New Drug Approvals

Home » Phase3 drugs

Category Archives: Phase3 drugs

DRUG APPROVALS BY DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO .....FOR BLOG HOME CLICK HERE

Blog Stats

  • 3,343,559 hits

Flag and hits

Flag Counter

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,605 other followers

Follow New Drug Approvals on WordPress.com

Archives

Categories

Recent Posts

Flag Counter

ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

Read all about Organic Spectroscopy on ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY INTERNATIONAL 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,605 other followers

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

Personal Links

Verified Services

View Full Profile →

Archives

Categories

Flag Counter

Sitravatinib


Sitravatinib.png
File:Sitravatinib.svg - Wikipedia

Sitravatinib

1-N‘-[3-fluoro-4-[2-[5-[(2-methoxyethylamino)methyl]pyridin-2-yl]thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl]oxyphenyl]-1-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxamide

1-N’-[3-fluoro-4-[2-[5-[(2-methoxyethylamino)methyl]pyridin-2-yl]thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl]oxyphenyl]-1-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxamide

MG-91516

1,1-Cyclopropanedicarboxamide, N-[3-fluoro-4-[[2-[5-[[(2-methoxyethyl)amino]methyl]-2-pyridinyl]thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl]oxy]phenyl]-N’-(4- fluorophenyl)-

N-(3-fluoro-4-((2-(5-(((2-methoxyethyl)amino)methyl)pyridin-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl)oxy)phenyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxamide

シトラバチニブ; ситраватиниб , سيترافاتينيب , 司曲替尼 , 
FormulaC33H29F2N5O4S
Cas1123837-84-2
Mol weight629.6763

MG-516

Sitravatinib (MGCD516)

UNII-CWG62Q1VTB

CWG62Q1VTB

MGCD-516

MGCD516

Antineoplastic, Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor

Sitravatinib (MGCD516) is an experimental drug for the treatment of cancer. It is a small molecule inhibitor of multiple tyrosine kinases.

Sitravatinib is being developed by Mirati Therapeutics.[1]

Ongoing phase II trials include a trial for liposcarcoma,[2] a combination trial for non-small cell lung cancer,[3] and a combination trial with nivolumab for renal cell carcinoma.[4]

Mirati Therapeutics and licensee BeiGene are developing sitravatinib, an oral multitargeted kinase inhibitor which inhibits Eph, Ret, c-Met and VEGF-1, -2 and -3, DDR, Trk, Axl kinases, CHR4q12, TYRO3 and Casitas B-lineage, in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors, for treating advanced solid tumors.

In March 2021, sitravatinib was reported to be in phase 3 clinical development.

PDT PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2009026717

WO2009026717 , in which sitravatinib was first disclosed, claiming heterocyclic compounds as multi kinase inhibitors.

Scheme 10



Example 52
N-(3-Fluoro-4-(2-(5-((2-methoxyethylamino)methyl)pyridin-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7- yloxy)phenyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane- 1 , 1 -dicarboxamide

Step 1 : tert-Butyl (6-(7-(2-Fluoro-4-(1-(4-fluorophenylcarbamoyl)-cyclopropanecarboxamido)phenoxy)thieno [3 ,2-b]pyridin-2-yl)pyridin-3 -y l)methyl(2-methoxyethyl)carbamate (146)
To aniline 126 (0.58 g, 1.1 mmol) and DIPEA (0.58 mL, 0.43 g, 3.3 mmol) in dry DMF

(20 mL) was added 1-(4-fluorophenylcarbamoyl)cyclopropanecarbpxylic acid (0.35 g, 1.5 mmol) and HATU (0.72 g, 1.9 mmol) and the mixture was stirred at r.t. for 18 h. It was then partitioned between ethyl acetate and water, the organic phase was washed with water, IM NaOH, brine, dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated. Silica gel chromatography (ethyl acetate) afforded title compound Ϊ46 (0.60 g, 74 % yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm): 10.40 (s, 1H), 10.01 (s, 1H), 8.52-8.49 (m, 2H), 8.33 (s, 1H), 8.27-8.24 (m, 1H), 7.92-7.88 (m, 1H), 7.78 (dd, J = 8.2, 2.1 Hz, 1H) 7.65-7.60 (m, 2H), 7.52-7.42 (m, 2H), 7.14 (t, J = 8.8 Hz, 2H), 6.65 (d, J = 5.1 Hz 1H), 4.47 (s, 2H), 3.42-3.30 (m, 4H), 3.22 (s, 3H), 1.46-1.30 (m, 13H). MS (m/z): 730.1 (M+H).
Step 2. N-(3-Fluoro-4-(2-(5-((2-methoxyethylamino)methyl)pyridin-2-yl)thieno[3,2-blpyridin-7-yloxy)phenyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane-1,1-dicarboxamide (147)
To the compound 146 (0.59 g, 0.81 mmol) in dichloromethane (50 mL) was added TFA (3 mL). The solution was stirred for 18 h then concentrated. The residue was partitioned between dichloromethane and 1 M NaOH, and filtered to remove insolubles. The organic phase was collected, washed with IM NaOH, brine, dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated to afford title compound 147 (0.35 g, 69 % yield).

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm): 10.40 (s, 1H), 10.01 (s, 1H), 8.55 (d, J = 1.6 Hz, 1H), 8.51 (d, J = 5.3 Hz, 1H), 8.31 (s, 1H), 8.22 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H), 7.92-7.87 (m, 2H), 7.65-7.61 (m, 2H), 7.52-7.43 (m, 2H), 7.17-7.12 (m, 2H), 6.64 (d, J = 5.5 Hz, 1H), 3.77 (s, 2H), 3.40 (t, J = 5.7 Hz, 2H), 3.23 (s, 3H), 2.64 (t, J = 5.7 Hz, 2H), 1.46 (br s, 4H). MS (m/z): 630.1 (M+H).

PATENT

WO 2009026720 

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2009026720A1

PATENT

WO-2021050580

Novel, stable crystalline polymorphic forms (form D) of sitravatinib , useful for treating a multi tyrosine kinase-associated cancer eg sarcoma, glioma, non-small cell lung, bladder, kidney, ovarian, gastric, breast or liver cancer. 

 International publication No. W02009/026717A disclosed compounds with the inhibition activities of multiple protein tyrosine kinases, for example, the inhibition activities of VEGF receptor kinase and HGF receptor kinase. In particular, disclosed N-(3-fluoro-4-((2-(5-(((2-methoxyethyl)amino)methyl)pyridin-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl)oxy)phenyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane- 1,1 -di carboxamide (Compound 1) is a multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor with demonstrated potent inhibition of a closely related spectrum of tyrosine kinases, including RET, CBL, CHR4ql2, DDR and Trk, which are key regulators of signaling pathways that lead to cell growth, survival and tumor progression.

[003]

Compound 1

[004] Compound 1 shows tumor regression in multiple human xenograft tumor models in mice, and is presently in human clinical trials as a monotherapy as well as in combination for

treating a wide range of solid tumors. Compound 1 is presently in Phase 1 clinical trial for patients with advanced cancer, in Phase 2 studies for patients with advanced liposarcoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

[005] The small scale chemical synthesis of the amorphous Compound 1 had been disclosed in the Example 52 (compound 147) of W02009/026717A, however, in order to prepare the API of Compound 1 with high quality and in large quantity, crystalline forms of Compound 1 would be normally needed so the process impurities could be purged out by recrystallization.

Practically, it is difficult to predict with confidence which crystalline form of a particular compound will be stable, reproducible, and suitable for phamaceutical processing. It is even more difficult to predict whether or not a particular crystalline solid state form will be produced with the desired physical properties for pharmaceutical formulations.

[006] For all the foregoing reasons, there is a great need to produce crystalline forms of Compound 1 that provide manufacturing improvements of the pharmaceutical composition.

The present invention advantageously addresses one or more of these needs.

EXAMPLE 1

Preparation of N-(3-fluoro-4-((2-(5-(((2-methoxyethyl)amino)methyl)pyridin-2- yl)thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl)oxy)phenyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane-l,l- dicarboxamide (Compound 1)

[0085] This Example illustrates the preparation ofN-(3-fluoro-4-((2-(5-(((2-methoxyethyl)amino)methyl)pyridin-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl)oxy)phenyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)cyclopropane- 1,1 -di carboxamide (Compound 1).

[0086] Step 1: N-(Y6-bromopyridin-3-vDmethvD-2-methoxyethan-l-amine (Compound 1A)

Compound 1A

[0087] To a stirred solution of 2-Methoxyethylamine (3.0 eq) in dichloromethane (DCM) (12 vol) was added Molecular sieves (0.3 w/w) and stirred for 2 hours at 25±5°C under nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction mass water content was monitored by Karl Fischer analysis until the water content limit reached 0.5 % w/w. Once the water content limit was reached, the reaction mass cooled to 5±5°C and 6-bromonicotinaldehyde (1.0 eq) was added lot wise over period of 30 minutes to the above reaction mass at 5±5°C. The reaction mass was stirred for 30±5 minutes at 5±5°C and acetic acid (1.05 eq) was added drop wise at 5±5°C. After completion of the addition, the mass was slowly warmed to 25±5°C and stirred for 8 h to afford Compound 1 A. The imine formation was monitored by HPLC.

[0088] Step 2: tert-butyl (Y6-brom opyri din-3 -vQmethvO(2-m ethoxy ethvDcarbamate (Compound

IB)

Compound 1B

[0089] Charged Compoud 1A (1.0 eq) in THF (5.0 vol) was added and the reaction mass was stirred for 30 minutes at 25±5°C under nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction mass was cooled to temperature of about 10±5°C. Di-tert- butyl dicarbonate (1.2 eq) was added to the reaction mass at 10±5°C under nitrogen atmosphere and the reaction mass temperature was raised to 25±5°C and the reaction mass for about 2 hours. The progress of the reaction was monitored by HPLC. After IPC completion, a prepared solution of Taurine (1.5 eq) in 2M aq NaOH (3.1 vol) was charged and stirred at 10±5°C for 16 h to 18 h. The reaction mass was further diluted with 1M aq.NaOH solution (3.7 vol) and the layers were separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with DCM (2 x 4.7vol) and the extract combined with the organic layer. The combined organic layers were washed with 1M aq.NaOH solution (3.94 vol), followed by water (2×4.4 vol), and dried over sodium sulfate (2.0 w/w) . The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure below 40° C until no distillate was observed. Tetrahydrofuran (THF) was sequentially added (1×4 vol and lx 6vol) and concentrated under reduced pressure below 40°C until no distillate was observed to obtained Compound IB as light yellow colored syrup liquid.

[0090] Step 3: tert-butyl 7-chlorothieno[3.2-b1pyridin-2-yl)pyridin-3-yl )methyl)(2- 

methoxyethvDcarbamate (Compound 1C)

Compound 1C

[0091] To a stirred solution of 7-chlorothieno[3,2-b]pyridine (1.05 eq) in tetrahydrofuran (7 vol) was added n-butyl lithium (2.5 M in hexane) drop wise at -15±10°C and stirred for 90 minutes at same temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. Zinc chloride (1.05 eq) was added to the reaction mass at -15±10°C. The reaction mass was slowly warmed to 25±5°C and stirred for 45 minutes under nitrogen atmosphere to afford Compound 1C. The progress of the reaction was monitored by HPLC.

[0092] Step 4: tert-butyl (Y6-(7-(4-amino-2-fluorophenoxy)thieno[3.2-b1pyridin-2-v0pyridin-3-vDmethvD(2-methoxyethvDcarbamate (Compound ID)

Compound 1D

[0093] 3-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzenaminium chloride (1.2 eq) in DMSO (3.9 vol) at 25±5°C was charged under nitrogen atmosphere and the reaction mass was stirred until observance of a clear solution at 25±5°C. t-BuOK was added lot wise under nitrogen atmosphere at 25±10°C. The reaction mass temperature was raised to 45±5°C and maintained for 30 minutes under nitrogen atmosphere. Compound 1C was charged lot-wise under nitrogen atmosphere at 45±5°C and stirred for 10 minutes at 45± 5°C.The reaction mixture was heated to 100± 5°C and stirred for 2 hrs. The reaction mass is monitored by HPLC.

[0094] After reaction completion, the reaction mass was cooled to 10± 5°C and quenched with chilled water (20 vol) at 10±5°C. The mass temperature was raised to 25± 5°C and stirred for 7-8 h. The resulting Compound ID crude was collected by filtration and washed with 2 vol of water. Crude Compound ID material taken in water (10 vol) and stirred for up to 20 minutes at 25±5°C. The reaction mass was heated to 45±5°C and stirred for 2-3 h at 45±5°C, filtered and vacuum-dried.

[0095] Crude Compound ID was taken in MTBE (5 vol) at 25±5°C and stirred for about 20 minutes at 25±5°C. The reaction mass temperature was raised to 45±5°C, stirred for 3-4 h at 45±5°C and then cooled to 20±5°C. The reaction mass was stirred for about 20 minutes at 20±5°C, filtered, followed by bed wash with water (0. 5 vol) and vacuum-dried.

[0096] The crude material was dissolved in acetone (10 vol) at 25±5°C and stirred for about 2h at 25±5°C. The reaction mass was filtered through a celite bed and washed with acetone (2.5 vol). The filtrate was slowly diluted with water (15 vol) at 25±5°C. The reaction mass was stirred for 2-3 h at 25±5°C, filtered and bed washed with water (2 vol) & vacuum-dried to afford Compound ID as brown solid.

[0097] Step 5 : 1 -((4-((2-(5-(((tert-butoxycarbonv0(2-methoxy ethvOaminolmethvOpyri din-2 -yl )thieno[3.2-b]pyridin-7-yl )oxy)-3 -fluorophenyl icarbamoyl level opropane-1 -carboxylic acid (Compound IE)

Compound 1E

[0098] To a solution of Compound ID (1.0 eq.) in tetrahydrofuran (7 vol.), aqueous potassium carbonate (1.0 eq.) in water (8 vol.) was added. The solution was cooled to 5±5°C, and stirred for about 60 min. While stirring, separately triethylamine (2.0 eq.) was added to a solution of 1,1-cyclopropanedicarboxylic acid (2.0 eq.) in tetrahydrofuran (8 vol.), at 5±5°C, followed by thionyl chloride (2.0 eq.) and stirred for about 60 min. The acid chloride mass was slowly added to the Compound ID solution at 5±5°C. The temperature was raised to 25±5°C and stirred for 3.0 h. The reaction was monitored by HPLC analysis.

[0099] After reaction completion, the mass was diluted with ethyl acetate (5.8 vol.), water (5.1 vol.), 10% (w/w) aqueous hydrochloric acid solution (0.8 vol.) and 25% (w/w) aqueous sodium chloride solution (2 vol.). The aqueous layer was separated and extracted with ethyl acetate (2 x 5 vol.). The combined organic layers were washed with a 0.5M aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (7.5 vol.). The organic layer was treated with Darco activated charcoal (0.5 w/w) and sodium sulfate (0.3 w/w) at 25±5°C for 1.0 h. The organic layer was filtered through celite and washed with tetrahydofuran (5.0 vol.). The filtrate was concentrated under vacuum below 50°C to about 3 vol and co-distilled with ethyl acetate (2 x 5 vol.) under vacuum below 50°C up to ~ 3.0 vol. The organic layer was cooled to 15±5°C, stirred for about 60 min., filtered, and the solid was washed with ethyl acetate (2.0 vol.). The material was dried under vacuum at 40±5°C until water content was less than 1% to afford Compound IE as brown solid.

[00100] Step 6: tert-butyl (Y6-(7-(2-fluoro-4-(T-(Y4-fluorophenvDcarbamovDcvclopropane-l-carboxamido)phenoxy)thieno[3.2-b]pyridin-2-v0pyri din-3 – (2- 
methoxyethvDcarbamate (Compound IF)

[00101] Pyridine (1.1 eq.) was added to a suspension of Compound IE (1.0 eq.) in tetrahydrofuran (10 vol.) and cooled to 5±5°C. Thionyl chloride (2.0 eq.) was added and stirred for about 60 min. The resulting acid chloride formation was confirmed by HPLC analysis after quenching the sample in methanol. Separately, aqueous potassium carbonate (2.5 eq.) solution (7.0 vol. of water) was added to a solution of 4-fluoroaniline (3.5 eq.) in tetrahydrofuran (10 vol.), cooled to 5±5°C, and stirred for about 60 min. The temperature of the acid chloride mass at 5±5°C was raised to a temperature of about 25±5°C and stirred for 3 h. The reaction monitored by HPLC analysis.

[00102] After completion of the reaction, the solution was diluted with ethyl acetate (25 vol.), the organic layer was separated and washed with a 1M aqueous sodium hydroxide solution (7.5 vol.), a 1M aqueous hydrochloric acid solution (7.5 vol.), and a 25% (w/w) aqueous sodium chloride solution (7.5 vol.). The organic layer was dried and and filtered with sodium sulfate (1.0 w/w). The filtrate was concentrated ~ 3 vol under vacuum below 50°C and co-distilled with ethyl acetate (3 x 5 vol.) under vacuum below 50°C to ~ 3.0 vol. Ethyl acetate (5 vol.) and MTBE (10 vol.) were charged, heated up to 50±5°C and stirred for 30-60 min. The mixture was cooled to 15±5°C, stirred for about 30 min., filtered, and the solid was washed with ethyl acetate (2.0 vol.). MGB3 content was analyzed by HPLC analysis. The material was dried under vacuum at 40±5°C until the water content reached about 3.0% to afford Compound IF as brown solid.

[00103] Step 7 : N-(3-fluoro-4-((2-(5-(((2-methoxyethv0amino)methv0pyridin-2-yl )thieno[3.2-b]pyridin-7-yl )oxy)phenyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl level opropane-1. 1 -dicarboxamide (Compound 1)

Compound 1

[0100] To a mixture of Compound IF in glacial acetic acid (3.5 vol.) concentrated hydrochloric acid (0.5 vol.) was added and stirred at 25±5°C for 1.0 h. The reaction was monitored by HPLC analysis.

[0101] After reaction completion, the mass was added to water (11 vol.) and stirred for 20±5°C for 30 min. The pH was adjusted to 3.0 ± 0.5 using 10% (w/w) aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution and stirred for 20±5°C for approximately 3.0 h.. The mass was filtered, washed with water (4 x 5.0 vol.) and the pH of filtrate was checked after every wash. The material was dried under vacuum at 50±5°C until water content was about 10%.

[0102] Crude Compound 1 was taken in ethyl acetate (30 vol.), heated to 70±10°C, stirred for 1.0 h., cooled to 25±5°C, filtered, and washed with ethyl acetate (2 vol.). The material was dries under vacuum at 45±5°C for 6.0 h.

[0103] Crude Compound 1 was taken in polish filtered tetrahydrofuran (30 vol.) and pre washed Amberlyst A-21 Ion exchange resin and stirred at 25±5°C until the solution became clear. After getting the clear solution, the resin was filtered and washed with polish filtered tetrahydrofuran (15 vol.). The filtrate was concentrated by -50% under vacuum below 50°C and co-distilled with polish filtered IPA (3 x 15.0 vol.) and concentrated up to -50% under vacuum below 50°C. Charged polish filtered IPA (15 vol.) was added and the solution concentrated under vacuum below 50°C to – 20 vol. The reaction mass was heated to 80±5°C, stirred for 60 min. and cooled to 25±5°C. The resultant reaction mass was stirred for about 20 hours at 25±5°C. The reaction mass was cooled to 0±5°C, stirred for 4-5 hours, filtered, and washed with polish filtered IPA (2 vol.). The material was dried under vacuum at 45±5°C, until the water content was about 2%, to obtain the desired product Compound 1. ¾-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO- d): 510.40 (s, 1H), 10.01 (s, 1H), 8.59 – 8.55 (m, 1H), 8.53 (d, J= 5.6 Hz, 1H), 8.32 (s, 1H), 8.23 (d, J= 8.0 Hz, 1H), 7.96 – 7.86 (m, 2H), 7.70 – 7.60 (m, 2H), 7.56 – 7.43 (m, 2H), 7.20 – 7.11 (m, 2H), 6.66 (d, J= 5.6 Hz, 1H), 3.78 (s, 2H), 3.41 (t, J= 5.6 Hz, 2H), 3.25 (s, 3H), 2.66 (t, J= 5.6 Hz, 2H), 1.48 (s, 4H)ppm. MS: M/e 630 (M+l)+.

EXAMPLE 2

Preparation of Crystalline Form D of N-(3-fluoro-4-((2-(5-(((2- methoxyethyl)amino)methyl)pyridin-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]pyridin-7-yl)oxy)phenyl)-N-(4- fluorophenyl)cyclopropane-l, 1-dicarboxamide

EXAMPLE 2A: Preparation of Compound 1 Crystalline Form D

[0104] To a 50 L reactor, 7.15 Kg of Compound 1, 40 g of Form D as crystal seed and 21 L acetone (>99%) were added. The mixture was heated to reflux ( ~56 °C) for 1~2 h. The mixture was agitated with an internal temperature of 20±5 °C for at least 24 h. Then, the suspension was filtered and washed the filter cake with 7 L acetone. The wet cake was dried under vacuum at <45 °C, to obtain 5.33 kg of Compound 1 of desired Form D

[0105] X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD)

The XRPD patterns were collected with a PAN alytical X’ Pert PRO MPD diffractometer using auincident beam of Cu radiation produced using au Optix long, fine-focus source. An elliptically graded multilayer mirror was used to focus Cu Ka X -rays through the specimens and onto the detector. Prior to the analysis, a silicon specimen (NIST SRM 640e) was analyzed to verify the observed position of the Si Ill peak is consistent with the NIST-certified position. A specimen of each sample was sandwiched between 3 -pm -thick films and analyzed in transmission geometly. A beam-stop, short autiscatter extension, and an autiscatter knife edge were used to minimize the background generated by air. Sober slits for the incident aud diffracted beauls were used to minimize broadening from axial divergence. The diffraction patterns were collected using a scanning position-sensitive detector (X’Celerator) located 240 mm from the specimens and Data Collector software v. 2.2b. Pattern Match v2.3.6 was used to create XRPD patterns.

[0106] The X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) pattern was used to characterize the Compound 1 obtained, which showed that the Compound 1 was in Crystalline Form D of Compound 1 (Compound 1 Form D), see Figure 1A. The XRPD pattern yielded is substantially the same as that shown in Figure 3C.

[0107] Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC)

[0108] DSC was performed using a Mettler-Toledo DSC3+ differential scanning calorimeter. Temperature calibration was performed using octane, phenyl salicylate, indium, tin, and zinc. The TAWN sensitivity was 11.9. The samples were placed into aluminum DSC pans, covered with lids, and the weights were accurately recorded. A weighed aluminum pan configured as the sample pan was placed on the reference side of the cell. The pan lids were pierced prior to sample analyses. The method name on the thermograms is an abbreviation for the start and end temperature as well as the heating rate; e.g., -30-250-10 means “from ambient to 250°C, at 10°C/min.” The nitrogen flow rate was 50.0 mL/min. This instrument does not provide gas pressure value as required by USP because it is the same as atmospheric pressure.

[0109] A broad small endotherm with a peak maximum at approximately 57°C to 62°C (onset ~20°C to 22°C) followed by a sharp endotherm with a peak maximum at approximately 180°C (onset ~178°C) were observed. These events could be due to the loss of volatiles and a melt, respectively (see Figure IB).

[0110] In an alternative embodiment Form D was prepared as follows. Designated Material O was suspended in 600 pL of acetone. Initial dissolution was observed followed by re precipitation. The amount of suspended solids was not measured because the target of the experiment was to get a suspension with enough solids to slurry isolate and collect XRPD data. Based on the solubility of Form D in acetone a very rough estimate for the scale of the experiment is about 80-100mg. The suspension was stirred at ambient temperature for approximately 2 5 weeks after which the solids were isolated by centrifugation with filtration. XRPD data appeared to be consistent with Form D The sample was then dried in vacuum oven at ~40 °C for ~2 5 hours. The XRPD pattern of the final solids was consistent with Form D EXAMPLE 2B: Preparation of Compound 1 Form D

[0111] 427.0 mg of Compound 1 was dissolved in 5 mL of THF to obtain a clear brown solution. The resulting solution was filtered, and the filtrate evaporated under flow of nitrogen. A sticky solid was obtained, which was dried under vacuum in room temperature for ~5 min, still a sticky brown solid obtained. It was dissolved in 0.2 mL of EtOAc and sonicated to dissolve. The solution obtained was stirred at room temperature for 15 min and a solid precipitated. The resulting solid was added 0.4 mL of EtOAc and stirred in room temperature for 21 h 40 min to ontian a suspension. The solid was spparated from mother liquor by centrifugation, then the resulting solid was resuspended the in 0.6 mL of EtOAc and stirred in room temperature for 2 days. The solid was isolated by centrifugation, to obtain Compound 1 of desired Form D.

[0112] The X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) pattern was used to characterize the Compound 1 obtained, which showed that the Compound 1 was in Crystalline Form D of Compound 1 (Compound 1 Form D).

EXAMPLE 2C: Preparation of Compound 1 Form D

[0113] Single crystal X-ray diffraction data of Compound 1 was collected at 180 K on a Rigaku XtaLAB PRO 007HF(Mo) diffractometer, with Mo Ka radiation (l = 0.71073 A). Data reduction and empirical absorption correction were performed using the CrysAlisPro program. The structure was solved by a dual-space algorithm using SHELXT program. All non-hydrogen atoms could be located directly from the difference Fourier maps. Framework hydrogen atoms were placed geometrically and constrained using the riding model to the parent atoms. Final structure refinement was done using the SHELXL program by minimizing the sum of squared deviations of F2 using a full-matrix technique.

Preparation of Compound 1 Form D ( a Single Crystal )

[0114] Compound 1 Form D was dissolved in a mixture of acetone/ ACN (1/2) with the concentration of Compound 1 at ~7 mg/mL. A block single crystal was obtained, which was a single crystal.

[0115] The XRPD pattern was used to characterize the single crystal of Compound 1 Form D obtained, see Figure 2A. The crystal structural data are summarized in Table IB. The refined single crystal structure were shown in Figure 2B. The single crystal structure of Compound 1 Form D is in the P-1 space group and the triclinic crystal system. The terminal long alkyl chain is found to have large ellipsoids, indicating high mobility with disordered atoms.

[0116] The theoretical XRPD calculated from the single crystal structure and experimental XRPD are essentially similar (Figure 2A). A few small peaks are absent or shift because of orientation preference, disorder and tested temperature (180 K for single crystal data and 293 K for experimental one).

[0117] Table IB. Crystal Data and Structure Refinement for Compound 1 Form D (a Single Crystal)

References

  1. ^ http://www.mirati.com/go/mgcd516/
  2. ^ “MGCD516 in Advanced Liposarcoma and Other Soft Tissue Sarcomas – Full Text View – ClinicalTrials.gov”.
  3. ^ “Phase 2 Study of Glesatinib, Sitravatinib or Mocetinostat in Combination With Nivolumab in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer – Full Text View – ClinicalTrials.gov”.
  4. ^ “MGCD516 Combined With Nivolumab in Renal Cell Cancer (RCC) – Full Text View – ClinicalTrials.gov”.
Identifiers
showIUPAC name
CAS Number1123837-84-2
ChemSpider52083477
UNIICWG62Q1VTB
KEGGD11140
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC33H29F2N5O4S
Molar mass629.68 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)Interactive image
hideSMILESCOCCNCc1ccc(nc1)c2cc3c(s2)c(ccn3)Oc4ccc(cc4F)NC(=O)C5(CC5)C(=O)Nc6ccc(cc6)F
hideInChIInChI=1S/C33H29F2N5O4S/c1-43-15-14-36-18-20-2-8-25(38-19-20)29-17-26-30(45-29)28(10-13-37-26)44-27-9-7-23(16-24(27)35)40-32(42)33(11-12-33)31(41)39-22-5-3-21(34)4-6-22/h2-10,13,16-17,19,36H,11-12,14-15,18H2,1H3,(H,39,41)(H,40,42)Key:WLAVZAAODLTUSW-UHFFFAOYSA-N

///////////// sitravatinib, phase 3, シトラバチニブ , MGCD516, MG-516Sitravatinib (MGCD516)UNII-CWG62Q1VTBCWG62Q1VTBMGCD-516ситраватиниб , سيترافاتينيب , 司曲替尼 , Antineoplastic, MGCD 516

#sitravatinib, #phase 3, #シトラバチニブ , #MGCD516, #MG-516#Sitravatinib (MGCD516), #UNII-#CWG62Q1VTB, #CWG62Q1VTB, #MGCD-516ситраватиниб , سيترافاتينيب , 司曲替尼 , #Antineoplastic, #MGCD516

COCCNCC1=CN=C(C=C1)C2=CC3=NC=CC(=C3S2)OC4=C(C=C(C=C4)NC(=O)C5(CC5)C(=O)NC6=CC=C(C=C6)F)F

NIROGACESTAT


Nirogacestat.png
img
Structure of NIROGACESTAT

NIROGACESTAT

(2S)-2-[[(2S)-6,8-difluoro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl]amino]-N-[1-[1-(2,2-dimethylpropylamino)-2-methylpropan-2-yl]imidazol-4-yl]pentanamide

489.6 g/mol, C27H41F2N5O

CAS 1290543-63-3

PF-03084014, 1290543-63-3, PF-3084014, 865773-15-5QZ62892OFJUNII:QZ62892OFJUNII-QZ62892OFJнирогацестат [Russian] [INN]نيروغاسيستات [Arabic] [INN]尼罗司他 [Chinese] [INN]ニロガセスタット;

orphan drug designation in June 2018 for the treatment of desmoid tumors, and with a fast track designation

 Nirogacestat, also known as PF-03084014, is a potent and selective gamma secretase (GS) inhibitor with potential antitumor activity. PF-03084014 binds to GS, blocking proteolytic activation of Notch receptors. Nirogacestat enhances the Antitumor Effect of Docetaxel in Prostate Cancer. Nirogacestat enhances docetaxel-mediated tumor response and provides a rationale to explore GSIs as adjunct therapy in conjunction with docetaxel for men with CRPC (castration-resistant prostate cancer).

Nirogacestat was disclosed to be a gamma-secretase inhibitor, which can inhibit Aβ-peptide production. SpringWorks Therapeutics (a spin-out of Pfizer ) is developing nirogacestat, as hydrobromide salt, a gamma-secretase inhibitor, for treating aggressive fibromatosis. In February 2021, nirogacestat was reported to be in phase 3 clinical development.

Nirogacestat is a selective gamma secretase (GS) inhibitor with potential antitumor activity. Nirogacestat binds to GS, blocking proteolytic activation of Notch receptors; Notch signaling pathway inhibition may follow, which may result in the induction of apoptosis in tumor cells that overexpress Notch. The integral membrane protein GS is a multi-subunit protease complex that cleaves single-pass transmembrane proteins, such as Notch receptors, at residues within their transmembrane domains. Overexpression of the Notch signaling pathway has been correlated with increased tumor cell growth and survival.

Nirogacestat has been used in trials studying the treatment of Breast Cancer, HIV Infection, Desmoid Tumors, Advanced Solid Tumors, and Aggressive Fibromatosis, among others.

SpringWorks Therapeutics

Nirogacestat (Gamma Secretase Inhibitor)

Nirogacestat is an oral, selective, small molecule, gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) in Phase 3 clinical development for patients with desmoid tumors. Gamma secretase is a protease complex that cleaves, or divides, multiple transmembrane protein complexes, including Notch, which, when dysregulated, can play a role in activating pathways that contribute to desmoid tumor growth.

Gamma secretase has also been shown to directly cleave BCMA, a therapeutic target that is highly expressed on multiple myeloma cells. By inhibiting gamma secretase with nirogacestat, membrane-bound BCMA can be preserved, thereby increasing target density while simultaneously reducing levels of soluble BCMA, which may serve as decoy receptors for BCMA-directed therapies. Together, these mechanisms combine to potentially enhance the activity of BCMA therapies and improve outcomes for multiple myeloma patients. SpringWorks is seeking to advance nirogacestat as a cornerstone of multiple myeloma combination therapy in collaboration with industry leaders who are advancing BCMA therapies.

SpringWorks Therapeutics Announces Clinical Collaboration with Pfizer

By Satish  October 05, 2020 

SpringWorks Therapeutics today announced that the company has entered into a clinical trial collaboration agreement with Pfizer to evaluate SpringWorks Therapeutics’ investigational gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI), nirogacestat, in combination with Pfizer’s anti-B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) CD3 bispecific antibody, PF‐06863135, in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

Gamma secretase inhibition prevents the cleavage and shedding of BCMA from the surface of myeloma cells. In preclinical models, nirogacestat has been shown to increase the cell surface density of BCMA and reduce levels of soluble BCMA, thereby enhancing the activity of BCMA-targeted therapies, including CD3 bispecific antibodies.

Saqib Islam, Chief Executive Officer of SpringWorks Therapeutics Said: This collaboration is another important step in continuing to advance our goal of developing nirogacestat as a best-in-class BCMA potentiator, and we are pleased to work with Pfizer to study nirogacestat in combination with PF‐06863135, which has recently demonstrated promising monotherapy clinical data, We now have five collaborations with industry-leading BCMA developers to evaluate nirogacestat in combinations across modalities. We look forward to generating clinical data with our collaborators to further evaluate the ability of nirogacestat to improve outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma.

Under the terms of the agreement, Pfizer will sponsor and conduct the Phase 1b/2 study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and preliminary efficacy of the combination, and will assume all costs associated with the study, other than expenses related to the manufacturing of nirogacestat and certain expenses related to intellectual property rights. Pfizer and SpringWorks Therapeutics will also form a joint development committee to manage the clinical study, which is expected to commence in the first half of 2021.

Chris Boshoff, MD, PhD, Chief Development Officer for Pfizer Oncology at Pfizer Said: Entering into this clinical collaboration is a proud milestone in our strong relationship with SpringWorks,We believe that studying nirogacestat in combination with PF-06863135 could hold significant therapeutic promise for patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, and we look forward to working together to advance this important area of research.

In addition to its ongoing clinical collaborations with BCMA-directed therapies, SpringWorks is also currently conducting a global Phase 3, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial (the DeFi Trial) to evaluate nirogacestat in adults with progressing desmoid tumors.

About Nirogacestat

Nirogacestat is an investigational, oral, selective, small molecule gamma secretase inhibitor in Phase 3 clinical development for desmoid tumors, which are rare and often debilitating and disfiguring soft-tissue tumors. Gamma secretase cleaves multiple transmembrane protein complexes, including Notch, which is believed to play a role in activating pathways that contribute to desmoid tumor growth.

In addition, gamma secretase has been shown to directly cleave membrane-bound BCMA, resulting in the release of the BCMA extracellular domain, or ECD, from the cell surface. By inhibiting gamma secretase, membrane-bound BCMA can be preserved, increasing target density while reducing levels of soluble BCMA ECD, which may serve as decoy receptors for BCMA-directed therapies. Nirogacestat’s ability to enhance the activity of BCMA-directed therapies has been observed in preclinical models of multiple myeloma. SpringWorks is evaluating nirogacestat as a BCMA potentiator and has five collaborations with industry-leading BCMA developers to evaluate nirogacestat in combinations across modalities, including with an antibody-drug conjugate, two CAR T cell therapies and two bispecific antibodies. In addition, SpringWorks and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have entered into a sponsored research agreement to further characterize the ability of nirogacestat to modulate BCMA and potentiate BCMA directed therapies using a variety of preclinical and patient-derived multiple myeloma models developed by researchers at Fred Hutch.

Nirogacestat has received Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of desmoid tumors (June 2018) and from the European Commission for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma (September 2019). The FDA also granted Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy Designations for the treatment of adult patients with progressive, unresectable, recurrent or refractory desmoid tumors or deep fibromatosis (November 2018 and August 2019).

About PF‐06863135

PF‐06863135 is an anti-B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) CD3 bispecific antibody being investigated in a Phase 1 clinical study to treat relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. This bispecific antibody can be administered subcutaneously and has been optimized for binding affinity to both BCMA and CD3, enabling more potent T-cell-mediated tumor cell toxicity.

Source: SpringWorks Therapeutics

FDA Grants Breakthrough Designation to Nirogacestat for Desmoid Tumors

The FDA has granted nirogacestat, an investigational gamma-secretase inhibitor, with a breakthrough therapy designation for the treatment of adult patients with progressive, unresectable, recurrent or refractory desmoid tumors or deep fibromatosis.

The FDA has granted nirogacestat (PF-03084014), an investigational gamma-secretase inhibitor, with a breakthrough therapy designation for the treatment of adult patients with progressive, unresectable, recurrent or refractory desmoid tumors or deep fibromatosis.1

The breakthrough designation was granted as a result of positive findings seen in phase I and II trials of nirogacestat monotherapy in patients with desmoid tumors. A phase III trial has also been initiated investigating nirogacestat in patients with desmoid tumors or aggressive fibromatosis (NCT03785964).

“We are committed to pursuing the rapid development of nirogacestat given the important need for new therapies for patients with desmoid tumors and are pleased to receive this breakthrough therapy designation,” Saqib Islam, CEO of SpringWorks, the company developing the small molecule inhibitor, said in a statement. “We are currently enrolling adult patients in our phase III DeFi trial and will continue to work closely with the FDA with the goal of bringing nirogacestat to patients as quickly as possible.”

The open-label, single-center phase II trial of nirogacestat enrolled 17 patients with desmoid tumors who were not eligible for surgical resection or definitive radiation therapy and who had experienced disease progression after at least 1 prior treatment regimen. Patients received 150 mg twice per day of continuous, oral nirogacestat in 21-day cycles.2

The median age of patients was 34 years (range, 19-69), 82% of the patients were female, and 53% of patients had aCTNNB1T41A somatic missense mutation. The median number of prior therapies was 4 (range, 1-9), which included cytotoxic chemotherapy in 71% and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor in 59%.

Sixteen patients were evaluable for response. After a median follow-up of more than 25 months, 5 patients (29%) achieved a partial response and 11 (65%) had stable disease, for a disease control rate of 100%. Ten patients (59%) remained on treatment with nirogacestat for more than 2 years.

Grade 1/2 adverse events were observed in all patients, with diarrhea (76%) and skin disorders (71%) being the most common toxicities. The only treatment-related grade 3 event was reversible hypophosphatemia, which was reported in 8 patients (47%) and was considered to be a class effect of gamma-secretase inhibitors. Four patients met the criteria for dose reduction.

Findings from the phase I study also showed a disease control rate of 100% with nirogacestat. However, the median progression-free survival was not reached in either study due to a lack of patients progressing on treatment. Only 1 patient discontinued treatment due to an adverse event between the 2 studies.1

The FDA had previously granted nirogacestat with an orphan drug designation in June 2018 for the treatment of desmoid tumors, and with a fast track designation in November 2018 for the treatment of adult patients with progressive, unresectable, recurrent or refractory desmoid tumors or deep fibromatosis.

References

  1. SpringWorks Therapeutics Receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Nirogacestat for the Treatment of Adult Patients with Progressive, Unresectable, Recurrent or Refractory Desmoid Tumors [press release]. Stamford, CT: SpringWorks Therapeutics, Inc; August 29, 2019. https://bit.ly/30IV0Eb. Accessed September 3, 2019.
  2. Kummar S, O&rsquo;Sullivan Coyne G, Do KT, et al. Clinical Activity of the &gamma;-Secretase Inhibitor PF-03084014 in Adults With Desmoid Tumors (Aggressive Fibromatosis).J Clin Oncol.2017;35(14):1561-1569. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2016.71.1994.

PAPER

str1-png

Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters (2011), 21(9), 2637-40.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0960894X10018822

Design, synthesis, and in vivo characterization of a novel series of tetralin amino imidazoles as γ-secretase inhibitors: Discovery of PF-3084014 - ScienceDirect
Design, synthesis, and in vivo characterization of a novel series of tetralin amino imidazoles as γ-secretase inhibitors: Discovery of PF-3084014 - ScienceDirect
Design, synthesis, and in vivo characterization of a novel series of tetralin amino imidazoles as γ-secretase inhibitors: Discovery of PF-3084014 - ScienceDirect

PATENT

WO 2016089208

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016089208

PATENT

WO-2021029854

Novel, stable crystalline polymorphic (A to N) and amorphous forms of nirogacestat hydrobromide , useful for treating desmoid tumors such as multiple myeloma, a cancer having a mutation in a Notch pathway gene, adenoid cystic carcinoma and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

(S)-2-(((S)-6,8-difluoro-l,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)amino)-N-(l-(2- methyl- l-(neopentylamino) propan-2-yl)-lH-imidazol-4-yl)pentanamide (“Compound 1”) is a gamma-secretase inhibitor which can inhibit Ab-peptide production.

[0003] Not all compounds that are gamma-secretase inhibitors have characteristics affording the best potential to become useful therapeutics. Some of these characteristics include high affinity at the gamma-secretase, duration of gamma-secretase deactivation, oral bioavailability, tissue distribution, and stability (e.g., ability to formulate or crystallize, shelf life). Favorable characteristics can lead to improved safety, tolerability, efficacy, therapeutic index, patient compliance, cost efficiency, manufacturing ease, etc.

[0004] In addition, the isolation and commercial -scale preparation of a solid state form of hydrobromide salts of Compound 1 and corresponding pharmaceutical formulations having acceptable solid state properties (including chemical stability, thermal stability, solubility, hygroscopicity, and/or particle size), compound manufacturability (including yield, impurity rejection during crystallization, filtration properties, drying properties, and milling properties), and formulation feasibility (including stability with respect to pressure or compression forces during tableting) present a number of challenges.

[0005] Accordingly, there is a current need for one or more solid state forms of hydrobromide salts of Compound 1 that have an acceptable balance of these properties and can be used in the preparation of pharmaceutically acceptable solid dosage forms.

Crystalline Form A

[0147] In one aspect, the present disclosure relates to crystalline Form A of a hydrobromide salt of (S)-2-(((S)-6,8-difluoro-l,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)amino)- N-(l -(2 -methyl- l-(neopentylamino) propan-2-yl)-lH-imidazol-4-yl)pentanamide having Formula (I),

[0148] In one embodiment, crystalline Form A is anhydrous.

[0149] In another embodiment, the melting point of crystalline Form A is about 254 °C.

[0150] In another embodiment, Form A is characterized by an XRPD pattern having peaks at 8.8 ± 0.2, 9.8 ± 0.2, and 23.3 ± 0.2 degrees two theta when measured by Cu Ka radiation. In another embodiment, Form A is characterized by an XRPD pattern having peaks at 8.8 ± 0.2, 9.8 ± 0.2, 23.3 ± 0.2, 25.4 ± 0.2, 28.0 ± 0.2, and 29.3 ± 0.2 degrees two theta when measured by Cu Ka radiation. In another embodiment, Form A is characterized by an XRPD pattern having peaks at 8.8 ± 0.2, 9.8 ± 0.2, 20.0 ± 0.2, 23.3 ± 0.2, 25.4 ± 0.2, 28.0 ± 0.2, 29.3 ± 0.2, and 32.5 ± 0.2 degrees two theta when measured by Cu Ka radiation.

Patent

Product case, WO2005092864 ,

hold protection in the EU states until March 2025, and expire in the US in February 2026 with US154 extension.

PATENT

WO2020208572 , co-assigned to GSK and SpringWorks, claiming a combination of nirogacestat with anti-BCMA antibody (eg belantamab mafodotin ), for treating cancer.

PATENT

US10590087 , for a prior filing from Pfizer, claiming crystalline forms of nirogacestat hydrobromide.

////////////NIROGACESTAT, orphan drug designation, esmoid tumors,  fast track designation, PF-03084014, PF 03084014, QZ62892OFJ , UNII:QZ62892OFJ ,UNII-QZ62892OFJ, ,нирогацестат , نيروغاسيستات , 尼罗司他 , ニロガセスタット, phase 3

CCCC(C(=O)NC1=CN(C=N1)C(C)(C)CNCC(C)(C)C)NC2CCC3=C(C2)C(=CC(=C3)F)F

TROFINETIDE


ChemSpider 2D Image | Trofinetide | C13H21N3O6
Trofinetide structure.png

Trofinetide

  • Molecular FormulaC13H21N3O6
  • Average mass315.322 Da

Tofinetide , NNZ-256610076853400-76-7[RN]
glycyl-2-methyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid
H-Gly-PMe-Glu-OHL-Glutamic acid, glycyl-2-methyl-L-prolyl-UNII-Z2ME8F52QLZ2ME8F52QLтрофинетид [Russian] [INN]تروفينيتيد [Arabic] [INN]曲非奈肽 [Chinese] [INN]

IUPAC CondensedH-Gly-aMePro-Glu-OH
SequenceGXE
HELMPEPTIDE1{G.[*C(=O)[C@@]1(CCCN1*)C |$_R2;;;;;;;;_R1;$|].E}$$$$
IUPACglycyl-alpha-methyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid

An (1-3) IGF-1 analog with neuroprotective activity.

OPTICAL ROT; -52.4 °   Conc: 0.19 g/100mL;  water ;  589.3 nm; Temp: 20 °C; Len: 1.0 dm…Tetrahedron 2005, V61(42), P10018-10035 

EU Customs Code CN, 29339980

Harmonized Tariff Code, 293399

  • L-Glutamic acid, glycyl-2-methyl-L-prolyl-
  • glycyl-2-methyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid
  • Glycyl-L-2-methylprolyl-L-glutamic acid
2D chemical structure of 853400-76-7

Trofinetide (NNZ-2566) is a drug developed by Neuren Pharmaceuticals that acts as an analogue of the neuropeptide (1-3) IGF-1, which is a simple tripeptide with sequence GlyProGlu formed by enzymatic cleavage of the growth factor IGF-1 within the brain. Trofinetide has anti-inflammatory properties and was originally developed as a potential treatment for stroke,[1][2] but has subsequently been developed for other applications and is now in Phase II clinical trials against Fragile X syndrome and Rett syndrome.[3][4][5]

Trofinetide (NNZ-2566), a neuroprotective analogue of glypromate, is a novel molecule that has a profile suitable for both intravenous infusion and chronic oral delivery. It is currently in development to treat traumatic brain injury.

In February 2021, Neuren is developing trofinetide (NNZ-2566, phase 2 clinical ), a small-molecule analog of the naturally occurring neuroprotectant and N-terminus IGF-1 tripeptide Glypromate (glycine-proline-glutamate), for intravenous infusion treatment of various neurological conditions, including moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, chronic neurodegenerative disorders and peripheral neuropathies. At the same time, Neuren is also investigating an oral formulation of trofinetide (phase 3 clinical) for similar neurological indications, including mild TBI.

Autism Spectrum Disorders and neurodevelopment disorders (NDDs) are becoming increasingly diagnosed. According to the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual oƒ Mental Disorders (DSM-4), Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a collection of linked developmental disorders, characterized by abnormalities in social interaction and communication, restricted interests and repetitive behaviours. Current classification of ASD according to the DSM-4 recognises five distinct forms: classical autism or Autistic Disorder, Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). A sixth syndrome, pathological demand avoidance (PDA), is a further specific pervasive developmental disorder.

More recently, the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual oƒ Mental Disorders (DSM-5) recognizes recognises Asperger syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) as ASDs.

This invention applies to treatment of disorders, regardless of their classification as either DSM-4 or DSM-5.

Neurodevelopment Disorders (NDDs) include Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), Angelman Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Phelan McDermid Syndrome, Rett Syndrome, CDKL5 mutations (which also are associated with Rett Syndrome and X-Linked Infantile Spasm Disorder) and others. Many but not all NDDs are caused by genetic mutations and, as such, are sometimes referred to as monogenic disorders. Some patients with NDDs exhibit behaviors and symptoms of autism.

As an example of a NDD, Fragile X Syndrome is an X-linked genetic disorder in which affected individuals are intellectually handicapped to varying degrees and display a variety of associated psychiatric symptoms. Clinically, Fragile X Syndrome is characterized by intellectual handicap, hyperactivity and attentional problems, autism spectrum symptoms, emotional lability and epilepsy (Hagerman, 1997a). The epilepsy seen in Fragile X Syndrome is most commonly present in childhood, but then gradually remits towards adulthood. Hyperactivity is present in approximately 80 percent of affected males (Hagerman, 1997b). Physical features such as prominent ears and jaw and hyper-extensibility of joints are frequently present but are not diagnostic. Intellectual handicap is the most common feature defining the phenotype. Generally, males are more severely affected than females. Early impressions that females are unaffected have been replaced by an understanding of the presence of specific learning difficulties and other neuropsychiatric features in females. The learning disability present in males becomes more defined with age, although this longitudinal effect is more likely a reflection of a flattening of developmental trajectories rather than an explicit neurodegenerative process.

The compromise of brain function seen in Fragile X Syndrome is paralleled by changes in brain structure in humans. MRI scanning studies reveal that Fragile X Syndrome is associated with larger brain volumes than would be expected in matched controls and that this change correlates with trinucleotide expansion in the FMRP promoter region (Jakala et al, 1997). At the microscopic level, humans with Fragile X Syndrome show abnormalities of neuronal dendritic structure, in particular, an abnormally high number of immature dendritic spines (Irwin et al, , 2000).

Currently available treatments for NDDs are symptomatic – focusing on the management of symptoms – and supportive, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Educational and social skills training and therapies are implemented early to address core issues of learning delay and social impairments. Special academic, social, vocational, and support services are often required. Medication, psychotherapy or behavioral therapy may be used for management of co-occurring anxiety, ADHD, depression, maladaptive behaviors (such as aggression) and sleep issues, Antiepileptic drugs may be used to control seizures.

Patent

WO 2014085480,

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2014085480

str1-1

EP 0 366 638 discloses GPE (a tri-peptide consisting of the amino acids Gly-Pro-Glu) and its di-peptide derivatives Gly-Pro and Pro-Glu. EP 0 366 638 discloses that GPE is effective as a neuromodulator and is able to affect the electrical properties of neurons.

WO95/172904 discloses that GPE has neuroprotective properties and that administration of GPE can reduce damage to the central nervous system (CNS) by the prevention or inhibition of neuronal and glial cell death.

WO 98/14202 discloses that administration of GPE can increase the effective amount of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the central nervous system (CNS).

WO99/65509 discloses that increasing the effective amount of GPE in the CNS, such as by administration of GPE, can increase the effective amount of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the CNS to increase TH-mediated dopamine production in the treatment of diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.

WO02/16408 discloses certain GPE analogs having amino acid substitutions and certain other modification that are capable of inducing a physiological effect equivalent to GPE within a patient. The applications of the GPE analogs include the treatment of acute brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, including injury or disease in the CNS.

EXAMPLES

The following examples are intended to illustrate embodiments of this invention, and are not intended to limit the scope to these specific examples. Persons of ordinary skill in the art can apply the disclosures and teachings presented herein to develop other embodiments without undue experimentation and with a likelihood of success. All such embodiments are considered part of this invention.

Example 1: Synthesis of N,N-Dimethylglycyl-L-prolyl)-L-glutamic acid

The following non-limiting example illustrates the synthesis of a compound of the invention, N,N-Dimethylglycyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid

All starting materials and other reagents were purchased from Aldrich; BOC=tert-butoxycarbonyl; Bn=benzyl.

BOC-L-proline-(P-benzyl)-L-glutamic acid benzyl ester

To a solution of BOC-proline [Anderson GW and McGregor AC: J. Amer. Chem. Soc: 79, 6810, 1994] (10 mmol) in dichloromethane (50 mi), cooled to 0°C, was added triethylamine (1 .39 ml, 10 mmol) and ethyl chloroformate (0.96 ml, 10 mmol). The resultant mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 30 minutes. A solution of dibenzyl-L-glutamate (10 mmol) was then added and the mixture stirred at 0° C for 2 hours then warmed to room temperature and stirred overnight. The reaction mixture was washed with aqueous sodium bicarbonate and citric acid (2 mol 1-1) then dried (MgSO4) and concentrated at reduced pressure to give BOC-L-proline-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (5.0 g, 95%).

L-proline-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester

A solution of BOC-L-glutamyl-L-proline dibenzyl ester (3.4 g, 10 mmol), cooled to 0 °C, was treated with trifluoroacetic acid (25 ml) for 2 h. at room temperature. After removal of the volatiles at reduced pressure the residue was triturated with ether to give L-proline-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester.

N,N-Dimethylglycyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid

A solution of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (10.3 mmol) in dichloromethane (10 ml) was added to a stirred and cooled (0 °C) solution of L-proline-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (10 mmol), N,N-dimethylglycine (10 mmol) and triethylamine ( 10.3 mmol) in dichloromethane (30 ml). The mixture was stirred at 0°C overnight and then at room temperature for 3 h. After filtration, the filtrate was evaporated at reduced pressure. The resulting crude dibenzyl ester was dissolved in a mixture of ethyl acetate (30 ml) and methanol (30 ml) containing 10% palladium on charcoal (0.5 g) then hydrogenated at room temperature and pressure until the uptake of hydrogen ceased. The filtered solution was evaporated and the residue recrystallised from ethyl acetate to yield the tripeptide derivative.

It can be appreciated that following the method of the Examples, and using alternative amino acids or their amides or esters, will yield other compounds of Formula 1.

Eample 2: Synthesis of Glycyl-L-2-Methyl-L-Prolyl-L-Glutamate

L-2-Methylproline and L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester p-toluenesulphonate were purchased from Bachem, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-glycine from Acros Organics and bis(2-oxo-3-oxazolidinyl)phosphinic chloride (BoPCl, 97%) from Aldrich Chem. Co.

Methyl L-2-methylprolinate hydrochloride 2

Thionyl chloride (5.84 cm3, 80.1 mmol) was cautiously added dropwise to a stirred solution of (L)-2-methylproline 1 (0.43 g, 3.33 mmol) in anhydrous methanol (30 cm3) at -5 °C under an atmosphere of nitrogen. The reaction mixture was heated under reflux for 24 h, and the resultant pale yellow-coloured solution was. concentrated to dryness in vacuo. The residue was dissolved in a 1 : 1 mixture of methanol and toluene (30 cm3) then concentrated to dryness to remove residual thionyl chloride. This procedure was repeated twice more, yielding hydrochloride 2 (0.62 g, 104%) as an hygroscopic, spectroscopically pure, off-white solid: mp 127- 131 °C; [α]D -59.8 (c 0.24 in CH2Cl2); vmax (film)/cm-1 3579, 3398 br, 2885, 2717, 2681 , 2623, 2507, 1743, 1584, 1447, 1432, 1374, 1317, 1294, 1237, 1212, 1172, 1123, 981 , 894, 861 and 764; δH (300 MHz; CDCl3; Me4Si) 1.88 (3H, s, Proα-CH3), 1 .70-2.30 (3H, br m, Proβ-HAΗΒ and Proγ-H2), 2.30-2.60 (1H, br m, Proβ-HAΗΒ), 3.40-3.84 (2H, br m, Proδ-H2), 3.87 (3H, s, CO2CH3), 9.43 (1H, br s, NH) and 10.49 ( 1H, br s, HCl); δC (75 MHz; CDCl3) 21.1 (CH3, Proα-CH3), 22.4 (CH2, Proγ-C), 35.6 (CH2, Proβ-C), 45.2 (CH2, Proδ-C), 53.7 (CH3, CO2CH3), 68.4 (quat., Proα-C) and 170.7 (quat, CO); m/z (FAB+) 323.1745 [M2.H35Cl.H+: (C7H13NO2)2. H35Cl.H requires 323.1738] and 325.1718 [M2.H37Cl.H+: (C7H13NOz)2. H37Cl.H requires 325.1708],

N-Benxyloxycarbonyl-glycyl-L-2-methylproline 5

Anhydrous triethylamine (0.45 cm3, 3.23 mmol) was added dropwise to a mixture of methyl L-2-methylprolinate hydrochloride 2 (0.42 g, 2.34 mmol) and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-glycine (98.5%) 3 (0.52 g, 2.45 mmol) in methylene chloride (16 cm3), at 0 °C, under an atmosphere of nitrogen. The resultant solution was stirred for 20 min and a solution of 1 ,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (0.56 g, 2.71 mmol) in methylene chloride (8 cm3) at 0 °C was added dropwise and the reaction mixture was warmed to room temperature and stirred for a further 20 h. The resultant white mixture was filtered through a Celite™ pad to partially remove 1 ,3-dicyclohexylurea, and the pad was washed with methylene chloride (50 cm3). The filtrate was washed successively with 10% aqueous hydrochloric acid (50 cm3) and saturated aqueous sodium hydrogen carbonate (50 cm3), dried (MgSO4), filtered, and concentrated to dryness in vacuo. Further purification of the residue by flash column chromatography (35 g SiO2; 30-70% ethyl acetate – hexane; gradient elution) afforded tentatively methyl N-benzyloxycarbonyl-glycyl-L-2-methylprolinate 4 (0.56 g), containing 1 ,3-dicyclohexylurea, as a white semi-solid: Rf 0.65 (EtOAc); m/z (ΕI+) 334.1534 (M+. C17H22N2O5 requires 334.1529) and 224 ( 1 ,3-dicyclohexylurea).

To a solution of impure prolinate 4 (0.56 g, ca. 1.67 mmol) in 1,4-dioxane (33 cm3) was added dropwise 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide (10 cm3, 10 mmol) and the mixture was stirred for 19 h at room temperature. Methylene chloride ( 100 cm3) was then added and the organic layer extracted with saturated aqueous sodium hydrogen carbonate (2 x 100 cm3). The combined aqueous layers were carefully acidified with hydrochloric acid (32%), extracted with methylene chloride (2 x 100 cm3), and the combined organic layers dried (MgSO4), filtered, and

concentrated to dryness in vacuo. Purification of the ensuing residue (0.47 g) by flash column chromatography ( 17 g SiO2; 50% ethyl acetate – hexane to 30% methanol – dichloromethane; gradient elution) gave N-protected dipeptide 5 (0.45 g, 60%) as a white foam in two steps from hydrochloride 2. Dipeptide 5 was shown to be exclusively the frafw-orientated conformer by NMR analysis: Rf 0.50 (20% MeOH – CH2Cl2); [α]D -62.3 (c 0.20 in CH2Cl2); vmax (film)/cm-1 3583, 3324 br, 2980, 2942, 1722, 1649, 1529, 1454, 1432, 1373, 1337, 1251 , 1219, 1179, 1053, 1027, 965, 912, 735 and 698; δH (300 MHz; CDCl3; Me4Si) 1.59 (3H, s, Proα-CH3), 1 .89 (1H, 6 lines, J 18.8, 6.2 and 6.2, Proβ-HAHB), 2.01 (2H, dtt, J 18.7, 6.2 and 6.2, Proγ-H2), 2.25-2.40 (1H, m, Proβ-HAΗΒ), 3.54 (2H, t, J 6.6, Proδ-H2), 3.89 (1H, dd, J 17.1 and 3.9, Glyα-HAHB), 4.04 (1H, dd, J 17.2 and 5.3, Glyα-HAΗΒ), 5.11 (2H, s, OCH2Ph), 5.84 (I H, br t, J 4.2, N-H), 7.22-7.43 (5H, m, Ph) and 7.89 (1 H, br s, -COOH); δC (75 MHz; CDCl3) 21.3 (CH3, Proα-CH3), 23.8 (CH2, Proγ-C), 38.2 (CH2, Proβ-C), 43.6 (CH2, Glyα-C), 47.2 (CH2, Proδ-C), 66.7 (quat, Proα-C), 66.8 (CH2, OCH2Ph), 127.9 (CH, Ph), 127.9 (CH, Ph), 128.4, (CH, Ph), 136.4 (quat., Ph), 156.4 (quat., NCO2), 167.5 (quat., Gly-CON) and 176.7 (quat., CO); m/z (EI+) 320.1368 (M+. C16Η20Ν2Ο5 requires 320.1372).

Dibenzyl N-benzyloxycarbonyl-glycyl-L-2-methylprolyl-L-glutamate 7

Triethylamine (0.50 cm3, 3.59 mmol) was added dropwise to a solution of dipeptide 5 (0.36 g, 1.12 mmol) and L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester /Moluenesulphonate 6 (0.73 g, 1.46 mmol) in methylene chloride (60 cm3) under nitrogen at room temperature, and the reaction mixture stirred for 10 min. Bis(2-oxo-3-oxazoIidinyl)phosphinic chloride (BoPCl, 97%) (0.37 g, 1.41 mmol) was added and the colourless solution stirred for 17 h. The methylene chloride solution was washed successively with 10% aqueous hydrochloric acid (50 cm3) and saturated aqueous sodium hydrogen carbonate (50 cm3), dried (MgSO4), filtered, and evaporated to dryness in vacuo. Purification of the resultant residue by repeated (2x) flash column chromatography (24 g SiO2; 30-70% ethyl acetate – hexane; gradient elution) yielded ƒully protected tripeptide 7 (0.63 g, 89%) as a colourless oil. Tripeptide 7 was shown to be exclusively the trans-orientated conformer by NMR analysis: Rf 0.55 (EtOAc); [α]D -41.9 (c 0.29 in CH2Cl2); vmax (film)/cm-1 3583, 3353 br, 2950, 1734, 1660, 1521, 1499, 1454, 1429, 1257, 1214, 1188, 1166, 1051, 911, 737 and 697; δH (400 MHz; CDCl3; Me4Si) 1.64 (3H, s, Proot-CH3), 1.72 (1H, dt, J 12.8, 7.6 and 7.6, Proβ-HAHB), 1.92 (2H, 5 lines, J 6.7, Proγ-H2), 2.04 (1H, 6 lines, J 7.3 Gluβ-HAHB), 2.17-2.27 (1H, m, Gluβ-HAΗΒ), 2.35-2.51 (3H, m, Proβ-HAΗΒ and Gluγ-H2), 3.37-3.57 (2H, m, Proδ-H2), 3.90 (1 H, dd, J 17.0 and 3.6, Glyα-HAHB), 4.00 (1H, dd, J 17.1 and 5.1, Glyα-HAΗΒ), 4.56 (1H, td, J 7.7 and 4.9, Glyα-H), 5.05-5.20 (6H, m, 3 x OCH2Ph), 5.66-5.72 (1H, br m, Gly-NH), 7.26-7.37 (15H, m, 3 x Ph) and 7.44 (1H, d, J 7.2, Glu-NH); δC (100 MHz; CDCl3) 21.9 (CH3, Proα-CH3), 23.4 (CH2, Proγ-C), 26.6 (CH2, Gluβ-C), 30.1 (CH2, Gluγ-C), 38.3 (CH2, Proβ-C),

43.9 (CH2, Glyα-C), 47.6 (CH2, Proδ-C), 52.2 (CH, Glua-C), 66.4 (CH2, OCH2Ph), 66.8 (CH2, OCH2Ph), 67.1 (CH2, OCH2Ph), 68.2 (quat, Proα-C), 127.9 (CH, Ph), 128.0 (CH, Ph), 128.1, (CH, Ph), 128.2, (CH, Ph), 128.2, (CH, Ph), 128.3, (CH, Ph), 128.4, (CH, Ph), 128.5, (CH, Ph), 128.5, (CH, Ph), 135.2 (quat., Ph), 135.7 (quat., Ph), 136.4 (quat, Ph), 156.1 (quat, NCO2), 167.3 (quat., Gly-CO), 171.4 (quat., CO), 172.9 (quat., CO) and 173.4 (quat., CO); m/z (FAB+) 630.2809 (MH+. C35H40N3O8 requires 630.2815).

Glycyl-L-2-methylprolyl-L-glutamic acid (G-2-MePE)

A mixture of the protected tripeptide 7 (0.63 g, 1.00 mmol) and 10 wt % palladium on activated carbon (0.32 g, 0.30 mmol) in 91 :9 methanol – water (22 cm3) was stirred under an atmosphere of hydrogen at room temperature, protected from light, for 23 h. The reaction mixture was filtered through a Celite™ pad and the pad washed with 75 :25 methanol – water (200 cm3). The filtrate was concentrated to dryness under reduced pressure and the residue triturated with anhydrous diethyl ether to afford a 38: 1 mixture of G-2-MePE and tentatively methylamine 8 (0.27 g, 86%) as an extremely hygroscopic white solid. Analytical reverse-phase HPLC studies on the mixture [Altech Econosphere C 18 Si column, 150 x 4.6 mm, 5 ☐m; 5 min flush with H2O (0.05% TFA) then steady gradient over 25 min to MeCN as eluent at flow rate of 1 ml/min; detection using diode array] indicated it was a 38: 1 mixture of two eluting peaks with retention times of 13.64 and 14.44 min at 207 and 197 nm, respectively. G-2-MePE was shown to be a 73 :27 trans:cis mixture of conformers by 1H NMR analysis (the ratio was estimated from the relative intensities of the double doublet and triplet at δ 4.18 and 3.71 , assigned to the Gluα-H protons of the major and minor conformers, respectively):

mp 144 °Cɸ;

[ α]D -52.4 (c 0.19 in H2O);

δα (300 MHz; D2O; internal MeOH) 1.52 (3H, s, Proα-CH3), 1.81-2.21 (6H, m, Proβ-H2, Proγ-H, and Gluβ-H2), 2.34 (1.46H, t, J 7.2, Gluy-H2), 2.42* (0.54H, t, 77.3, Gluγ-H2), 3.50-3.66 (2H, m, Pro6-H2), 3.71 * (0.27H, t, J 6.2, Gluoc-H), 3.85 (1H, d, J 16.6, Glyα-HAHB), 3.92 (1H, d, J 16.6, Glyα-HAΗΒ) and 4.18 (0.73H, dd, J 8.4 and 4.7, Glua-H);

δC (75 MHz; D2O; internal MeOH) 21.8 (CH3, Proα-CH3), 25.0 (CH2, Proγ-C), 27.8* (CH2: Gluβ-C), 28.8 (CH2, Gluβ-C), 32.9 (CH2, Gluγ-C), 40.8 (CH2, Proβ-C), 42.7 (CH2, Glyα-C), 49.5 (CH2, Proδ-C), 56.0* (CH, Gluα-C), 56.4 (CH, Gluα-C), 69.8 (quat, Proα-C), 166.5 (quat., Gly-CO), 177.3 (quat., Pro-CON), 179.2 (quat., Gluα-CO), 180.2* (quat., Gluγ-CO) and 180.6 (quat., Gluγ-CO);

m/z (FAB+) 3 16.1508 (MH+. C13H22N3O6 requires 316.1509).

PATENT

WO02094856

Example

The following non-limiting example illustrates the synthesis of a compound of the invention, NN-dimethylglycyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid.

All starting materials and other reagents were purchased from Aldrich;
BOC = tert-butoxycarbonyl; Bn = benzyl.

BOC-(γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid benzyl ester
To a solution of BOC-proline [Anderson GW and McGregor AC: J. Amer. Chem.

Soc: 79, 6180, 1957] (10 mmol) in dichloromethane (50 ml), cooled to 0 °C, was added triethylamine (1.39 ml, 10 mmol) and ethyl chloroformate (0.96 ml, 10 mmol). The resultant mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 30 minutes. A solution of dibenzyl L-glutamate (10 mmol) was then added and the mixture stirred at 0 °C for 2 hours then warmed to room temperature and stirred overnight. The reaction mixture was washed with aqueous sodium bicarbonate and citric acid (2 mol l“1) then dried (MgS04) and concentrated at reduced pressure to give BOC-(γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (5.0 g, 95%).

(7-Benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester
A solution of BOC-(γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (3.4 g, 10 mmol), cooled to 0 °C, was treated with trifluoroacetic acid (25 ml) for 2 hr at room temperature. After removal of the volatiles at reduced pressure the residue was triturated with ether to give (γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (I).

N,N-Dimethylglycyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid
A solution of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (10.3 mmol) in dichloromethane (10 ml) was added to a stirred and cooled (0 °C) solution of (7-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (10 mmol), TVN-dimethylglycine (10 mmol) and triethylamine
(10.3 mmol) in dichloromethane (30 ml). The mixture was stirred at 0 °C overnight and then at room temperature for 3 h. After filtration, the filtrate was evaporated at reduced pressure. The resulting crude dibenzyl ester was dissolved in a mixture of ethyl acetate (30 ml) and methanol (30 ml) containing 10% palladium on charcoal (0.5 g) then hydrogenated at room temperature and pressure until the uptake of hydrogen ceased. The filtered solution was evaporated and the residue recrystallized from ethyl acetate to yield the tri-peptide derivative.

It will be evident that following the method of the Example, and using alternative amino acids or their amides or esters, will yield other compounds of Formula 1.

Testing; Material and Methods
The following experimental protocol followed guidelines approved by the

University of Auckland animal ethics committee.
Preparation of cortical astrocyte cultures for harvest of metabolised cell culture supernatant

One cortical hemisphere from a postnatal day 1 rat was used and collected into

4ml of DMEM. Trituration was done with a 5ml glass pipette and subsequently through an 18 gauge needle. Afterwards, the cell suspension was sieved through a lOOμm cell strainer and washed in 50ml DMEM (centrifugation for 5min at 250g). The sediment was resuspended into 20ml DMEM+10% fetal calf serum. 10 Milliliters of suspension was added into each of two 25cm3 flasks and cultivated at 37°C in the presence of 10% C02, with a medium change twice weekly. After cells reached confluence, they were washed three times with PBS and adjusted to Neurobasal/B27 and incubated for another 3 days. This supernatant was frozen for transient storage until usage at -80°C.

Preparation of striatal and cortical tissue from rat E18/E19 embryos
A dam was sacrificed by C02-treatment in a chamber for up to 4 minutes and was prepared then for cesarean section. After surgery, the embryos were removed from their amniotic sacs, decapitated and the heads put on ice in DMEM/F12 medium for striatum and PBS + 0.65% D(+)-glucose for cortex.

Striatal tissue extraction procedure and preparation of cells
Whole brain was removed from the skull with the ventral side facing upside in DMEM/F12 medium. The striatum was dissected out from both hemispheres under a stereomicroscope and the striatal tissue was placed into the Falcon tube on ice.

The collected striatal tissue was triturated by using a PI 000 pipettor in 1ml of volume. The tissue was triturated by gently pipetting the solution up and down into the pipette tip about 15 times, using shearing force on alternate outflows. The tissue pieces settled to the bottom of the Falcon tube within 30 seconds, subsequently the supernatant was transferred to a new sterile Falcon tube on ice. The supernatant contained a suspension of dissociated single cells. The tissue pieces underwent a second trituration to avoid excessively damaging cells already dissociated by over triturating them. 1 Milliliter of ice-cold DMEM/F12 medium was added to the tissue pieces in the first tube and triturated as before. The tissue pieces were allowed to settle and the supernatant was removed to a new sterile Falcon tube on ice. The cells were centrifuged at 250g for 5 minutes at 4°C. The resuspended cell pellet was ready for cell counting.

Plating and cultivation of striatal cells
Striatal cells were plated into Poly-L-Lysine (O.lmg/ml) coated 96-well plates (the inner 60 wells only) at a density of 200,000 cells /cm2 in Neurobasal/B27 medium (Invitrogen). The cells were cultivated in the presence of 5% C02 at 37°C under 100% humidity. Complete medium was changed on days 1, 3 and 6.

Cortical tissue extraction procedure and preparation of cells
The two cortical hemispheres were carefully removed by a spatula from the whole brain with the ventral side facing upside into a PBS +0.65% D(+)-glucose containing petri dish. Forcips were put into the rostral part (near B. olfactorius) of the cortex for fixing the tissue and two lateral – sagittal oriented cuttings were done to remove the paraform and entorhinal cortices. The next cut involved a frontal oriented cut at the posterior end to remove the hippocampal formation. A final frontal cut was done a few millimeters away from the last cut in order to get hold of area 17/18 of the visual cortex.

The collected cortices on ice in PBS+0.65% D(+)-glucose were centrifuged at 350g for 5min. The supernatant was removed and trypsin/EDTA (0.05%/0.53mM) was added for 8min at 37°C. The reaction was stopped by adding an equal amount of DMEM+10%) fetal calf serum. The supernatant was removed by centrifugation followed by two subsequent washes in Neurobasal/B27 medium.

The cells were triturated once with a glass Pasteur pipette in 1 ml of
Neurobasal/B27 medium and subsequently twice by using a 1ml insulin syringe with a 22 gauge needle. The cell suspension was passed through a lOOμm cell strainer and subsequently rinsed by 1ml of Neurobasal B27 medium. Cells were counted and adjusted to 50,000 cells per 60μl.

Plating and cultivation of cortical cells

96-well plates were coated with 0.2mg/ml Poly-L-Lysine and subsequently coated with 2μg/ml laminin in PBS, after which 60μl of cortical astrocyte-conditioned medium was added to each well. Subsequently, 60μl of cortical cell suspension was added. The cells were cultivated in the presence of 10% C02 at 37°C under 100%) humidity. At day 1, there was a complete medium change (1:1- Neurobasal/B27 and astrocyte-conditioned medium) with addition of lμM cytosine-β-D-arabino-furanoside (mitosis inhibitor). On the second day, 2/3 of medium was changed. On day 5, 2/3 of the medium was changed again.

Cerebellar microexplants from P8 animals: preparation, cultivation and fixation

The laminated cerebellar cortices of the two hemispheres were explanted from a P8 rat, cut into small pieces in PBS + 0.65% D(+)glucose solution and triturated by a 23gauge needle and subsequently pressed through a 125 μm pore size sieve. The microexplants that were obtained were centrifuged (60 g) twice (media exchange) into serum-free BSA-supplemented START V-medium (Biochrom). Finally, the
microexplants were reconstituted in 1500 μl STARTV-medium (Biochrom). For cultivation, 40μl of cell suspension was adhered for 3 hours on a Poly-D-Lysine
(O.lmg/ml) coated cover slip placed in 35mm sized 6-well plates in the presence of 5% C02 under 100% humidity at 34°C. Subsequently, 1ml of STARTV-medium was added together with the toxins and drugs. The cultures were monitored (evaluated) after 2-3 days of cultivation in the presence of 5% C02 under 100% humidity. For cell counting analysis, the cultures were fixed in rising concentrations of paraformaldehyde (0.4%, 1.2%, 3% and 4% for 3min each) followed by a wash in PBS.
Toxin and drug administration for cerebellar, cortical and striatal cells: analysis

All toxin and drug administration experiments were designed that 1/100 parts of okadaic acid (30nM and lOOnM concentration and 0.5mM 3-nitropropionic acid for cerebellar microexplants only), GPE (InM -ImM) and G-2Methyl-PE (InM-lmM) were used respectively at 8DIV for cortical cultures and 9DIV for striatal cultures. The incubation time was 24hrs. The survival rate was determined by a colorimetric end-point MTT-assay at 595nm in a multi-well plate reader. For the cerebellar microexplants four windows (field of 0.65 mm2) with highest cell density were chosen and cells displaying neurite outgrowth were counted.

Results
The GPE analogue G-2Methyl-PE exhibited comparable neuroprotective capabilities within all three tested in vitro systems (Figures 12-15).

The cortical cultures responded to higher concentrations of GPE (Figure 12) /or

G-2Methyl-PE (lOμM, Figure 13) with 64% and 59% neuroprotection, respectively.

Whereas the other 2 types of cultures demonstrated neuroprotection at lower doses of G-2Methyl-PE (Figures 14 and 15). The striatal cells demonstrated
neuroprotection within the range of InM to ImM of G-2Methyl-PE (Figure 15) while the postnatal cerebellar microexplants demonstrated neuroprotection with G-2Methyl-PE in the dose range between InM and lOOnM (Figure 14).

While this invention has been described in terms of certain preferred embodiments, it will be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art having regard to that knowledge and this disclosure that equivalents of the compounds of this invention may be prepared and administered for the conditions described in this application, and all such equivalents are intended to be included within the claims of this application.

PATENT

WO-2021026066

Composition and kits comprising trofinetide and other related substances. Also claims a process for preparing trofinetide and the dosage form comprising the same. Disclosed to be useful in treating neurodegenerative conditions, autism spectrum disorders and neurodevelopmental disorders.

Trofinetide is a synthetic compound, having a similar core structure to Glycyl-Prolyl-Glutamic acid (or “GPE”). Trofinetide has been found to be useful in treating neurodegenerative conditions and recently has been found to be effective in treating Autism Spectrum disorders and Neurodevelopmental disorders.

Formula (Ila),

Example 1: Trofinetide Manufacturing Process

In general, trofinetide and related compounds can be manufactured from a precursor peptide or amino acid reacted with a silylating or persilylating agent at one or more steps. In the present invention, one can use silylating agents, such as N-trialkylsilyl amines or N-trialkylsilyl amides, not containing a cyano group.

Examples of such silylating reagents include N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetamide (BSA), N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, hexamethyldisilazane, N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)acetamide (TMA), N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, N-(trimethylsilyl)acetamide, N-(trimethylsilyl)diethylamine, N-(trimethylsilyl)dimethylamine, 1-(trimethylsilyl)imidazole, 3-(trimethylsilyl)-2-oxazolidone.

Step 1: Preparation of Z-Gly-OSu

Several alternative procedures can be used for this step.

Procedure 1A

One (1) eq of Z-Gly-OH and 1.1 eq of Suc-OH were solubilized in 27 eq of iPrOH and 4 eq of CH2Cl2 at 21 °C. The mixture was cooled and when the temperature reached -4 °C, 1.1 eq of EDC.HCl was added gradually, keeping the temperature below 10 °C. During the reaction a dense solid appeared. After addition of EDC.HCl, the mixture was allowed to warm to 20 °C. The suspension was cooled to 11 °C and filtered. The cake was washed with 4.9 eq of cold iPrOH and 11 eq of IPE before drying at 34 °C (Z-Gly-OSu dried product -Purity: 99.5%; NMR assay: 96%; Yield: 84%).

Procedure 1B

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 1A, and differs by replacing iPrOH with ACN. One (1) eq of Z-Gly-OH and 1.1 eq of Suc-OH were solubilized in 22 eq of ACN at 35 °C. The mixture was cooled in an ice bath. When the temperature reached 1 °C, 0.9 eq of DCC in 5.5 eq of ACN was added gradually to keep the temperature below 5 °C. The coupling reaction took about 20 hrs. During the reaction, DCU precipitated and was removed by filtration at the end of the coupling. After filtration, DCU was washed with ACN to recover the product. The mixture of Z-Gly-OSu was then concentrated to reach 60% by weight. iPrOH (17 eq) was added to initiate the crystallization. Quickly after iPrOH addition a dense solid appeared. An additional 17 eq of iPrOH was needed to liquify the suspension. The suspension was cooled in an ice bath and filtered. The solid was washed with 9 eq of iPrOH before drying at 45 °C (Z-Gly-OSu dried product – Purity: 99.2%; HPLC assay: 99.6%; Yield: 71%).

Step 2: Preparation of Z-Gly-MePro-OH

Several alternative procedures can be used for this step.

Procedure 2A

 One (1) eq of MePro.HCl was partially solubilized in 29 eq of CH2Cl2 at 35 °C with 1.04 eq of TEA and 1.6 eq of TMA. The mixture was heated at 35 °C for 2 hrs to perform the silylation. Then 1.02 eq of Z-Gly-OSu was added to the mixture. The mixture was kept at 35 °C for 3 hrs and then 0.075 eq of butylamine was added to quench the reaction. The mixture was allowed to return to room temperature and mixed for at least 15 min. The Z-Gly-MePro-OH was extracted once with 5% w/w NaHCO3 in 186 eq of water, then three times successively with 5% w/w NaHCO3 in 62 eq of water. The aqueous layers were pooled and the pH was brought to 2.2 by addition of 34 eq of HCl as 12N HCl at room temperature. At this pH, Z-Gly-MePro-OH formed a sticky solid that was solubilized at 45 °C with approximately 33 eq of EtOAc and 2.3 eq of iButOH. Z-Gly-MePro-OH was extracted into the organic layer and washed with 62 eq of demineralized water. The organic layer was then dried by azeotropic distillation with 11.5 eq of EtOAc until the peptide began to precipitate. Cyclohexane (12 eq) was added to the mixture to complete the precipitation. The suspension was cooled at 5 °C for 2 hrs and filtered. The solid was washed with 10 eq of cyclohexane before drying at 45 °C (Z-Gly-MePro-OH dried product – Purity: 100%; HPLC assay: 100%; Yield 79%).

Procedure 2B

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 2A. One (1) eq of MePro.HCl was partially solubilized in 36.6 eq of CH2Cl2 at 34 °C with 1.01 eq of TEA and 0.1 eq of TMA. Then 1.05 eq of Z-Gly-OSu was added to the mixture, followed by 1.0 eq of TEA. The mixture was maintained at 35 °C for approximately 1 hr, cooled to 25 to 30 °C and 0.075 eq of DMAPA was added to stop the reaction. One hundred (100) eq of water, 8.6 eq of HCl as 12N HCl and 0.3 eq of KHSO4 were added to the mixture (no precipitation was observed, pH=1.7). Z-Gly-MePro-OH was extracted into the organic layer and washed twice with 97 eq of demineralized water with 0.3 eq of KHSO4, then 100 eq of demineralized water, respectively. EtOAc (23 eq) was added to the mixture and CH2Cl2 was removed by distillation until the peptide began to precipitate. Cyclohexane (25 eq) was added to the mixture to complete the precipitation. The suspension was cooled at -2 °C overnight and filtered. The solid was washed with 21 eq of cyclohexane before drying at 39 °C (Z-Gly-MePro-OH dried product – Purity: 98.7%; NMR assay: 98%; Yield 86%).

Procedure 2C


In reactor 1, MePro.HCl (1 eq) was suspended in EtOAc (about 7 eq). DIPEA (1 eq) and TMA (2 eq) were added, and the mixture heated to dissolve solids. After dissolution, the solution was cooled to 0 °C. In reactor 2, Z-Gly-OH (1 eq) was suspended in EtOAc (about 15 eq). DIPEA (1 eq), and pyridine (1 eq) were added. After mixing, a solution was obtained, and cooled to -5 °C. Piv-Cl (1 eq) was added to reactor 2, and the contents of reactor 1 added to reactor 2. Upon completed addition, the contents of reactor 2 were taken to room temperature. The conversion from Z-Gly-OH to Z-Gly-MePro-OH was monitored by HPLC. When the reaction was complete, the reaction mixture was quenched with DMAPA (0.1 eq), and washed with an aqueous solution comprised of KHSO4, (about 2.5 wt%), NaCl (about 4 wt%), and conc. HCl (about 6 wt%) in 100 eq H2O. The aqueous layer was re-extracted with EtOAc, and the combined organic layers washed with an aqueous solution comprised of KHSO4 (about 2.5 wt%) and NaCl (about 2.5 wt%) in 100 eq H2O, and then with water (100 eq). Residual water was removed from the organic solution of Z-Gly-MePro-OH by vacuum distillation with EtOAc. The resulting suspension was diluted with heptane (about 15 eq) and cooled to 0 °C. The product was isolated by filtration, washed with cold heptane (about 7 eq), and dried under vacuum at 45 °C. Z-Gly-MePro-OH (85% yield) was obtained.

Step 3: Preparation of Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH

Several alternative procedures can be used in this step.

Procedure 3A

 H-Glu-OH (1.05 eq) was silylated in 2 eq of CH2Cl2 with 3.5 eq of TMA at 65 °C. Silylation was completed after 2 hrs. While the silylation was ongoing, 1.0 eq of Z-Gly-MePro-OH and 1.0 eq of Oxyma Pure were solubilized in 24 eq of CH2Cl2 and 1.0 eq of DMA at room temperature in another reactor. EDC.HCl (1.0 eq.) was added. The activation rate reached 97% after 15 min. The activated Oxyma Pure solution, was then added to silylated H-Glu-OH at 40 °C and cooled at room temperature. Coupling duration was approximately 15 min, with a coupling rate of 97%. Addition of 8.2% w/w NaHCO3 in 156 eq of water to the mixture at room temperature (with the emission of CO2) was performed to reach pH 8. Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was extracted in water. The aqueous layer was washed twice with 29 eq of CH2Cl2. Residual CH2Cl2 was removed by concentration. The pH was brought to 2.5 with 2.5N HCl, followed by 1.4 eq of solid KHSO4 to precipitate Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH. The mixture was filtered and the solid was washed with 3 x 52 eq of water. The filtered solid was added to 311 eq of demineralized water and heated to 55-60 °C. iPrOH (29 eq) was added gradually until total solubilization of the product. The mixture was slowly cooled to 10 °C under moderate mixing during 40 min to initiate the crystallization. The peptide was filtered and washed with 2 x 52 eq of water before drying at 45 °C (Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH dried product – Purity: 99.5%; NMR assay: 96%; Yield 74%).

Procedure 3B

One (1) eq of Z-Gly-MePro-OH and 1.05 eq of Suc-OH were solubilized in 40 eq of ACN and 30 eq of CH2Cl2 at room temperature. The mixture was cooled in an ice bath, and when the temperature was near 0 °C, 1.05 eq of DCC dissolved in 8 eq of ACN was added gradually, keeping the temperature below 5 °C. After addition of DCC, the mixture was progressively heated from 0 °C to 5 °C over 1 hr, then to 20 °C between 1 to 2 hrs and then to 45 °C between 2 to 5 hrs. After 5 hrs, the mixture was cooled to 5 °C and maintained overnight. The activation rate reached 98% after approximately 24 hrs. DCU was removed by filtration and washed with 13.5 eq of ACN. During the activation step, 1.1 eq of H-Glu-OH was silylated in 30 eq of ACN with 2.64 eq of TMA at 65 °C. Silylation was completed after 2 hrs. Z-Gly-MePro-OSu was then added gradually to the silylated H-Glu-OH at room temperature, with 0.4 eq of TMA added to maintain the solubility of the H-Glu-OH. The mixture was heated to 45 °C and 0.7 eq of TMA was added if precipitation occurred. The coupling duration was about 24 hrs to achieve a coupling rate of approximately 91%. The reaction was quenched by addition of 0.15 eq of butylamine and 2.0 eq of TEA. Water (233 eq) was added and the mixture concentrated until gelation occurred. Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was extracted in water by addition of 5% w/w NaHCO3 in 233 eq of water and 132 eq of CH2Cl2. The aqueous layer was washed twice with 44 eq of CH2Cl2. Residual CH2Cl2 was removed by distillation. The pH was brought to 2.0 with 24 eq of HCl as 12N HCl followed by 75 eq of HCl as 4N HCl. At this pH, Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH precipitated. The mixture was cooled in an ice bath over 1 hr and filtered. The solid was washed with 186 eq of cold water before drying at 45 °C (Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH dried product – HPLC Purity: 98.4%; NMR assay: 100%; Yield 55%).

Procedure 3C

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 3A. H-Glu-OH (1.05 eq) was silylated in 3.7 eq of CH2Cl2 with 3.5 eq of TMA at 62 °C. Silylation was completed after approximately 1.5 to 2 hrs, as evidenced by solubilization. During the silylation step, 1.0 eq of Z-Gly-MePro-OH and 1.0 eq of Oxyma Pure were solubilized in 31.5 eq of CH2Cl2 at 22 °C. One (1.06) eq of EDC.HCl was added to complete the activation. The silylated H-Glu-OH was then added to the activated Oxyma Pure solution. The temperature was controlled during the addition to stay below 45 °C. Desilylation was performed by addition of a mixture of 2.5% w/w KHSO4 in 153 eq of water and 9 eq of iPrOH to reach a pH of 1.65. Residual CH2Cl2 was removed by concentration. The mixture was cooled to 12 °C to precipitate the Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH. The mixture was filtered and the solid was washed with 90 eq of water before drying at 36 °C.

Procedure 3D

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 3A. H-Glu-OH (1.05 eq.) was silylated in 3.9 eq of CH2Cl2 with 3.5 eq of TMA at 62 °C. Silylation was completed after 2 hrs, as evidenced by Solubilization. During the silylation step, 1 eq of Z-Gly-MePro-OH and 1 eq of Oxyma Pure were solubilized in 25 eq of CH2Cl2 at 23 °C. One (1) eq of EDC.HCl was added. To complete the activation, an additional 0.07 eq of EDC. HCl was added. Silylated H-Glu-OH was then added to the activated Oxyma Pure solution. Temperature was controlled during the addition to stay below 45 °C. Desilylation was performed by addition of a mixture of 2.5% w/w KHSO4 in 160 eq of water and 9.6 eq of iPrOH to reach pH 1.63.

Residual CH2Cl2 was removed by concentration. The mixture was cooled to 20 °C to precipitate the Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH. The mixture was filtered and the solid was washed with 192 eq of water before drying at about 25 °C for 2.5 days. The solid was then solubilized at 64 °C by addition of 55 eq of water and 31 eq of iPrOH. After solubilization, the mixture was diluted with 275 eq of water and cooled to 10 °C for crystallization. The mixture was filtered and the solid was washed with 60 eq of water before drying at 27 °C (Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH dried product – Purity: 99.6%; NMR assay: 98%; Yield 74%).

Procedure 3E

 In reactor 1, H-Glu-OH (1.05 eq) was suspended in ACN (about 2.2 eq). TMA (about 3.5 eq) added, and the mixture was heated to dissolve solids. After dissolution, the solution was cooled to room temperature. In reactor 2, Z-Gly-MePro-OH (1 eq) was suspended in ACN (14 eq). Oxyma Pure (1 eq) and EDC.HCl (1 eq) were added. The mixture was stirred at room temperature until the solids dissolved. The contents of reactor 2 were added to reactor 1. The conversion from Z-Gly-MePro-OH to Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was monitored by HPLC. Upon completion the reaction mixture was added to an aqueous solution comprised of KHSO4 (about 2.5 wt%) dissolved in about 100 eq H2O. ACN was removed from the aqueous suspension of Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH by vacuum distillation with H2O. After stirring at room temperature, the product in the resulting suspension was isolated by filtration and washed with water. The solid obtained was dissolved in an aqueous solution comprised of NaHCO3 (about 5 wt%) in 110 eq H2O, and recrystallized by addition of an aqueous solution comprised of KHSO4 (about 10 wt%) in 90 eq H2O. The product was isolated by filtration, washed with water, and dried under vacuum at 45 °C. Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH (75% yield) was obtained.

Step 4: Deprotection and Isolation of Trofinetide

Several alternative procedures can be used in this step.

Procedure 4A

 Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH (1 eq) was suspended in water (about 25 eq) and EtOAc (about 15 eq). Pd/C (0.025 eq by weight and containing 10% Pd by weight) was added, and the reaction mixture hydrogenated by bubbling hydrogen through the reaction mixture at room temperature. The conversion from Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH to trofinetide was monitored by HPLC, and upon reaction completion the catalyst was removed by filtration, and the layers separated. Residual EtOAc was removed from the aqueous solution containing trofinetide by sparging with nitrogen or washing with heptane. The aqueous solution was spray-dried to isolate the product. Trofinetide (90% yield) was obtained. Alternatively, deprotection can be accomplished using MeOH only, or a combination of iPrOH and MeOH, or by use of ethyl acetate in water.

Procedure 4B

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 4A, excluding EtOAc. Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH (1 eq) was suspended in water (about 50 eq). Pd/C (0.05 eq, 5% Pd by weight) was added, and the reaction mixture hydrogenated at room temperature with a pressure of 5 bar. The conversion from Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH to trofinetide was monitored by HPLC. Upon

reaction completion the catalyst was removed by filtration, and the aqueous layer washed with EtOAc (about 5 eq). Residual EtOAc was removed from the aqueous solution containing trofinetide by sparging with nitrogen or washing with heptane. The aqueous solution was spray-dried to isolate the product. Trofinetide (90% yield) was obtained.

Procedure 4C

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 4A, replacing EtOAc with MeOH. Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH (1 eq) was suspended in MeOH (100 eq) and water (12 eq). Pd/Si (0.02 eq by weight) was added and the mixture was heated at 23 °C for the hydrogenolysis. Solubilization of the peptide occurred during the deprotection. The conversion from Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH to trofinetide was monitored by HPLC, and upon reaction completion the catalyst was removed by filtration and the layers were washed with MeOH and iPrOH. The solvents were concentrated under vacuum at 45 °C, and trofinetide precipitated. The precipitate was filtered and dried at 45 °C to provide trofinetide.

Procedure 4D

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 4A, replacing Pd/C with Pd/Si. One (1.0) eq of Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was partially solubilized in 105 eq of MeOH and 12 eq of water. Pd/Si (0.02 eq by weight) was added and the mixture was heated at 23 °C for the hydrogenolysis. Solubilization of the peptide occurred during the deprotection. At the end of the deprotection (conversion rate approximately 99% after 1 hr), the catalyst was filtered off and washed with 20-30 eq of MeOH. iPrOH (93 eq) was added and MeOH was replaced by iPrOH by concentration at 45 °C under vacuum. The peptide was concentrated until it began to precipitate. The peptide was filtered and dried at 45 °C (H-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH dried product: Purity: 98.1%; NMR assay: 90%; Yield 81%).

Procedure 4E

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 4A, removing H2O and replacing Pd/C with Pd/Si. One (1.0) eq of Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was partially solubilized in 44 eq of MeOH. Pd/Si type 340 (0.02 eq by weight) was added and the mixture was kept at 20 °C for the hydrogenolysis. Solubilization of the peptide occurred during the deprotection. At the end of the deprotection (conversion rate about 99.9%, after 3-3.5 hrs), the catalyst was filtered off and washed with 8 eq of MeOH. Deprotected peptide was then precipitated in 56 eq of iPrOH. After 30 min at 5 °C, the peptide was filtered and washed with three times with 11 eq of iPrOH before drying at 25 °C (H-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH dried product: Purity: 99.4%; HPLC assay: ~98%; Yield: 81%).

Procedure 4F

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 4A. One (1) eq of Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was partially solubilized in 14 eq of EtOAc and 25 eq of water. Pd/C (0.01 eq by weight) was added and the mixture was kept at 20 °C for the hydrogenolysis. Solubilization of the peptide occurred during the deprotection. At the end of the deprotection (conversion rate about 100%, after about 3.5 hrs), the catalyst was filtered off and washed with a mixture of 3.5 eq of EtOAc and 6 eq of water. The aqueous layer was then ready for spray-drying (Aqueous H-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH peptide solution: Purity: 98.6%; Yield: ~95%).

Procedure 4G

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 4A, replacing Pd/C with Pd/Si, EtOAc with MeOH, and removing H2O. Pd/Si type 340 (0.02 eq by weight) was added to 2.9 vols of MeOH for pre-reduction during 30 min. One (1.0) eq of Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was partially solubilized in 34 eq of MeOH. The reduced palladium was then transferred to the peptide mixture. The mixture was kept at 20 °C for the hydrogenolysis. Solubilization of the peptide occurred during the deprotection. Pd/C type 39 (0.007 eq by weight) was added to the mixture to increase reaction kinetics. At the end of the deprotection, the catalyst was filtered off and washed with 13.6 eq of MeOH. The deprotected peptide was then precipitated in 71 eq of iPrOH. After about 40 min, the peptide was filtered and washed with 35 eq of iPrOH. The peptide was dried below 20 °C and was then ready for solubilization in water and spray-drying.

Procedure 4H

This Procedure is for a variant of Procedure 4A. One (1.0) eq of Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH was partially solubilized in 24.8 eq of water and 13.6 eq of EtOAc. Pd/C type 39 (0.025 eq by weight) was added to the peptide mixture. The mixture was kept at 20 °C for the hydrogenolysis. Solubilization of the peptide occurred during the deprotection. At the end of the deprotection (19 hrs), the catalyst was removed by filtration and washed with 5.3 eq of water and 2.9 eq of EtOAc. The biphasic mixture was then decanted to remove the upper organic layer. The aqueous layer was diluted with water to reach an H-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH concentration suitable for spray-drying the solution.

Example 2: Alternative Trofinetide Manufacturing Process

An alternative method for synthesis of Trofinetide is based on U.S. Patent No.

8,546,530 adapted for a tripeptide as follows.

The persilylated compounds used to synthesis Formula (Ia) (trofinetide) are obtained by silylating a corresponding peptide or amino acid by reaction with a silylating agent, optionally in an organic solvent. The persilylated peptide or amino acid can be isolated and purified if desired. One can use the persilylated peptide or amino acid in situ, e.g. by combining a solution containing persilylated peptide or amino acid with a solution containing, optionally activated, peptide or amino acid.

In step 2, the persilylated compound of an amino acid is obtained by silylating a corresponding amino acid (for example, H-MePro-OH) by reaction with a silylating agent, optionally in an organic solvent. The persilylated amino acid can be isolated and purified if desired. One can use the persilylated amino acid in situ, e.g. by combining a solution containing the persilylated amino acid with a solution containing, optionally activated, amino acid (for example, Z-Gly-OH).

In step 3, the persilylated compound of an amino acid is obtained by silylating a corresponding amino acid (for example, H-Glu-OH) by reaction with a silylating agent, optionally in an organic solvent. The persilylated amino acid or peptide can be isolated and purified if desired. It is however useful to use the persilylated amino acid or peptide in situ, e.g. by combining a solution containing the persilylated amino acid with a solution containing, optionally activated (for example, by using EDC.HCl and Oxyma Pure), peptide (for example, Z-Gly-MePro-OH).

In the present invention, it is useful to use silylating agents, such as N-trialkylsilyl amines or N-trialkylsilyl amides, not containing a cyano group. Examples of such silylating reagents include N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetamide (BSA), N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, hexamethyldisilazane, N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)acetamide (TMA), N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, N-(trimethylsilyl)acetamide, N-(trimethylsilyl)diethylamine, N-(trimethylsilyl)dimethylamine, 1-(trimethylsilyl)imidazole, 3-(trimethylsilyl)-2-oxazolidone.

The reaction of step 2 is generally carried out at a temperature from 0 °C to 100 °C, optionally from 10 °C to 40 °C, and optionally from 15 °C to 30 °C.

The reaction of step 3 is generally carried out at a temperature from 0 °C to 100 °C, optionally from 10 °C to 60 °C, optionally from 15 °C to 50 °C.

In the reaction of step 2, generally 0.5 to 5 equivalents, optionally 1 to 3 equivalents, optionally about 1.5 to 2.5 equivalents of silylating agent are used relative to the molar amount of functional groups to be silylated. Use of 2 to 4 equivalents of silylating agent relative to the molar amount of functional groups to be silylated is also possible. “Functional groups to be silylated” means particular groups having an active hydrogen atom that can react with the silylating agent such as amino, hydroxyl, mercapto or carboxyl groups.

In the reaction of step 3, generally 0.5 to 5 equivalents, optionally 2 to 4.5 equivalents, optionally about 3 to 4 equivalents of silylating agent are used relative to the molar amount of functional groups to be silylated. Use of 2.5 to 4.5 equivalents of silylating agent relative to the molar amount of functional groups to be silylated is also possible.

It is understood that “persilylated” means an amino acid or peptide or amino acid analogue or peptide analogue in which the groups having an active hydrogen atom that can react with the silylating agent are sufficiently silylated to ensure that a homogeneous reaction medium for a coupling step is obtained.

In the process according to the invention, the reaction between the amino acid or peptide and the persilylated amino acid or peptide is often carried out in the presence of a carboxyl group activating agent. In that case the carboxylic activating reagent is suitably selected from carbodiimides, acyl halides, phosphonium salts and uronium or guanidinium salts. More optionally, the carboxylic activating agent is an acyl halide, such as isobutyl chloroformate or pivaloyl chloride or a carbodiimide, such as EDC.HC1 or DCC.

Good results are often obtained when using additional carboxylic activating reagents which reduce side reactions and/or increase reaction efficiency. For example, phosphonium and uronium salts can, in the presence of a tertiary base, for example, N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA) and triethylamine (TEA), convert protected amino acids into activated species. Other reagents help prevent racemization by providing a protecting reagent. These reagents include carbodiimides (for example, DCC) with an added auxiliary nucleophile (for example, 1-hydroxy-benzo triazole (HOBt), 1-hydroxy-azabenzotriazole (HOAt), or Suc-OH) or derivatives thereof. Another reagent that can be utilized is TBTU. The mixed anhydride method, using isobutyl chloroformate, with or without an added auxiliary nucleophile, is also used, as is the azide method, due to the low racemization associated with it. These types of compounds can also increase the rate of carbodiimide-mediated couplings. Typical additional reagents include also bases such as N,N-diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA), triethylamine (TEA) or N-methylmorpholine (NMM).

When the silylation is carried out in the presence of a solvent, said solvent is optionally a polar organic solvent, more optionally a polar aprotic organic solvent. An amide type solvent such as N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC)

can be used. In the present invention for step 2, one can use an alkyl acetate solvent, in particular ethyl acetate is more particularly optional.

In the present invention for step 3, one can use a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent or alkyl cyanide solvent, in particular dichloromethane or acetonitrile are more particularly optional.

In another embodiment, silylation is carried out in a liquid silylation medium consisting essentially of silylating agent and amino acid or peptide.

In the present invention, amino acid or peptide is understood to denote in particular an amino acid or peptide or amino acid analogue or peptide analogue which is bonded at its N-terminus or optionally another position, to a carboxylic group of an amino protected amino acid or peptide.

Example 3: Specifications for Compositions Containing Compounds of Formula (I)

1 ICH guideline Q3C on impurities: guideline for residual solvents

Example 4: Alternative Manufacturing of Trofinetide Example 1, Step 4, Procedure 4B

This Procedure is for a variant of Step 4, Procedure 4B. Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH (1 eq) was added in portions to Pd/C (0.027 eq by weight and containing 5% Pd by weight) in about 50 eq of water. The reaction mixture was hydrogenated at 20 °C at a pressure of 5 bar for at least 4 cycles of 4 hrs each. Pd/C (0.0027 eq by weight) was charged between cycles, as needed, to speed up the reaction. The conversion from Z-Gly-MePro-Glu-OH to trofinetide was monitored by HPLC. Upon reaction completion the catalyst was removed by filtration, washed with water (12.5 eq) and the aqueous layer washed with EtOAc (about 14 eq). After phase separation, residual EtOAc was removed from the aqueous solution containing

trofinetide by sparging with nitrogen under vacuum at 20 °C for about 3 hrs. The aqueous solution was filtered. The final concentration of trofinetide was about 25 wt% and the solution was then ready for spray-drying to isolate the product.

Example 5: Alternative Composition of Trofinetide

A composition comprising a compound of Formula (I)

or a stereoisomer, hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and a compound of Formula (II):

or a stereoisomer, hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and/or a compound of Formula (III):

or a stereoisomer, hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R1, R2, R3 and R4 independently are selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and C1-4 alkyl, provided that least one of R1, R2, R3 and R4 is C1-4 alkyl, and wherein the composition comprises at least 90 wt%, such as 91 wt%, 92 wt%, 93 wt%, 94 wt%, 95 wt%, 96 wt%, or 97 wt% of the compound of Formula (I) on an anhydrous basis.

Example 6: Alternative Composition of Trofinetide

A composition comprising a compound of Formula (Ia)

or a hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and a compound of Formula (II):

or a stereoisomer, hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and/or a compound of Formula (III):

or a stereoisomer, hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein R1, R2, R3 and R4 independently are selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and C1-4 alkyl, provided that least one of R1, R2, R3 and R4 is C1-4 alkyl, and wherein the composition comprises at least 90 wt%, such as 91 wt%, 92 wt%, 93 wt%, 94 wt%, 95 wt%, 96 wt%, or 97 wt% of the compound of Formula (Ia) on an anhydrous basis.

Example 7: A Product of Trofinetide

A product, including a kit containing a dosage form with instructions for use, comprising a compound of Formula (Ia)

or a hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and a compound of Formula (IIa)


or a hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, wherein the product comprises between 95 wt% and 105 wt%, such as 96 wt%, 97 wt%, 98 wt%, 99 wt%, 100 wt%, 101

wt%, 102 wt%, 103 wt%, or 104 wt% of the specified amount of the compound of Formula (Ia) in the product.

Example 8: A Product of Trofinetide

A product, including a kit containing a dosage form with instructions for use, comprising a compound of Formula (Ia)

or a hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and a compound of Formula (IIa)

 or a hydrate, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, and additionally comprising one or more compounds selected from the group consisting of Formula (III), Formula (IIIa), Formula (IV), Formula (V), Formula (VI), Formula (VII), Formula (VIII), and Formula (IX), wherein the composition comprises between 95 wt% and 105 wt%, such as 96 wt%, 97 wt%, 98 wt%, 99 wt%, 100 wt%, 101 wt%, 102 wt%, 103 wt%, or 104 wt% of the specified amount of the compound of Formula (Ia) in the product.

Example 9: Analysis of Products and Compositions

The products and compositions disclosed herein may be analyzed by liquid chromatography, a suitable chromatographic method using UPLC, e.g. using materials and conditions such as Waters Acquity CSH C18, 1.7 µm, 150 x 2.1 mm column, water with 0.1 % TFA (mobile phase A), and water/ACN 70/30 + 0.1 % TFA (mobile phase B), ranging from (4% phase A/6% phase B to 100% phase B and flushed with 4% phase A/6% phase B).

Flow rate: 0.35 ml/min, Column temperature: 40 °C, autosampler temperature: 4 °C, injection volume: 4 ml (e.g. prepared by weighing about 10 mg of powder in a 10 ml volumetric flask and diluted to volume with water). Examples of detectors are UV (ultraviolet, UV 220 nm) and MS (mass spectrometry).

INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY

This invention finds use in the pharmaceutical, medical, and other health care fields.

PATENT

WO2014085480 ,

claiming use of trofinetide for treating autism spectrum disorders including autism, Fragile X Syndrome or Rett Syndrome.

EP 0 366 638 discloses GPE (a tri-peptide consisting of the amino acids Gly-Pro- Glu) and its di-peptide derivatives Gly-Pro and Pro-Glu. EP 0 366 638 discloses that GPE is effective as a neuromodulator and is able to affect the electrical properties of neurons.

W095/172904 discloses that GPE has neuroprotective properties and that administration of GPE can reduce damage to the central nervous system (CNS) by the prevention or inhibition of neuronal and glial cell death.

WO 98/14202 discloses that administration of GPE can increase the effective amount of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the central nervous system (CNS).

WO99/65509 discloses that increasing the effective amount of GPE in the CNS, such as by administration of GPE, can increase the effective amount of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the CNS for increasing TH-mediated dopamine production in the treatment of diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.

WO02/16408 discloses GPE analogs capable of inducing a physiological effect equivalent to GPE within a patient. The applications of the GPE analogs include the treatment of acute brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, including but not limited to, injury or disease in the CNS.

Example

The following non-limiting example illustrates the synthesis of a compound of the invention, NN-dimethylglycyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid.

All starting materials and other reagents were purchased from Aldrich;
BOC = tert-butoxycarbonyl; Bn = benzyl.

BOC-(γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid benzyl ester
To a solution of BOC-proline [Anderson GW and McGregor AC: J. Amer. Chem.

Soc: 79, 6180, 1957] (10 mmol) in dichloromethane (50 ml), cooled to 0 °C, was added triethylamine (1.39 ml, 10 mmol) and ethyl chloroformate (0.96 ml, 10 mmol). The resultant mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 30 minutes. A solution of dibenzyl L-glutamate (10 mmol) was then added and the mixture stirred at 0 °C for 2 hours then warmed to room temperature and stirred overnight. The reaction mixture was washed with aqueous sodium bicarbonate and citric acid (2 mol l“1) then dried (MgS04) and concentrated at reduced pressure to give BOC-(γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (5.0 g, 95%).

(7-Benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester
A solution of BOC-(γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (3.4 g, 10 mmol), cooled to 0 °C, was treated with trifluoroacetic acid (25 ml) for 2 hr at room temperature. After removal of the volatiles at reduced pressure the residue was triturated with ether to give (γ-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (I).

N,N-Dimethylglycyl-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid
A solution of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (10.3 mmol) in dichloromethane (10 ml) was added to a stirred and cooled (0 °C) solution of (7-benzyl)-L-prolyl-L-glutamic acid dibenzyl ester (10 mmol), TVN-dimethylglycine (10 mmol) and triethylamine
(10.3 mmol) in dichloromethane (30 ml). The mixture was stirred at 0 °C overnight and then at room temperature for 3 h. After filtration, the filtrate was evaporated at reduced pressure. The resulting crude dibenzyl ester was dissolved in a mixture of ethyl acetate (30 ml) and methanol (30 ml) containing 10% palladium on charcoal (0.5 g) then hydrogenated at room temperature and pressure until the uptake of hydrogen ceased. The filtered solution was evaporated and the residue recrystallized from ethyl acetate to yield the tri-peptide derivative.

It will be evident that following the method of the Example, and using alternative amino acids or their amides or esters, will yield other compounds of Formula 1.

PAPER

Tetrahedron (2005), 61(42), 10018-10035.  (CLICK HERE)

The synthesis of ten proline-modified analogues of the neuroprotective tripeptide GPE is described. Five of the analogues incorporate a proline residue with a hydrophobic group at C-2 and two further analogues have this side chain locked into a spirolactam ring system. The pyrrolidine ring was also modified by replacing the γ-CH2 group with sulfur and/or incorporation of two methyl groups at C-5.

Graphical Abstract

PAPER

Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2005), 15(9), 2279-2283

A series of GPE analogues, including modifications at the Pro and/or Glu residues, was prepared and evaluated for their NMDA binding and neuroprotective effects. Main results suggest that the pyrrolidine ring puckering of the Pro residue plays a key role in the biological responses, while the preference for cis or trans rotamers around the Gly-Pro peptide bond is not important.

Graphical abstract

A series of Pro and/or Glu modified GPE analogues is described. Compounds incorporating PMe and dmP showed higher affinity for glutamate receptors than GPE and neuroprotective effects similar to those of this endogenous tripeptide in culture hippocampal neurons exposed to NMDA.

PATENT

US 20060251649

WO 2006127702

US 20070004641

US 20080145335

WO 2012102832

WO 2014085480

US 20140147491

References

  1. ^ Bickerdike MJ, Thomas GB, Batchelor DC, Sirimanne ES, Leong W, Lin H, et al. (March 2009). “NNZ-2566: a Gly-Pro-Glu analogue with neuroprotective efficacy in a rat model of acute focal stroke”. Journal of the Neurological Sciences278 (1–2): 85–90. doi:10.1016/j.jns.2008.12.003PMID 19157421S2CID 7789415.
  2. ^ Cartagena CM, Phillips KL, Williams GL, Konopko M, Tortella FC, Dave JR, Schmid KE (September 2013). “Mechanism of action for NNZ-2566 anti-inflammatory effects following PBBI involves upregulation of immunomodulator ATF3”Neuromolecular Medicine15 (3): 504–14. doi:10.1007/s12017-013-8236-zPMID 23765588S2CID 12522580.
  3. ^ Deacon RM, Glass L, Snape M, Hurley MJ, Altimiras FJ, Biekofsky RR, Cogram P (March 2015). “NNZ-2566, a novel analog of (1-3) IGF-1, as a potential therapeutic agent for fragile X syndrome”. Neuromolecular Medicine17 (1): 71–82. doi:10.1007/s12017-015-8341-2PMID 25613838S2CID 11964380.
  4. ^ Study Details – Rett Syndrome Study
  5. ^ Neuren’s trofinetide successful in Phase 2 clinical trial in Fragile X
PHASESTATUSPURPOSECONDITIONSCOUNT
3Enrolling by InvitationTreatmentRett’s Syndrome1
3RecruitingTreatmentRett’s Syndrome1
2CompletedSupportive CareInjuries, Brain1
2CompletedTreatmentFragile X Syndrome (FXS)1
2CompletedTreatmentInjuries, Brain1
2CompletedTreatmentRett’s Syndrome2
2TerminatedTreatmentConcussions1
1CompletedTreatmentBrain Injuries,Traumatic2
Legal status
Legal statusUS: Investigational New Drug
Identifiers
IUPAC name[show]
CAS Number853400-76-7 
PubChem CID11318905
ChemSpider9493869
UNIIZ2ME8F52QL
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC13H21N3O6
Molar mass315.322 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)Interactive image
SMILES[hide]C[C@]1(CCCN1C(=O)CN)C(=O)N[C@@H](CCC(=O)O)C(=O)O
InChI[hide]InChI=1S/C13H21N3O6/c1-13(5-2-6-16(13)9(17)7-14)12(22)15-8(11(20)21)3-4-10(18)19/h8H,2-7,14H2,1H3,(H,15,22)(H,18,19)(H,20,21)/t8-,13-/m0/s1Key:BUSXWGRAOZQTEY-SDBXPKJASA-N

////////////Tofinetide , NNZ 2566, PHASE 2, PHASE 3. NEUREN, Amino Acids, Peptides, Proteins,

CC1(CCCN1C(=O)CN)C(=O)NC(CCC(=O)O)C(=O)O

Devimistat


Devimistat Chemical Structure
DEVIMISTAT
6,8-Bis(benzylthio)octanoic acid.png

Devimistat

CPI-613

Molecular Weight388.59
FormulaC₂₂H₂₈O₂S₂
CAS No.95809-78-2
SMILESO=C(O)CCCCC(SCC1=CC=CC=C1)CCSCC2=CC=CC=C2

phase III, hematological cancer

6,8-Bis(benzylsulfanyl)octanoic acid

Octanoic acid, 6,8-bis[(phenylMethyl)thio]-

Octanoic acid, 6,8-bis((phenylmethyl)thio)-

Rafael Pharmaceuticals (formerly Cornerstone Pharmaceuticals), a subsidiary of Rafael Holdings, is developing devimistat, the lead candidate from a program of thioctans and their derivatives that act as pyruvate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate inhibitors and stimulators of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), using the company’s proprietary Altered Energy Metabolism Directed (AEMD) platform, for the iv treatment of hematological cancer [phase III, January 2021].

Devimistat (INN; development code CPI-613) is an experimental anti-mitochondrial drug being developed by Rafael Pharmaceuticals.[1] It is being studied for the treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer and relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Devimistat’s mechanism of action differs from other drugs, operating on the tricarboxylic acid cycle and inhibiting enzymes involved with cancer cell energy metabolism. A lipoic acid derivative different from standard cytotoxic chemotherapy, devimistat is currently being studied in combination with modified FOLFIRINOX to treat various solid tumors and heme malignancies.

Regulation

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has designated devimistat as an orphan drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, AML, myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), peripheral T-cell lymphoma, and Burkitt’s lymphoma, and given approval to initiate clinical trials in pancreatic cancer and AML.

Clinical trials

Clinical trials of the drug are underway including a Phase III open-label clinical trial[2] to evaluate efficacy and safety of devimistat plus modified FOLFIRINOX (mFFX) versus FOLFIRINOX (FFX) in patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

Developed as part of Rafael’s proprietary Altered Metabolism Directed (AMD) drug platform, CPI-613® was discovered at Stony Brook University. CPI-613® is designed to target the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, an indispensable process essential to tumor cell multiplication and survival, selectively in cancer cells.

The attacks of CPI-613® on the TCA cycle also substantially increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to a diverse range of chemotherapeutic agents. This synergy allows for combinations of CPI-613® with lower doses of these generally toxic drugs to be highly effective with lower patient side effects. Combinations with CPI-613® represent a diverse range of potential opportunities to substantially improve patient benefit in many different cancers.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given Rafael approval to initiate pivotal clinical trials in pancreatic cancer and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and has designated CPI-613® as an orphan drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, AML, Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), peripheral T-cell lymphoma and Burkitt’s lymphoma. The EMA has granted orphan drug designation to CPI-613® for pancreatic cancer and AML.


Learn more about recent developments involving CPI-613®CPI-613® (devimistat) Fact Sheet

he FDA granted a Fast Track designation to devimistat for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

The FDA has granted a Fast Track designation to devimistat (CPI-613) for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), Rafael Pharmaceuticals, announced in a press release.1

“This designation underscores the pressing need to find new ways to combat this aggressive disease,” said Jorge Cortes, MD, director of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, and principal investigator on the phase 3 clinical trial, in a statement. “It brings hope not only to clinicians, but to patients who hear that they have been diagnosed.”

The first-in-class agent devimistat targets enzymes that are involved in cancer cell energy metabolism. This therapy substantially increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to a diverse range of chemotherapies, and this synergy allows for potential combinations that could be more effective with devimistat and lower doses of drugs that are generally toxic.

“Receiving Fast Track designation, especially during a pandemic that has created significant challenges for many trials across the globe, is a testament to the dedicated work of the Rafael team,” stated Sanjeev Luther, president and CEO of Rafael Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Devimistat combinations appear promising with a diverse range of potential opportunities to improve benefit in patients with various cancer types. Two pivotal phase 3 clinical trials, including the AVENGER 500 study in pancreatic cancer (NCT03504423) and ARMADA 2000 for AML (NCT03504410), have been approved for initiation by the FDA.

The primary end point of the multicenter, open-label, randomized ARMADA 2000 study is complete response (CR), and secondary end points include overall survival and CR plus CR with partial hematologic recovery rate. To be eligible to enroll to the study, patients must be aged ≥50 years with a documented AML diagnosis that has relapsed from or became refractory to previous standard therapy. Patients must have an ECOG performance status of 0 to 2 and an expected survival longer than 3 months.

Five hundred patients are expected to be enrolled and randomized in the study. To enroll, patients could not have received prior radiotherapy or cytotoxic chemotherapy for their current AML. Those with active central nervous system involvement, active uncontrolled bleeding, history of other malignancy, or known hypersensitivity to study drugs are ineligible to enroll to the trial as well.

This study aims to determine the safety and efficacy of devimistat in combination with high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone in older patients with relapsed/refractory AML compared with high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone therapy alone. Other control groups include patients treated with mitoxantrone, etoposide, and cytarabine and the combination of fludarabine, cytarabine, and filgrastim. The addition of devimistat is expected to improve the CR rate in patients who are aged 50 years or older with relapsed/refractory AML.

In a prior phase 1 study of devimistat plus high-dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone in patients with relapsed/refractory AML, the addition of devimistat sensitized AML cells to chemotherapy treatment.2

The objective response rate was 50% including CRs in 26 of 62 evaluable patients. Median overall survival was 6.7 months. In patients above age 60, the CR or CR with incomplete hematologic recovery rate was 47% and the median survival was 6.9 months.

This designation for this experimental anti-mitochondrial agent follows news of another Fast Track designation granted to devimistat for the treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer in November 2020, as well as an Orphan Drug designation granted in October 2020 for the treatment of patients with soft tissue sarcoma.

References

1. Rafael Pharmaceuticals Receives FDA Fast Track Designation for CPI-613® (devimistat) for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). News Release. Rafael Pharmaceuticals, Inc. December 15, 2020. Accessed December 15, 2020. https://bit.ly/34g6YsR

2. Pardee TS, Anderson RG, Pladna KM, et al. A Phase I Study of CPI-613 in Combination with High-Dose Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone for Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Clin Cancer Res. 2018;24(9):2060-2073. doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-17-2282 P[APERJournal of the American Chemical Society (1954), 76, 4109-12.https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ja01645a016
PAPERJournal of the American Chemical Society (1955), 77, 416-19.https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ja01607a057PAPERJustus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie (1958), 614, 66-83.https://chemistry-europe.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jlac.19586140108PATENTWO 2009123597WO 2009110859WO 2010110771PATENTCN 111362848

PATENT

WO-2021011334

Deuterated derivatives of 6,8-bis(benzylsulfanyl)octanoic acid (CPI-613 or devimistat ) or its salts for treating cancer.

CPI-613 (6,8-bis(benzylsulfanyl)octanoic acid) is a first-in-class investigational small-molecule (lipoate analog), which targets the altered energy metabolism unique to many cancer cells. CPI-613 is currently being evaluated in two phase III clinical trials, and has been granted orphan drug designation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), Burkitt lymphoma and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

[0004] One limitation to the clinical utility of CPI-613 is its very rapid metabolism. After IV dosing the half-life of 6,8-bis(benzylsulfanyl)octanoic acid is only about 1-2 hours (Pardee,

T.S. et al, Clin Cancer Res. 2014, 20, 5255-64). The short half-life limits the patient’s overall exposure to the drug and necessitates administration of relatively high doses. For safety reasons, CPI-613 is administered via a central venous catheter as an IV infusion over 30-120 minutes, with higher doses requiring longer infusion times.

The terms“6,8-bis(benzylsulfanyl)octanoic acid” and“ 6,8-bis-benzylthio-octanoic acid” refer to the compound known as CPI-613 or devimistat, having the chemical structure

PATENT

WO2020132397

claiming the use of CPI-613 in combination with an autophagy inhibitor eg chloroquine for treating eg cancers.

CPI-613 (6,8-bis-benzylthio-octanoic acid) is a first-in-class investigational small-molecule (lipoate analog), which targets the altered energy metabolism that is common to many cancer cells. CPI-613 has been evaluated in multiple phase I, I/II, and II clinical studies, and has been granted orphan drug designation for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), Burkitt lymphoma and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).

PAPER

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/op200091t

An Efficient, Economical Synthesis of the Novel Anti-tumor Agent CPI-613

Cite this: Org. Process Res. Dev. 2011, 15, 4, 855–857

Publication Date:May 2, 2011
https://doi.org/10.1021/op200091t

An efficient and practical synthesis of the novel anti-tumor compound 6,8-dithiobenzyl octanoic acid, CPI-613 (2), was developed and executed on a practical scale. CPI-613 can be made in a single vessel from (±)-lipoic acid (1) via reductive opening of the disulfide ring followed by benzylation of the sulfhydryls with benzyl bromide. CPI-613 was isolated by simple crystallization in high yield and purity. The process is scaleable and has been demonstrated at up to 100 kg.CPI-613 (2) was isolated [4.7 kg (90%)] with an HPLC purity of 99.8 area %. Mp 66–67 °C. IR: 3050, 1710, 1400, 668 cm–11H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.40–7.20 (m, 10 H), 3.80–3.60 (m, 4 H), 2.60–2.50 (m, 2 H), 2.44 (t, J = 8.7, 2 H), 2.23 (t, J = 8.1, 2 H) 2.03–1.30 (m, 8 H). Anal. Calc for C22H28O2S2: C, 68.00; H, 7.26; S, 16.50. Found: C, 67.99; H, 7.31; S, 16.37. 

References

  1. ^ “CPI-613”. Rafael Pharmaceuticals.
  2. ^ Philip PA, Buyse ME, Alistar AT, Rocha Lima CM, Luther S, Pardee TS, Van Cutsem E (October 2019). “A Phase III open-label trial to evaluate efficacy and safety of CPI-613 plus modified FOLFIRINOX (mFFX) versus FOLFIRINOX (FFX) in patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas”Future Oncology15 (28): 3189–3196. doi:10.2217/fon-2019-0209PMC 6854438PMID 31512497.
Clinical data
Other namesCPI-613
Legal status
Legal statusInvestigational
Identifiers
IUPAC name[show]
CAS Number95809-78-2
PubChem CID24770514
DrugBank12109
ChemSpider28189062
UNIIE76113IR49
ChEMBLChEMBL3186849
CompTox Dashboard(EPA)DTXSID70914807
ECHA InfoCard100.231.125 
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC22H28O2S2
Molar mass388.58 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)Interactive image
SMILES[hide]C1=CC=C(C=C1)CSCCC(CCCCC(=O)O)SCC2=CC=CC=C2

//////////devimistat, CPI-613, CPI 613, phase 3, hematological cancer , Fast Track designation, ORPHAN DRUG, 

BINDARIT


Bindarit.png
ChemSpider 2D Image | bindarit | C19H20N2O3
Bindarit Chemical Structure

BINDARIT

  • Molecular FormulaC19H20N2O3
  • Average mass324.374 Da

CAS 130641-38-2

2-[(1-benzylindazol-3-yl)methoxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid

2-[(1 -benzyl-1 H-indazol-3-yl)methoxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid

2-[(1-benzyl-1H-indazol-3-yl)methoxy]-2-methylpropanoic acidJQ11LH711MPropanoic acid, 2-methyl-2-[[1-(phenylmethyl)-1H-indazol-3-yl]methoxy]- [ACD/Index Name]биндарит [Russian] [INN]بينداريت [Arabic] [INN]宾达利 [Chinese] [INN]PHASE 2Bindarit has been used in trials studying the prevention and treatment of Coronary Restenosis and Diabetic Nephropathy.

Bindarit, an inhibitor of monocyte chemotactic protein synthesis, protects against bone loss induced by chikungunya virus infection

Bindarit (AF2838) is a selective inhibitor of the monocyte chemotactic proteins MCP-1/CCL2MCP-3/CCL7, and MCP-2/CCL8, and no effect on other CC and CXC chemokines such as MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MIP-3/CCL23. Bindarit also has anti-inflammatory activity.

As is known, MCP-1 (Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 ) is a protein belonging to the β subfamily of chemokines. MCP-1 has powerful chemotactic action on monocytes and exerts its action also on T lymphocytes, mastocytes and basophils (Rollins BJ. , Chemokines, Blood 1997; 90: 909-928; M.

Baggiolini, Chemokines and leukocyte traffic, Nature 1998; 392: 565-568).

Other chemokines belonging to the β subfamily are, for example, MCP-2 (Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-2), MCP-3, MCP-4, MIP-1 α and MIP-1 β, RANTES.

The β subfamily differs from the α subfamily in that, in the structure, the first two cysteines are adjacent for the β subfamily, whereas they are separated by an intervening amino acid for the α subfamily. MCP-1 is produced by various types of cells (leukocytes, platelets, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells).

Among all the known chemokines, MCP-1 shows the highest specificity for monocytes and macrophages, for which it constitutes not only a chemotactic factor but also an activation stimulus, consequently inducing processes for producing numerous inflammatory factors (superoxides, arachidonic acid and derivatives, cytokines/chemokines) and amplifying the phagocytic activity.

The secretion of chemokines in general, and of MCP-1 in particular, is typically induced by various pro-inflammatory factors, for instance interleukin-1 (IL-1 ), interleukin-2 (IL-2), TNFα (Tumour Necrosis Factor α), interferon-γ and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

Prevention of the inflammatory response by blocking the chemokine/chemokine receptor system represents one of the main targets of pharmacological intervention (Gerard C. and Rollins B. J., Chemokines and disease. Nature Immunol. 2001 ; 2:108-1 15).

There is much evidence to suggest that MCP-1 plays a key role during inflammatory processes and has been indicated as a new and validated target in various pathologies.

Evidence of a considerable physiopathological contribution of MCP-1 has been obtained in the case of patients with articular and renal inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus nephritis, diabetic nephropathy and rejection following transplant).

However, more recently, MCP-1 has been indicated among the factors involved in inflammatory pathologies of the CNS (multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, HIV-associated dementia) and other pathologies and conditions, with and without an obvious inflammatory component, including atopic dermatitis, colitis, interstitial lung pathologies, restenosis, atherosclerosis, complications following a surgical intervention (for instance angioplasty, arterectomy, transplant, organ and/or tissue replacement, prosthesis implant), cancer (adenomas, carcinomas and metastases) and even metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance and obesity.

In addition, despite the fact that the chemokine system is involved in controlling and overcoming viral infections, recent studies have demonstrated that the response of certain chemokines, and in particular of MCP-1 , may have a harmful role in the case of host-pathogen interactions. In particular, MCP-1 has been indicated among the chemokines that contribute towards organ and tissue damage in pathologies mediated by alpha viruses characterized by monocyte/macrophage infiltration in the joints and muscles (Mahalingam S. et al. Chemokines and viruses: friend or foes? Trends in Microbiology 2003; 1 1 : 383-391 ; RuIIi N. et al. Ross River Virus: molecular and cellular aspects of disease pathogenesis. 2005; 107: 329-342).

Monocytes are the main precursors of macrophages and dendritic cells, and play a critical role as mediators of inflammatory processes. CX3CR1 , with its ligand CX3CL1 (fractalkine), represents a key factor in regulating the migration and adhesiveness of monocytes. CX3CR1 is expressed in monocytes, whereas CX3CL1 is a transmembrane chemokine in endothelial cells. Genetic studies in man and in animal models have demonstrated an important role in the physiopathology of inflammatory diseases of CX3CR1 and CX3CL1. There is in fact much evidence to suggest a key contribution of CX3CR1 and of its ligand in the pathogenesis and progression of articular, renal, gastrointestinal and vascular inflammatory diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, lupus nephritis, diabetic nephropathy, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, restenosis and atherosclerosis). The expression of CX3CR1 is over-regulated in T cells, which are believed to accumulate in the synovium of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the expression of CX3CL1 is over-regulated in endothelial cells and fibroblasts present in the synovium of these patients. Consequently, the CX3CR1/CX3CL1 system plays an important role in controlling the type of cell and the mode of infiltration of the synovium and contributes towards the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (Nanki T. et al., “Migration of CX3CR1-positive T cells producing type 1 cytokines and cytotoxic molecules into the synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis”, Arthritis & Rheumatism (2002), vol. 46, No. 1 1 , pp. 2878-2883). In patients suffering form renal damage, the majority of the inflammatory leukocytes that infiltrate the kidneys express CX3CR1 , and in particular it is expressed on two of the main cell types involved in the most common inflammatory renal pathologies and in kidney transplant rejection, T cells and monocytes (Segerer S. et al., Expression of the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1 ) in human kidney diseases, Kidney International (2002) 62, pp. 488-495).

Participation of the CX3CR1/CX3CL1 system has been suggested also in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In point of fact, in the case of patients suffering from IBD (e.g. Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis), a significant increase in the production of CX3CL1 by the intestinal capillary system and a – A – significant increase in CX3CR1 -positive cells have been demonstrated, both at the circulatory level and in the mucosa (Sans M. et al., “Enhanced recruitment of CX3CR1 + T cells by mucosal endothelial cell-derived fractalkine in inflammatory bowel diseases”, Gastroenterology 2007, vol. 132, No. 1 , pp. 139-153).

Even more interesting is the demonstration of the key role played by the CX3CR1/CX3CL1 system in vascular damage and in particular under pathological conditions, for instance atherosclerosis and restenosis. CX3CR1 is indicated as a critical factor in the process of infiltration and accumulation of monocytes in the vascular wall, and CX3CR1 polymorphism in man is associated with a reduced prevalence of atherosclerosis, coronary disorders and restenosis (Liu P. et al., “Cross-talk among Smad, MAPK and integrin signalling pathways enhances adventitial fibroblast functions activated by transforming growth factor-1 and inhibited by Gax” Arterioscler. Thromb. Vase. Biol. 2008; McDermott D. H. et al., “Chemokine receptor mutant CX3CR1 -M280 has impaired adhesive function and correlates with protection from cardiovascular diseases in humans”, J. Clin. Invest. 2003; Niessner A. et al., Thrombosis and Haemostasis 2005).

IL-12 and IL-23 are members of a small family of proinflammatory heterodimeric cytokines. Both cytokines share a common subunit, p40, which is covalently bonded either to the p35 subunit to produce the mature form of IL-12, or to the p19 subunit to produce the mature form of IL-23. The receptor for IL-12 is constituted by the subunits IL-12Rβ1 and IL-12Rβ2, while the receptor for IL-23 is constituted by the subunits IL-12Rβ1 and IL-23R. IL-12 and IL-23 are mainly expressed by activated dendritic cells and by phagocytes. The receptors for the two cytokines are expressed on the T and NK cells, and NK T cells, but low levels of complexes of the receptor for IL-23 are also present in monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells.

Despite these similarities, there is much evidence to suggest that IL-12 and IL-23 control different immunological circuits. In point of fact, whereas IL-12 controls the development of Th1 cells, which are capable of producing gamma-interferon (IFN-γ), and increases the cytotoxic, antimicrobial and antitumoral response, IL-23 regulates a circuit that leads to the generation of CD4+ cells, which are capable of producing IL-17. The induction of IL-23- dependent processes leads to the mobilization of various types of inflammatory cell, for instance TH-17, and it has been demonstrated as being crucial for the pathogenesis of numerous inflammatory pathologies mediated by immonological responses. Typical examples of pathologies associated with the expression of p40 are chronic inflammatory diseases of the articular apparatus (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis), of the dermatological apparatus (e.g. psoriasis) and of the gastrointestinal apparatus (e.g. Crohn’s disease). However, IL-23 also exerts a role in promoting tumour incidence and growth. In point of fact, IL-23 regulates a series of circuits in the tumoral microenvironment, stimulating angiogenesis and the production of inflammation mediators.

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 3% of the world’s population (Koo J. Dermatol. Clin. 1996; 14:485-96; Schon M. P. et al., N. Engl. J. Med. 2005; 352: 1899-912). A type-1 aberrant immune response has been correlated with the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and the cytokines that induce this response, such as IL-12 and IL-23, may represent suitable therapeutic objects. The expression of IL-12 and IL-23, which share the subunit p40, is significantly increased in psoriasis plaques, and preclinical studies have demonstrated a role of these cytokines in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. More recently, the treatment of anti- IL-12 and IL-23 monoclonal antibodies of patients suffering from psoriasis proved to be effective in improving the signs of progression and seriousness of the disease and has subsequently reinforced the role of IL-12 and IL-23 in the physiopathology of psoriasis. Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory pathology of the digestive apparatus and may affect any region thereof – from the mouth to the anus. It typically afflicts the terminal tract of the ileum and well-defined areas of the large intestine. It is often associated with systemic autoimmune disorders, such as mouth ulcers and rheumatic arthritis. Crohn’s disease affects over 500 000 people in Europe and 600 000 people in the United States.

Crohn’s disease is a pathology associated with a Th1 cell-mediated excessive activity of cytokines. IL-12 is a key cytokine in the initiation of the inflammatory response mediated by Th1 cells. Crohn’s disease is characterized by increased production of IL-12 by cells presenting the antigen in intestinal tissue, and of gamma-interferon (IFN-γ) and TNFα by lymphocytes and intestinal macrophages. These cytokines induce and support the inflammatory process and thickening of the intestinal wall, which are characteristic signs of the pathology. Preclinical and clinical evidence has demonstrated that inhibition of IL-12 is effective in controlling the inflammatory response in models of intestinal inflammation and/or in patients suffering from Crohn’s disease.

The relationship between cancer and inflammation is now an established fact. Many forms of tumours originate from sites of inflammation, and inflammation mediators are often produced in tumours.

IL-23 has been identified as a cytokine associated with cancer and, in particular, the expression of IL-23 is significantly high in samples of human carcinomas when compared with normal adjacent tissues. In addition, the absence of a significant expression of IL-23 in the normal adjacent tissues suggests an over-regulation of IL-23 in tumours, reinforcing its role in tumour genesis.

European patent EP-B-O 382 276 describes a number of 1-benzyl-3-hydroxymethylindazole derivatives endowed with analgesic activity. In turn, European patent EP-B-O 510 748 describes, on the other hand, the use of these derivatives for preparing a pharmaceutical composition that is active in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Finally, European patent EP-B-1 005 332 describes the use of these derivatives for preparing a pharmaceutical composition that is active in treating diseases derived from the production of MCP-1. 2-Methyl-2-{[1-(phenylmethyl)-1 H-indazol-3-yl]methoxy}propanoic acid is thought to be capable of inhibiting, in a dose-dependent manner, the production of MCP-1 and TNF-α induced in vitro in monocytes from LPS and Candida albicans, whereas the same compound showed no effects in the production of cytokines IL-1 and IL-6, and of chemokines IL-8, MIP-1 α, and RANTES (Sironi M. et al., “A small synthetic molecule capable of preferentially inhibiting the production of the CC chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 “, European Cytokine Network. Vol. 10, No. 3, 437-41 , September 1999).

European patent application EP-A-1 185 528 relates to the use of triazine derivatives for inhibiting the production of IL-12. European patent application EP-A-1 188 438 and EP-A-1 199 074 relate to the use of inhibitors of the enzyme PDE4, for instance Rolipram, Ariflo and diazepine-indole derivatives, in the treatment and prevention of diseases associated with excessive production of IL-12. European patent application EP-A-1 369 1 19 relates to the use of hyaluronane with a molecular weight of between 600 000 and 3 000 000 daltons for controlling and inhibiting the expression of IL-12. European patent application EP-A-1 458 687 relates to the use of pyrimidine derivatives for treating diseases related to an overproduction of IL-12. European patent application EP-A-1 819 341 relates to the use of nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds, for instance pyridine, pyrimidine and triazine derivatives, for inhibiting the production of IL-12 (or of other cytokines, such as IL-23 and IL-27 which stimulate the production of IL-12). European patent application EP-A-1 827 447 relates to the use of pyrimidine derivatives for treating diseases related to an overproduction of IL-12, IL-23 and IL-27.

European patent applications EP-A-1 869 055, EP-A-1 869 056 and EP-A-1 675 862 describe 1 ,3-thiazolo-4,5-pyrimidine derivatives that are capable of acting as CX3CR1 receptor antagonists.

Despite the activity developed thus far, there is still felt to be a need for novel pharmaceutical compositions and compounds that are effective in the treatment of diseases based on the expression of MCP-1 , CX3CR1 and p40. The Applicant has found, surprisingly, novel 1-benzyl-3-hydroxymethylindazole derivatives with pharmacological activity.

The Applicant has found, surprisingly, that the novel 1-benzyl-3-hydroxymethylindazole derivatives according to formula (I) of the present invention are capable of reducing the production of the chemokine MCP-1. More surprisingly, the Applicant has found that the novel 1-benzyl-3-hydroxymethylindazole derivatives according to formula (I) of the present invention are capable of reducing the expression of the chemokine MCP-1.

Even more surprisingly, the Applicant has found that the 1-benzyl-3-hydroxymethylindazole derivatives according to formula (I) of the present invention are capable of reducing the expression of the subunit p40 involved in the production of the cytokines IL-12 and IL-23, and the expression of the receptor CX3CR1.

SYN

PATENTS

EP 0382276

https://patents.google.com/patent/EP0382276A2/en

PATENT

WO 2009109613

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2009109613

Preparation of compound 29

2-[(1 -benzyl-1 H-indazol-3-yl)methoxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid The preparation of product 29 was performed as described in patent application EP 382 276.

PATENT

WO 2011015502

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2011015502

Example 5

Preparation of 2-[(1-benzyl-1H-indazol-3-yl)methoxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid

Ethyl-2-hydroxyisobutyrate (18.5 g, 140 mmol, 1.2 eq.), toluene (100 ml_) and DMF (20 ml_) were placed in a three-necked flask fitted with a mechanical stirrer and a reflux condenser under an inert atmosphere. A dispersion of 60% NaH (5.6 g, 140 mmol, 1.2 eq.) was added to the mixture in portions over a period of approximately 1.5 hours. A solution of i -benzyl-3-chloromethyl-I H-indazole (30 g,

117 mmol, 1 eq.) in toluene (90 ml_) and DMF (60 ml_) was then added dropwise. The reaction mixture was heated to approximately 90°C and kept at that temperature until the reaction was complete (checked by TLC, approximately 10 hours). After cooling to room temperature the mixture was washed with acidified water and water. The organic phase was concentrated under reduced pressure and the oily residue obtained was treated with 10 M NaOH (36 ml_) at reflux temperature for at least 3 hours. The product, which was precipitated out by the addition of concentrated HCI, was filtered and dried. Yield: 32.3 g of white solid (85%).

mp: 133-134°C.

Elemental analysis:Calculated: C (70.35), H (6.21 ), N (8.64), Found: C (70.15), H (6.17), N (8.63).

1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm) 1.44 (s, 6H), 4.76 (s, 2H), 5.60 (s, 2H), 7.14 (t, 1 H, J = 7.6 Hz), 7.20-7.34 (m, 5H), 7.37 (ddd, 1 H, J = 8.3 Hz, 7.0 Hz, 1.1 Hz), 7.66 (d, 1 H, J = 8.4 Hz), 7.94 (d, 1 H, J = 8.1 Hz), 12.77 (s, 1 H).

13C NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm) 24.48, 24.48, 51.63, 59.65,76.93, 109.69, 120.22, 121.06, 122.62, 126.28, 127.36, 127.36, 127.44, 128.46, 128.46, 137.49, 140.31 , 141.97, 175.46.

PATENT

WO 2011015501

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2011015501A1

PATENT

US 8350052

US 8354544

US 8835481

//////////////BINDARIT, JQ11LH711M, биндарит , بينداريت , 宾达利 , AF2838, AF 2838, PHASE 2

CC(C)(C(=O)O)OCC1=NN(C2=CC=CC=C21)CC3=CC=CC=C3

ROLUPERIDONE


Roluperidone | C22H23FN2O2 | ChemSpider

MIN-101.svg
  • Molecular FormulaC22H23FN2O2
  • Average mass366.429 Da

Roluperidone

CAS 359625-79-9

1937215-88-7 hcl

ролуперидон [Russian] [INN]

رولوبيريدون [Arabic] [INN]

罗鲁哌酮 [Chinese] [INN]

1H-Isoindol-1-one, 2-[[1-[2-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl]-4-piperidinyl]methyl]-2,3-dihydro-2-({1-[2-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl]-4-piperidinyl}methyl)-1-isoindolinone

2-[[1- [2–fluorophenyl) -2-oxotyl] piperidine –4-yl] methyl] isoindrin-hydrochloride

CYR-101

UNII-4P31I0M3BF

MIN-101

SYN

Roluperidone (former developmental code names MIN-101CYR-101MT-210) is a 5-HT2A and σ2 receptor antagonist that is under development by Minerva Neurosciences for the treatment of schizophrenia.[1][2][3][4] One of its metabolites also has some affinity for the H1 receptor.[2] As of May 2018, the drug is in phase III clinical trials.[5]

Minerva Neurosciences (following the merger of Cyrenaic and Sonkei Pharmaceuticals ), under license from Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma , is developing roluperidone (MIN-101, CYR-101, MT-210), a dual 5-HT2A /sigma 2 antagonist, as a modified-release formulation, for the potential oral treatment of schizophrenia. In December 2017, a phase III trial was initiated in patients with negative symptoms of schizophrenia. By March 2020, Minerva had filed an IND for apathy in dementia.

Schizophrenia is a complex, challenging, and heterogeneous psychiatric condition, affecting up to 0.7% of the world population according to the World Health Organization (WHO, 2006). Patients suffering with schizophrenia present with a range of symptoms, including: positive symptoms, such as delusions, hallucinations, thought disorders, and agitation; negative symptoms, such as mood flatness and lack of pleasure in daily life; cognitive symptoms, such as the decreased ability to understand information and make decisions, difficulty focusing, and decreased working memory function; and sleep disorders.

The etiology of schizophrenia is not fully understood. A major explanatory hypothesis for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is the Dopamine (DA) hypothesis, which proposes that hyperactivity of DA transmission is responsible for expressed symptoms of the disorder. This hypothesis is based on the observation that drugs effective in treating schizophrenia share the common feature of blocking DA D2 receptors. However, these so-called typical antipsychotics are associated with a very high incidence of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). Furthermore, negative symptoms and cognitive impairment are considered relatively unresponsive to typical antipsychotics.

Most currently approved therapies for schizophrenia show efficacy primarily in the management of positive symptoms. An estimated 4.2 million people suffered from schizophrenia in 2012 in the United States and the five major European Union markets. Of those, an estimated 48% experienced predominantly negative symptoms and 80% suffered from cognitive impairment. In addition, about 50% of patients with schizophrenia experience sleep disorders, which can further exacerbate both positive and negative symptoms.

The introduction of the so-called atypical antipsychotics in the last decade represented a significant advance in the treatment of schizophrenia. Although these atypical antipsychotics differ widely in chemical structure and receptor-binding profiles, they share a characteristic of potent antagonism of the Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) type 2 receptor (5-HT2A). A high 5-HT2A:D2 affinity ratio is thought to substantially reduce the liability for inducing EPS, compared with typical antipsychotics.

However, many patients are still treatment-noncompliant despite the advantage of atypical antipsychotics of tolerability. Although the risk of EPS is clearly lower with the atypical antipsychotics, the high doses required with some atypical antipsychotics are likely to result in an increased incidence of EPS and require concomitant medications such as antiparkinson drugs.

In addition to EPS, antipsychotic medications cause a broad spectrum of side effects including sedation, anticholinergic effects, prolactin elevation, orthostatic hypotension, weight gain, altered glucose metabolism, and QTc prolongation. These side effects can affect patients’ compliance with their treatment regimen. It should be noted that noncompliance with treatment regimen is a primary reason for relapse of the disease.

Although atypical antipsychotics offer advantages over typical antipsychotics in terms of symptom alleviation and side effect profile, these differences are generally modest. A certain population of patients still remains refractory to all currently available antipsychotics. Newer agents to address these issues continue to be sought.

Product Ingredients

INGREDIENTUNIICASINCHI KEY
Roluperidone hydrochlorideWFL7TF8DTP1937215-88-7NZKANSJXJCILHS-UHFFFAOYSA-N

PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2001064670

Example 1: 2-[[1- [2–fluorophenyl) -2-oxotyl] piperidine –4-yl] methyl] isoindrin-hydrochloride (Compound 1 in Table 1)

a) tert-Butyl 4-aminomethylpiperidine-carpoxylate hydrochloride’salt

4-Aminomethylpiperidin 5. 71g as a starting material

Tert-Butyl 4-aminomethylbiperidine-power reportage was synthesized according to the method described in Synthetic Commun., 22 (16), 2357-2360 (1992). This compound was dissolved in 80 ml of ethyl acetate, 4N ethyl monoacetate hydrochloride was added, and the mixture was stirred. Precipitated solid

Was collected to obtain 10.27 g (yield 82%) of the indicated compound. At melting point 236-240.

Ή-NMR (DMS0-d 6 ): 8.00 (3H, s), 3. 92 (2H, br d, J = 12.6), 2.68 H, m), 1.77- 1. 65 (3H, m), 1.39 (9H, s), 1.02 (2H, m) b) 2-Bromomethylbenzoic acid etyl ester

2-Methylbenzoic acid etyl ester (2.00 g, 11.9 mmol) is dissolved in carbon tetrachloride (60 ml), and N-promosucciimide (2.56 g, 14.4 mmo 1) and a catalytic amount of benzoyl peroxide are added to the solution. In addition, heat reflux. After 1 hour, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, hexan (40 m was added, the insoluble material was filtered off, and the filtrate was distilled off under reduced pressure to obtain 3.16 g of the indicated compound as a yellow oil. It was used for the next reaction without purification as it was.

c) tert-Butyl 4- (1-oxoisoindrin-2 -ylmethyl) piperidine-1 -carpoxylate

Add 3.15 g of the compound obtained in Example lb and the compound (3.00 g, 12. Ommol) obtained in Example la to dimethylformamide (30πΠ), and stir at room temperature with trietylamine (3.5 ml, 25 mmol). ) Is added and stirred at the same temperature for 17 hours. Water is added to the reaction mixture, and the mixture is extracted with a mixed solvent of etyl hexane vinegar. The organic layer is washed with 10% aqueous quenic acid solution, water, sodium bicarbonate solution, and saturated brine, and dried with magnesium sulfate. The insoluble material was filtered, the filtrate was distilled off under reduced pressure, and the obtained oil was purified by silicon gel column chromatography (etyl-hexan acetate). I got it as a thing.

Ή-NMR (CDC1 3 ): 7.85 (1H, d, J = 7.5), 7.4-7.6 (3Η, m),

4.41 (2H, s), 4.0-4.2 (2H, m), 3.4-3.6 (2H, m), 2.6-2.8 (2H, m), 1.8-2.0 (1H, m), 1.5 -1.7 (4H, m), to 45 (9H, s)

d) 2- (Piperidine -4 -Ilmethyl) Isondrin -1 -On Hydrochloride

The compound (1.6 lg, 4.87 mmol) obtained in Example 1c is dissolved in methylene chloride (5 ml) and ethanol (lm mixed solvent, and at room temperature, 4 standard ethyl acetate solvent (5 ml, 20 mmol) is added. Stir at warm temperature for 1 hour and filter the precipitated solid. The obtained solid was washed with ethanol acetate and then dried under reduced pressure to give the indicated compound 7260 ^ (yield 56%) as a colorless solid. ..

Ή-NMR (DMS0-d 6 ): 8. 83 (1H, brs), 8. 53 (1H, brs), 7. 4-7. 7 (4 Η, m), 4. 50 (2H, s), 3. 44 (2H, d, J = 7.2), 3. 2-3. 3 (2H, i), 2. 7-2.9 (2H, m), 1. 9-2.1 (1H) , m), 1. 6-1. 8 (2H, m), 1. 3-1. 5 (2H, m)

e) 2- [Π_ [2- (4-Fluo-mouth phenyl) -2-oxotil] Piperidin –4-yl] Methyl] Isoindrin-卜 on

Add the compounds obtained in Example Id (518 mg, 1. 94 mmo and 2-cloucet -4, -fluoroacetophenone (358 mg, 2.07 mmol) to dimethylform amamide (12 ml) with stirring at room temperature. Add trietylamine (575 1, 4. 13 mmol). After stirring at the same temperature for 4 hours, add water to the reaction solution and extract with ethyl acetate. The organic layer is washed with water and saturated saline and sodium sulfate. Dry with thorium. Filter the insoluble material and concentrate the filtrate under reduced pressure to obtain 0.70 g of orange oil. Add hexane to the obtained oil to solidify. Filter this. By drying under reduced pressure, 551 mg (yield 77%) of the notation compound was obtained as a pale yellow solid.

! H-NMR (CDC1 3 ): 8.0-8 . 1 (2H, m), 7. 85 (1H, d = 7.2), 7.4-7. 55 (3 Η, m), 7.1 2 ( 2H, t), 4. 41 (2H, s), 3. 73 (2H, s), 3.51 (2H, d, J = 7.5), 2. 9-3. 0 (2H, m) , 2. 1-2. 2 (2H, m), 1. 4-19.9 (5H, m)

f) 2- [Π- [2- (4 -Fluolophenyl) -2 -Oxoetyl] Piperidin –4-yl] Methyl] Isoindoline-Piol hydrochloride

The compound (550 mg, 1.5 Ommo 1) obtained in Example le was used as an etano.

Dissolve in (2 ml) and add 4 specified ethyl hydrochloride solvent (2 ml, 8 imol) at room temperature and stir at the same temperature for 15 minutes. Ethyl acetate (10 ml) is added to the reaction solution, and the precipitated solid is filtered. The obtained solid is washed with ethyl acetate and then dried under reduced pressure to obtain 364 mg of white powder. This was recrystallized from ethanol monoacetate to give 246 mg (yield 41%) of the notation compound as a colorless solid. At melting point 182-188.

Ή-NMR (DMS0-d 6 ): 9.93 (1H, brs), 8.0-8. 2 (2H, m), 7.4-7.7 (6 Η, m), 4. 9-5.1 (2H, m), 4.53 (2H, s), 2.9-3.6 (6H, m), 1.6-2.2 (5H, m)

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/US7166617B2/en

Example 12-[[1-[2-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl]piperidin-4-yl]methyl]isoindolin-1-one hydrochloride (Compound 1 in Table 1)a) tert-Butyl 4-aminomethylpiperidine-1-carboxylate hydrochloride

By using 4-aminomethylpiperidine 5.71 g as a starting material, tert-butyl 4-aminomethylpiperidine-1-carboxylate was prepared according to the method described in Synthetic Commun., 22(16), 2357–2360 (1992). The resulting compound was dissolved in 80 ml of ethyl acetate, and the solution was added with 4N hydrogen chloride-ethyl acetate and stirred. The precipitated solids were collected by filtration to obtain the title compound (10.27 g, yield: 82%).

Melting point: 236–240° C. 1H-NMR(DMSO-d6): 8.00(3H,s), 3.92(2H, br d, J=12.6), 2.68(4H, m), 1.77–1.65(3H, m), 1.39(9H, s), 1.02(2H, m)

b) 2-Bromomethylbenzoic acid ethyl ester

2-Methylbenzoic acid ethyl ester (2.00 g, 11.9 mmol) was dissolved in carbon tetrachloride (60 ml), and the solution was added with N-bromosuccinimide (2.56 g, 14.4 mmol) and a catalytic amount of benzoylperoxide and then heated under reflux. After one hour, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature and added with hexane (40 ml) to remove insoluble solids by filtration. The filtrate was evaporated under reduced pressure to obtain the title compound 3.16 g as yellow oil. the product was used in the next reaction without purification.

c) tert-Butyl 4-(1-oxoisoindolin-2-yl-methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate

The compound obtained in Example 1b (3.15 g), and the compound obtained in Example 1a (3.00 g, 12.0 mmol) were added in dimethylformamide (30 ml). The mixture was added with triethylamine (3.5 ml, 25 mmol) with stirring at room temperature, and then stirring was continued for 17 hours at the same temperature. Water was added to the reaction mixture and extracted with a mixed solvent of ethyl acetate-hexane. The organic layer was washed with 10% aqueous citric acid solution, water, aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution, and then with saturated brine and the dried over magnesium sulfate. Insoluble solids were removed by filtration, and the filtrate was evaporated under reduced pressure. The resulting oil was purified by silica gel column chromatography (ethyl acetate-hexane) to obtain the title compound as yellow oil (yield: 41%)

1H-NMR(CDCl3): 7.85(1H,d,J=7.5), 7.4–7.6(3H,m), 4.41(2H,s), 4.0–4.2(2H,m), 3.4–3.6(2H,m), 2.6–2.8(2H,m), 1.8–2.0(1H,m), 1.5–1.7(4H,m), 1.45(9H,s)

d) 2-(Piperidin-4-yl-methyl)isoindolin-1-one hydrochloride

The compound obtained in Example 1c (1.61 g, 4.87 mmol) was dissolved in a mixed solvent of methylene chloride (5 ml) and ethanol (1 ml) and the solution was added with 4N hydrochloric acid in ethyl acetate (5 ml, 20 mmol) at room temperature. The mixture was stirred at the same temperature for 1 hour, and the precipitated solids were collected by filtration. The resulting solids were washed with ethyl acetate and then dried under reduced pressure to obtain the title compound as colorless solid (726 mg, yield: 56%).

1H-NMR(DMSO-d6): 8.83(1H,brs), 8.53(1H,brs), 7.4–7.7(4H,m), 4.50(2H,s), 3.44(2H,d,J=7.2), 3.2–3.3(2H,m), 2.7–2.9(2H,m), 1.9–2.1(1H,m), 1.6–1.8(2H,m), 1.3–1.5(2H,m)

e) 2-[[1-[2-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl]piperidin-4-yl]methyl]isoindolin-1-one

The compound obtained in Example 1d (518 mg, 1.94 mmol) and 2-chloro-4′-fluoroacetophenone (358 mg, 2.07 mmol) was added to dimethylformamide (12 ml), and the solution was added with triethylamine (575 μl, 4.13 mmol) with stirring at room temperature. Stirring was continued at the same temperature for 4 hours, and then the reaction mixture was added with water and extracted with ethyl acetate. The organic layer was washed with water and then with saturated brine, and then dried over sodium sulfate. Insoluble solids were removed by filtration and the filtrate was evaporated under reduced pressure to obtain orange oil (0.70 g). The resulting oil was solidified by adding hexane, and the solids were collected by filtration and dried under reduced pressure to obtain the title compound as pale yellow solid (551 mg, yield: 77%).

1H-NMR(CDCl3): 8.0–8.1(2H,m), 7.85(1H,d=7.2), 7.4–7.55(3H,m), 7.12(2H,t), 4.41(2H,s), 3.73(2H,s), 3.51(2H,d,J=7.5), 2.9–3.0(2H,m), 2.1–2.2(2H,m), 1.4–1.9(5H,m)

f) 2-[[1-[2-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl]piperidin-4-yl]methyl]isoindolin-1-one hydrochloride

The compound obtained in Example 1e (550 mg, 1.50 mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (2 ml), and the solution was added with 4N hydrochloric acid in ethyl acetate (2 ml, 8 mmol) at room temperature, and stirring was continued at the same temperature for 15 minutes. The reaction mixture was added with ethyl acetate (10 ml) and the precipitated solids were collected by filtration. The resulting solids were washed with ethyl acetate and then dried under reduced pressure to obtain white powder (364 mg). The product was recrystallized from ethanol-ethyl acetate to obtain the title compound as colorless solid (246 mg, yield: 41%)

Melting point: 182–188° C. 1H-NMR(DMSO-d6): 9.93(1H,brs), 8.0–8.2(2H,m), 7.4–7.7(6H,m), 4.9–5.1(2H,m), 4.53(2H,s), 2.9–3.6(6H,m), 1.6–2.2(5H, m)

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/US9458130B2/en?oq=9%2c458%2c130+US

PATENT

WO-2020264486

Novel crystalline form of roluperidone HCL (designated as form 4) as 5-HT 2a receptor antagonist useful for treating schizophrenia.

Roluperidone has the chemical name 2-({ l-[2-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl]-4-piperidinyl}methyl)-l-isoindolinone. Roluperidone has the following chemical structure:

[0003] Roluperidone is reported to be a drug candidate with equipotent affinities for 5-hydroxytryptamine-2A (5-HT2A) and sigma2 and, at lower affinity levels, al -adrenergic receptors. A pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial is ongoing with roluperidone as a monotherapy for negative symptoms in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

[0004] Roluperidone is known from U.S. Patent No. 7,166,617.

[0005] Solid state form of 2-((l-(2-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-oxoethyl)piperidin-4-yl)methyl)isoindolin-l-o-ne monohydrochloride dihydrate is known from U.S. Patent No.9,458,130.

Examples

[00113] Roluperidone can be prepared according to the procedure described in U.S. Patent No. 7,166,617.

Example 1: Preparation of Roluperidone HC1

[00114] 2.02 grams of Roluperidone was dissolved in acetone (80 mL). 2.76 mL of HC1 (2M) was added to the solution. The obtained suspension was stirred for 21 hours at 10°C and then filtered over black ribbon filter paper under vacuum. Obtained solid was analyzed by PXRD.

References

  1. ^ Mestre TA, Zurowski M, Fox SH (April 2013). “5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor antagonists as potential treatment for psychiatric disorders”. Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs22 (4): 411–21. doi:10.1517/13543784.2013.769957PMID 23409724.
  2. Jump up to:a b Ebdrup BH, Rasmussen H, Arnt J, Glenthøj B (September 2011). “Serotonin 2A receptor antagonists for treatment of schizophrenia”. Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs20 (9): 1211–23. doi:10.1517/13543784.2011.601738PMID 21740279.
  3. ^ Köster LS, Carbon M, Correll CU (December 2014). “Emerging drugs for schizophrenia: an update”. Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs19 (4): 511–31. doi:10.1517/14728214.2014.958148PMID 25234340.
  4. ^ “Drug Development in Schizophrenia: Summary and Table”. Pharmaceutical Medicine28 (5): 265–271. 2014. doi:10.1007/s40290-014-0070-6ISSN 1178-2595.
  5. ^ “Roluperidone – Minerva Neurosciences”Adis Insight. Springer Nature Switzerland AG.
Clinical data
Other namesMIN-101; CYR-101; MT-210
Routes of
administration
By mouth
Identifiers
IUPAC name[show]
CAS Number359625-79-9
PubChemCID9799284
DrugBankDB13080
ChemSpider7975049
UNII4P31I0M3BF
KEGGD11258
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)DTXSID10189512 
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC22H23F2N2O2
Molar mass385.435 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)Interactive image
SMILES[show]
InChI[show]

/////////////////Roluperidone, PHASE 3, ролуперидон , رولوبيريدون , 罗鲁哌酮 , CYR 101, UNII-4P31I0M3BF , MIN 101,

C1CN(CCC1CN2CC3=CC=CC=C3C2=O)CC(=O)C4=CC=C(C=C4)F

CILOFEXOR


Cilofexor.png

Cilofexor Chemical Structure

 

 

CILOFEXOR

C28H22Cl3N3O5 ,

586.8 g/mol

1418274-28-8

GS-9674, Cilofexor (GS(c)\9674)

UNII-YUN2306954

YUN2306954

2-[3-[2-chloro-4-[[5-cyclopropyl-3-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1,2-oxazol-4-yl]methoxy]phenyl]-3-hydroxyazetidin-1-yl]pyridine-4-carboxylic acid

Cilofexor is under investigation in clinical trial NCT02943447 (Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Cilofexor in Adults With Primary Biliary Cholangitis Without Cirrhosis).

Cilofexor (GS-9674) is a potent, selective and orally active nonsteroidal FXR agonist with an EC50 of 43 nM. Cilofexor has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects. Cilofexor has the potential for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) research.

Gilead , following a drug acquisition from  Phenex , is developing cilofexor tromethamine (formerly GS-9674), the lead from a program of farnesoid X receptor (FXR; bile acid receptor) agonists, for the potential oral treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), primary biliary cholangitis/cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In March 2019, a phase III trial was initiated for PSC; at that time, the trial was expected to complete in August 2022.

PATENT

Product case WO2013007387 , expiry EU in 2032 and in the US in 2034.

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2013007387A1/en

Figure imgf000039_0001

PATENT

WO2020150136 claiming 2,6-dichloro-4-fluorophenyl compounds.

PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2020172075&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&_cid=P20-KEP1ZU-65392-1

WO-2020172075

Novel crystalline forms of cilofexor as FXR agonists useful for treating nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.   Gilead , following a drug acquisition from  Phenex , is developing cilofexor tromethamine (formerly GS-9674), the lead from a program of farnesoid X receptor (FXR; bile acid receptor) agonists, for the potential oral treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), primary biliary cholangitis/cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In March 2019, a phase III trial was initiated for PSC; at that time, the trial was expected to complete in August 2022. Family members of the cilofexor product case WO2013007387 , expire in the EU in 2032 and in the US in 2034.

solid forms of compounds that bind to the NR1H4 receptor (FXR) and act as agonists or modulators of FXR. The disclosure further relates to the use of the solid forms of such compounds for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of diseases and/or conditions through binding of said nuclear receptor by said compounds.

 

[0004] Compounds that bind to the NR1H4 receptor (FXR) can act as agonists or modulators of FXR. FXR agonists are useful for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of diseases and conditions through binding of the NR1H4 receptor. One such FXR agonist is the compound of Formula I:

 

 

I.

 

[0005] Although numerous FXR agonists are known, what is desired in the art are physically stable forms of the compound of Formula I, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, with desired properties such as good physical and chemical stability, good aqueous solubility and good bioavailability. For example, pharmaceutical compositions are desired that address

challenges of stability, variable pharmacodynamics responses, drug-drug interactions, pH effect, food effects, and oral bioavailability.

 

[0006] Accordingly, there is a need for stable forms of the compound of Formula I with suitable chemical and physical stability for the formulation, therapeutic use, manufacturing, and storage of the compound.

 

[0007] Moreover, it is desirable to develop a solid form of Formula I that may be useful in the synthesis of Formula I. A solid form, such as a crystalline form of a compound of Formula I may be an intermediate to the synthesis of Formula F A solid form may have properties such as bioavailability, stability, purity, and/or manufacturability at certain conditions that may be suitable for medical or pharmaceutical uses.

Description

Cilofexor (GS-9674) is a potent, selective and orally active nonsteroidal FXR agonist with an EC50 of 43 nM. Cilofexor has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects. Cilofexor has the potential for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) research[1][2].

IC50 & Target

EC50: 43 nM (FXR)[1]

In Vivo

Cilofexor (GS-9674; 30 mg/kg; oral gavage; once daily; for 10 weeks; male Wistar rats) treatment significantly increases Fgf15 expression in the ileum and decreased Cyp7a1 in the liver in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) rats. Liver fibrosis and hepatic collagen expression are significantly reduced. Cilofexor also significantly reduces hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation and significantly decreases portal pressure, without affecting systemic hemodynamics[3].

Animal Model: Male Wistar rats received a choline-deficient high fat diet (CDHFD)[3]
Dosage: 30 mg/kg
Administration: Oral gavage; once daily; for 10 weeks
Result: Significantly increased Fgf15 expression in the ileum and decreased Cyp7a1 in the liver. Liver fibrosis and hepatic collagen expression were significantly reduced.
Clinical Trial
NCT Number Sponsor Condition Start Date Phase
NCT02943460 Gilead Sciences
Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis
November 29, 2016 Phase 2
NCT02808312 Gilead Sciences
Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)
July 13, 2016 Phase 1
NCT02781584 Gilead Sciences
Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)|Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)
July 13, 2016 Phase 2
NCT02943447 Gilead Sciences
Primary Biliary Cholangitis
December 1, 2016 Phase 2
NCT03987074 Gilead Sciences|Novo Nordisk A+S
Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis
July 29, 2019 Phase 2
NCT03890120 Gilead Sciences
Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis
March 27, 2019 Phase 3
NCT02854605 Gilead Sciences
Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)
October 26, 2016 Phase 2
NCT03449446 Gilead Sciences
Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis
March 21, 2018 Phase 2
NCT02654002 Gilead Sciences
Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)
January 2016 Phase 1
Patent ID Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2019142814 Novel FXR (NR1H4) binding and activity modulating compounds 2019-01-15
US2019055273 ACYCLIC ANTIVIRALS 2017-03-09
US10220027 FXR (NR1H4) binding and activity modulating compounds 2017-10-13
US10071108 Methods and pharmaceutical compositions for the treatment of hepatitis b virus infection 2018-02-19
US2018000768 INTESTINAL FXR AGONISM ENHANCES GLP-1 SIGNALING TO RESTORE PANCREATIC BETA CELL FUNCTIONS 2017-09-06
Patent ID Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US9820979 NOVEL FXR (NR1H4) BINDING AND ACTIVITY MODULATING COMPOUNDS 2016-12-05
US9539244 NOVEL FXR (NR1H4) BINDING AND ACTIVITY MODULATING COMPOUNDS 2015-08-12 2015-12-03
US9895380 METHODS AND PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF HEPATITIS B VIRUS INFECTION 2014-09-10 2016-08-04
US2017355693 FXR (NR1H4) MODULATING COMPOUNDS 2017-06-12
US2016376279 FXR AGONISTS AND METHODS FOR MAKING AND USING 2016-09-12
Patent ID Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US9139539 NOVEL FXR (NR1H4) BINDING AND ACTIVITY MODULATING COMPOUNDS 2012-07-12 2014-08-07
US2018133203 METHODS OF TREATING LIVER DISEASE 2017-10-27

ClinicalTrials.gov

CTID Title Phase Status Date
NCT03890120 Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Cilofexor in Non-Cirrhotic Adults With Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Phase 3 Recruiting 2020-08-31
NCT02781584 Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Selonsertib, Firsocostat, and Cilofexor in Adults With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Phase 2 Recruiting 2020-08-13
NCT03987074 Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Monotherapy and Combination Regimens in Adults With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Phase 2 Completed 2020-07-29
NCT02943460 Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Cilofexor in Adults With Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Without Cirrhosis Phase 2 Completed 2020-06-09
NCT02943447 Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Cilofexor in Adults With Primary Biliary Cholangitis Without Cirrhosis Phase 2 Completed 2020-02-11

ClinicalTrials.gov

CTID Title Phase Status Date
NCT03449446 Safety and Efficacy of Selonsertib, Firsocostat, Cilofexor, and Combinations in Participants With Bridging Fibrosis or Compensated Cirrhosis Due to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Phase 2 Completed 2019-12-24
NCT02854605 Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of GS-9674 in Participants With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Phase 2 Completed 2019-01-29
NCT02808312 Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of GS-9674 in Adults With Normal and Impaired Hepatic Function Phase 1 Completed 2018-10-30
NCT02654002 Study in Healthy Volunteers to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of GS-9674, and the Effect of Food on GS-9674 Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Phase 1 Completed 2016-07-27

EU Clinical Trials Register

EudraCT Title Phase Status Date
2019-000204-14 A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Cilofexor in Non-Cirrhotic Subjects with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Phase 3 Restarted, Ongoing 2019-09-11
2016-002496-10 A Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of GS-9674 in Subjects with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Phase 2 Completed 2017-02-21
2016-002443-42 A Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of GS-9674 in Subjects with Primary Biliary Cholangitis Without Cirrhosis Phase 2 Completed 2017-01-09
2016-002442-23 A Phase 2, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study Evaluating the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of GS-9674 in Subjects with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Without Cirrhosis Phase 2 Completed 2017-01-09

///////////CILOFEXOR, Cilofexor (GS(c)\9674), GS-9674, phase 3

 

C1CC1C2=C(C(=NO2)C3=C(C=CC=C3Cl)Cl)COC4=CC(=C(C=C4)C5(CN(C5)C6=NC=CC(=C6)C(=O)O)O)Cl

RESMETIROM


Mgl-3196.png

Image result for resmetirom

2D chemical structure of 920509-32-6

Structure of RESMETIROM

RESMETIROM

C17H12Cl2N6O4

435.2 g/mol

MGL-3196

CAS 920509-32-6, Resmetirom, VIA-3196, UNII-RE0V0T1ES0

Phase III, Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

2-[3,5-dichloro-4-[(6-oxo-5-propan-2-yl-1H-pyridazin-3-yl)oxy]phenyl]-3,5-dioxo-1,2,4-triazine-6-carbonitrile

2-(3,5-DICHLORO-4-((5-ISOPROPYL-6-OXO-1,6-DIHYDROPYRIDAZIN-3-YL)OXY)PHENYL)-3,5-DIOXO-2,3,4,5-TETRAHYDRO-(1,2,4)TRIAZINE-6-CARBONITRILE

1,2,4-TRIAZINE-6-CARBONITRILE, 2-(3,5-DICHLORO-4-((1,6-DIHYDRO-5-(1-METHYLETHYL)-6-OXO-3-PYRIDAZINYL)OXY)PHENYL)-2,3,4,5-TETRAHYDRO-3,5-DIOXO-

Madrigal Pharmaceuticals , following the merger between Synta and Madrigal Pharmaceuticals (pre-merger) (following the acquisition of  VIA Pharmaceuticals ‘ assets (originally under license from  Roche )), is developing resmetirom (MGL-3196, VIA-3196), the lead from oral capsule formulation thyroid hormone receptor (THR) beta agonists, cholesterol and triglyceride modulators, for the use in the treatment of metabolic disorders including hypercholesterolemia and other dyslipidemias, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

MGL-3196 is a first-in-class, orally administered, small-molecule, liver-directed, THR β-selective agonist. Preclinical, toxicology and Phase 1 clinical data suggest MGL-3196 has an attractive, differentiated profile as a potential treatment for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and dyslipidemias. THR-β selectivity also enhances the safety profile of MGL-3196, compared to non-selective agents. MGL-3196 has shown no suppression of the central thyroid axis, no THR-α effects on heart rate or bone, and no elevation of liver enzymes. These characteristics make MGL-3196 among the most promising molecules in development in this therapeutic area. MGL-3196 is in a Phase 2 clinical trial for the treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

PATENT

WO-2020010068

Novel crystalline salt of resmetirom as thyroid hormone receptor agonists useful for treating obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes. Appears to be the first filing from the assignee and the inventors on this compound,

Thyroid hormones are critical for normal growth and development and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis (Paul M. Yen, Physiological reviews, Vol. 81(3): pp. 1097-1126 (2001)). Circulating levels of thyroid hormones are tightly regulated by feedback mechanisms in the hypothalamus/pituitary/thyroid (HPT) axis. Thyroid dysfunction leading to hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism clearly demonstrates that thyroid hormones exert profound effects on cardiac function, body weight, metabolism, metabolic rate, body temperature, cholesterol, bone, muscle and behavior.

[0005] The biological activity of thyroid hormones is mediated by thyroid hormone receptors (TRs or THRs) (M. A. Lazar, Endocrine Reviews, Vol. 14: pp. 348-399 (1993)). TRs belong to the superfamily known as nuclear receptors. TRs form heterodimers with the retinoid receptor that act as ligand-inducible transcription factors. TRs have a ligand binding domain, a DNA binding domain, and an amino terminal domain, and regulate gene expression through interactions with DNA response elements and with various nuclear co-activators and co repressors. The thyroid hormone receptors are derived from two separate genes, a and b. These distinct gene products produce multiple forms of their respective receptors through differential RNA processing. The major thyroid receptor isoforms are aΐ, a2, bΐ, and b2. Thyroid hormone receptors aΐ, bΐ, and b2 bind thyroid hormone. It has been shown that the thyroid hormone receptor subtypes can differ in their contribution to particular biological responses. Recent studies suggest that TIIb 1 plays an important role in regulating TRH (thyrotropin releasing hormone) and on regulating thyroid hormone actions in the liver. T11b2 plays an important role in the regulation of TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) (Abel et. al, J. Clin. Invest., Vol 104: pp. 291-300 (1999)). TIIb 1 plays an important role in regulating heart rate (B. Gloss et. al. Endocrinology, Vol. 142: pp. 544-550 (2001); C. Johansson et. al, Am. J. Physiol., Vol. 275: pp. R640-R646 (1998)).

[0006] Efforts have been made to synthesize thyroid hormone analogs which exhibit increased thyroid hormone receptor beta selectivity and/or tissue selective action. Such thyroid hormone mimetics may yield desirable reductions in body weight, lipids, cholesterol, and lipoproteins, with reduced impact on cardiovascular function or normal function of the hypothalamus/pituitary/thyroid axis (see, e.g., Joharapurkar et al, J. Med. Chem, 2012, 55 (12), pp 5649-5675). The development of thyroid hormone analogs which avoid the undesirable effects of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism while maintaining the beneficial effects of thyroid hormones would open new avenues of treatment for patients with metabolic disease such as obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and other disorders and diseases such as liver steatosis and NASH, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, hypothyroidism, thyroid cancer, thyroid diseases, a resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) syndrome, and related disorders and diseases.

PATENT

WO2018075650

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=38F602DAA4A51CA8DF413F1EDBC87DA4.wapp2nB?docId=WO2018075650&recNum=322&office=&queryString=&prevFilter=%26fq%3DICF_M%3A%22A61K%22&sortOption=Pub+Date+Desc&maxRec=1894357

In one embodiment, the metabolite of Compound A comprises a compound

having the following structure: 
(“Ml”).

PATENT

WO 2007009913

PATENT

WO 2014043706

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2014043706A1/en

Example 3: Preparation of (Z)-ethyl (2-cyano-2-(2-(3,5-dichloro-4-((5-isopropyl-6- oxo- l,6-dihydropyridazin-3-yl)oxy)phenyl)hydrazono)acetyl)carbamate (Int. 8)

A 2 L, three-neck, round-bottom flask equipped with overhead stirring, a thermocouple, N2 inlet/outlet was charged with Int. 7 (75.0 g, 0.239 mol, 1 wt), acetic acid (600 mL, 8 vol), water (150 mL, 2 vol), and concentrated HC1 (71.3 mL, 0.95 vol). The resulting thin slurry was cooled to 6 °C and a solution of NaN02 (16.8 g, 0.243 mol, 1.02 equiv) in water (37.5 mL, 0.5 vol) was added over a period of 10 min while maintaining a batch temperature below 10 °C. After an additional 10 min of agitation between 5-10 °C, HPLC analysis showed complete conversion of Int. 7 to the diazonium intermediate. A solution of NaOAc (54.5 g, 0.664 mol, 2.78 equiv) in water (225 mL, 3 vol) was added over a period of 6 min while maintaining a batch temperature below 10 °C. N-cyanoacetylurethane (37.9 g, 0.243 mol, 1.02 equiv) was immediately added, the cooling was removed, and the batch naturally warmed to 8 °C over 35 min. HPLC analysis showed complete consumption of the diazonium intermediate and the reaction was deemed complete. The batch warmed naturally to 21 °C and was filtered through Sharkskin filter paper. The reactor and cake were washed sequentially with water (375 mL, 5 vol) twice. The collected orange solid was dried in a 35 °C vacuum oven for 64 h to provide crude Int. 8 (104.8 g, 91%).

A I L, three-neck, round-bottom flask equipped with overhead stirring, a

thermocouple, and N2 inlet/outlet was charged with crude Int. 8 (104.4 g, 1 wt) and acetic acid (522 mL, 5 vol). The resulting slurry was heated to 50 °C and held at that temperature for 1.5 h. The batch cooled naturally to 25 °C over 2 h and was filtered through Sharkskin filter paper. The reactor and cake were washed sequentially with water (522 mL, 5 vol) and the cake conditioned under vacuum for 1.75 h. The light orange solid was dried to constant weight in a 40 °C vacuum oven to provide 89.9 g (78% from Int. 7) of the desired product. 1H NMR (DMSO) was consistent with the assigned structure.

Example 4: Preparation of 2-(3,5-dichloro-4-((5-isopropyl-6-oxo-l,6- dihydropyridazin-3-yl)oxy)phenyl)-3,5-dioxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-l,2,4-triazine-6-carbonitrile (Compound A)

A 2 L, three-neck, round-bottom flask equipped with overhead stirring, a

thermocouple, N2 inlet/outlet, and reflux condenser was charged with Int. 8 (89.3 g, 0.185 mol, 1 wt), DMAC (446 mL, 5 vol), and KOAc (20.0 g, 0.204 mol, 1.1 equiv). The mixture was heated to 120 °C and held at that temperature for 2 h. HPLC analysis showed complete conversion to Compound A. The batch temperature was adjusted to 18 °C over 1 h, and acetic acid (22.3 mL, 0.25 vol) was added. The batch temperature was adjusted to 8 °C, and water (714 mL, 8 vol) was added over 1 h; an orange slurry formed. The batch was filtered through Sharkskin filter paper and the cake was allowed to condition overnight under N2 without vacuum for convenience. A premixed solution of 1 : 1 acetone/water (445 mL, 5 vol) was charged to the flask and added to the cake as a rinse with vacuum applied. After 2 h of conditioning the cake under vacuum, it was transferred to a clean 1 L, three-neck, round- bottom flask equipped with overhead stirring, a thermocouple, and N2inlet/outlet. Ethanol (357 mL, 4 vol) and acetone (357 mL, 4 vol) were charged and the resulting slurry was heated to 60 °C; dissolution occurred. Water (890 mL, 10 vol) was added over a period of 90 min while maintaining a batch temperature between 55-60 °C. The resulting slurry was allowed to cool to 25 °C and filtered through Sharkskin filter paper. The reactor and cake were washed sequentially with a solution of 1:1 EtOH/water (446 mL, 5 vol). The cake was conditioned overnight under N2 without vacuum for convenience. The cracks in the cake were smoothed and vacuum applied. The cake was washed with water (179 mL, 2 vol) and dried in a 45 °C vacuum oven to a constant weight of 70.5 g (87%, crude Compound A). HPLC analysis showed a purity of 94.8%.

A 500 mL, three-neck, round-bottom flask equipped with overhead stirring, a thermocouple, N2 inlet/outlet, and reflux condenser was charged with crude Compound A (70.0 g) and MIBK (350 mL, 5 vol). The orange slurry was heated to 50 °C and held at that temperature for 2 h. The batch cooled naturally to 23 °C and was filtered through Sharkskin filter paper. The reactor and cake were washed sequentially with MIBK (35 mL, 0.5 vol) twice. The collected solids were dried in a 45 °C vacuum oven to a constant weight of 58.5 g (84%). This solid was charged to a 500 mL, three-neck, round-bottom flask equipped with overhead stirring, a thermocouple, N2 inlet/outlet, and reflux condenser. Ethanol (290 mL, 5 vol) was added and the slurry was heated to reflux. After 3.5 h at reflux, XRPD showed the solid was consistent with Form I, and heating was removed. Upon reaching 25 °C, the batch was filtered through filter paper, and the reactor and cake were washed sequentially with EtOH (174 mL, 3 vol). The tan solid Compound A was dried in a 40 °C vacuum oven to a constant weight of 50.4 g (87%, 64% from Int. 8). HPLC analysis showed a purity of 99.1%. 1H NMR (DMSO) was consistent with the assigned structure.

Example 5: Scaled up preparation of 2-(3,5-dichloro-4-((5-isopropyl-6-oxo-l,6- dihydropyridazin-3-yl)oxy)phenyl)-3,5-dioxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-l,2,4-triazine-6-carbonitrile (Compound A)

A larger scale batch of Compound A was synthesized according to the scheme below. The conditions in the scheme below are similar to those described in Examples 1-4 above.

Figure imgf000055_0001

6A

Figure imgf000055_0002

Compound A

Synthesis of 4: A 50 L jacketed glass vessel (purged with N2) was charged with 3,6- dichloropyridazine (2.00 kg), 4-amino-2,6-dichlorophenol (2.44 kg) and N,N- dimethylacetamide (10.0 L). The batch was vacuum (26 inHg) / nitrogen (1 PSIG) purged 3 times. Cesium carbonate (5.03 kg) was added and the batch temperature was adjusted from 22.3 °C to 65.0 °C over 3.5 hours. The batch was held at 65.0 °C for 20 hours. At this point,

NMR analysis indicated 3.34% 3.6-dichloropyridazine relative to 2. The batch temperature was adjusted to 21.5 °C and ethyl acetate (4.00 L) was added to the batch. The batch was agitated for 10 minutes and then filtered through a 18″ Nutsche filter equipped with polypropylene filter cloth. The filtration took 15 minutes. Ethyl acetate (5.34 L) was charged to the vessel and transferred to the filter as a rinse. The batch was then manually re- suspended in the filter before re-applying vacuum. This process was repeated 2 more times and the filter cake was conditioned for 10 minutes. The filtrate was charged to a 100-L vessel that contained (16.0 L) of a previously prepared 15% sodium chloride in H20. The batch was agitated for 5 minutes and then allowed to separate for 35 minutes. The interface was not visible, so the calculated 23 L of the lower aqueous phase was removed. 16.0 L of 15% Sodium chloride in H20 was added to the batch. The batch was agitated for 6 minutes and then allowed to separate for 7 minutes. The interface was visible at -19 L and the lower aqueous phase was removed. 17.0 L of 15% Sodium chloride in H20 was added to the batch. The batch was agitated for 7 minutes and then allowed to separate for 11 minutes. The lower aqueous phase was removed. The vessel was set up for vacuum distillation and the batch was concentrated from 17.0 L to 8.0 L over 2 hours 20 minutes with the batch temperature kept around 21 °C. Benzoic anhydride (3.19 kg) and acetic acid (18.0 L) were charged to the vessel. The vessel was set up for vacuum distillation and the batch was concentrated from 28.0 L to 12.0 L over 2 days (overnight hold at 20 °C) with the batch temperature kept between 20 and 55 °C. At this point, JH NMR analysis indicated a mol ratio of acetic acid to ethyl acetate of 1.0:0.015. Acetic acid (4.0 L) was charged to the batch and the batch was distilled to 12 L. JH NMR analysis indicated a mol ratio of acetic acid to ethyl acetate of 1.0:0.0036. Acetic acid (20.0 L) was charged to the batch and the batch temperature was adjusted to 70.0 °C. The batch was sampled for HPLC analysis and 2 was 0.16%. Sodium acetate (2,20 kg) was added to the batch and the batch temperature was adjusted from 72.4 °C to 110.0 °C. After 18.5 hours, HPLC analysis indicated no Int. B detected. The batch temperature was adjusted from 111.3 to 74.7 °C and DI water (30.0 L) was added to the batch over 2 hours. The batch temperature was adjusted to 20 .5 °C and then filtered using a 24″ Haselloy Nutsche filter equipped with polypropylene filter cloth. A previously prepared solution of 1:1 acetic acid in DI H20 (10.0 L) was charged to the vessel and agitated for 5 minutes. The wash was transferred to the filter and the batch was then manually re- suspended in the filter before re-applying vacuum. DI H20 (10.0 L) was charged to the vessel and then transferred to the filter. The batch was manually re-suspended in the filter before re-applying vacuum. DI H20 (10.0 L) was charged directly to the filter and the batch was then manually re-suspended in the filter before re-applying vacuum. The filter cake was allowed to condition for 18 hours to give 14.4 kg of 4. HPLC analysis indicated a purity of 93.7%. This wet cake was carried forward into the purification. A 100 L jacketed glass vessel (purged with N2) was charged with crude 4 (wet cake 14.42 kg), acetic acid (48.8 L) and the agitator was started. DI H20 (1.74 L) was charged. The batch (a slurry) temperature was adjusted from 18.1 to 100.1 °C over 4.25 hours. The batch was held at 100.1 to 106.1 °C for 1 hour and then adjusted to 73.1 °C. DI H20 (28.0 L) was added to the batch over 1 hour keeping the batch temperature between 73.1 and 70.3 °C. The batch temperature was adjusted further from 70.3 °C to 25.0 °C overnight. The batch was filtered using a 24″ Hastelloy Nutsche filter equipped with polypropylene filter cloth. The filtration took 13 minutes. A solution of DI H20 (9.00 L) and acetic acid (11.0 L) was prepared and added to the 100 L vessel. The mixture was agitated for 5 minutes and then transferred to the filter cake. DI H20 (20.0 L) was charged to the vessel, agitated for 6 minutes and then transferred to the filter cake. DI H20 (20.0 L) was charged to the vessel, agitated for 9 minutes and then transferred to the filter cake. The batch was allowed to condition for 3 days and then transferred to drying trays for vacuum oven drying. After 3 days at 50 °C and 28’7Hg, the batch gave a 74% yield (3.7 kg) of4 as an off-white solid. The JH NMR spectrum was consistent with the assigned structure, HPLC analysis indicated a purity of 98.87% and KF analysis indicated 0.14% H20. Synthesis of Int. 7: A 100-L jacketed glass vessel (purged with N2) was charged with tetrahydrofuran (44.4 L). The agitator was started (125 RPM) and 4 (3.67 kg) was charged followed by lithium chloride (1.26 kg). The batch temperature was observed to be 26.7 ° C and was an amber solution. Isopropenylmagnesium bromide 1.64 molar solution in 2-methyl THF (21.29 kg) was added over 2 ½ hours keeping the batch between 24.3 and 33.6 °C. The batch was agitated at 24.5 °C for 17 hours at which point HPLC analysis indicated 9% 4. A 2nd 100-L jacketed glass vessel (purged with N2) was charged with 3N hydrogen chloride (18.3 L). The batch was transferred to the vessel containing the 3N HC1 over 25 minutes keeping the batch temperature between 20 and 46 °C. A bi-phasic solution was observed. The quenched batch was transferred back to the 1st 100-L vessel to quench the small amount of residue left behind. THF (2.00 L) was used as a rinse. The batch temperature was observed to be 40.9 ° C and was agitated at 318 RPM for 45 minutes. The batch temperature was adjusted to 21.8 ° C and the layers were allowed to separate. The separation took 10 minutes. The lower aqueous phase was removed (-26.0 L). A solution of sodium chloride (1.56 kg) in DI water (14.0 L) was prepared and added to the batch. This was agitated at 318 RPM for 10 minutes and agitator was stopped. The separation took 3 minutes. The lower aqueous phase was removed (-16.0 L). The batch was vacuum distilled from 58.0 L to 18.4 L using ~24’7Hg and a jacket temperature of 50 to 55 °C. A solution of potassium hydroxide (2.30 kg) in DI water (20.7 L) was prepared in a 72-L round bottom flask. The vessel was set up for atmospheric distillation using 2 distillation heads and the batch was transferred to the 72-L vessel. THF (0.75 L) was used as a rinse. The batch volume was -41.0 L, the temperature was adjusted to 64.1 °C and distillation started with the aid of a N2 sweep. Heating was continued to drive the batch temperature to 85.4 °C while distilling at which point the 72-L vessel was set up for reflux (batch volume was about 28.0 L at the end of the distillation). The batch was held at 85 °C for 13 hours at which point HPLC analysis indicated 0.3% compound 6A. Heating was stopped and the batch was transferred to a 100-L jacketed glass vessel. Solids were observed. The batch temperature was adjusted from 70.6 °C to 56.7 °C. A previously prepared solution of sodium hydrogen carbonate (2.82 kg) in DI water (35.0 L) was added over 80 minutes keeping the batch temperature between 56.7 and 46.7 °C. The batch pH at the end of the addition was 9.8. The batch was held at

46.7 to 49.0 °C for 40 minutes and then cooled to 25.0 °C. The batch was filtered using a 18″ stainless steel Nutsche filter. DI water (18.4 L) was charged to the vessel and transferred to the filter. The filter cake was manually re-suspended in the filter and then the liquors were removed. This process was repeated once more and the filter cake was 3″ thick. The filter cake was conditioned on the filter for 3 days, was transferred to drying trays and dried in a vacuum oven at 45 °C to provide 2.93 kg Int. 7 (95% yield) with an HPLC purity of 87.6%.

Synthesis of Int. 8: A 100 L jacketed glass vessel (purged with N2 and plumbed to a caustic scrubber) was charged with acidic acid (13.0 L). Int. 7 (2.85 kg) was charged to the vessel and the agitator was started. N-Cyanoacetylurethane (1.56 kg) and DI water (5.70 L) were charged to the vessel. The batch temperature was adjusted from 17.0 °C to 5.5 °C and a thin slurry was observed. At this point 37% hydrogen chloride (2.70 L) was added over 10 minutes keeping the batch temperature between 4.8 °C and 8.8 °C. A previously prepared solution of sodium nitrite (638 g) in DI water (1.42 L) was added over 26 minutes keeping the batch temperature between 5.8 °C and 8.7 °C. A brown gas was observed in the vessel head space during the addition. HPLC analysis indicated no Int. 7 detected. At this point a previously prepared solution of sodium acetate (2.07 kg) in DI water (8.50 L) was added over 47 minutes keeping the batch temperature between 5.5 °C and 9.5 °C. After the addition, a thin layer of orange residue was observed on the vessel wall just above the level of the batch. The batch temperature was adjusted from 9.4 °C to 24.5 °C and held at 25 °C (+ 5 °C) for 12 hours. The batch was filtered using a 24″ Hastelloy Nutsche filter equipped with tight-weave polypropylene filter cloth. The filtration took 30 minutes. The vessel was rinsed with 14.3 L of a 1 : 1 acidic acid / DI water. The orange residue on the reactor washed away with the rinse. The rinse was transferred to the filter where the batch was manually re-suspended. Vacuum was re-applied to remove the wash. A 2nd 1 : 1 acidic acid / DI water wash was performed as above and the batch was conditioned on the filter for 26 hours. HPLC analysis of the wet filter cake indicated purity was 90.4%. The batch was dried to a constant weight of 3.97 kg (91% yield) in a vacuum oven at 45 °C and 287Hg. Preparation of Compound A DMAC Solvate

A 100 L, jacketed, glass vessel purged with N2 was charged with Int. 8 (3.90 kg) and potassium acetate (875 g). N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC, 18.3 L) was charged to the vessel and the agitator was started. The batch temperature was adjusted to 115 °C over 2 h. After 2 h at 115 °C, the batch was sampled and HPLC analysis indicated 0.27% Int. 8 remained. The batch temperature was adjusted to 25.0 °C overnight. Acetic acid (975 mL) was added to the batch and the batch was agitated further for 3 h. The batch was transferred to a carboy and the vessel was rinsed clean with 800 mL of DMAC. The batch was transferred back to the 100 L vessel using vacuum through a 10 μιη in-line filter and a DMAC rinse (1.15 L) was used. The filtration was fast at the beginning but slow at the end, plugging up the filter. The batch temperature was adjusted to 11.1 °C and DI water (35.1 L) was added over 2 h 20 min, keeping the batch temperature between 5-15 °C. The batch was held for 1 h and filtered, using an 18″ Nutsche filter equipped with tight-weave

polypropylene cloth. The filtration took 15 h. A 1: 1 ethanol/DI water wash (19.5 L) was charged to the vessel, cooled to 10 °C, and transferred to the filter cake. The cake was allowed to condition under N2 and vacuum for 8 h and transferred to drying trays. The batch was dried in a vacuum oven at 45 °C and 28’7Hg to give 89% yield (3.77 kg) of Compound A DMAC solvate as an orange/tan solid. The 1H NMR spectrum was consistent with the assigned structure and Karl Fischer analysis indicated 0.49% H20. XRPD indicated the expected form, i.e., Compound A DMAC solvate. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated 16% weight loss. HPLC analysis indicated a purity of 93.67%.

Preparation of Crude Compound A

A 100 L, jacketed, glass vessel purged with N2 was charged with Compound A

DMAC solvate (3.75 kg) and ethanol (15.0 L). The agitator was started and acetone (15.0 L) was added. The batch temperature was adjusted from 10.6 °C to 60.0 °C over 1 h. At this point, the batch was in solution. DI water was added to the batch over 1.5 h, keeping the batch temperature at 60 + 5 °C. The batch was held at 60 + 5 °C for 1 h and cooled to 23.5 °C. An 18″ Nutsche filter equipped with tight-weave (0.67 CFM) polypropylene cloth was set up and the batch was filtered. The filtration took 15 h. A 1: 1 ethanol/DI water wash (19.5 L) was charged to the vessel and transferred to the filter cake. The cake was allowed to condition under N2 and vacuum for 8 h and transferred to drying trays. The batch was dried in a vacuum oven at 45 °C and 28’7Hg for five days to give a 94% yield (2.90 kg) of Compound A as a powdery tan solid. The NMR spectrum is consistent with the assigned structure and Karl Fischer analysis indicated 6.6% H20. XRPD indicated the expected form of dihydrate. TGA indicated 6.7% weight loss. HPLC analysis indicated a purity of 96.4% (AUC).

Purification of Crude Compound A

A 50 L, jacketed, glass vessel purged with N2 was charged with Compound A crude

(2.90 kg) and methyl isobutyl ketone (14.5 L). The agitator was started and the batch temperature was adjusted from 20.2 °C to 50.4 °C over 1.5 h. The batch was held at 50 °C (+ 5 °C) for 1 h and cooled to 20-25 °C. The batch was held at 20-25 °C for 2.5 h. An 18″ Nutsche filter equipped with tight- weave (0.67 CFM) polypropylene cloth was set up and the batch was filtered. The filtration took 20 min. Methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK, 1.45 L) was charged to the vessel and transferred to the filter cake. The cake was manually resuspended and the liquors were pulled through with vacuum. Methyl isobutyl ketone (2.90 L) was charged to the filter cake and the cake was manually resuspended. The liquors were pulled through with vacuum and the cake was conditioned with vacuum and nitrogen for 15 h. The filter cake dried into a tan, hard 18″ x 1 ½” disc. This was manually broken up and run through coffee grinders to give a 76% yield (2.72 kg) of MGL-3196 MIBK solvate as a tan, powdery solid. No oven drying was necessary. The NMR spectrum was consistent with the assigned structure and Karl Fischer analysis indicated <0.1 % H20. XRPD indicated the expected form MIBK solvate. TGA indicated 17.3% weight loss. HPLC analysis indicated a purity of 98.5%.

Example 6: Conversion of Compound A to Form I

Purified Compound A (4802 g) as a 1:1 MIBK solvate which was obtained from Int. 8 as described in Example 5 above was added into a jacketed, 100 L reactor along with 24 liters of ethanol. The resulting slurry was heated to 80 + 5 °C (reflux) over 1 h 25 min; the mixture was stirred at that temperature for 4 h 25 min. Analysis of the filtered solids at 2 h 55 min indicated that the form conversion was complete, with the XRPD spectra conforming to Form I. The mixture was cooled to 20 + 5 °C over 45 min and stirred at that temperature for 15 min. The slurry was filtered and the filter cake was washed twice with prefiltered ethanol (2 x 4.8 L). The wet cake (4.28 kg) was dried under vacuum at 40 + 5 °C for 118 h to afford 3390 g of Compound A form I.

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2014), 57(10), 3912-3923

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm4019299

The beneficial effects of thyroid hormone (TH) on lipid levels are primarily due to its action at the thyroid hormone receptor β (THR-β) in the liver, while adverse effects, including cardiac effects, are mediated by thyroid hormone receptor α (THR-α). A pyridazinone series has been identified that is significantly more THR-β selective than earlier analogues. Optimization of this series by the addition of a cyanoazauracil substituent improved both the potency and selectivity and led to MGL-3196 (53), which is 28-fold selective for THR-β over THR-α in a functional assay. Compound 53 showed outstanding safety in a rat heart model and was efficacious in a preclinical model at doses that showed no impact on the central thyroid axis. In reported studies in healthy volunteers, 53 exhibited an excellent safety profile and decreased LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides (TG) at once daily oral doses of 50 mg or higher given for 2 weeks.

Abstract Image

//////////////RESMETIROM , MGL-3196, VIA-3196, UNII-RE0V0T1ES0, Phase III

CC(C)C1=CC(=NNC1=O)OC2=C(C=C(C=C2Cl)N3C(=O)NC(=O)C(=N3)C#N)Cl

Azeliragon


Azeliragon.png

Azeliragon

C32H38ClN3O2, 532.1 g/mol

CAS 603148-36-3

TTP488

UNII-LPU25F15UQ

LPU25F15UQ

TTP-488; PF-04494700

3-[4-[2-butyl-1-[4-(4-chlorophenoxy)phenyl]imidazol-4-yl]phenoxy]-N,N-diethylpropan-1-amine

MOA:RAGE inhibitor

Indication:Alzheimer’s disease (AD)

Status:Phase III (Active), Dementia, Alzheimer’s type
Company:vTv Therapeutics (Originator)

Azeliragon

Azeliragon is in phase III clinical for the treatment of Alzheimer’s type dementia.

Azeliragon was originally by TransTech Pharma (now vTv Therapeutics), then licensed to Pfizer in 2006.

Pfizer discontinued the research in 2011, now vTv Therapeutics continues the further reaserch.

vTv Therapeutics  (previously TransTech Pharma) is developing azeliragon, an orally active antagonist of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in patients with diabetes.  In June 2019, this was still the case .

Azeliragon was originally developed at TransTech Pharma. In September 2006, Pfizer entered into a license agreement with the company for the development and commercialization of small- and large-molecule compounds under development at TransTech. Pursuant to the collaboration, Pfizer gained exclusive worldwide rights to develop and commercialize TransTech’s portfolio of RAGE modulators, including azeliragon.

Reference:

1. WO03075921A2.

2. US2008249316A1.

US 20080249316

VTV Therapeutics

Azeliragon (TTP488) is an orally bioavailable small molecule that inhibits the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). A Phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate azeliragon as a potential treatment of mild-AD in patients with type 2 diabetes is ongoing.  The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial is designed as sequential phase 2 and phase 3 studies operationally conducted under one protocol. For additional information on the study, refer to NCT03980730 at Clinicaltrials.gov.

RAGE is an immunoglobulin-like cell surface receptor that is overexpressed in brain tissues of patients with AD. The multiligand nature of RAGE is highlighted by its ability to bind diverse ligands such as advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), linked to diabetic complications and β-amyloid fibrils, a hallmark of AD. The association between type 2 diabetes and AD is well documented. A linear correlation between circulating hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and cognitive decline has been demonstrated in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

PATENT

WO-2019190823

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019190823&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&_cid=P12-K1K59I-21476-1

Novel crystalline forms of [3-(4-{2-butyl-1-[4-(4-chlorophenoxy)phenyl]-1H-imidazol-4-yl}phenoxy)-propyl]-diethylamine and its salt ( azeliragon ) (deignated as forms III and IV) as RAGE inhibitors useful for treating  psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and Alzheimer’s disease.

The Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin super family of cell surface molecules. Activation of RAGE in different tissues and organs leads to a number of pathophysiological consequences. RAGE has been implicated in a variety of conditions including: acute and chronic inflammation (Hofmann et al., Cell 97:889-901 (1999)), the development of diabetic late complications such as increased vascular permeability (Wautier et al., J. Clin. Invest. 97:238-243 (1995)), nephropathy (Teillet et al., J. Am. Soc. Nephrol. 11 : 1488- 1497 (2000)), atherosclerosis (Vlassara et. al., The Finnish Medical Society DUODECIM, Ann. Med. 28:419-426 (1996)), and retinopathy (Hammes et al., Diabetologia 42:603-607 (1999)). RAGE has also been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (Yan et al., Nature 382: 685-691 , (1996)), erectile dysfunction, and in tumor invasion and metastasis (Taguchi et al., Nature 405: 354-357, (2000)).

Binding of ligands such as advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), S100/calgranulin/EN-RAGE, b-amyloid, CML (Ne-Carboxymethyl lysine), and amphoterin to RAGE has been shown to modify expression of a variety of genes. For example, in many cell types interaction between RAGE and its ligands generates oxidative stress, which thereby results in activation of the free radical sensitive transcription factor NF-kB, and the activation of NF-kB regulated genes, such as the cytokines IL- 1 b, TNF- a, and the like. In addition, several other regulatory pathways, such as those involving p21 ras.

MAP kinases, ERK1 and ERK2, have been shown to be activated by binding of AGEs and other ligands to RAGE. In fact, transcription of RAGE itself is regulated at least in part by NF-kB. Thus, an ascending, and often detrimental, spiral is fueled by a positive feedback loop initiated by ligand binding. Antagonizing binding of physiological ligands to RAGE, therefore, is our target, for down-regulation of the pathophysiological changes brought about by excessive concentrations of AGEs and other ligands for RAGE.

Pharmaceutically acceptable salts of a given compound may differ from each other with respect to one or more physical properties, such as solubility and dissociation, true density, melting point, crystal shape, compaction behavior, flow properties, and/or solid state stability. These differences affect practical parameters such as storage stability, compressibility and density (important in formulation and product manufacturing), and dissolution rates (an important factor in determining bio-availability). Although U.S. Patent No. 7,884,219 discloses Form I and Form II of COMPOUND I as a free base, there is a need for additional drug forms that are useful for inhibiting RAGE activity in vitro and in vivo, and have properties suitable for large-scale manufacturing and formulation. Provided herein

PATENT

WO03075921

PATENT

WO2019190822

PATENT

WO2008123914

Publications

Links to the following publications and presentations, which are located on outside websites, are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute the opinions or views of vTv Therapeutics

Presentations and Posters

Links to the following publications and presentations, which are located on outside websites, are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute the opinions or views of vTv Therapeutics

///////////Azeliragon, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, TTP-488,  PF-04494700, RAGE inhibitors, TransTech Pharma, PHASE 3, Dementia, Alzheimer’s type,

CCCCC1=NC(=CN1C2=CC=C(C=C2)OC3=CC=C(C=C3)Cl)C4=CC=C(C=C4)OCCCN(CC)CC

PF 04965842, Abrocitinib


PF-04965842, >=98% (HPLC).png

img

2D chemical structure of 1622902-68-4

PF-04965842

PF 04965842, Abrocitinib

UNII: 73SM5SF3OR

CAS Number 1622902-68-4, Empirical Formula  C14H21N5O2S, Molecular Weight 323.41

N-[cis-3-(Methyl-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamino)cyclobutyl]-1-propanesulfonamide,

N-((1s,3s)-3-(methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)cyclobutyl)propane-1-sulfonamide

1-Propanesulfonamide, N-(cis-3-(methyl-7H-pyrrolo(2,3-d)pyrimidin-4-ylamino)cyclobutyl)-

N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}-propane-1-sulfonamide

PHASE 3, for the potential oral treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD)

Jak1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor

THE US

In February 2018, the FDA granted Breakthrough Therapy designation for the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe AD

PHASEIII

In December 2017, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, phase III trial (NCT03349060; JADE Mono-1; JADE; B7451012; 2017-003651-29) of PF-04965842 began in patients aged 12 years and older (expected n = 375) with moderate-to-severe AD

PRODUCT PATENT

Pub. No.: WO/2014/128591 International Application No.: PCT/IB2014/058889
Publication Date: 28.08.2014 International Filing Date: 11.02.2014

EXPIRY  Roughly 2034

form powder
color white to beige
solubility DMSO: 10 mg/mL, clear
storage temp. room temp
    Biochem/physiol Actions
    • PF-04965842 is a Janus Kinase (JAK) inhibitor selective for JAK1 with an IC50value of 29 nM for JAK1 compared to 803 nM for JAK2, >10000 nM for JAK3 and 1250 nM for Tyk2. JAKs mediate cytokine signaling, and are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. PF-04965842 has been investigated as a possible treatment for psoriasis.
  • Originator Pfizer
  • Class Skin disorder therapies; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Janus kinase 1 inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase IIIAtopic dermatitis
  • DiscontinuedLupus vulgaris; Plaque psoriasis

Most Recent Events

  • 08 Mar 2018Phase-III clinical trials in Atopic dermatitis (In children, In adults, In adolescents) in USA (PO) (NCT03422822)
  • 14 Feb 2018PF 4965842 receives Breakthrough Therapy status for Atopic dermatitis in USA
  • 06 Feb 2018Pfizer plans the phase III JADE EXTEND trial for Atopic Dermatitis (In children, In adults, In adolescents) in March 2018 (PO) (NCT03422822)

This compound was developed by Pfizer for Kinase Phosphatase Biology research. To learn more about Sigma′s partnership with Pfizer and view other authentic, high-quality Pfizer compounds,

Image result for PF-04965842

PF-04965842 is an oral Janus Kinase 1 inhibitor being investigated for treatment of plaque psoriasis.

Protein kinases are families of enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of specific residues in proteins, broadly classified into tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. Inappropriate kinase activity, arising from mutation, over-expression, or inappropriate regulation, dys-regulation or de-regulation, as well as over- or under-production of growth factors or cytokines has been i mplicated in many diseases, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular diseases, allergies, asthma and other respiratory diseases, autoimmune d iseases, inflammatory diseases, bone diseases, metabolic disorders, and neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Inappropriate kinase activity triggers a variety of biological cellular responses relating to cell growth, cell differentiation , survival, apoptosis, mitogenesis, cell cycle control, and cel l mobility implicated in the aforementioned and related diseases.

Thus, protein kinases have emerged as an important class of enzymes as targets for therapeutic intervention. In particular, the JAK family of cellular protein tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, and Tyk2) play a central role in cytoki ne signaling (Kisseleva et al., Gene, 2002, 285 , 1; Yamaoka et al. Genome Biology 2004, 5, 253)). Upon binding to their receptors, cytokines activate JAK which then phosphorylate the cytokine receptor, thereby creating docking sites for signaling molecules, notably, members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family that ultimately lead to gene expression. Numerous cytokines are known to activate the JAK family. These cytokines include, the IFN family (IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, IFN-omega, Limitin, IFN-gamma, IL- 10, IL- 19, IL-20, IL-22), the gp 130 family (IL-6, IL- 11, OSM, LIF, CNTF, NNT- 1//SF-3, G-CSF, CT- 1, Leptin, IL- 12 , I L-23), gamma C family (IL-2 , I L-7, TSLP, IL-9, IL- 15 , IL-21, IL-4, I L- 13), IL-3 family (IL-3 , IL-5 , GM-CSF), single chain family (EPO, GH, PRL, TPO), receptor tyrosine kinases (EGF, PDGF, CSF- 1, HGF), and G-protein coupled receptors (ATI).

There remains a need for new compounds that effectively and selectively inhibit specific JAK enzymes, and JAK1 in particular, vs. JAK2. JAK1 is a member of the Janus family of protein kinases composed of JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2. JAK1 is expressed to various levels in all tissues. Many cytokine receptors signal through pairs of JAK kinases in the following combinations: JAK1/JAK2, JAK1/JAK3, JAK1/TYK2 , JAK2/TYK2 or JAK2/JAK2. JAK1 is the most broadly

paired JAK kinase in this context and is required for signaling by γ-common (IL-2Rγ) cytokine receptors, IL—6 receptor family, Type I, II and III receptor families and IL- 10 receptor family. Animal studies have shown that JAK1 is required for the development, function and homeostasis of the immune system. Modulation of immune activity through inhibition of JAK1 kinase activity can prove useful in the treatment of various immune disorders (Murray, P.J.

J. Immunol., 178, 2623-2629 (2007); Kisseleva, T., et al., Gene, 285 , 1-24 (2002); O’Shea, J . J., et al., Ceil , 109, (suppl .) S121-S131 (2002)) while avoiding JAK2 dependent erythropoietin (EPO) and thrombopoietin (TPO) signaling (Neubauer H., et al., Cell, 93(3), 397-409 (1998);

Parganas E., et al., Cell, 93(3), 385-95 (1998)).

Figure

Tofacitinib (1), baricitinib (2), and ruxolitinib (3)

SYNTHESIS 5+1 =6 steps

Main synthesis

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 61(3), 1130-1152; 2018

INTERMEDIATE

CN 105732637

ONE STEP

CAS 479633-63-1,  7H-Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, 4-chloro-7-[(4- methylphenyl)sulfonyl]-

Image result for PF-04965842

Pfizer Receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation from FDA for PF-04965842, an oral JAK1 Inhibitor, for the Treatment of Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 8:30 am EST

Dateline:

NEW YORK

Public Company Information:

NYSE:
PFE
US7170811035
“We look forward to working closely with the FDA throughout our ongoing Phase 3 development program with the hope of ultimately bringing this important new treatment option to these patients.”

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) today announced its once-daily oral Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) inhibitor PF-04965842 received Breakthrough Therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD). The Phase 3 program for PF-04965842 initiated in December and is the first trial in the J AK1 A topic D ermatitis E fficacy and Safety (JADE) global development program.

“Achieving Breakthrough Therapy Designation is an important milestone not only for Pfizer but also for patients living with the often devastating impact of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, their providers and caregivers,” said Michael Corbo, Chief Development Officer, Inflammation & Immunology, Pfizer Global Product Development. “We look forward to working closely with the FDA throughout our ongoing Phase 3 development program with the hope of ultimately bringing this important new treatment option to these patients.”

Breakthrough Therapy Designation was initiated as part of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) signed in 2012. As defined by the FDA, a breakthrough therapy is a drug intended to be used alone or in combination with one or more other drugs to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition and preliminary clinical evidence indicates that the drug may demonstrate substantial improvement over existing therapies on one or more clinically significant endpoints, such as substantial treatment effects observed early in clinical development. If a drug is designated as a breakthrough therapy, the FDA will expedite the development and review of such drug.1

About PF-04965842 and Pfizer’s Kinase Inhibitor Leadership

PF-04965842 is an oral small molecule that selectively inhibits Janus kinase (JAK) 1. Inhibition of JAK1 is thought to modulate multiple cytokines involved in pathophysiology of AD including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, IL-31 and interferon gamma.

Pfizer has established a leading kinase research capability with multiple unique kinase inhibitor therapies in development. As a pioneer in JAK science, the Company is advancing several investigational programs with novel selectivity profiles, which, if successful, could potentially deliver transformative therapies for patients. Pfizer has three additional kinase inhibitors in Phase 2 development across multiple indications:

  • PF-06651600: A JAK3 inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis and alopecia areata
  • PF-06700841: A tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2)/JAK1 inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of psoriasis, ulcerative colitis and alopecia areata
  • PF-06650833: An interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4) inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

Working together for a healthier world®

At Pfizer, we apply science and our global resources to bring therapies to people that extend and significantly improve their lives. We strive to set the standard for quality, safety and value in the discovery, development and manufacture of health care products. Our global portfolio includes medicines and vaccines as well as many of the world’s best-known consumer health care products. Every day, Pfizer colleagues work across developed and emerging markets to advance wellness, prevention, treatments and cures that challenge the most feared diseases of our time. Consistent with our responsibility as one of the world’s premier innovative biopharmaceutical companies, we collaborate with health care providers, governments and local communities to support and expand access to reliable, affordable health care around the world. For more than 150 years, we have worked to make a difference for all who rely on us. We routinely post information that may be important to investors on our website at www.pfizer.com. In addition, to learn more, please visit us on www.pfizer.com and follow us on Twitter at @Pfizer and @Pfizer_NewsLinkedInYouTube and like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/Pfizer.

DISCLOSURE NOTICE: The information contained in this release is as of February 14, 2018. Pfizer assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements contained in this release as the result of new information or future events or developments.

This release contains forward-looking information about PF-04965842 and Pfizer’s ongoing investigational programs in kinase inhibitor therapies, including their potential benefits, that involves substantial risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statements. Risks and uncertainties include, among other things, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, including the ability to meet anticipated clinical trial commencement and completion dates and regulatory submission dates, as well as the possibility of unfavorable clinical trial results, including unfavorable new clinical data and additional analyses of existing data; risks associated with preliminary data; the risk that clinical trial data are subject to differing interpretations, and, even when we view data as sufficient to support the safety and/or effectiveness of a product candidate, regulatory authorities may not share our views and may require additional data or may deny approval altogether; whether regulatory authorities will be satisfied with the design of and results from our clinical studies; whether and when drug applications may be filed in any jurisdictions for any potential indication for PF-04965842 or any other investigational kinase inhibitor therapies; whether and when any such applications may be approved by regulatory authorities, which will depend on the assessment by such regulatory authorities of the benefit-risk profile suggested by the totality of the efficacy and safety information submitted, and, if approved, whether PF-04965842 or any such other investigational kinase inhibitor therapies will be commercially successful; decisions by regulatory authorities regarding labeling, safety and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of PF-04965842 or any other investigational kinase inhibitor therapies; and competitive developments.

A further description of risks and uncertainties can be found in Pfizer’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016 and in its subsequent reports on Form 10-Q, including in the sections thereof captioned “Risk Factors” and “Forward-Looking Information and Factors That May Affect Future Results”, as well as in its subsequent reports on Form 8-K, all of which are filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and available at www.sec.gov  and www.pfizer.com .

Image result for PF-04965842

# # # # #

1 Food and Drug Administration Fact Sheet Breakthrough Therapies at https://www.fda.gov/RegulatoryInformation/LawsEnforcedbyFDA/SignificantAmendmentstotheFDCAct/FDASIA/ucm329491.htmaccessed on January 25, 2018

PATENT

CA 2899888

PATENT

WO 2014128591

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=6767BBB5964A985E88C9251B6DF3182B.wapp2nB?docId=WO2014128591&recNum=233&maxRec=8235&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=EN_ALL%3Anmr+AND+PA%3Apfizer&tab=PCTDescription

PFIZER INC. [US/US]; 235 East 42nd Street New York, New York 10017 (US)

BROWN, Matthew Frank; (US).
FENWICK, Ashley Edward; (US).
FLANAGAN, Mark Edward; (US).
GONZALES, Andrea; (US).
JOHNSON, Timothy Allan; (US).
KAILA, Neelu; (US).
MITTON-FRY, Mark J.; (US).
STROHBACH, Joseph Walter; (US).
TENBRINK, Ruth E.; (US).
TRZUPEK, John David; (US).
UNWALLA, Rayomand Jal; (US).
VAZQUEZ, Michael L.; (US).
PARIKH, Mihir, D.; (US)

COMPD 2

str1

Example 2 : N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}-propane- l -sulƒonamide

This compound was prepared using 1-propanesulfonyl chloride. The crude compound was purified by chromatography on silica gel eluting with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (93 : 7) to afford the title compound as a tan sol id (78% yield). 1NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 11.60 (br s, 1 H), 8.08 (s, 1 H), 7.46 (d, 1 H), 7.12 (d, 1 H), 6.61 (d, 1 H), 4.81-4.94 (m, 1 H), 3.47-3.62 (m, 1 H), 3.23 (s, 3 H), 2.87-2.96 (m, 2 H), 2.52-2.63 (m, 2 H), 2.14-2.27 (m, 2 H) 1.60- 1.73 (m, 2 H) 0.96 (t, 3 H). LC/MS (exact mass) calculated for C14H21N5O2S;

323.142, found (M + H+); 324.1.

PAPER

 Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2018), 61(3), 1130-1152.

Abstract Image

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b01598

N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}propane-1-sulfonamide (25)

Compound 48a·2HBr …………..was collected by filtration, washed with 2:1 EtOH/H2O (100 mL), and again dried overnight in a vacuum oven at 40 °C.
1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 11.64 (br s, 1H), 8.12 (s, 1 H), 7.50 (d, J = 9.4 Hz, 1H), 7.10–7.22 (m, 1H), 6.65 (dd, J= 1.8, 3.3 Hz, 1H), 4.87–4.96 (m, 1H), 3.53–3.64 (m, 1H), 3.27 (s, 3H), 2.93–2.97 (m, 2H), 2.57–2.64 (m, 2H), 2.20–2.28 (m, 2H), 1.65–1.74 (m, 2H), 0.99 (t, J = 7.4 Hz, 3H).
LC/MS m/z (M + H+) calcd for C14H22N5O2S: 324. Found: 324. Anal. Calcd for C14H21N5O2S: C, 51.99; H, 6.54; N, 21.65; O, 9.89; S, 9.91. Found: C, 52.06; H, 6.60; N, 21.48; O, 10.08; S, 9.97.

SchmiederG.DraelosZ.PariserD.BanfieldC.CoxL.HodgeM.KierasE.Parsons-RichD.MenonS.SalganikM.PageK.PeevaE. Efficacy and safety of the Janus Kinase 1 inhibitor PF-04965842 in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study Br. J. Dermatol. 2017DOI: 10.1111/bjd.16004

Compound 25N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}-propane-1-sulfonamide is available through MilliporeSigma (cat. no. PZ0304).

REFERENCES

1: Schmieder GJ, Draelos ZD, Pariser DM, Banfield C, Cox L, Hodge M, Kieras E, Parsons-Rich D, Menon S, Salganik M, Page K, Peeva E. Efficacy and safety of the Janus Kinase 1 inhibitor PF-04965842 in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Br J Dermatol. 2017 Sep 26. doi: 10.1111/bjd.16004. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28949012

 2 Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2018), 61(3), 1130-1152.

  • Originator Pfizer
  • Class Anti-inflammatories; Antipsoriatics; Pyrimidines; Pyrroles; Skin disorder therapies; Small molecules; Sulfonamides
  • Mechanism of Action Janus kinase 1 inhibitors
  • Phase III Atopic dermatitis
  • Discontinued Lupus vulgaris; Plaque psoriasis
  • 21 May 2019Pfizer initiates enrolment in a phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in USA (PO) (NCT03937258)
  • 09 May 2019 Pfizer plans a phase I pharmacokinetic and drug-drug interaction trial in healthy volunteers in May 2019 (NCT03937258)
  • 30 Apr 2019 Pfizer completes a phase I trial (In volunteers) in USA (PO) (NCT03626415)

/////////PF 04965842, Abrocitinib, Phase III,  Atopic dermatitis, pfizer

CCCS(=O)(N[C@H]1C[C@@H](N(C)C2=C3C(NC=C3)=NC=N2)C1)=O

CCCS(=O)(=O)N[C@@H]1C[C@@H](C1)N(C)c2ncnc3[nH]ccc23

%d bloggers like this: