washed with 5% aqueous potassium phosphate tribasic (18 mL) and the organic layer dried over magnesium sulfate. The solid was filtered and the filter cake washed with ethyl acetate (33 mL). The filtrate was concentrated to a volume of 42 mL and slowly added to heptane (251 mL) and the resulting solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with heptane and dried at 50 °C in a vacuum oven for 19 hours to yield C98- (2R,3S) enantiomer as a solid. Yield: 6.4 g, 17.5 mmol, 76%, 98.8% ee. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 7.64 (d, J=9.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.14 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 6.56 (s, 1 H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.20, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.78 (dd, J=9.37, 5.1 Hz, 1 H), 4.30 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 4.14 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.75 (s, 3H), 3.45 – 3.53 (m, 1 H), 2.65 – 2.75 (m, 1 H), 2.56 – 2.64 (m, 1 H), 1.38 (s, 9H), 1.30 – 1.35 (m, 2H). HPLC retention time 5.2 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1.5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes. Chiral HPLC retention time 8.7 minutes; column: Chiralcel OD-H column (250 mm x 4.6 mm); column temperature 40 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 208 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = ethanol (18%), solvent B = heptane (85%); isocratic elusion; total run time 20.0 minutes.

Step 6: Preparation of C99. A solution of potassium phosphate tribasic N-hydrate (8.71 g, 41 .05 mmol) in water (32.0 mL) at 22 °C was treated with a slurry of C26- mesylate salt (12.1 g, 27.4 mmol, q-NMR potency 98%) in dichloromethane (100.00 mL). The slurry was stirred for 1 hour at 22 °C. The reaction mixture was transferred to a separatory funnel and the layers separated. The aqueous layer was back extracted with dichloromethane (50.0 mL). The organic layers were combined, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with

dichloromethane (2 x 16 mL). The filtrate (-190 mL, amine solution) was used directly in the next step.

A solution of 1 ,1 ‘-carbonyldiimidazole (6.66 g, 41 .0 mmol) in dichloromethane (100 mL) at 22 °C under nitrogen was treated with the previously prepared amine solution (-190 mL) added dropwise using an addition funnel over 3 hour at 22 °C with stirring. After the addition, the mixture was stirred for 1 hour at 22 °C, then treated with C98-(2R,3S) enantiomer. (10.0 g, 27.4 mmol) followed by /V,/V-dimethylformamide (23.00 mL). The reaction mixture was stirred at 22 °C for 3 hours and then heated at 40 °C for 12 hours. The solution was cooled to room temperature and the dichloromethane was removed using the rotary evaporator. The reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate (216.0 mL) and washed with 10% aqueous citric acid (216.0 mL), 5% aqueous sodium chloride (2 x 216.0 mL), dried over magnesium sulfate and filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (3 x 13 mL) and the ethyl acetate solution was concentrated on the rotary evaporator to a volume of (-1 10.00 mL) providing a suspension. The suspension (~1 10.00 mL) was warmed to 40 °C and transferred into a stirred solution of heptane (22 °C) over 1 hour, to give a slurry. The slurry was stirred for 1 hour and filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was washed with heptane (3 x 30 mL) and dried under vacuum at 50 °C for 12 hours to afford C99 as a solid. Yield: 18.1 g, 24.9 mmol, 92%. LCMS m/z 728.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.09 (s, 1 H), 7.62 (d, J=9.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.33-7.52 (m, 10H), 7.07 (d, J=8.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.51 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.50 (m, 1 H), 6.44 (dd, J=8.3, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.12 (m, 1 H), 6.07 (s, 1 H), 5.27 (s, 2H), 5.00 (s, 2H), 4.73 (dd, J=9.4, 5.2 Hz, 1 H), 4.38 (d, J=15.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.19 (m, 2H), 3.99 (d, J=15.0 Hz, 1 H), 3.72 (s, 3H), 3.71 (s, 3H), 3.48 (m, 1 H), 3.28 (m, 1 H), 3.12 (m, 1 H), 1 .37 (s, 9H).

Step 7: Preparation of C100. A solution of C99 (46.5 g, 63.9 mmol) in acetonitrile (697 mL and water (372 mL) was treated with potassium persulfate (69.1 g, 255.6 mmol) and potassium phosphate dibasic (50.1 g, 287.5 mmol). The biphasic mixture was heated to 75 °C and vigorously stirred for 1.5 hours. The pH was maintained between 6.0-6.5 by potassium phosphate dibasic addition (-12 g). The mixture was cooled to 20 °C, the suspension was filtered and washed with acetonitrile (50 mL). The filtrate was concentrated using the rotary evaporator and treated with water (50 mL) followed by ethyl acetate (200 mL). The slurry was stirred for 2 hours at room temperature, filtered and the solid dried under vacuum at 40 °C overnight. The solid was slurried in a mixture of ethyl acetate and water (6 : 1 , 390.7 mL) at 20 °C for 1 hour then collected by filtration. The solid was dried in a vacuum oven to yield C100. Yield: 22.1 g, 38.3 mmol, 60%. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.17 (br s, 1 H), 7.96 (s, 1 H), 7.58 (d, J=9.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.29-7.50 (m, 10H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.0, 6.0 Hz, 1 H), 6.08 (dd, J=5.6, 5.2 Hz, 1 H), 5.93 (s, 1 H), 5.22 (s, 2H), 4.96 (s, 2H), 4.77 (dd, J=9.6, 5.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.16 (m, 2H), 3.61 (m, 1 H), 3.1 1 (m, 2H), 1.36 (s, 9H). HPLC retention time 6.17 minutes; XBridge C8 column (4.6 x 75 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 2.0 mL/minute; detection UV 210 nm, 230 nm, and 254 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = methanesulfonic acid (5%) in 10 mmol sodium octylsulfonate, solvent B = acetonitrile (100%); gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%), 1.5-8.5 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 8.5-10.0 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 10.01- 12.0 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%); total run time 12.0 minutes.

Step 8: Preparation of C101. A solution of trifluoroacetic acid (120 mL, 1550 mmol) under nitrogen was treated with methoxybenzene (30 mL, 269 mmol) and cooled to -5 °C. Solid C100 (17.9 g, 31.0 mmol) was charged in one portion at -5 °C and the resulting mixture stirred for 3 hours. The reaction mixture was cannulated with nitrogen pressure over 15 minutes to a stirred mixture of Celite (40.98 g) and methyl ferf-butyl ether (550 mL) at 10 °C. The slurry was stirred at 16 °C for 30 minutes, then filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was rinsed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 100 mL). The solid was collected and slurried in methyl ferf-butyl ether (550 mL) with vigorous stirring for 25 minutes. The slurry was filtered by vacuum filtration and washed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 250 mL). The solid was collected and dried in a vacuum oven at 60 °C for 18 hours to afford C101 on Celite. Yield: 57.6 g total = C101 + Celite; 16.61 g C101 , 28.1 mmol, 91%. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.75-8.95 (br s, 2H), 8.65 (s, 1 H), 8.21 (s, 1 H), 7.30-7.58 (m, 10H), 6.83 (br s, 1 H), 6.65 (br s, 1 H), 6.17 (s, 1 H), 5.30 (s, 2H), 5.03 (s, 2H), 4.45 (br s, 1 H), 4.22 (br s, 2H), 3.77 (m, 1 H), 3.36 (m, 1 H), 3.22 (m, 1 H). 19F NMR (376 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ -76.0 (s, 3F). HPLC retention time 5.81 minutes; XBridge C8 column (4.6 x 75 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 2.0 mL/minute; detection UV 210 nm, 230 nm, and 254 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = methanesulfonic acid (5%) in 10 mmol sodium octylsulfonate, solvent B = acetonitrile (100%); gradient elusion: 0-1.5 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%), 1.5-8.5 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 8.5-10.0 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 10.01-12.0 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%); total run time 12.0 minutes.

Step 9: Preparation of C90. A suspension of C101 (67.0 g, 30% activity on Celite = 33.9 mmol) in acetonitrile (281 .4 mL) was treated with molecular sieves 4AE (40.2 g), C5 (17.9 g, 33.9 mmol), 4-dimethylaminopyridine (10.4 g, 84.9 mmol) and the mixture was stirred at 40°C for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 °C, filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with acetonitrile (2 x 100 mL). The filtrate was concentrated under vacuum to a volume of -50 mL. The solution was diluted with ethyl acetate (268.0 mL) and washed with 10% aqueous citric acid (3 x 134 mL) followed by 5% aqueous sodium chloride (67.0 mL). The organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate and filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (2 x 50 mL) and the filtrate was concentrated to a volume of -60 mL. The filtrate was added slowly to heptane (268 mL) with stirring and the slurry was stirred at 20 °C for 1 hour. The slurry was filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with a mixture of heptane and ethyl acetate (4: 1 , 2 x 27 mL). The solid was collected and dried under vacuum for 12 hours at 50 °C to afford a solid. The crude product was purified via chromatography on silica gel (ethyl acetate / 2-propanol), product bearing fractions were combined and the volume was reduced to -60 mL. The solution was added dropwise to heptane (268 mL) with stirring. The slurry was stirred at room temperature for 3 hours, filtered and washed with heptane and ethyl acetate (4: 1 , 2 x 27 mL). The solid was collected and dried under vacuum for 12 hours at 50 °C to afford C90 as a solid. Yield: 16.8 g, 18.9 mmol, 58%. LCMS m/z 889.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-cfe) 1 1.90 (br s, 1 H), 9.25 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.40 (br s, 1 H), 7.98 (s, 1 H), 7.50-7.54 (m, 2H), 7.32- 7.47 (m, 8H), 7.28 (s, 1 H), 6.65 (br s, 1 H), 6.28 (br s, 1 H), 5.97 (s, 1 H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.8, 5 Hz, 1 H), 4.99 (s, 2H), 4.16-4.28 (m, 2H), 3.74-3.80 (m, 1 H), 3.29-3.41 (m, 1 H), 3.13-3.23 (m, 1 H), 1 .42 (s, 9H), 1 .41 (s, 3H), 1.39 (br s, 12H).

Step 10: Preparation of C91. A solution of C90 (14.5 g, 16.3 mmol) in anhydrous N,N- dimethylformamide (145.0 mL) was treated with sulfur trioxide /V,/V-dimethylformamide complex (25.0 g, 163.0 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 45 minutes, then transferred to a stirred mixture of 5% aqueous sodium chloride (290 mL) and ethyl acetate (435 mL) at 0 °C. The mixture was warmed to 18 °C and the layers separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (145 mL) and the combined organic layers washed with 5% aqueous sodium chloride (3 x 290 mL) followed by saturated aqueous sodium chloride (145 mL). The organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered through diatomaceous earth and the filter cake washed with ethyl acetate (72 mL). The filtrate was concentrated to a volume of 36 mL and treated with methyl ferf-butyl ether (290 mL), the resulting slurry was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with methyl ferf- butyl ether (58 mL) and dried at 50 °C for 2 hours followed by 20 °C for 65 hours in a vacuum oven to yield C91 as a solid. Yield: 15.0 g, 15.4 mmol, 95%. LCMS m/z 967.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1 1.62 (br s, 1 H), 9.29 (d, J=8.8 Hz, 1 H), 9.02 (s, 1 H), 7.58-7.61 (m, 2H), 7.38-7.53 (m, 9H), 7.27 (s, 1 H), 7.07 (s, 1 H), 6.40 (br d, J=8.0 Hz, 1 H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.20 (dd, J=8.8, 5.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.46 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17.0, 5.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.38 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17.0, 6.0 Hz, 1 H), 3.92- 3.98 (m, 1 H), 3.79-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.07-3.17 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 9H), 1.39 (s, 3H), 1.38 (s, 12H).

Step 11 : Preparation of C92. A solution of C91 (20.0 g, 20.6 mmol) in

dichloromethane (400 mL) was concentrated under reduced pressure (420 mmHg) at 45 °C to a volume of 200 mL. The solution was cooled to -5 °C and treated with 1 M boron trichloride in dichloromethane (206.0 mL, 206.0 mmol) added dropwise over 40 minutes. The reaction mixture was warmed to 15 °C over 1 hour with stirring. The slurry was cooled to -15 °C and treated with a mixture of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (69.2 mL) and methyl ferf-butyl ether (400 mL), maintaining the temperature at -15 °C. The reaction mixture was warmed to 0 °C over 1 hour. The suspension was filtered using nitrogen pressure and the solid washed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 200 mL).

Nitrogen was passed over the solid for 2 hours. The solid was collected and suspended in methyl ferf-butyl ether (400 mL) for 1 hour with stirring at 18 °C. The suspension was filtered using nitrogen pressure and the solid washed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 200 mL). Nitrogen was passed over the resulting solid for 12 hours. A portion of the crude product was neutralized with 1 M aqueous ammonium formate to pH 5.5 with minimal addition of /V,/V-dimethylformamide to prevent foaming. The feed solution was filtered and purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.2% formic acid modifier). The product bearing fractions were combined and concentrated to remove acetonitrile. The solution was captured on a GC-161 M column, washed with deionized water and blown dry with nitrogen pressure. The product was released using a mixture of methanol / water (10: 1 ) and the product bearing fractions were added to a solution of ethyl acetate (6 volumes). The solid was collected by filtration to afford C92 as a solid. Yield: 5.87 g, 9.28 mmol. LCMS m/z 633.3 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 9.22 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.15 (s, 1 H), 7.26-7.42 (br s, 2H), 7.18-7.25 (m, 1 H), 6.99 (s, 1 H), 6.74 (s, 1 H), 6.32-6.37 (m, 1 H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.33 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.94-4.00 (m, 1 H), 3.60-3.68 (m, 1 H), 3.19-3.27 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 3H), 1.39 (s, 3H).

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2014), 57(9), 3845-3855

Siderophore Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Lactivicin Analogues in Gram-Negative Bacteria

Medicinal Chemistry, Computational Chemistry, §Antibacterials Research Unit, and Structural Biology, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
J. Med. Chem.201457 (9), pp 3845–3855
DOI: 10.1021/jm500219c
Publication Date (Web): April 2, 2014
Copyright © 2014 American Chemical Society
*Phone: (860)-686-1788. E-mail: seungil.han@pfizer.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens are an emerging threat to human health, and addressing this challenge will require development of new antibacterial agents. This can be achieved through an improved molecular understanding of drug–target interactions combined with enhanced delivery of these agents to the site of action. Herein we describe the first application of siderophore receptor-mediated drug uptake of lactivicin analogues as a strategy that enables the development of novel antibacterial agents against clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. We report the first crystal structures of several sideromimic conjugated compounds bound to penicillin binding proteins PBP3 and PBP1a from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and characterize the reactivity of lactivicin and β-lactam core structures. Results from drug sensitivity studies with β-lactamase enzymes are presented, as well as a structure-based hypothesis to reduce susceptibility to this enzyme class. Finally, mechanistic studies demonstrating that sideromimic modification alters the drug uptake process are discussed.

PAPER

Pyridone-Conjugated Monobactam Antibiotics with Gram-Negative Activity

Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Computational Chemistry, §Antibacterials Research Unit, Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics & Metabolism, Structural Biology, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
J. Med. Chem.201356 (13), pp 5541–5552
DOI: 10.1021/jm400560z
Publication Date (Web): June 11, 2013
Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society
*Phone: 860-441-3522. E-mail: matthew.f.brown@pfizer.com.
Abstract Image

Herein we describe the structure-aided design and synthesis of a series of pyridone-conjugated monobactam analogues with in vitro antibacterial activity against clinically relevant Gram-negative species including Pseudomonas aeruginosaKlebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Rat pharmacokinetic studies with compound 17 demonstrate low clearance and low plasma protein binding. In addition, evidence is provided for a number of analogues suggesting that the siderophore receptors PiuA and PirA play a role in drug uptake in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1.

STR1

17 as a solid. Yield: 5.87 g, 9.28 mmol. LCMS m/z 633.3 (M+1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSOd6) δ 9.22 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1H), 8.15 (s, 1H), 7.26-7.42 (br s, 2H), 7.18-7.25 (m, 1H), 6.99 (s, 1H), 6.74 (s, 1H), 6.32-6.37 (m, 1H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1H), 4.33 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.94-4.00 (m, 1H), 3.60-3.68 (m, 1H), 3.19-3.27 (m, 1H), 1.40 (s, 3H), 1.39 (s, 3H).

Nc1nc(cs1)\C(=N\OC(C)(C)C(=O)O)C(=O)N[C@@H]3C(=O)N([C@@H]3CNC(=O)NCC2=CC(=O)C(O)=CN2O)S(=O)(=O)O

PAPER

Process Development for the Synthesis of Monocyclic β-Lactam Core 17

Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00359
Publication Date (Web): January 4, 2018
Copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society
Abstract Image

Process development and multikilogram synthesis of the monocyclic β-lactam core 17 for a novel pyridone-conjugated monobactam antibiotic is described. Starting with commercially available 2-(2,2-diethoxyethyl)isoindoline-1,3-dione, the five-step synthesis features several telescoped operations and direct isolations to provide significant improvement in throughput and reduced solvent usage over initial scale-up campaigns. A particular highlight in this effort includes the development of an efficient Staudinger ketene–imine [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of N-Boc-glycine ketene 12 and imine 9 to form racemic β-lactam 13 in good isolated yield (66%) and purity (97%). Another key feature in the synthesis involves a classical resolution of racemic amine 15 to afford single enantiomer salt 17 in excellent isolated yield (45%) with high enantiomeric excess (98%).

Figure

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00359/suppl_file/op7b00359_si_001.pdf

Nc1nc(cs1)\C(=N\OC(C)(C)C(=O)O)C(=O)N[C@@H]3C(=O)N([C@@H]3CNC(=O)NCC2=CC(=O)C(O)=CN2O)S(=O)(=O)O

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J. Med. Chem.201356 (13), pp 5541–5552
DOI: 10.1021/jm400560z

OXYGEN ANALOGUE…………..

STR2
 1380110-45-1, C20 H23 N7 O13 S2, 633.57
Propanoic acid, 2-​[[(Z)​-​[1-​(2-​amino-​4-​thiazolyl)​-​2-​[[(2R,​3S)​-​2-​[[[[(1,​4-​dihydro-​1,​5-​dihydroxy-​4-​oxo-​2-​pyridinyl)​methoxy]​carbonyl]​amino]​methyl]​-​4-​oxo-​1-​sulfo-​3-​azetidinyl]​amino]​-​2-​oxoethylidene]​amino]​oxy]​-​2-​methyl-
2-[[(Z)-[1-(2-Amino-4-thiazolyl)-2-[[(2R,3S)-2-[[[[(1,4-dihydro-1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-2-pyridinyl)methoxy]carbonyl]amino]methyl]-4-oxo-1-sulfo-3-azetidinyl]amino]-2-oxoethylidene]amino]oxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid

STR2

18 as a light yellow solid. Yield: 43 mg, 0.068 mmol, 51%. LCMS m/z 634.4 (M+1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6), characteristic peaks: δ 9.29 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1H), 8.10 (s, 1H), 7.04-7.10 (m, 1H), 7.00 (s, 1H), 6.75 (s, 1H), 5.05-5.30 (m, 3H), 4.00-4.07 (m, 1H), 1.42 (s, 3H), 1.41 (s, 3H).

Nc1nc(cs1)\C(=N\OC(C)(C)C(=O)O)C(=O)N[C@@H]3C(=O)N([C@@H]3CNC(=O)OCC2=CC(=O)C(O)=CN2O)S(=O)(=O)O

Step 4: Preparation of 18-Bis Na salt. A suspension of 5 (212 mg, 0.33 mmol) in water (10 mL) was cooled to 0 oC and treated with a solution of sodium bicarbonate (56.4 mg, 0.67 mmol) in water (2 mL), added dropwise. The reaction mixture was cooled to -70 oC (frozen) and lyophilized to afford 18-Bis Na salt as a white solid. Yield: 210 mg, 0.31 mmol, 93%. LCMS m/z 632.5 (M-1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, D2O) δ 7.87 (s, 1H), 6.94 (s, 1H), 6.92 (s, 1H), 5.35 (d, J=5 Hz, 1H), 5.16 (s, 2H), 4.46-4.52 (m, 1H), 3.71 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1H), 3.55 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1H), 1.43 (s, 3H), 1.42 (s, 3H).

WO 2012073138

Inventors Matthew Frank BrownSeungil HanManjinder LallMark. J. Mitton-FryMark Stephen PlummerHud Lawrence RisleyVeerabahu ShanmugasundaramJeremy T. Starr
Applicant Pfizer Inc.

Example 5

disodium 2-({[(1Z)-1 -(2-amino-1 ,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-({(2R,3S)-2-[({[(1 ,5-dihydroxy-4- oxo-1 ,4-dihydropyridin-2-yl)methoxy]carbonyl}amino)methyl]-4-oxo-1 – sulfonatoazetidin-3-yl}amino)-2-oxoethylidene]amino}oxy)-2-methylpropanoate

(C104-Bis Na salt).

Figure imgf000092_0001

Step 1 : Preparation of C102. A solution of C28 (300 mg, 0.755 mmol) in

tetrahydrofuran (10 mL) was treated with 1 , 1 ‘-carbonyldiimidazole (379 mg, 2.26 mmol) at room temperature and stirred for 20 hours. The yellow reaction mixture was treated with a solution of C9 (286 mg, 0.543 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (25 mL). The mixture was stirred for 6 hours at room temperature, then treated with water (20 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The crude material was purified via chromatography on silica gel (heptane / ethyl acetate / 2-propanol) to afford C102 as a light yellow solid. Yield: 362 mg, 0.381 mmol, 62%. LCMS m/z 950.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de), characteristic peaks: δ 9.31 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 1 H), 8.38 (s, 1 H), 8.00 (s, 1 H), 7.41 (br d, J=8.2 Hz, 2H), 7.36 (br d, J=8.8 Hz, 2H), 7.26 (s, 1 H), 6.10 (s, 1 H), 5.20 (s, 2H), 4.92 (br s, 4H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.76 (s, 3H), 1.45 (s, 9H), 1.38 (s, 9H). Step 2: Preparation of C103. A solution of C102 (181 mg, 0.191 mmol) in anhydrous /V,/V-dimethylformamide (2.0 mL) was treated with sulfur trioxide pyridine complex (302 mg, 1.91 mmol). The reaction mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature for 6 hours, then cooled to 0 °C and quenched with water. The resulting solid was collected by filtration and dried in vacuo to yield C103 as a white solid. Yield: 145 mg, 0.14 mmol, 74%. APCI m/z 1028.5 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6), characteristic peaks: δ 1 1.65 (br s, 1 H), 9.37 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1 H), 8.87 (s, 1 H), 7.49 (br d, J=8.6 Hz, 2H), 7.43 (br d, J=8.6 Hz, 2H), 7.26 (s, 1 H), 7.01 (br d, J=8.9 Hz, 2H), 7.00 (br d, J=8.8 Hz, 2H), 5.43 (s, 2H), 5.20 (dd, J=8.4, 6 Hz, 1 H), 4.01-4.07 (m, 1 H), 3.78 (s, 3H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.50- 3.58 (m, 1 H), 3.29-3.37 (m, 1 H), 1.44 (s, 9H), 1.37 (s, 9H). Step 3: Preparation of C104. A solution of C103 (136 mg, 0.132 mmol) in anhydrous dichloromethane (5 mL) was treated with 1 M boron trichloride in p-xylenes (0.92 mL, 0.92 mmol) and allowed to stir at room temperature for 40 minutes. The reaction mixture was cooled in an ice bath, quenched with water (0.4 mL), and transferred into a solution of methyl ferf-butyl ether: heptane (1 :2, 12 mL). The solvent was removed in vacuo and the crude product was purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.1 % formic acid modifier) to yield C104 as a light yellow solid. Yield: 43 mg, 0.068 mmol, 51 %. LCMS m/z 634.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de), characteristic peaks: δ 9.29 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1 H), 8.10 (s, 1 H), 7.04- 7.10 (m, 1 H), 7.00 (s, 1 H), 6.75 (s, 1 H), 5.05-5.30 (m, 3H), 4.00-4.07 (m, 1 H), 1 .42 (s, 3H), 1 .41 (s, 3H).

Step 4: Preparation of C104-Bis Na salt. A suspension of C104 (212 mg, 0.33 mmol) in water (10 mL) was cooled to 0 °C and treated with a solution of sodium bicarbonate (56.4 mg, 0.67 mmol) in water (2 mL), added dropwise. The reaction mixture was cooled to -70 °C (frozen) and lyophilized to afford C104-Bis Na salt as a white solid. Yield: 210 mg, 0.31 mmol, 93%. LCMS m/z 632.5 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, D20) δ 7.87 (s, 1 H), 6.94 (s, 1 H), 6.92 (s, 1 H), 5.35 (d, J=5 Hz, 1 H), 5.16 (s, 2H), 4.46-4.52 (m, 1 H), 3.71 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1 H), 3.55 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1 H), 1.43 (s, 3H), 1 .42 (s, 3H).

////////////Pfizer,  monobactam,  PF-?, 1380110-34-8, pfizer, pf, 1380110-45-1, WO 2012073138, Matthew Frank BrownSeungil HanManjinder LallMark. J. Mitton-FryMark Stephen PlummerHud Lawrence RisleyVeerabahu ShanmugasundaramJeremy T. Starr, preclinical

Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one derivatives as antiglioma agents


Med. Chem. Commun., 2018, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7MD00551B, Research Article
Yi-Bin Li, Wen Hou, Hui Lin, Ping-Hua Sun, Jing Lin, Wei-Min Chen
Two series of 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one derivatives were synthesized and their antiglioma activities were evaluated.

Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one derivatives as antiglioma agents

Author affiliations

Abstract

D-2-Hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) is frequently found in human brain cancers. Approximately 50–80% of grade II glioma patients have a high level of D-2HG production, which can lead to cancer initiation. In this study, a series of novel 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one derivatives were designed and synthesized as antiglioma agents, and their related structure–activity relationships are discussed. Among these novel compounds, 4a exhibited promising anti-proliferative activity against glioma HT1080 cells and U87 cells with an IC50 of 1.43 μM and 4.6 μM, respectively. Further studies found that the most active compound (4a) shows an 86.3% inhibitory rate against the intracellular production of D-2HG at 1 μM, and dramatic inhibitory effects, even at 1 μM on the colony formation and migration of U87 and HT1080 cells.

STR1 STR2 str3 str4
6,6′-((4-(Benzyloxy)phenyl)methylene)bis(5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4- one) (4a) The reaction was performed according to the general procedure C, using 1 (1.00 g, 7.90 mmol) and 4-(benzyloxy)benzaldehyde (0.84 g, 3.95 mmol).2 The crude product was recrystallized from isopropanol affording a white powder 4a (1.53 g, 87%): mp 261.4-262.1oC; 1HNMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6)  2.22 (s, 6H, CH3), 5.08 (s, 3H, OCH2- Ph), 5.96 (s, 1H, CH-Ar), 6.25 (s, 2H, C=CH), , 7.01 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2H, Ar-H3’/H5’), 7.22 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2H, Ar-H2’/H6’), 7.31-7.45 (m, 5H, Ph-H); 13CNMR (75 MHz, DMSO-d6)  173.95, 165.08, 158.12, 151.20, 147.68, 142.19, 140.77, 137.42, 129.87, 128.91, 128.16, 127.69, 115.46, 114.97, 111.74, 69.69, 19.63; ESI-MS m/z: 447.1 [M+H]+ ; ESI-HRMS m/z: 447.1438 [M+H]+ , calcd for C26H23O7 447.1438.

The synthesis, biological evaluation and structure–activity relationship of 2-phenylaminomethylene-cyclohexane-1,3-diones as specific anti-tuberculosis agents


ST50238235.png

str1

CAS  74102-02-6

Molecular Formula: C15H17NO3
Molecular Weight: 259.305 g/mol

2-(((2-hydroxyphenyl)amino)methylene)-5,5-dimethylcyclohexane-1,3-dione (39): White solid; m.p. 249 o C; TLC Rf value, 0.48 (in EtOAc:Hexane,60:40);

IR (neat) 2980, 2950, 1678, 1040 cm-1;

1 H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 9.86 (1H, bs), 8.66 (1H, d, J = 16.0 Hz), 7.46- 7.34 (1H, m), 7.07-6.84 (3H, m), 2.46 (2H, s), 2.41 (2H, s), 1.10 (3H, s), 1.09 (3H, s);

13C NMR (101 MHz, CDCl3) δ 199.8, 197.2, 149.6, 149.3, 147.8, 127.2, 126.6, 120.6, 120.3, 108.

The synthesis, biological evaluation and structure–activity relationship of 2-phenylaminomethylene-cyclohexane-1,3-diones as specific anti-tuberculosis agents

 Author affiliations

Abstract

The present study utilised whole cell based phenotypic screening of thousands of diverse small molecules against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (M. tuberculosis) and identified the cyclohexane-1,3-dione-based structures 5 and 6 as hits. The selected hit molecules were used for further synthesis and a library of 37 compounds under four families was synthesized for lead generation. Evaluation of the library against M. tuberculosis lead to the identification of three lead antituberculosis agents (3739 and 41). The most potential compound, 2-(((2-hydroxyphenyl)amino)methylene)-5,5-dimethylcyclohexane-1,3-dione (39) showed an MIC of 2.5 μg mL−1, which falls in the range of MICs values found for the known antituberculosis drugs ethambutol, streptomycin and levofloxacin. Additionally, this compound proved to be non-toxic (<20% inhibition at 50 μM concentration) against four human cell lines. Like first line antituberculosis drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide) this compound lacks activity against general Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and even against M. smegmatis; thereby reflecting its highly specific antituberculosis activity.

Graphical abstract: The synthesis, biological evaluation and structure–activity relationship of 2-phenylaminomethylene-cyclohexane-1,3-diones as specific anti-tuberculosis agents
http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2017/MD/C7MD00350A?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2FMD+%28RSC+-+Med.+Chem.+Commun.+latest+articles%29#!divAbstract
Background Image

Muzafar Ahmad Rather

Ph.D Research Scholar

CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine (CSIR-IIIM), Srinagar

Clinical Microbiology and PK/PD Division, Clinical Microbiology PK/PD/Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Sanatnagar, Srinagar, India-190005

Image result for Zahoor Ahmad CSIR

CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine

(Council of Scientific & Industrial Research)

Dr. Zahoor Ahmad Parry

Clinical Microbiology Division
CSIR – Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine,Canal Road, Jammu – 180001
Email: zahoorap@iiim.ac.in
Positions Held
Position Held Date Organization
Sr. Scientist   2010 – Present CSIR-IIIM

Dr. Bilal Ahmad Bhat

Medicinal Chemistry Division
CSIR – Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine,Canal Road, Jammu – 180001
Email: bilal@iiim.ac.in
Positions Held
Position Held Date Organization
Scientist 2010 – Present CSIR-IIIM

Image result for Medicinal Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Sanatnagar, Srinagar,

Medicinal Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Sanatnagar, Srinagar,

A small Drug Research Laboratory working under the Government of Jammu & Kashmir was taken over by CSIR in 1957 and named as Regional Research Laboratory, Jammu. Col. Sir Ram Nath Chopra, who is acclaimed the father of modern Pharmacology in India, was the Director of Drug Research Laboratory, continued as the first Director of Regional Research Laboratory. Having significant expertise in the area of medicinal & aromatic plants, Col. Chopra started its related R&D activities such as collection of plants from north & north-west and study the chemistry & pharmacology of the plant extracts and the new molecules isolated from these plants. Thus the initial mandate of this laboratory was mainly focused on screening the flora of north India for new molecules and to study the biological activity of these molecules. Gradually the activities of the institute increased, many more disciplines were introduced, that were important for the exploitation of regional resources such as mineral technology division, paper & pulp, fur technology division, sericulture, food technology division and mycology division. The main stream department such as chemistry, botany and pharmacology were strengthened by the introduction of a small animal house, instrumentation and chemical engineering & design division. The activity of the institute gradually increased which showed up in its publications and technology developments.

With the progress of time, the institute developed high quality expertise and infrastructure for working in the area of plant based products & drugs to explore new botanicals for new molecules and new activity. The institute specialized for working in the area of chemistry of natural products, synthesis of new & nature like molecules. These were studied for their use on various indication such as Oncology, hepatoprotection, anti-bacterial, bio-enhancers, anti-diabetes, anti-inflammation, aphrodisiac, hypertension, immunomodulation, anti-oxidants, oral care and beauty care. Some of the areas which did not progress to the satisfaction level gradually became redundant and were dropped.

Keeping in view the expertise developed in the area of natural products and revised mandate of the institute to explore and exploit natural, nature like and synthetic products with modern scientific tools to reduce the burden of disease, the institute became more focused towards integrative medicine hence was renamed as Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine in 2007 by the governing body of CSIR

////////////////// synthesis, biological evaluation, structure–activity relationship, 2-phenylaminomethylene-cyclohexane-1,3-diones, anti-tuberculosis agents

O=C2CC(C)(C)CC(=O)/C2=C\Nc1ccccc1O

 

DISCLAIMER

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS ” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

Takeda’s Peripherally selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor


str1

SCHEMBL1279856.png

ChemSpider 2D Image | 1-{[(6S,7R)-7-(4-Chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-1,4-oxazepan-6-yl]methyl}-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid | C18H18ClFN2O4

1-{[(6S,7R)-7-(4-Chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-1,4-oxazepan-6-yl]methyl}-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid

  • Molecular Formula C18H18ClFN2O4
  • Average mass 380.798 Da

CAS 1372185-97-1

CAS 1372180-09-0 hydrochloride

Peripherally selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor

Image result for takeda pharmaceuticals1-([(6S,7R)-7-(4-Chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-1,4-oxazepan-6-yl]methyl]-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxylic acid monohydrochloride

3-Pyridinecarboxylic acid, 1-[[(6S,7R)-7-(4-chloro-3-fluorophenyl)hexahydro-1,4-oxazepin-6-yl]methyl]-1,2-dihydro-2-oxo-, hydrochloride (1:1)

1-{[(6S,7R)-7-(4-Chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-1,4-oxazepan-6-yl]methyl}-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxylic Acid Hydrochloride (1:1) (1·HCl)

TAKEDA PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY LIMITED [JP/JP]; 1-1, Doshomachi 4-chome, Chuo-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka 5410045 (JP)

ISHICHI, Yuji; (JP).
YAMADA, Masami; (US).
KAMEI, Taku; (JP).
FUJIMORI, Ikuo; (US).
NAKADA, Yoshihisa; (JP).
YUKAWA, Tomoya; (JP).
SAKAUCHI, Nobuki; (JP).
OHBA, Yusuke; (JP).
TSUKAMOTO, Tetsuya; (JP)

Paper

Development of a Practical Synthesis of a Peripherally Selective Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor Possessing a Chiral 6,7-trans-Disubstituted-1,4-oxazepane as a Scaffold

Process Chemistry, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, 17-85, Jusohonmachi 2-Chome, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-8686, Japan
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00313

Abstract

Abstract Image

A practical synthesis of a peripherally selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor that has a chiral 6,7-trans-disubstituted-1,4-oxazepane as a new class of scaffold is described. The amino alcohol possessing the desired stereochemistry was obtained with excellent dr and ee, starting from a commercially available aldehyde via a Morita–Baylis–Hillman reaction, Michael addition, isolation as maleic acid salt, reduction, and diastereomeric salt formation with (+)-10-camphorsulfonic acid. The desired single stereoisomer obtained at an early stage of the synthesis was used for seven-membered ring formation in fully telescoped processes, providing the chiral 6,7-trans-disubstituted-1,4-oxazepane efficiently. In addition to controls of dr and ee of the chiral 1,4-oxazepane, and control of N,O-selectivity in SN2 reaction of the intermediate mesylate with a pyridone derivative, finding appropriate intermediates that were amenable to isolation and upgrade of purity enabled a practical chiral HPLC separation-free, column chromatograph-free synthesis of the drug candidate with excellent chemical and optical purities in a higher overall yield.

Mp 261–262 °C;
1H NMR (600 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 3.09–3.18 (m, 1H), 3.20–3.43 (m, 4H), 3.77–3.88 (m, 1H), 3.96 (br dd, J = 13.2, 5.7 Hz, 1H), 4.04 (dt, J = 13.8, 4.2 Hz, 1H), 4.17 (br dd, J = 13.6, 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.59 (br d, J = 9.1 Hz, 1H), 6.66 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 1H), 7.27 (br dd, J = 8.3, 1.1 Hz, 1H), 7.47 (br dd, J = 10.4, 1.3 Hz, 1H), 7.54 (br t, J = 8.1 Hz, 1H), 8.10 (dd, J = 6.4, 1.9 Hz, 1H), 8.26 (dd, J = 7.2, 1.9 Hz, 1H), 9.59 (br s, 2H), 14.2 (br s, 1H);
 13C NMR (151 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 40.5, 44.9, 46.5, 50.0, 63.9, 82.1, 108.4, 116.0 (2JCF = 21.1 Hz), 116.7, 119.3 (2JCF = 18.1 Hz), 125.1 (3JCF = 4.5 Hz), 130.4, 140.9 (3JCF = 7.6 Hz), 145.1, 145.2, 156.8 (1JCF = 247.6 Hz), 163.6, 164.4;
IR (ATR) 2925, 2693, 1725, 1625, 1563, 1484, 1445, 1379, 1293, 1206, 1126, 1097, 1064, 1003, 934, 868, 856, 820, 783, 771, 627, 538, 521, 459, 411 cm–1;
HRMS (ESI): [M + H]+ calcd for C18H19ClFN2O4 (1), 381.1017; found, 381.1009.

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2012046882A1?cl=zh

PAPER

Volume 24, Issue 16, 15 August 2016, Pages 3716–3726

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0968089616304382

Abstract

Peripheral-selective inhibition of noradrenaline reuptake is a novel mechanism for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence to overcome adverse effects associated with central action. Here, we describe our medicinal chemistry approach to discover a novel series of highly potent, peripheral-selective, and orally available noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors with a low multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) efflux ratio by cyclization of an amide moiety and introduction of an acidic group. We observed that the MDR1 efflux ratio was correlated with the pKa value of the acidic moiety. The resulting compound 9exhibited favorable PK profiles, probably because of the effect of intramolecular hydrogen bond, which was supported by a its single-crystal structure. The compound 9, 1-{[(6S,7R)-7-(4-chloro-3-fluorophenyl)-1,4-oxazepan-6-yl]methyl}-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxylic acid hydrochloride, which exhibited peripheral NET-selective inhibition at tested doses in rats by oral administration, increased urethral resistance in a dose-dependent manner.


Graphical abstract

Image for unlabelled figure

REFERNCES

(a) IshichiY.YamadaM.KameiT.FujimoriI.NakadaY.YukawaT.SakauchiN.OhbaY.TsukamotoT. WO 2012/046882 A1, Apr 12, 2012.

(b) FujimoriI.YukawaT.KameiT.NakadaY.SakauchiN.YamadaM.OhbaY.TakiguchiM.KunoM.KamoI.NakagawaH.HamadaT.IgariT.OkudaT.YamamotoS.TsukamotoT.IshichiY.UenoH. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2015235000– 5014 DOI: 10.1016/j.bmc.2015.05.017

(c) YukawaT.FujimoriI.KameiT.NakadaY.SakauchiN.YamadaM.OhbaY.UenoH.TakiguchiM.KunoM.KamoI.NakagawaH.FujiokaY.IgariT.IshichiY.TsukamotoT. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2016243207– 3217 DOI: 10.1016/j.bmc.2016.05.038

(d) YukawaT.NakadaY.SakauchiN.KameiT.YamadaM.OhbaY.FujimoriI.UenoH.TakiguchiM.KunoM.KamoI.NakagawaH.FujiokaY.IgariT.IshichiY.TsukamotoT. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2016243716– 3726 DOI: 10.1016/j.bmc.2016.06.014

//////////////////1372185-97-1, 1372180-09-0, Peripherally selective,  noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor,  TAKEDA

O=C(O)C3=CC=CN(C[C@@H]1CNCCO[C@H]1c2ccc(Cl)c(F)c2)C3=O

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent
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