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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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FDA approves first biosimilar to Neulasta, Fulphila (pegfilgrastim) to help reduce the risk of infection during cancer treatment


Image result for pegfilgrastim-jmdb

FDA approves first biosimilar to Neulasta to help reduce the risk of infection during cancer treatment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Fulphila (pegfilgrastim-jmdb) as the first biosimilar to Neulasta (pegfilgrastim) to decrease the chance of infection as suggested by febrile neutropenia (fever, often with other signs of infection, associated with an abnormally low number of infection-fighting white blood cells), in patients with non-myeloid (non-bone marrow) cancer who are receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy that has a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia.

Continue reading…

June 4, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Fulphila (pegfilgrastim-jmdb) as the first biosimilar to Neulasta (pegfilgrastim) to decrease the chance of infection as suggested by febrile neutropenia (fever, often with other signs of infection, associated with an abnormally low number of infection-fighting white blood cells), in patients with non-myeloid (non-bone marrow) cancer who are receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy that has a clinically significant incidence of febrile neutropenia.

“Bringing new biosimilars to patients is a top priority for the FDA, and a key part of our efforts to help promote competition that can reduce drug costs and promote access,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “We’ll continue to prioritize reviews of these products to help ensure that biosimilar medications are brought to the market efficiently and through a process that makes certain that these new medicines meet the FDA’s rigorous standard for approval. This summer, we’ll release a comprehensive new plan to advance new policy efforts that promote biosimilar product development. Biologics represent some of the most clinically important, but also costliest products that patients use to promote their health. We want to make sure that the pathway for developing biosimilar versions of approved biologics is efficient and effective, so that patients benefit from competition to existing biologics once lawful intellectual property has lapsed on these products.”

Biological products are generally derived from a living organism and can come from many sources, such as humans, animals, microorganisms or yeast. A biosimilar is a biological product that is approved based on data showing that it is highly similar to a biological product already approved by the FDA (reference product) and has no clinically meaningful differences in terms of safety, purity and potency (i.e., safety and effectiveness) from the reference product, in addition to meeting other criteria specified by law.

The FDA’s approval of Fulphila is based on review of evidence that included extensive structural and functional characterization, animal study data, human pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data, clinical immunogenicity data, and other clinical safety and effectiveness data that demonstrates Fulphila is biosimilar to Neulasta. Fulphila has been approved as a biosimilar, not as an interchangeable product.

The most common side effects of Fulphila are bone pain and pain in extremities. Patients with a history of serious allergic reactions to human granulocyte colony-stimulating factors such as pegfilgrastim or filgrastim products should not take Fulphila.

Serious side effects from treatment with Fulphila include rupture of the spleen, acute respiratory distress syndrome, serious allergic reactions including anaphylaxis, acute inflammation of the kidney (glomerulonephritis), an abnormally high level of white blood cells (leukocytosis), capillary leak syndrome and the potential for tumor growth. Fatal sickle cell crises have occurred.

The FDA granted approval of Fulphila to Mylan GmbH.

Image result for Neulasta

//////////// pegfilgrastim, fda 2018, Fulphila, Neulasta, Mylan GmbH, biosimilars, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY,

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Burosumab-twza, ブロスマブ


> Burosumab Heavy Chain Sequence
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVSCKASGYTFTNHYMHWVRQAPGQGLEWMGIINPISGSTSN
AQKFQGRVTMTRDTSTSTVYMELSSLRSEDTAVYYCARDIVDAFDFWGQGTMVTVSSAST
KGPSVFPLAPSSKSTSGGTAALGCLVKDYFPEPVTVSWNSGALTSGVHTFPAVLQSSGLY
SLSSVVTVPSSSLGTQTYICNVNHKPSNTKVDKKVEPKSCDKTHTCPPCPAPELLGGPSV
FLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSHEDPEVKFNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQYNSTY
RVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKALPAPIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSRDELTK
NQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSKLTVDKSRWQQG
NVFSCSVMHEALHNHYTQKSLSLSPGK
> Burosumab Light Chain Sequence
AIQLTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTITCRASQGISSALVWYQQKPGKAPKLLIYDASSLESGVPS
RFSGSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFATYYCQQFNDYFTFGPGTKVDIKRTVAAPSVFIFPPS
DEQLKSGTASVVCLLNNFYPREAKVQWKVDNALQSGNSQESVTEQDSKDSTYSLSSTLTL
SKADYEKHKVYACEVTHQGLSSPVTKSFNRGEC

ALSO

(Heavy chain)
QVQLVQSGAE VKKPGASVKV SCKASGYTFT NHYMHWVRQA PGQGLEWMGI INPISGSTSN
AQKFQGRVTM TRDTSTSTVY MELSSLRSED TAVYYCARDI VDAFDFWGQG TMVTVSSAST
KGPSVFPLAP SSKSTSGGTA ALGCLVKDYF PEPVTVSWNS GALTSGVHTF PAVLQSSGLY
SLSSVVTVPS SSLGTQTYIC NVNHKPSNTK VDKKVEPKSC DKTHTCPPCP APELLGGPSV
FLFPPKPKDT LMISRTPEVT CVVVDVSHED PEVKFNWYVD GVEVHNAKTK PREEQYNSTY
RVVSVLTVLH QDWLNGKEYK CKVSNKALPA PIEKTISKAK GQPREPQVYT LPPSRDELTK
NQVSLTCLVK GFYPSDIAVE WESNGQPENN YKTTPPVLDS DGSFFLYSKL TVDKSRWQQG
NVFSCSVMHE ALHNHYTQKS LSLSPGK
(Light chain)
AIQLTQSPSS LSASVGDRVT ITCRASQGIS SALVWYQQKP GKAPKLLIYD ASSLESGVPS
RFSGSGSGTD FTLTISSLQP EDFATYYCQQ FNDYFTFGPG TKVDIKRTVA APSVFIFPPS
DEQLKSGTAS VVCLLNNFYP REAKVQWKVD NALQSGNSQE SVTEQDSKDS TYSLSSTLTL
SKADYEKHKV YACEVTHQGL SSPVTKSFNR GEC
(dimer; disulfide bridge:H22-H96, H144-H200, H220-L213, H220-H’226, H229-H’229, H261-H321, H367-H425, H’22-H’96, H’144-H’200, H’220-L’213, H’261-H’321, H’367-H’425, L23-L88, L133-L193, L’23-L’88, L’133-L’193)

Burosumab-twza, KRN 23

ブロスマブ

CAS1610833-03-8

UNII G9WJT6RD29

Protein chemical formulaC6388H9904N1700O2006S46

Protein average weight144100.0 Da

Protein Based Therapies
Monoclonal antibody (mAb)

breakthrough therapy and orphan drug designations

Approval Status:Approved April 2018

Specific Treatments:X-linked hypophosphatemia

Crysvita (burosumab-twza) is a fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) blocking antibody.

This drug is indicated for the treatment of X-linked hypophosphatemia with radiological evidence of bone disease in children of 1 year of age and older and adolescents with growing skeletons [4].

Burosumab (INN, trade name Crysvita) known as KRN23 is a human monoclonal antibody designed for the treatment of X-linked hypophosphatemia.[1][2][3] Burosumab was approved by the FDA for its intended purpose, in patients aged 1 year and older, on 17 April 2018.[4] The FDA approval fell under both the breakthrough therapy and orphan drug designations.[4]

This drug was developed by Ultragenyx and is in a collaborative license agreement with Kyowa Hakko Kirin.[5]

Burosumab (KRN23) is an entirely human monoclonal IgG1 antibody that binds excess fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and has been successfully tested in clinical trials in children with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets [1].

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Crysvita (burosumab) in April 2018. This is the first drug approved to treat adults and children ages 1 year and older with X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), which is a rare, inherited form of rickets. X-linked hypophosphatemia causes low circulating levels of phosphorus in the blood. It causes impaired bone growth and development in children and adolescents and issues with bone mineralization throughout a patient’s life [3].

XLH is a serious disease which affects about 3,000 children and 12,000 adults in the United States. Most children with XLH suffer from bowed or bent legs, short stature, bone pain and severe dental pain. Some adults with this condition suffer from persistent, unrelenting discomfort and complications, such as joint pain, impaired mobility, tooth abscesses and hearing loss [3]

Crysvita is specifically indicated for the treatment of X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH) in adult and pediatric patients 1 year of age and older.

Crysvita is supplied as a subcutaneous injection. The recommended starting dose for pediatrics is 0.8 mg/kg of body weight, rounded to the nearest 10 mg, administered every two weeks. The minimum starting dose is 10 mg up to a maximum dose of 90 mg. After initiation of treatment with Crysvita, measure fasting serum phosphorus every 4 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment, and thereafter as appropriate. If serum phosphorus is above the lower limit of the reference range for age and below 5 mg/dL, continue treatment with the same dose. Follow dose adjustment schedule per the drug label. The recommended dose regimen in adults is 1 mg/kg body weight, rounded to the nearest 10 mg up to a maximum dose of 90 mg, administered every four weeks.  After initiation of treatment with Crysvita, assess fasting serum phosphorus on a monthly basis, measured 2 weeks post-dose, for the first 3 months of treatment, and thereafter as appropriate. If serum phosphorus is within the normal range, continue with the same dose. See drug label for specific dose adjustments.

Mechanism of Action

Crysvita (burosumab-twza) is a fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) blocking antibody. X-linked hypophosphatemia is caused by excess fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) which suppresses renal tubular phosphate reabsorption and the renal production of 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D. Burosumab-twza binds to and inhibits the biological activity of FGF23 restoring renal phosphate reabsorption and increasing the serum concentration of 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D.

REFERENCES

1 file:///H:/761068Orig1s000ChemR.pdf

REF

  • Kutilek S: Burosumab: A new drug to treat hypophosphatemic rickets. Sudan J Paediatr. 2017;17(2):71-73. doi: 10.24911/SJP.2017.2.11. [PubMed:29545670]
  • Kinoshita Y, Fukumoto S: X-linked hypophosphatemia and FGF23-related hypophosphatemic diseases -Prospect for new treatment. Endocr Rev. 2018 Jan 26. pii: 4825438. doi: 10.1210/er.2017-00220. [PubMed:29381780]
  • FDA approves first therapy for rare inherited form of rickets, x-linked hypophosphatemia [Link]
  • Crysvita Drug Label [Link]
  • Burosumab for a rare bone disease [Link]
  • DRUG: Burosumab [Link]
  • NHS document [Link]
  • Burosumab for XLH [Link]
Burosumab
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Human
Target FGF 23
Clinical data
Trade names Crysvita
Synonyms KRN23
ATC code
Identifiers
CAS Number
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C6388H9904N1700O2006S46
Molar mass 144.1 kDa

References

//////////////Burosumab-twza, Crysvita  FDA 2018, BLA 761068, Protein Based Therapies, Monoclonal antibody, mAb, KRN 23,  breakthrough therapyorphan drug designations, Peptide, ブロスマブ

Tildrakizumab-asmn


Heavy chain:
QVQLVQSGAEVKKPGASVKVSCKASGYIFITYWMTWVRQAPGQGL
EWMGQIFPASGSADYNEKFEGRVTMTTDTSTSTAYMELRSLRSDD
TAVYYCARGGGGFAYWGQGTLVTVSSASTKGPSVFPLAPSSKSTS
GGTAALGCLVKDYFPEPVTVSWNSGALTSGVHTFPAVLQSSGLYS
LSSVVTVPSSSLGTQTYICNVNHKPSNTKVDKKVEPKSCDKTHTC
PPCPAPELLGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSHEDP
EVKFNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREEQYNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNG
KEYKCKVSNKALPAPIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPSRDELTKN
QVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFL
YSKLTVDKSRWQQGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHYTQKSLSLSPGK
Light chain:
DIQMTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTITCRTSENIYSYLAWYQQKPGKAPK
LLIYNAKTLAEGVPSRFSGSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFATYYCQH
HYGIPFTFGQGTKVEIKRTVAAPSVFIFPPSDEQLKSGTASVVCL
LNNFYPREAKVQWKVDNALQSGNSQESVTEQDSKDSTYSLSSTLT
LSKADYEKHKVYACEVTHQGLSSPVTKSFNRGEC

Tildrakizumab-asmn

Immunoglobulin G1, anti-(human interleukin 23) (human-Mus musculus monoclonal heavy chain), disulfide with human-Mus musculus monoclonal light chain, dimer

CAS 1326244-10-3,  BLA 761067

Tildrakizumab (SCH 900222/MK-3222)

ILUMYA; MK-3222; SCH-900222; SUNPG 1622; SUNPG 1622 I; SUNPG 1623 I; SUNPG 1623 II; SUNPG 1623 III; SUNPG 1623 IV; SUNPG1623; Tildrakizumab-asmn

DRUG BANK https://www.drugbank.ca/drugs/DB14004

Company Sun Pharmaceuticals

Approval Status  FDA Approved March 2018 FOR Psoriasis, plaque

Treatments plaque psoriasis

Protein chemical formulaC6426H9918N1698O2000S46

Protein average weight144400.0 DaSequences

>Tildrakizumab Sequence
MLGSRAVMLLLLLPWTAQGRAVPGGSSPAWTQCQQLSQKLCTLAWSAHPLVGHMDLREEG
DEETTNDVPHIQCGDGCDPQGLRDNSQFCLQRIHQGLIFYEKLLGSDIFTGEPSLLPDSP
VGQLHASLLGLSQLLQPEGHHWETQQIPSLSPSQPWQRLLLRFKILRSLQAFVAVAARVF
AHGAATLSP
Tildrakizumab
Monoclonal antibody
Type ?
Source Humanized (from mouse)
Target IL23
Clinical data
Trade names Ilumya
Synonyms Tildrakizumab-asmn
Routes of
administration
Subcutaneous injection
ATC code
  • none
Identifiers
CAS Number
ChemSpider
  • none
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C6426H9918N1698O2000S46
Molar mass 144.4 kg/mol
  • Originator Schering-Plough
  • Developer Almirall S.A.; Merck & Co; Schering-Plough; Sun Pharmaceutical Industries
  • Class Antipsoriatics; Monoclonal antibodies
  • Mechanism of Action Interleukin 23 inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug StatusNo
  • New Molecular EntityYes

Highest Development Phases

  • Registered Plaque psoriasis
  • Phase II Ankylosing spondylitis; Psoriatic arthritis
  • Discontinued Autoimmune disorders

Most Recent Events

  • 21 Mar 2018 Registered for Plaque psoriasis in USA (SC) – First global approval
  • 16 Feb 2018 Adverse events data from two phase III trials (reSURFACE 1 and 2) in chronic Plaque psoriasis presented at the 76th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD-2018)
  • 16 Feb 2018 Pharmacokinetics data from population PK model in healthy volunteers and patients with psoriasis presented at the 76th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD-2018)

Ilumya (tildrakizumab-asmn) is an interleukin-23 antagonist.

Humanized monoclonal IgG1-kappa antibody against IL-23p19; produced in CHO cells
Immunoglobulin G1, anti-(human interleukin 23) (human-Mus musculus monoclonal heavy chain), disulfide with human-Mus musculus monoclonal light chain, dimer

Ilumya is specifically indicated for the treatment of adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy.

Ilumya is supplied as a solution for subcutaneous injection. The recommended dose is 100 mg at Weeks 0, 4, and every twelve weeks thereafter.

Image result for tildrakizumab-asmn

Tildrakizumab (Ilumya) is a monoclonal antibody designed for the treatment of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders.[1] In the United States, it is approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.[2]

Tildrakizumab was designed to block interleukin-23, a cytokine that plays an important role in managing the immune system and autoimmune disease. Originally developed by Schering-Plough, this drug is now part of Merck‘s clinical program, following that company’s acquisition of Schering-Plough.

Sun Pharmaceutical acquired worldwide rights to tildrakizumab for use in all human indications from Merck in exchange for an upfront payment of U.S. $80 million. Upon product approval, Sun Pharmaceutical will be responsible for regulatory activities, including subsequent submissions, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of the approved product. [3]

Image result for tildrakizumab-asmn

As of March 2014, the drug was in phase III clinical trials for plaque psoriasis. The two trials enrolled nearly 2000 patients. [4][5]

In 2016, tildrakizumab became the first IL-23p19 inhibitor to demonstrate positive results in Phase-3 clinical trials for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, further validating the importance of the role of IL-23 in psoriasis. Sun Pharma signed a licensing pact with Spain’s Almirall for marketing tildrakizumab in Europe [6]

In March 2018, it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis as an injection for subcutaneous use in the United States.[2]

In 2014, Sun Pharma acquired worldwide rights to tildrakizumab from Merck; upon product approval, Sun Pharma is responsible for regulatory activities, including subsequent submissions, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of the product. In 2016, Almirall sublicensed the product for the development and marketing in Europe for the treatment of psoriasis.

See also

  • Ustekinumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting both IL-12 and IL-23 and used to treat plaque psoriasis, launched in the United States under the brand name Stelara
  • Guselkumab, another experimental, IL-23-specific monoclonal antibody. (FDA approved in 2017)
  • Risankizumab, another experimental, IL-23-specific monoclonal antibody. (In Phase 3 clinical trials for plaque psoriasis as of 2017)

References

Mechanism of Action

Tildrakizumab is a humanized IgG1/k monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to the p19 subunit of IL-23 and inhibits its interaction with the IL-23 receptor. IL-23 is a naturally occurring cytokine that is involved in inflammatory and immune responses. Tildrakizumab inhibits the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

FDA APPROVAL DATA

BLA 761067

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/appletter/2018/761067Orig1s000REPLACEMENT_ltr.pdf

Please refer to your Biologics License Application (BLA) dated and received March 23, 2017 and your amendments, submitted under section 351(a) of the Public Health Service Act for ILUMYA (tildrakizumab-asmn) injection. We also refer to our approval letter dated March 20, 2018 which contained the following error: the Final Report Submission date was incorrectly listed for postmarketing requirement 3357-3. This replacement approval letter incorporates the correction of the error. The effective approval date will remain March 20, 2018, the date of the original approval letter.

LICENSING We have approved your BLA for ILUMYA (tildrakizumab-asmn) effective this date. You are hereby authorized to introduce or deliver for introduction into interstate commerce, ILUMYA under your existing Department of Health and Human Services U.S. License No. 0002. ILUMYA is indicated for the treatment of adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy.

MANUFACTURING LOCATIONS Under this license, you are approved to manufacture ILUMYA drug substance at . The final formulated drug product will be manufactured, filled, labeled, and packaged at MSD Ireland, Carlow, Ireland. You may label your product with the proprietary name, ILUMYA, and market it in 100 mg/1 mL single-dose prefilled syringe

DATING PERIOD The dating period for ILUMYA drug product shall be 36 months from the date of manufacture when stored at 2-8°C. The date of manufacture shall be defined as the date of final sterile filtration of the formulated drug product. The dating period for your drug substance shall be months from the date of manufacture when stored at We have approved the stability protocols in your license application for the purpose of extending the expiration dating period of your drug substance and drug product under 21 CFR 601.12.

PATENTS

WO 2014109927

PAPER

Antibodies to watch in 2015

Pages 1-8 | Accepted author version posted online: 19 Nov 2014, Published online: 19 Nov 2014

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.4161/19420862.2015.988944

Tildrakizumab (SCH 900222/MK-3222) targets the p19 subunit of IL-23. The mAb was developed by Schering-Plough, which was acquired by Merck & Co. in 2009, and it was then licensed by Merck to Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd in September 2014. Clinical development and regulatory activities will be conducted by Merck, but funded by Sun Pharma. As of October 2014, the safety and efficacy of tildrakizumab are being evaluated in 2 Phase 3 studies that are ongoing but not recruiting patients. Both studies include patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and subcutaneously administered drug. The 52-week Phase 3 NCT01729754 study has 4 arms (200 mg tildrakizumab; 100 mg tildrakizumab; 50 mg etanercept; and placebo only), and includes an optional long-term safety extension study. The estimated enrollment is 1050, and the estimated primary completion date is October 2019. The 64-week Phase 3 NCT01722331 study is evaluating the effects of either 200 mg or 100 mg tildrakizumab to placebo; it includes an optional long-term safety extension study. The estimated enrollment is 885, and the estimated primary completion date is June 2015.

Image result for tildrakizumab-asmn


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Sun Pharma 

Mar 21, 2018, 09:04 ET

MUMBAI, India and PRINCETON, N.J.March 21, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Reuters: SUN.BO, Bloomberg: SUNP IN, NSE: SUNPHARMA, BSE: 524715, “Sun Pharma” and includes its subsidiaries and/or associate companies) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ILUMYA™ (tildrakizumab-asmn) for the treatment of adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy. ILUMYA selectively binds to the p19 subunit of IL-23 and inhibits its interaction with the IL-23 receptor leading to inhibition of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. ILUMYA is administered at a dose of 100 mg by subcutaneous injection every 12 weeks, after the completion of initial doses at weeks 0 and 4. ILUMYA is contraindicated in patients with a previous serious hypersensitivity reaction to tildrakizumab or to any of the excipients.

“With the approval of ILUMYA and our long-standing commitment in dermatology, we are focused on making a difference for people living with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis,” said Abhay Gandhi, President and Chief Executive Officer, North America, Sun Pharma. “We are committed to working with all relevant stakeholders to make ILUMYA available to appropriate people with plaque psoriasis.”

The FDA approval of ILUMYA for the treatment of adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis was supported by data from the pivotal Phase-3 reSURFACE clinical development program. In the two multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (reSURFACE 1 and reSURFACE 2), 926 adult patients were treated with ILUMYA (N=616) or placebo (N=310). Results from these studies were published in The Lancet in July 2017, with primary endpoints presented at the 25th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Congress.

Both Phase-3 studies met the primary efficacy endpoints, demonstrating significant clinical improvement with ILUMYA 100 mg compared to placebo when measured by at least 75 percent of skin clearance (Psoriasis Area Sensitivity Index or PASI 75) and Physician’s Global Assessment (PGA) score of “clear” or “minimal” at week 12 after two doses.

Efficacy Primary Endpoint at Week 12 in Adults with Plaque Psoriasis (NRI*)

reSURFACE 1 Study

(NCT01722331)

reSURFACE 2 Study

(NCT01729754)

ILUMYA 100 mg

n=309

Placebo

n=154

ILUMYA 100 mg

n=307

Placebo

n=156

PGA of “clear” (0) or “minimal” (1)†

179 (58%)

11 (7%)

168 (55%)

7 (4%)

PASI 75†

197 (64%)

9 (6%)

188 (61%)

9 (6%)

PASI 90

107 (35%)

4 (3%)

119 (39%)

2 (1%)

PASI 100

43 (14%)

2 (1%)

38 (12%)

0 (0%)

* NRI = Non-Responder Imputation † Co-Primary Endpoints

Of the patients in the reSURFACE 1 study 74 percent (229 patients) achieved 75 percent skin clearance at week 28 after three doses, and 84 percent of patients who continued receiving ILUMYA 100 mg maintained PASI 75 at week 64 compared to 22 percent of patients who were re-randomized to placebo. In addition, 69 percent of the patients receiving ILUMYA 100 mg who had a PGA score of “clear” or “minimal” at week 28 maintained this response at week 64 compared to 14 percent of patients who were re-randomized to placebo.

Full Prescribing Information and Medication Guide for ILUMYA are attached:
PDF: https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/656994/Sun_Pharma_ILUMYA_US_Prescribing_Information.pdf
PDF: https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/656995/Sun_Pharma_ILUMYA_US_Medication_Guide.pdf

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION (continued)

Cases of angioedema and urticaria occurred in ILUMYA treated subjects in clinical trial. If a serious hypersensitivity reaction occurs, discontinue ILUMYA immediately and initiate appropriate therapy.

ILUMYA may increase the risk of infection. Treatment with ILUMYA should not be initiated in patients with a clinically important active infection until the infection resolves or is adequately treated. Consider the risks and benefits of treatment prior to prescribing ILUMYA in patients with a chronic infection or a history of recurrent infection. Instruct patients receiving ILUMYA to seek medical help if signs or symptoms of clinically important chronic or acute infection occur. If a patient develops a clinically important or serious infection, or is not responding to standard therapy, closely monitor and discontinue ILUMYA until the infection resolves.

Evaluate patients for TB infection prior to initiating treatment with ILUMYA. Initiate treatment of latent TB prior to administering ILUMYA. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of active TB during and after ILUMYA treatment. Do not administer ILUMYA to patients with active TB infection.

Prior to initiating ILUMYA, consider completion of all age-appropriate immunizations according to current immunization guidelines. Avoid use of live vaccines in patients treated with ILUMYA.

The most common (≥1%) adverse reactions associated with ILUMYA include upper respiratory infections, injection site reactions, and diarrhea.  Adverse reactions that occurred at rates less than 1% but greater than 0.1% in the ILUMYA group and at a higher rate than in the placebo group included dizziness and pain in extremity.

About the Phase-3 reSURFACE Trials
The Phase-3 studies (reSURFACE 1 and reSURFACE 2) were randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, three-part studies designed to demonstrate efficacy of ILUMYA in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis compared to placebo and comparative drug and to assess safety and tolerability. Part one of the studies randomized patients into three or four treatment arms, including ILUMYA 100 mg, ILUMYA 200 mg, placebo and etanercept (reSURFACE 2 only). After Week 12, patients on placebo were then re-randomized into ILUMYA 100 mg and 200 mg treatment arms to proceed into part two of the studies. Finally, in part three of the reSURFACE 1 study, responders (PASI ≥75) and partial responders (PASI ≥50 and PASI <75) to ILUMYA were re-randomized after Week 28 to continue the same treatment, a different dose of ILUMYA or placebo. Partial and non-responders to etanercept were treated with ILUMYA 200 mg in part three of the reSURFACE 2 study. Patients with guttate, erythrodermic, or pustular psoriasis were excluded.

About Psoriasis
Psoriasis is a chronic immune disease that appears on the skin. It is a non-contagious disorder that speeds the growth cycle of skin cells1 and results in thick scaly areas of skin2. The most common form, affecting about 80 to 90 percent of people living with psoriasis, is called plaque psoriasis3. It appears as red, raised areas of skin covered with flaky white scales, which may be itchy and painful and can crack and bleed2. Many people with plaque psoriasis continue to struggle with the ongoing, persistent nature of this chronic disease.

About Sun Dermatology
Sun Dermatology (the branded dermatology division of a wholly owned subsidiary of Sun Pharma) is committed to expanding its dermatology portfolio to bring healthcare providers and patients around the world more treatment options and ongoing support for conditions like moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Sun Pharma, along with its subsidiaries, is ranked fourth in dermatology prescription volume within the U.S. per IMS and is fifth largest specialty generic pharmaceutical company globally. In addition to ILUMYA, Sun Dermatology is comprised of several branded products indicated for the treatment of acne and actinic keratosis with a focus on other dermatologic conditions.

About Sun Pharma, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA, Agreement
Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.’s wholly owned subsidiary licensed worldwide rights to ILUMYA from a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA, in 2014. Funded by a Sun Pharma subsidiary, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA was responsible for the completion of Phase-3 trials and submission of a Biologics License Application to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as well as manufacturing finished goods to support Sun Pharma’s initial product launch. Sun Pharma will be responsible for all post-approval regulatory activities, including subsequent submissions, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of the approved product. Sun Pharma will also be responsible for all regulatory, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialization of approved products for all non-U.S. markets. Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA is eligible to receive milestone payments and royalties on sales of ILUMYA.

About Sun Pharma, Almirall S.A, Europe, Agreement
Sun Pharma and its wholly owned subsidiary and Almirall (Spanish Stock Exchange ticker: ALM) closed on July 2016 a licensing agreement on the development and commercialization of tildrakizumab-asmn for psoriasis in Europe. Under the terms of the licensing agreement, Almirall is able to lead European studies, and participate in larger Global clinical studies for plaque psoriasis indication subject to the terms of the Sun Pharma – Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA agreements, as well as certain cost sharing agreements. Sun Pharma will be eligible to receive development and regulatory milestone payments and, additionally, sales milestone payments and royalties on net sales. Sun Pharma will continue to lead development of tildrakizumab-asmn for other indications, where Almirall will have right of first negotiation for certain indications in Europe. The agreement between Sun Pharma and Almirall remains subject to the exclusive licensing agreement between Sun Pharma and Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA.

About Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (CIN – L24230GJ1993PLC019050) 
Sun Pharma is the world’s fifth largest specialty generic pharmaceutical company and India’s top pharmaceutical company. A vertically integrated business, economies of scale and an extremely skilled team enable us to deliver quality products in a timely manner at affordable prices. It provides high-quality, affordable medicines trusted by customers and patients in over 150 countries across the world. Sun Pharma’s global presence is supported by 41 manufacturing facilities spread across 6 continents, R&D centres across the globe and a multi-cultural workforce comprising over 50 nationalities. In India, the company enjoys leadership across 11 different classes of doctors with 30 brands featuring amongst top 300 pharmaceutical brands in India. Its footprint across emerging markets covers over 100 markets and 6 markets in Western Europe. Its Global Consumer Healthcare business is ranked amongst Top 10 across 3 global markets. Its API business footprint is strengthened through 14 world class API manufacturing facilities across the globe. Sun Pharma fosters excellence through innovation supported by strong R&D capabilities comprising about 2,000 scientists and R&D investments of approximately 8% of annual revenues. For further information, please visit www.sunpharma.com & follow us on Twitter @SunPharma_Live.

References
1. National Psoriasis Foundation. Facts about psoriasis. www.psoriasis.org/sites/default/files/for-media/MediaKit.pdf. Accessed on February 22, 2018.
2. National Psoriasis Foundation. About Psoriasis. www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis. Accessed on February 22, 2018.
3. Menter A, Gottlieb A, Feldman SR, Van Voorhees AS et al. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 1. Overview of psoriasis and guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with biologics. J Am Acad Dermatol 2008 May; 58(5):826-50.

////////////////tildrakizumab-asmn, FDA 2018, MERCK, Schering-Plough, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, SCH 900222, MK-3222, Psoriasis, plaque,  BLA 761067, SCH-900222, SUNPG 1622, SUNPG 1622 I, SUNPG 1623 I, SUNPG 1623 II, SUNPG 1623 III, SUNPG 1623 IV, SUNPG1623,

Lofexidine, лофексидин , لوفيكسيدين , 洛非西定 ,


Lofexidine.svgLofexidine.png

Lofexidine

  • Molecular FormulaC11H12Cl2N2O
  • Average mass259.132 Da
  • (±)-2-[1-(2,6-Dichlorophenoxy)ethyl]-2-imidazoline
UNII:UI82K0T627
лофексидин [Russian] [INN]
لوفيكسيدين [Arabic] [INN]
洛非西定 [Chinese] [INN]
1H-Imidazole, 2-(1-(2,6-dichlorophenoxy)ethyl)-4,5-dihydro- (9CI)
2-{1-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)oxy]ethyl}-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole
CAS 31036-80-3 [RN]
Lofetensin, Loxacor
Synthesis Reference ZA 6800850eidem, US 3966757 (1968, 1976 both to Nordmark)
DE 1935479, Jan 21, 1971
U.S. Patent 3,966,757.

FDA Approved May 2018

Lofexidine was developed by US Woldmeds LLC and it got approved by the FDA on May 16, 2018

File:Lofexidine synthesis.svg

Experimental Properties

PROPERTY VALUE SOURCE
melting point (°C) 221-223 U.S. Patent 3,966,757.
boiling point (°C) 421.5 ºC at 760 mm Hg ‘MSDS’
water solubility Soluble ‘MSDS’
logP 5.37 FDA Advisory Committee Briefing Document.
pKa 9.43 FDA Advisory Committee Briefing Document.

SYN

Organic Process Research & Development, 13(3), 415-419; 2009

Title: Lofexidine
CAS Registry Number: 31036-80-3
CAS Name: 2-[1-(2,6-Dichlorophenoxy)ethyl]-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole
Additional Names: 2-[1-(2,6-dichlorophenoxy)ethyl]-2-imidazoline
Molecular Formula: C11H12Cl2N2O
Molecular Weight: 259.13
Percent Composition: C 50.99%, H 4.67%, Cl 27.36%, N 10.81%, O 6.17%
Literature References: a2-Adrenoceptor agonist related structurally to clonidine, q.v. Prepn of the HCl salt: H. Baganz, H. J. May, ZA 6800850eidem, US 3966757 (1968, 1976 both to Nordmark); of the free base: eidem, DE 1935479 (1971 to Nordmark), C.A.74, 87979 (1971). Pharmacological studies: J. Velly, J. Pharmacol. 8, 351 (1977); B. Jarrot et al., Biochem. Pharmacol. 28, 141 (1979). NMR data and cardiovascular effects: P. B. M. Timmermans, P. A. Van Zwieten, Eur. J. Med. Chem. 15, 323 (1980). Hypotensive and sedative properties: P. Birch et al., Br. J. Pharmacol. 68, 107 (1980). Effects in hypertension: N. D. Vlachakis et al., Fed. Proc. 39, 4844 (1980). Series of articles on pharmacology, toxicology, clinical studies: Arzneim.-Forsch. 32, 915-993 (1982). Toxicity studies: T. H. Tsai et al., ibid. 955. Review of clinical trials in treatment of opiate withdrawal: J. Strang et al., Am. J. Addict. 8, 337-348 (1999).
Properties: Crystals, mp 126-128°.
Melting point: mp 126-128°
Derivative Type: Hydrochloride
CAS Registry Number: 21498-08-8
Manufacturers’ Codes: MDL-14042A; Ba-168
Trademarks: BritLofex (Britannia); Lofetensin (Nattermann)
Molecular Formula: C11H12Cl2N2O.HCl
Molecular Weight: 295.59
Percent Composition: C 44.70%, H 4.43%, Cl 35.98%, N 9.48%, O 5.41%
Properties: Crystals from ethanol/ether or 2-propanol, mp 221-223° (U.S. patent); also reported as mp 230-232° (Ger. patent). Very sol in water, ethanol. Slightly sol in 2-propanol. Practically insol in ether. LD50 in mice, rats, dogs (mg/kg): between 74-147 orally (all species); between 8-18 i.v. (all species) (Tsai).
Melting point: mp 221-223° (U.S. patent); mp 230-232° (Ger. patent)
Toxicity data: LD50 in mice, rats, dogs (mg/kg): between 74-147 orally (all species); between 8-18 i.v. (all species) (Tsai)
Therap-Cat: In treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms; antihypertensive.
Keywords: Antihypertensive; Imidazole Derivatives.

Image result for lofexidine synthesis

LOFEXIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE

Cas No. 21498-08-8

Lofexidine, sold under the brand name Lucemyra among others,[1] is a medication historically used to treat high blood pressure, but more commonly used to help with the physical symptoms of opioid withdrawal.[2] It is taken by mouth.[3] It is an α2A adrenergic receptoragonist.[3] It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States in 2018.[3]

Medical uses

In the United States, the brand name Lucemyra (lofexidine HCl) is approved for the “mitigation of withdrawal symptoms to facilitate abrupt discontinuation of opioids in adults,” for a treatment duration of 14 days.[1] In the United Kingdom, lofexidine is commonly used in conjunction with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone in rapid detoxification cases. When these two drugs are paired, naltrexone is administered to induce an opioid-receptor blockade sending the subject into immediate withdrawal and accelerating the detoxificationprocess, while lofexidine is given to relieve the symptoms associated with the withdrawal including chills, sweating, stomach cramps, muscle pain, and runny nose.[citation needed]

Opioid withdrawal

The United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend the use of methadone or buprenorphine as first-line agents in the management of opioid use disorder. However, lofexidine is considered an acceptable alternative for people with mild or uncertain opioid dependence in need of short-term detoxification.[4]

Lofexidine is not an opioid.[3] It does not eliminate the symptoms of opioid withdrawal but reduces them.[3] Indeed, one suggested use for lofexidine is to ease withdrawal symptoms of methadone dependence. Its use is approved in the United States for up to 14 days.[3]

Other clinical uses

The possibility of using lofexidine to treat alcohol withdrawal symptoms has been investigated, and has not yet been shown to be an effective treatment.[5] It is also used in treatment of cases suffering from postmenopausal hot flashes.

Special populations

Lofexidine’s safety in pregnancy or in the setting of breastfeeding are unknown.[6] Caution is warranted if chronic kidney impairment is present.[6]

Adverse effects

Adverse effects that have occurred after taking lofexidine include the following:[6]

In addition, people may experience a sudden jump in blood pressure after stopping lofexidine.[1]

Overdose

The LD50 of lofexidine is above 77 mg/kg in animals. Studies of high-dose, single administrations of lofexidine proved tolerable for animals, but repeat administration induced symptoms consistent with toxicity. In studies on mice, rats, and dogs, these included ataxiasomnolence, and tremors. It is expected that an overdose of lofexidine would result in symptoms akin to its pharmacological side effects in humans, such as bradycardia and hypotension.[7]

Interactions

Many drug-drug interactions with lofexidine are possible.[8]

QT prolongation

Lofexidine prolongs the QT interval, which can result in a severe interaction (torsade de pointes) when combined with other drugs that also prolong the QT interval. Patient-specific characteristics that increase the risk for a clinically-significant drug-drug interaction include:[8]

As a result, there are many QT-prolonging drugs that may interact with lofexidine. These include medications such as amiodaronecitalopram, and fluconazole. Other medications may increase the risk for a low level of potassium in the blood, thereby indirectly increasing the risk for QT prolongation. For example, dexamethasonehydrochlorothiazide, and theophylline can lower the level of potassium in the blood.[8]

CNS depression

Lofexidine can depress the central nervous system (CNS), which, in combination with other CNS depressants, may reduce a person’s ability to perform tasks that require skills and attention. For example, clobazamgabapentin, and levetiracetam all can depress the CNS.[8]

Hypotension

The risk of hypotension (low blood pressure) is increased when lofexidine is combined with other drugs that lower blood pressure. These may include losartanmetoprolol, and pramipexole.[8]

Pharmacology

Lofexidine is an agonist at the α-2A, 2B, and 2C adrenergic receptor subtypes, with the highest activity at the alpha-2A receptor.[9]

Ki for lofexidine[9]
Adrenergic receptor Ki (nM)
α-2A 4
α-2B 67
α-2C 69

Ki represents the dissociation constant[10] for lofexidine’s binding to a specific subtype of alpha-2 receptor. The smaller the Ki value, the stronger the drug binds to the receptor to exert its activity.

Lofexidine inhibits the release of norepinephrine in the central and peripheral nervous system, thereby reducing some of the symptoms of opioid withdrawal, but it has no documented effect on drug craving and endogenous opioid levels.[2]

Pharmacokinetics

Lofexidine’s oral bioavailability is about 90%, with extensive oral absorption. Peak plasma concentrations occur at 3 hours after a single administration, with a half-life of 11 hours. Lofexidine is extensively metabolized by the liver, and primarily cleared by the kidney. It is 80-90% plasma protein bound.[7]

Chemistry

Lofexidine exists as a solid at room temperature, with a melting point of 127 degrees C.[7] The pair of ortho chlorine (Cl) atoms on the phenyl ring are necessary for lofexidine’s agonism at the α2a adrenergic receptor subtype; removal of either chlorine atom results in antagonism at the receptor.[9]

Comparison to clonidine

Structure of clonidine and lofexidine

Lofexidine is structurally analogous to clonidine, another α2 adrenergic receptor agonist used for treatment of opioid withdrawal symptoms. A comparison of the two structures is shown at right. Both contain an imidazoline ring and a 2,6-dichlorinated phenyl ring. The differences in structure are shown in red, while the similarities are in black. In addition to the structural differences, administration of lofexidine to people who abuse opioids has been shown to be more effective for a longer duration, with fewer withdrawal symptoms than clonidine even after one day.[11] However, clonidine is often preferred as it is substantially cheaper than lofexidine when purchased with a private (non-NHS) prescription. This factor is exacerbated by the considerable number of and quantities of medications prescribed to alleviate the constellation of withdrawal signs and symptoms. Additionally, clonidine has been shown to significantly lower blood pressure. Therefore, although similar to lofexidine, clonidine is most frequently prescribed to treat high blood pressure.[citation needed]

Society and culture

Britannia Pharmaceuticals has licensed lofexidine to be sold by US WorldMeds for sale in North America.[12] In the United Kingdom, the hydrochloride form, lofexidine HCl, has been licensed and sold since 1992 for opioid withdrawal relief in tablet form as BritLofex by Britannia Pharmaceuticals.[2] BritLofex is only available by prescription. Lofexidine was first approved by the US FDA on May 16, 2018 under the brand name Lucemyra, produced by US WorldMeds.[13] It was noted as the first, non-opioid drug approved in the US for the treatment of opioid withdrawal.[1]

Heroin has been reported to be the most prominent illicit drug of abuse among admissions at public!} -funded substance abuse treatment facilities in the US. At some time in their lives, about 2.4 million people have used heroin; in 1997, there were 81 ,000 new heroin users of whom 87% were less than 26 years of age. In spite of efforts to decrease illicit drug abuse, the problem escalates and the abusing population is increasingly younger. Hospital emergency room episodes from 21 metropolitan areas show that 14% of drug-related emergency room episodes involved heroin, and such episodes increased more than 2-fold from 1991 to 1996. Additionally, prescription opioid abuse escalates; the number of people addicted to prescription pain relievers is 3 -fold higher than those addicted to heroin. For example, from 1999 to 2001, the non-medical use of OxyContin®increased 4-fold, and its use continues to escalate.

[0003] Generally, opioid addiction has been associated with high morbidity and mortality, with a 15-20 fold increase in risk of death for intravenous drug users compared with their same age peers. Clearly, the medical and social importance of the development of effective treatments for opioid addiction is well recognized. Surprisingly, few treatment options for opioid addiction are available.

[0004] Withdrawal, maintenance and relapse are considered the progressive stages for treatment of opioid addiction. There are two predominant management strategies for the treatment of opioid addiction, detoxification and substitution therapy, which are typically combined with medical, social and psychological support. A majority of individuals may benefit from remaining in the maintenance phase for an indefinite period of time, while others may be able to directly undergo medically-supervised detoxification and/or relapse therapy, without the need for maintenance therapy. Methadone and buprenorphine constitute the most commonly used pharmacotherapies. Although patients continue to be successfully treated with methadone, a mμ opioid receptor agonist, several disadvantages of methadone treatment include the length of time for withdrawal, the difficulty of obtaining complete abstinence, and liability for its abuse. Due to the abuse liability of methadone and its consequent Schedule II classification by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), methadone has additional disadvantages with respect to its prescription requirements, the carefully controlled conditions under which it is dispensed, and the annoyance experienced by patients who must frequently visit the dispensing unit to obtain their methadone dosages.

[0005] BritLofex™ (Lofexidine hydrochloride 0.2 mg tablet), an α2-adrenergic agonist, is used as a non-opioid medication for opioid detoxification in the United Kingdom (UK). There is no non-opioid medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this indication in the US. The only medications currently approved by the FDA for opioid detoxification are methadone and buprenorphine, both opioid receptor agonists and both associated with abuse liability. Clonidine, an 012-adrenergic agonist, is often used “off-label” for this indication in the U.S. However, clonidine has not been approved by the FDA for this indication. However, the use of clonidine is limited by its side-effect profile, i.e., significant hypotension at doses effective in alleviating opioid withdrawal symptoms.

[0006] In contrast, Lofexidine HCl is the only non-opiate, non-addictive treatment approved for use in the UK to manage withdrawal symptoms in patients undergoing opiate detoxification. Lofexidine has been found to be effective in reducing the symptoms associated with heroin withdrawal such as chills, vomiting, sweating, stomach cramps, diarrhea, muscle pain, and runny nose and eyes. In the UK, the treatment is responsible for approximately 20,000 detoxifications per year. The drug’s proven level of safety permits its use in an outpatient situation. This is of great importance to patients in the US who are located in parts of the country where treatment clinics are not readily available.

[0007] Although naltrexone, methadone and more recently buprenorphine are FDA approved in the treatment of opioid addiction, these opioid treatments are associated with high relapse rates. Furthermore, there is currently insufficient availability of methadone and buprenorphine treatment for patients who abuse opioids. A significant number of these patients are undergoing detoxification treatments. However, the great risk of abuse and several other existing restrictions, such as medical prescribing and pharmaceutical dispensing, limit the use of methadone and buprenorphine for outpatient detoxification. In addition, the unapproved status of clonidine, its side effects, such as the lowering of blood pressure, and moderate efficacy limit its use. A substantial amount of research is ongoing to understand the mechanisms that may underline the high rates of relapse associated with opioid addiction. There is growing evidence that chronic drug use results in neuroadaptive changes in brain stress and reward circuits that may be associated with increased drug craving and risk of relapse particularly in the face of environmental triggers such as stressful life events and drug cues.

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/EP2334297A1/en

The lofexidine hydrochloride tablets available in the UK market (BritLofex™) contain the racemic mixture of the drug. However, since lofexidine enantiomers exhibit different affinities for central the nervous system neurotransmitter receptors involved in (±)-lofexidine’s action as a medication for opioid detoxification, each of these enantiomers may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of opioid addiction.

Experimental

[0028] 1) Resolution of (-)-lofexidine and (+)-lofexidine enantiomers found in the racemic mixture using chiral stationary phases by HPLC method:

[0029] A chiral chromatographic matrix was used to separate a racemic mixture of lofexidine into its component enantiomers by a process of HPLC to obtain optically pure (-)- lofexidine and optically pure (+)-lofexidine. The separation was performed using a chiral stationary phase consisted of D-glucose cyclodextran complex (Cyclobond HP-RSP) from Astec

Company (Whippany, NJ, USA) using a mobile phase consisted of 1OmM ammonium acetate

(88%), acetonitrile (8%), and methanol (8%) at 0.85 ml/min flow rate. Analysis was performed using Agilent series 1100 HPLC system comprising a solvent degasser unit, quaternary pump, autosampler, and DAD detector. Using such chiral stationary phase in a preparative scale enables the yield of gram quantities of desired enantiomers.

[0030] Resolution of (-)-lofexidine and (+)-lofexidine enantiomers found in the racemic mixture using a chiral acid, not only diastereomeric salt formation but also preferential crystallization: [0031] Optical resolution of (±)-lofexidine hydrochloride by using the classical methods of salt formation with a chiral acid such as, [( Di-p-toluoyl-D-tartaric acid [D]D20 +142° (c=l, CH3OH)] as shown in Figure 1, yielded (-)-lofexidine hydrochloride and (+)-lofexidine hydrochloride enantiomers (yield = 87%). The method comprised the following steps: [0032] A racemic form of lofexidine (10 mmol) was placed in ethanol (100 mL), and the chiral acid (+)-Di-p-toluoyl-D-tartaric acid was added in order to form a mixture of the (+)(-) and (+)(+) diastereomeric lofexidine salts. The diastereomeric salts i.e.: (+)(-) lofexidine Di-p- toluoyl-D-tartarate salt was separated from the (+)(+) lofexidine Di-p-toluoyl-D-tartarate salt by a process of fractional crystallization. 10 mL methanol and 1 ml water was added and the mixture was heated for 1 hour at 55-65 0C. After the mixture became clear it was left to cool down at room temperature. The crystals were isolated after two days, dried under vacuum. Recrystallization was performed using ethanol (20 volumes). Final yield was 87%. [0033] Chiral purity of the resulting crystals was tested by the chiral HPLC method. The

(+)(-) lofexidine Di-p-toluoyl-D-tartarate salt or the(+)(+) lofexidine Di-p-toluoyl-D-tartarate salt obtained was treated with a base such as 0.1 N sodium carbonate to liberate (-)-lofexidine and (+)-lofexidine. The resulting enantiomerically pure free base of (-)-lofexidine and (+)-lofexidine was converted to lofexidine hydrochloride salt.

PAPER

A Scalable, Enantioselective Synthesis of the α2-Adrenergic Agonist, Lofexidine

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, 725 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40536, U.S.A.
Org. Process Res. Dev.200913 (3), pp 415–419
DOI: 10.1021/op8002689

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/op8002689

* Author to whom correspondence may be sent. Tel: 859-257-1718. Fax: 859-257-7585. E-mail: pcrooks@email.uky.edu.
Abstract Image

A scalable and high-yielding synthetic route toward pure enantiomers of the α2-adrenergic agonist, lofexidine hydrochloride, is presented. Salient features include a rapid one-pot amide alkylation-imidazoline formation sequence on the carboxamide function of α-(2,6-dichlorophenoxy)propionamide, while preserving the sensitive configuration about the α-carbon of the resulting product. A means to accelerate the sluggish O-alkylation of the carboxamide function of α-(2,6-dichlorophenoxy)propionamide by Me3O+BF4 is also described, which may be of general applicability.

PATENTS

US8101779B2 *2008-10-062012-01-24University Of Kentucky Research FoundationEnantioselective synthesis of (+) and (–)-2-[1-(2,6-dichlorophenoxy)-ethyl]-1,3-diazacyclopent-2-ene

DE3149009A1 *1981-12-101983-06-23Nattermann A & Cie(-) – 2- (1- (2,6-dichlorophenoxy) ethyl) -1,3-diazacyclopent-2-ene, its preparation and its use in pharmaceutical preparations
DE3149010A1 *1981-12-101983-07-07Nattermann A & Cie(+) – 2- (1- (2,6-dichlorophenoxy) ethyl) -1,3-diazacyclopent-2-ene, its preparation and its use in preparations pharamazeutischen
EP1762239B1 *2005-09-082010-05-26Texcontor EtablissementLofexidine for intraspinal administration

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  9. Jump up to:a b c Fulton, Brian (2014). Drug Discovery for the Treatment of Addiction: Medicinal Chemistry Strategies. John Wiley & Sons. p. 151. ISBN 0470614161.
  10. Jump up^ Neubig, R. R. (1 December 2003). “International Union of Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification. XXXVIII. Update on Terms and Symbols in Quantitative Pharmacology”. Pharmacological Reviews55 (4): 597–606. doi:10.1124/pr.55.4.4.
  11. Jump up^ G. Gerra, et al., Lofexidine versus clonidine in rapid opioid detoxification, Journal of Substance Abuse TreatmentVolume 21, Issue 1, , July 2001, Pages 11-17.
  12. Jump up^ Britannia Pharmaceuticals Limited
  13. Jump up^ “Lucemyra (lofexidine hydrochloride) FDA Approval History – Drugs.com”Drugs.com. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
Lofexidine
Lofexidine.svg
Clinical data
Trade names BritLofex, Lucemyra, Kai Er Ding, others
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Routes of
administration
By mouth (tablets)
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • AU: S4 (Prescription only)
  • UK: POM (Prescription only)
  • US: ℞-only
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability >90%
Protein binding 80–90%
Metabolism Liver (glucuronidation)
Elimination half-life 11 hours
Excretion Kidney
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
Formula C11H12Cl2N2O
Molar mass 259.131 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
Chirality Racemic mixture

/////////////lofexidine, FDA 2018, лофексидин لوفيكسيدين 洛非西定 , Lofetensin, Loxacor

CC(C1=NCCN1)OC2=C(C=CC=C2Cl)Cl

FDA approves new drug Doptelet (avatrombopag) for patients with chronic liver disease who have low blood platelets and are undergoing a medical procedure


Avatrombopag.png

Avatrombopag

https://newdrugapprovals.org/2015/08/24/avatrombopag/

FDA approves new drug for patients with chronic liver disease who have low blood platelets and are undergoing a medical procedure

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Doptelet (avatrombopag) tablets to treat low blood platelet count (thrombocytopenia) in adults with chronic liver disease who are scheduled to undergo a medical or dental procedure. This is the first drug approved by the FDA for this use.Continue reading.

May 21, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Doptelet (avatrombopag) tablets to treat low blood platelet count (thrombocytopenia) in adults with chronic liver disease who are scheduled to undergo a medical or dental procedure. This is the first drug approved by the FDA for this use.

“Patients with chronic liver disease who have low platelet counts and require a procedure are at increased risk of bleeding,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Doptelet was demonstrated to safely increase the platelet count. This drug may decrease or eliminate the need for platelet transfusions, which are associated with risk of infection and other adverse reactions.”

Platelets (thrombocytes) are colorless cells produced in the bone marrow that help form blood clots in the vascular system and prevent bleeding. Thrombocytopenia is a condition in which there is a lower-than-normal number of circulating platelets in the blood. When patients have moderately to severely reduced platelet counts, serious or life-threatening bleeding can occur, especially during invasive procedures. Patients with significant thrombocytopenia typically receive platelet transfusions immediately prior to a procedure to increase the platelet count.

The safety and efficacy of Doptelet was studied in two trials (ADAPT-1 and ADAPT-2) involving 435 patients with chronic liver disease and severe thrombocytopenia who were scheduled to undergo a procedure that would typically require platelet transfusion. The trials investigated two dose levels of Doptelet administered orally over five days as compared to placebo (no treatment). The trial results showed that for both dose levels of Doptelet, a higher proportion of patients had increased platelet counts and did not require platelet transfusion or any rescue therapy on the day of the procedure and up to seven days following the procedure as compared to those treated with placebo.

The most common side effects reported by clinical trial participants who received Doptelet were fever, stomach (abdominal) pain, nausea, headache, fatigue and swelling in the hands or feet (edema). People with chronic liver disease and people with certain blood clotting conditions may have an increased risk of developing blood clots when taking Doptelet.

This product was granted Priority Review, under which the FDA’s goal is to take action on an application within six months where the agency determines that the drug, if approved, would significantly improve the safety or effectiveness of treating, diagnosing or preventing a serious condition.

The FDA granted this approval to AkaRx Inc.

 

//////////////Doptelet, avatrombopag, fda 2018, akarx, priority review,

FDA approves new uses for two drugs Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib) administered together for the treatment of BRAF-positive anaplastic thyroid cancer


Image result for Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

 

FDA approves new uses for two drugs Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib) administered together for the treatment of BRAF-positive anaplastic thyroid cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib), administered together, for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), and has a type of abnormal gene, BRAF V600E (BRAF V600E mutation-positive). Continue reading.

May 4, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib), administered together, for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), and has a type of abnormal gene, BRAF V600E (BRAF V600E mutation-positive).

“This is the first FDA-approved treatment for patients with this aggressive form of thyroid cancer, and the third cancer with this specific gene mutation that this drug combination has been approved to treat,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This approval demonstrates that targeting the same molecular pathway in diverse diseases is an effective way to expedite the development of treatments that may help more patients.”

Thyroid cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the thyroid gland. Anaplastic thyroid cancer is a rare, aggressive type of thyroid cancer. The National Institutes of Health estimates there will be 53,990 new cases of thyroid cancer and an estimated 2,060 deaths from the disease in the United States in 2018. Anaplastic thyroid cancer accounts for about 1 to 2 percent of all thyroid cancers.

Both Tafinlar and Mekinist are also approved for use, alone or in combination, to treat BRAF V600 mutation-positive metastatic melanoma. Additionally, Tafinlar and Mekinist are approved for use, in combination, to treat BRAF V600E mutation-positive, metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

The efficacy of Tafinlar and Mekinist in treating ATC was shown in an open-label clinical trial of patients with rare cancers with the BRAF V600E mutation. Data from trials in BRAF V600E mutation-positive, metastatic melanoma or lung cancer and results in other BRAF V600E mutation-positive rare cancers provided confidence in the results seen in patients with ATC. The trial measured the percent of patients with a complete or partial reduction in tumor size (overall response rate). Of 23 evaluable patients, 57 percent experienced a partial response and 4 percent experienced a complete response; in nine (64 percent) of the 14 patients with responses, there were no significant tumor growths for six months or longer.

The side effects of Tafinlar and Mekinist in patients with ATC are consistent with those seen in other cancers when the two drugs are used together. Common side effects include fever (pyrexia), rash, chills, headache, joint pain (arthralgia), cough, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myalgia (muscle pain), dry skin, decreased appetite, edema, hemorrhage, high blood pressure (hypertension) and difficulty breathing (dyspnea).

Severe side effects of Tafinlar include the development of new cancers, growth of tumors in patients with BRAF wild-type tumors, serious bleeding problems, heart problems, severe eye problems, fever that may be severe, serious skin reactions, high blood sugar or worsening diabetes, and serious anemia.

Severe side effects of Mekinist include the development of new cancers; serious bleeding problems; inflammation of intestines and perforation of the intestines; blood clots in the arms, legs or lungs; heart problems; severe eye problems; lung or breathing problems; fever that may be severe; serious skin reactions; and high blood sugar or worsening diabetes.

Both Tafinlar and Mekinist can cause harm to a developing fetus; women should be advised of the potential risk to the fetus and to use effective contraception.

The FDA granted Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapy designation for this indication. Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases, was also granted for this indication.

The FDA granted this approval to Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

 

///////////////Tafinlar, dabrafenib,  Mekinist, trametinib, fda 2018, Priority Review,  Breakthrough Therapy designation, Orphan Drug designation,  Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation,

FDA approves first therapy Crysvita (burosumab) for rare inherited form of rickets, x-linked hypophosphatemia


FDA approves first therapy for rare inherited form of rickets, x-linked hypophosphatemia

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Crysvita (burosumab), the first drug approved to treat adults and children ages 1 year and older with x-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), a rare, inherited form of rickets. XLH causes low levels of phosphorus in the blood. It leads to impaired bone growth and development in children and adolescents and problems with bone mineralization throughout a patient’s life.

April 17, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Crysvita (burosumab), the first drug approved to treat adults and children ages 1 year and older with x-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), a rare, inherited form of rickets. XLH causes low levels of phosphorus in the blood. It leads to impaired bone growth and development in children and adolescents and problems with bone mineralization throughout a patient’s life.

“XLH differs from other forms of rickets in that vitamin D therapy is not effective,” stated Julie Beitz, M.D., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This is the first FDA-approved medication for the treatment of XLH and a real breakthrough for those living with this serious disease.”

XLH is a serious disease affecting approximately 3,000 children and 12,000 adults in the United States. Most children with XLH experience bowed or bent legs, short stature, bone pain and severe dental pain. Some adults with XLH experience persistent discomfort or complications, such as joint pain, impaired mobility, tooth abscesses and hearing loss.

The safety and efficacy of Crysvita were studied in four clinical trials. In the placebo-controlled trial, 94 percent of adults receiving Crysvita once a month achieved normal phosphorus levels compared to 8 percent of those receiving placebo. In children, 94 to 100 percent of patients treated with Crysvita every two weeks achieved normal phosphorus levels. In both children and adults, X-ray findings associated with XLH improved with Crysvita therapy. Comparison of the results to a natural history cohort also provided support for the effectiveness of Crysvita.

The most common adverse reactions in adults taking Crysvita were back pain, headache, restless leg syndrome, decreased vitamin D, dizziness and constipation. The most common adverse reactions in children were headache, injection site reaction, vomiting, decreased vitamin D and pyrexia (fever).

Crysvita was granted Breakthrough Therapy designation, under which the FDA provides intensive guidance to the company on efficient drug development, and expedites its review of drugs that are intended to treat serious conditions where clinical evidence shows the drug may represent a substantial improvement over other available therapies. Crysvita also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The sponsor is receiving a Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher under a program intended to encourage development of new drugs and biologics for the prevention and treatment of rare pediatric diseases. A voucher can be redeemed at a later date to receive Priority Review of a subsequent marketing application for a different product. This is the 14th Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher issued by the FDA since the program began.

The FDA granted approval of Crysvita to Ultragenyx Pharmaceutical Inc.

 

////////////fda 2018, Crysvita, burosumab, Breakthrough Therapy, priority review.  Ultragenyx Pharmaceutical Inc

FDA expands approval of Blincyto (blinatumomab) for treatment of a type of leukemia in patients who have a certain risk factor for relapse


Image result for blinatumomab

FDA expands approval of Blincyto for treatment of a type of leukemia in patients who have a certain risk factor for relapse

Blincyto (blinatumomab)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to Blincyto (blinatumomab) to treat adults and children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are in remission but still have minimal residual disease (MRD). MRD refers to the presence of cancer cells below a level that can be seen under the microscope. In patients who have achieved remission after initial treatment for this type of ALL, the presence of MRD means they have an increased risk of relapse.Continue reading.

 

March 29, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to Blincyto (blinatumomab) to treat adults and children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are in remission but still have minimal residual disease (MRD). MRD refers to the presence of cancer cells below a level that can be seen under the microscope. In patients who have achieved remission after initial treatment for this type of ALL, the presence of MRD means they have an increased risk of relapse.

“This is the first FDA-approved treatment for patients with MRD-positive ALL,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Because patients who have MRD are more likely to relapse, having a treatment option that eliminates even very low amounts of residual leukemia cells may help keep the cancer in remission longer. We look forward to furthering our understanding about the reduction in MRD after treatment with Blincyto. Studies are being conducted to assess how Blincyto affects long-term survival outcomes in patients with MRD.”

B-cell precursor ALL is a rapidly progressing type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many B-cell lymphocytes, an immature type of white blood cell. The National Cancer Institute estimates that approximately 5,960 people in the United States will be diagnosed with ALL this year and approximately 1,470 will die from the disease.

Blincyto works by attaching to CD19 protein on the leukemia cells and CD3 protein found on certain immune system cells. Bringing the immune cell close to the leukemia cell allows the immune cells to attack the leukemia cells better. The FDA first approved Blincyto under accelerated approval in December 2014 for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative relapsed or refractory positive B-cell precursor ALL. Full approval for this indication was granted in July 2017, and at that time, the indication was also expanded to include patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive ALL.

The efficacy of Blincyto in MRD-positive ALL was shown in a single-arm clinical trial that included 86 patients in first or second complete remission who had detectable MRD in at least 1 out of 1,000 cells in their bone marrow. Efficacy was based on achievement of undetectable MRD in an assay that could detect at least one cancer cell in 10,000 cells after one cycle of Blincyto treatment, in addition to the length of time that the patients remained alive and in remission (hematological relapse-free survival). Overall, undetectable MRD was achieved by 70 patients. Over half of the patients remained alive and in remission for at least 22.3 months.

The side effects of Blincyto when used to treat MRD-positive B-cell precursor ALL are consistent with those seen in other uses of the drug. Common side effects include infections (bacterial and pathogen unspecified), fever (pyrexia), headache, infusion related reactions, low levels of certain blood cells (neutropenia, anemia), febrile neutropenia (neutropenia and fever) and low levels of platelets in the blood (thrombocytopenia).

Blincyto carries a boxed warning alerting patients and health care professionals that some clinical trial participants had problems with low blood pressure and difficulty breathing (cytokine release syndrome) at the start of the first treatment, experienced a short period of difficulty with thinking (encephalopathy) or other side effects in the nervous system. Serious risks of Blincyto include infections, effects on the ability to drive and use machines, inflammation in the pancreas (pancreatitis), and preparation and administration errors—instructions for preparation and administration should closely be followed. There is a risk of serious adverse reactions in pediatric patients due to benzyl alcohol preservative; therefore, the drug prepared with preservative free saline should be used for patients weighing less than 22 kilograms.

This new indication for Blincyto was approved under the accelerated approval pathway, under which the FDA may approve drugs for serious conditions where there is unmet medical need and a drug is shown to have certain effects that are reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit to patients. Further study in randomized controlled trials is required to verify that achieving undetectable MRD with Blincyto improves survival or disease-free survival in patients with ALL.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and it received Orphan Drugdesignation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted the approval of Blincyto to Amgen Inc.

 

//////amgen, fda 2018,  Priority Review m  Orphan Drug designation, Blincyto, blinatumomab,

FDA approves new HIV treatment Trogarzo (ibalizumab-uiyk) for patients who have limited treatment options


Image result for ibalizumab-uiykImage result for taiMed Biologics USA Corp

FDA approves new HIV treatment Trogarzo (ibalizumab-uiyk),for patients who have limited treatment options

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Trogarzo (ibalizumab-uiyk), a new type of antiretroviral medication for adult patients living with HIV who have tried multiple HIV medications in the past (heavily treatment-experienced) and whose HIV infections cannot be successfully treated with other currently available therapies (multidrug resistant HIV, or MDR HIV).Trogarzo is administered intravenously once every 14 days by a trained medical professional and used in combination with other antiretroviral medications. Continue reading.

 

 

March 6, 2018

Release

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Trogarzo (ibalizumab-uiyk), a new type of antiretroviral medication for adult patients living with HIV who have tried multiple HIV medications in the past (heavily treatment-experienced) and whose HIV infections cannot be successfully treated with other currently available therapies (multidrug resistant HIV, or MDR HIV).Trogarzo is administered intravenously once every 14 days by a trained medical professional and used in combination with other antiretroviral medications.

“While most patients living with HIV can be successfully treated using a combination of two or more antiretroviral drugs, a small percentage of patients who have taken many HIV drugs in the past have multidrug resistant HIV, limiting their treatment options and putting them at a high risk of HIV-related complications and progression to death,” said Jeff Murray, M.D., deputy director of the Division of Antiviral Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Trogarzo is the first drug in a new class of antiretroviral medications that can provide significant benefit to patients who have run out of HIV treatment options. New treatment options may be able to improve their outcomes.”

The safety and efficacy of Trogarzo were evaluated in a clinical trial of 40 heavily treatment-experienced patients with MDR HIV-1 who continued to have high levels of virus (HIV-RNA) in their blood despite being on antiretroviral drugs. Many of the participants had previously been treated with 10 or more antiretroviral drugs. The majority of participants experienced a significant decrease in their HIV-RNA levels one week after Trogarzo was added to their failing antiretroviral regimens. After 24 weeks of Trogarzo plus other antiretroviral drugs, 43 percent of the trial’s participants achieved HIV RNA suppression.

The clinical trial focused on the small patient population with limited treatment options and demonstrated the benefit of Trogarzo in achieving reduction of HIV RNA. The seriousness of the disease, the need to individualize other drugs in the treatment regimen, and safety data from other trials were considered in evaluating the Trogarzo development program.

A total of 292 patients with HIV-1 infection have been exposed to Trogarzo IV infusion. The most common adverse reactions to Trogarzo were diarrhea, dizziness, nausea and rash. Severe side effects included rash and changes in the immune system (immune reconstitution syndrome).
The FDA granted this application Fast TrackPriority Review and Breakthrough Therapy designations. Trogarzo also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted approval of Trogarzo to TaiMed Biologics USA Corp.

Theratechnologies Announces FDA Approval of Breakthrough Therapy, Trogarzo™ (ibalizumab-uiyk) Injection, the First HIV-1 Inhibitor and Long-Acting Monoclonal Antibody for Multidrug Resistant HIV-1


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Theratechnologies Inc. 


  •  First HIV treatment approved with a new mechanism of action in more than 10 years
  • Infused every two weeks, only antiretroviral treatment (ART) that does not require daily dosing
  • Trogarzo™ has no drug-drug interactions and no cross-resistance with other ARTs

MONTREALMarch 6, 2018 /PRNewswire/ – Theratechnologies Inc. (Theratechnologies) (TSX: TH) and its partner TaiMed Biologics, Inc. (TaiMed) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted approval of Trogarzo™ (ibalizumab-uiyk) Injection. In combination with other ARTs, Trogarzo™ is indicated for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in heavily treatment-experienced adults with multidrug resistant HIV-1 infection failing their current antiretroviral regimen.1

Trogarzo™ represents a critical new treatment advance as the first HIV therapy with a new mechanism of action approved in 10 years and proven effectiveness in difficult-to-treat patients with limited options. Unlike all other classes of ARTs, Trogarzo™ is a CD4-directed post-attachment HIV-1 inhibitor that binds to CD4+ receptors on host cells and blocks the HIV virus from infecting the cells.1

“Today’s approval of Trogarzo™ by the FDA is great news for people infected with difficult-to-treat multidrug resistant HIV. We look forward to bringing this much-needed therapy to patients in the U.S within six weeks,” said Luc Tanguay, President and Chief Executive Officer, Theratechnologies Inc. “We are grateful to the patients, investigators, as well as the FDA who supported the clinical development of Trogarzo™, and are helping address this critical unmet medical need.”

Trogarzo™ previously received Breakthrough Therapy and Orphan Drug designations as well as Priority Review status from the FDA, underscoring the significance of the treatment for this patient population.

“I witnessed some of the earliest cases of HIV and AIDS, at a time when the diagnosis was terrifying to patients because in many cases it was a death sentence,” said David Ho, M.D., chief scientific advisor of TaiMed and scientific director and CEO of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center. “Since then, treatment advances and the discovery that combinations of ARTs was the best way to bring viral load below the level of detection have allowed most people to manage HIV like a chronic condition and live long, healthy lives. However, this is not the reality for people whose HIV is resistant to multiple drugs and whose viral load is not controlled, which is why TaiMed dedicated the past decade to advancing ibalizumab in the clinic. For these patients, it represents the next breakthrough.”

Up to 25,000 Americans with HIV are currently multidrug resistant, of which 12,000 are in urgent need of a new treatment option because their current treatment regimen is failing them and their viral load has risen to detectable levels, jeopardizing their health and making HIV transmittable.2-13 The best way to prevent the transmission of multidrug resistant HIV is to control the virus in those living with it. According to new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the HIV virus cannot be transmitted if it is being fully suppressed.13

“I’ve struggled with multidrug resistant HIV for almost 30 years and it was completely debilitating to feel like I had run out of options – I made no long-term plans,” said Nelson Vergel, founder of the Program for Wellness Restoration (PoWeR) and Trogarzo™ patient. “Since starting treatment with Trogarzo™ six years ago and getting my viral load to an undetectable level, I have been my happiest, most productive self. Trogarzo™ is a new source of hope and peace of mind for people whose treatments have failed them, and I feel incredibly lucky to have been able to participate in the clinical trial program.”

TaiMed and Theratechnologies partnered on the development of Trogarzo™ so patients who can benefit from the treatment have access to it. For patients who need assistance accessing Trogarzo™ or who face challenges affording medicines, Theratechnologies has a team of patient care coordinators available to help. Patients can get assistance and expert support by contacting THERA patient support™ at 1-833-23-THERA (84372).

“In Phase 3 ibalizumab trials, we saw marked improvements in patients’ health who not only were heavily treatment-experienced and had limited remaining treatment options, but in cases they also had extremely high viral loads and significantly impaired immune systems,” said Edwin DeJesus, M.D., Medical Director for the Orlando Immunology Center. “As an investigator for ibalizumab clinical trials over nearly 10 years, it was remarkable and inspiring to see the dramatic effect ibalizumab had on such vulnerable patients. As a clinician, I am excited that we will now have another option with a different mechanism of action for our heavily pretreated patients who are struggling to keep their viral load below detection because their HIV is resistant to multiple drugs.”

Clinical Trial Findings

Clinical studies show that Trogarzo™, in combination with other ARTs, significantly reduces viral load and increases CD4+ (T-cell) count among patients with multidrug resistant HIV-1.

The Phase 3 trial showed:1

  • Trogarzo™ significantly reduced viral load within seven days after the first dose of functional monotherapy and maintained the treatment response when combined with an optimized background regimen that included at least one other active ART for up to 24 weeks of treatment, while being safe and well tolerated.
  • More than 80% of patients achieved the study’s primary endpoint – at least a 0.5 log10 (or 70%) viral load reduction from baseline seven days after receiving a 2,000 mg loading dose of Trogarzo™ and no adjustment to the failing background regimen.
  • The average viral load reduction after 24 weeks was 1.6 log10 with 43% of patients achieving undetectable viral loads.

Patients experienced a clinically-significant mean increase in CD4+ T-cells of 44 cells/mm3, and increases varied based on T-cell count at baseline. Rebuilding the immune system by increasing T-cell count is particularly important as people with multidrug resistant HIV-1 often have the most advanced form of HIV.1

The most common drug-related adverse reactions (incidence ≥ 5%) were diarrhea (8%), dizziness (8%), nausea (5%) and rash (5%). No drug-drug interactions were reported with other ARTs or medications, and no cross-resistance with other ARTs were observed.1

About Trogarzo™ (ibalizumab-uiyk) Injection

Trogarzo™ is a humanized monoclonal antibody for the treatment of multidrug resistant HIV-1 infection. Trogarzo™ binds primarily to the second extracellular domain of the CD4+ T receptor, away from major histocompatibility complex II molecule binding sites. It prevents HIV from infecting CD4+ immune cells while preserving normal immunological function.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Trogarzo™ is a prescription HIV medicine that is used with other antiretroviral medicines to treat human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infections in adults.

Trogarzo™ blocks HIV from infecting certain cells of the immune system. This prevents HIV from multiplying and can reduce the amount of HIV in the body.

Before you receive Trogarzo™, tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if Trogarzo™ may harm your unborn baby.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if Trogarzo™ passes into breast milk.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Trogarzo™ can cause serious side effects, including:

Changes in your immune system (Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome) can happen when you start taking HIV-1 medicines.  Your immune system might get stronger and begin to fight infections that have been hidden in your body for a long time.  Tell your health care provider right away if you start having new symptoms after starting your HIV-1 medicine.

The most common side effects of Trogarzo™ include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Rash

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of Trogarzo™. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.  You may also report side effects to at 1-833-23THERA (1-833-238-4372).

 

About Theratechnologies

Theratechnologies (TSX: TH) is a specialty pharmaceutical company addressing unmet medical needs to promote healthy living and an improved quality of life among HIV patients. Further information about Theratechnologies is available on the Company’s website at www.theratech.com and on SEDAR at www.sedar.com.

/////Trogarzo, ibalizumab-uiyk, fda 2018, Fast TrackPriority Review, Breakthrough Therapy designations,  Orphan Drug designation

FDA approves new treatment Erleada (apalutamide) for a certain type of prostate cancer using novel clinical trial endpoint


FDA approves new treatment Erleada (apalutamide) for a certain type of prostate cancer using novel clinical trial endpoint

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Erleada (apalutamide) for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer that has not spread (non-metastatic), but that continues to grow despite treatment with hormone therapy (castration-resistant). This is the first FDA-approved treatment for non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer. Continue reading.

February 14, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Erleada (apalutamide) for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer that has not spread (non-metastatic), but that continues to grow despite treatment with hormone therapy (castration-resistant). This is the first FDA-approved treatment for non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

“The FDA evaluates a variety of methods that measure a drug’s effect, called endpoints, in the approval of oncology drugs. This approval is the first to use the endpoint of metastasis-free survival, measuring the length of time that tumors did not spread to other parts of the body or that death occurred after starting treatment,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “In the trial supporting approval, Erleada had a robust effect on this endpoint. This demonstrates the agency’s commitment to using novel endpoints to expedite important therapies to the American public.”

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institutes of Health, prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in men in the U.S.. The NCI estimates approximately 161,360 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2017, and 26,730 were expected to die of the disease. Approximately 10 to 20 percent of prostate cancer cases are castration-resistant, and up to 16 percent of these patients show no evidence that the cancer has spread at the time of the castration-resistant diagnosis.

Erleada works by blocking the effect of androgens, a type of hormone, on the tumor. These androgens, such as testosterone, can promote tumor growth.

The safety and efficacy of Erleada was based on a randomized clinical trial of 1,207 patients with non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer. Patients in the trial either received Erleada or a placebo. All patients were also treated with hormone therapy, either with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog therapy or with surgery to lower the amount of testosterone in their body (surgical castration). The median metastasis-free survival for patients taking Erleada was 40.5 months compared to 16.2 months for patients taking a placebo.

Common side effects of Erleada include fatigue, high blood pressure (hypertension), rash, diarrhea, nausea, weight loss, joint pain (arthralgia), falls, hot flush, decreased appetite, fractures and swelling in the limbs (peripheral edema).

Severe side effects of Erleada include falls, fractures and seizures.

This application was granted Priority Review, under which the FDA’s goal is to take action on an application within 6 months where the agency determines that the drug, if approved, would significantly improve the safety or effectiveness of treating, diagnosing or preventing a serious condition.

The sponsor for Erleada is the first participant in the FDA’s recently-announced Clinical Data Summary Pilot Program, an effort to provide stakeholders with more usable information on the clinical evidence supporting drug product approvals and more transparency into the FDA’s decision-making process. Soon after approval, certain information from the clinical summary report will post with the Erleada entry on Drugs@FDA and on the new pilot program landing page.

The FDA granted the approval of Erleada to Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies.

//////////////fda 2018, Erleada, apalutamide, Priority Review, Janssen

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