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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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LASMIDITAN


Lasmiditan skeletal.svg

LASMIDITAN, COL-144 , LY-573144

613677-28-4 HYDROCHLORIDE
439239-90-4 (free base)

2,4,6-Trifluoro-N-[6-(1-methylpiperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)pyridin-2-yl]benzamide

2,4,6-trifluoro-N-{6-[(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)carbonyl]pyridin-2-yl}benzamide

CoLucid Pharmaceuticals, PHASE 3, MIGRAINE

UNII:760I9WM792

Lasmiditan succinate; UNII-W64YBJ346B; Lasmiditan succinate [USAN]; W64YBJ346B; 439239-92-6; Lasmiditan succinate (USAN)

Lasmiditan succinate.png

Molecular Formula: C42H42F6N6O8
Molecular Weight: 872.822 g/mol

Lasmiditan (COL-144) is an investigational drug for the treatment of acute migraine. It is being developed by Eli Lilly and is in phase III clinical trials. It is a first-in-class “neurally acting anti-migraine agent” ditan.

WO-2018010345,  from Solipharma and the inventor on this API. Eli Lilly , following its acquisition of CoLucid Pharmaceuticals , is developing lasmiditan, a 5-HT 1f agonist, for treating acute migraine.

WATCH THIS SPACE, SYNTHESIS COMING………..

noname01

 

SYN 2

noname01

Mechanism of action

Lasmiditan is a serotonin receptor agonist that, like the unsuccessful LY-334,370, selectively binds to the 5-HT1F receptor subtype. A number of triptans have been shown to act on this subtype as well, but only after their affinity for 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D has been made responsible for their anti-migraine activity. The lack of affinity for these receptors might result in fewer side effects related to vasoconstriction compared to triptans in susceptible patients, such as those with ischemic heart diseaseRaynaud’s phenomenon or after a myocardial infarction,[1] although a 1998 review has found such side-effects to rarely occur in patients taking triptans.[2][3]

Discovery and development

Lasmiditan was discovered by Eli Lilly and Company and was out-licensed to CoLucid Pharmaceuticals in 2006, until CoLucid was bought by Eli Lilly in 2017 to reacquire the drug.[4] The drug is protected by patents until 2031.[5]

Phase II clinical trials for dose finding purposes were completed in 2007 for an intravenous form[6] and in early 2010 for an oral form.[7]Two separate Phase III clinical trials for the oral version are currently ongoing under special protocol agreements with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Eli Lilly has stated that they intend to submit a new drug application to the FDA in early 2018.[5]

As of 2017, three phase III clinical trials have been completed or are in progress. The SPARTAN trial compares placebo with 50, 100, and 200 mg of lasmiditan.[8] SAMURAI compared placebo with 100 and 200 mg doses of lasmidatin. In 2016, CoLucid announced that the trial had met its primary and secondary endpoints of patients being pain-free two hours after dosing.[5] GLADIATOR is an open-labelstudy comparing 100 and 200 mg doses of lasmidatin in patients that received the drug as part of a prior trial.[9] In August 2017 topline results from the SPARTAN trial showed that the drug induced met its primary and secondary endpoints in the trial. The primary result showed a statistically significant improvement in pain relief relative to placebo 2 hours after the first dose. The secondary result showed a statistically significantly greater percentage of patients were free of their most bothersome symptom (MBS) compared with placebo at two hours following the first dose. [10]

Novel crystalline forms of a 5-HT1F receptor agonist, particularly lasmiditan – designated as Forms 1-3 and A-D – processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them are claimed. Also claim is their use for treating anxiety, fatigue, depression, premenstrual syndrome, trauma syndrome, memory loss, dementia (including Alzheimer’s), autism, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, epilepsy, anorexia nervosa, alcoholism, tobacco abuse, mutism and trichotillomania.

Biological Activity

Lasmiditan (also known as COL-144 and LY573144) is a high-affinity, highly selective serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist.

In vitro binding studies show a K(i) value of 2.21 nM at the 5-HT(1F) receptor, compared with K(i) values of 1043 nM and 1357 nM at the 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors, respectively, a selectivity ratio greater than 470-fold. Lasmiditan showed higher selectivity for the 5-HT(1F) receptor relative to other 5-HT(1) receptor subtypes than the first generation 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist LY334370.

In two rodent models of migraine, oral administration of lasmiditan potently inhibited markers associated with electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (dural plasma protein extravasation, and induction of the immediate early gene c-Fos in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis).

Conversion of different model animals based on BSA (Value based on data from FDA Draft Guidelines)
Species Mouse Rat Rabbit Guinea pig Hamster Dog
Weight (kg) 0.02 0.15 1.8 0.4 0.08 10
Body Surface Area (m2) 0.007 0.025 0.15 0.05 0.02 0.5
Km factor 3 6 12 8 5 20
Animal A (mg/kg) = Animal B (mg/kg) multiplied by Animal B Km
Animal A Km

For example, to modify the dose of resveratrol used for a mouse (22.4 mg/kg) to a dose based on the BSA for a rat, multiply 22.4 mg/kg by the Km factor for a mouse and then divide by the Km factor for a rat. This calculation results in a rat equivalent dose for resveratrol of 11.2 mg/kg.

Image result for LASMIDITAN

Image result for LASMIDITAN

PATENT

WO 03084949

https://www.google.co.in/patents/WO2003084949A1?cl=en

8. 2,4,6-Trifluoro-N-[6-(l -methyl-piperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridin-2-yl]- benzamide mono-hydrochloride salt

Figure imgf000035_0001

Combine 2-amino-6-(l-methylpiperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)pyridine (0.20 g, 0.92 mmol), 2,4,6-Trifluorobenzoyl chloride (0.357 g, 1.84 mmol), and 1 ,4-Dioxane (10 mL), and stir while heating at reflux. After 3 hr., cool the reaction mixture to ambient temperature and concentrate. Load the concentrated mixture onto an SCX column (lOg), wash with methanol, and elute with 2M ammonia in methanol. Concentrate the eluent to obtain the free base of the title compound as an oil (0.365 g (>100%)). Dissolve the oil in methanol (5 mL) and treat with ammonium chloride (0.05 g, 0.92 mmol). Concentrate the mixture and dry under vacuum to obtain the title compound. HRMS Obs. m/z 378.1435, Calc. m/z 378.1429; m.p. 255°C (dec).

Examples

21. 2,4,6-Trifluoro-N-[6-(l-methyl-piperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridin-2-yl]- benzamide

Figure imgf000049_0001

Add triethylamine (10.67 mL, 76.70 mmol, 2.4 eq) to a solution of 2-amino-(6-(l- methylpiperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridine (7g, 31.96 mmol, 1 eq) in anhydrous THF (100 mL) under a nitrogen atmosphere. Add 2,4,6-triflubenzoylchloride (7.46g, 5 mL, 38.35 mmol, 1.20 eq) dropwise at room temperature. After 2 hrs., add additional 2,4,6- triflubenzoylchloride (0.75 mL, 0.15 eq) and triethylamine (1.32 mL, 0.3 eq) to the reaction mixture and agitate the mixture for an additional 3 hrs. Quench the reaction with distilled water (10 mL) and 30%o NaOH (15 mL). Stir the resulting biphasic system for 1 hour and then separate the phases. Extract the organic fraction by adding H2O (75 mL) and acetic acid (12 mL), followed by cyclohexane (70 mL). Wash the organic fraction with H2O (50 mL) containing acetic acid (1 mL). Combine all the aqueous fractions and washes and neutralize the mixture with 30% NaOH (15 mL). Extract with methyl-tert- butyl ether (MTBE) (3×50 mL). Combine the organic fractions and dry with MgSO4, filter, concentrate under reduce pressure, and vacuum dry at room temperature, to obtain the title compound as a light-brown solid (11.031 g, 91 % yield).

Mass spectrum, (Electrospray) m/z = 378 (M+l); Η NMR (250 MHz, Chloroform-D) ppm 1.54 (m, 2 H) 2.02 (m, 2 H) 2.13 (t, J=l 1.48 Hz, 2 H) 2.29 (s, 3 H) 2.80 (m, J=l 1.96 Hz, 1 H) 3.56 (m, 1 H) 4.26 (d, J=7.87 Hz, 1 H) 6.17 (d, J=8.50 Hz, 1 H) 6.75 (m, 2 H) 7.45 (t, J=7.87 Hz, 1 H) 7.53 (m, 1 H) 7.95 (s, 1 H); 13C-NMR: (62.90 MHz, Chloroform-D) ppm 202.78; 162.6 (dm C-F-couplings); 162.0 (m C-F-couplings); 160.1 (m C-F-couplings); 158.1 ; 150.0; 139.7; 1 19.3; 1 17.9; 1 10.2 (m C-F-couplings); 100.9 (m C-F-couplings); 55.2; 46.5; 41.9; 28.1

22. 2,4,6-Trifluoro-N-[6-(l-methyl-piperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridin-2-yl]- benzamide mono-hydrochloride salt

Figure imgf000049_0002

Dissolve 2,4,6-trifluoro-N-[6-(l-methylpiperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridin-2-yl]- benzamide – free base (5g, 23.26mmol) in isopropanol (50 mL) at room temperature and add a solution of 3.3 M diethylether/HCl (8 mL). Heat the reaction mixture under reflux for 30 minutes. Cool the reaction mixture to room temperature and agitate for 2 hrs. Filter the resulting white precipitate and rinse with isopropanol (5 mL). Dry the residual solid under reduce pressure at 40°C overnight to obtain the title compound (5.12 g, 93% yield). M.p. 223-224°C (sublimation); Η NMR (400 MHz, d6-DMSO) d ppm 1.94 (m, 2 H) 2.14 (m, J=11.15 Hz, 2 H) 2.74 (s, 3 H) 2.99 (m, J=9.19 Hz, 2 H) 3.49 (m, J=1 1.15 Hz, 2 H) 3.77 (m, 1 H) 7.41 (t, J=8.71 Hz, 2 H) 7.78 (d, J=7.43 Hz, 1 H) 8.10 (t, J=7.92 Hz, 1 H) 8.37 (d, J=6.85 Hz, 1 H) 10.50 (s, 1 H) 1 1.51 (s, 1 H); 13C-NMR: (100.61 MHz, Chloroform-D) ppm 200.7; 130.6-158.0 (m, C-F-couplings); 150.4; 150.1; 140.2; 118.5; 1 18.2; 11 1.9; 101.3 (t, C-F couplings); 52.8; 42.6; 25.2

23. 2,4,6-Trifluoro-N-[6-(l-methyl-piperidine-4-carbonyl)-pyridin-2-yl]- benzamide hemi-succinate salt

Figure imgf000050_0001

Add succinic acid (0.25g, 2.148 mmol, 0.5eq) to a solution of 2,4,6-trifluoro-N-[6-

(l-methyl-piperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridin-2-yl]-benzamide – free base (1.62g, 4.297 mmol, leq) in acetone (16.2 mL), at room temperature. Warm the solution under reflux for 30 minutes. Cool the solution to room temperature and filter off the resulting white precipitate. Rinse the precipitate with acetone (0.2 mL) and dry under vacuum at 50°C for 16 hours to provide the title compound (1.5g, 80% yield). M.p. 198.5°C; mass spectrum (Electrospray) m/z = 495.45

The following examples are prepared by combinatorial chemistry techniques as follows:

Examples 24-54

Figure imgf000050_0002

Combine R-acid (300 μL of 0.5M solution in dimethylformamide (DMF)), HATU (57 mg, 0.15 mmol), collidine (19 μL, 0.15 mmol), 2-amino-(6-(l-methylpiperidin-4- ylcarbonyl)-pyridine and DMF (1.5 mL), and agitate for 48 hr. Dilute the reaction mixture with 10% acetic acid in methanol (0.5 L). Load the resulting reaction mixture onto a 2 g SCX column. Wash the column thoroughly with methanol and then elute with 1 M ammonia in methanol. Concentrate the eluent and further purify the product by high- throughput mass guided chromatography. This procedure is repeated in parallel for examples 24-54.

Examples 55-58

Figure imgf000051_0001

Heat R-acid chloride (300 μL of 0.5M solution in pyridine) to 55°C, add 2-amino- (6-(l-methylpiperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridine (200 μL of 0.5M solution in pyridine), and continue heating the reaction mixture for 24 hr. Concentrate the reaction mixture and then dilute with 10% Acetic acid in methanol (0.5 mL) and methanol (0.5 mL). Load the resulting reaction mixture directly onto a 2 g SCX column. Thoroughly wash the column with methanol and then elute the column with 1 M ammonia in methanol. Concentrate the eluent and then further purify the product by high- throughput mass guided chromatography. This procedure is repeated in parallel for examples 55-58.

Examples 59-71

Figure imgf000051_0002

Heat 2-amino-(6-(l-methylpiperidin-4-ylcarbonyl)-pyridine (200 μL of 0.5M solution in pyridine) to 55°C then add R-acid chloride (0.10 mmol), heat for 2 hr. Concentrate the reaction mixture and then dilute with 10% Acetic acid in methanol (0.5 mL) and methanol (0.5 mL). Load the resulting reaction mixture directly onto a 2 g SCX column. Thoroughly wash the column with methanol and then elute the column with 1 M ammonia in methanol. Concentrate the eluent and then further purify the product by high-throughput mass guided chromatography. This procedure is repeated in parallel for examples 59-71.

PATENT

WO 2018010345

Lasmiditan, also known as COL-144, LY573144, is a 5-HT 1F receptor agonist. Can be used to inhibit neuronal protein extravasation, to treat or prevent migraine in patients with diseases or conditions associated with other 5-HT 1F receptor dysfunction. The chemical name is 2,4,6-trifluoro-N- [6 – [(1 -methylpiperidin-4-yl) carbonyl] -pyridin- 2-yl] -benzamide, which has the chemical structure shown below I) shows:
Lasmiditan is a new and selective 5-HT 1F receptor agonist. It acts against migraine and other 5-HT 1F receptor related diseases by enhancing 5-HT 1F receptor activation while avoiding vasoconstrictive activity and inhibiting neuronal protein extravasation such as Migraine (including migraine, migraine headache, neurovascular headache), general pain, trigeminal neuralgia, anxiety, panic disorder, depression, post traumatic syndrome, dementia and the like.
Patent document CN100352817C reports on Lasmiditan, Lasmiditan hemisuccinate and Lasmiditan hydrochloride and the synthetic preparation thereof, and discloses the mass spectra of Lasmiditan, Lasmiditan hemisuccinate and Lasmiditan hydrochloride, 1 H-NMR, 13 C -NMR detection data and the melting points of Lasmiditan hemisuccinate and Lasmiditan hydrochloride. The inventor of the present invention has found that Lasmiditan, which is obtained according to the preparation method of Example 17 and Example 21 in CN100352817C, is a light brown oily amorphous substance, which has the defects of instability, moisture absorption and poor morphology.
Example 8 of patent document CN100352817C reports the preparation of Lasmiditan hydrochloride, which mentions Lasmiditan free base as an oily substance. The Lasmiditan hydrochloride obtained according to the preparation method of Example 8 in CN100352817 is a white amorphous substance which also has the disadvantages of unstable crystalline form, high hygroscopicity and poor topography.
The synthesis of Lasmiditan hemisuccinate intermediate, including Lasmiditan and Lasmiditan hydrochloride, is reported in Example 2 of U.S. Patent No. 8,697,876 B2. The inventor’s study found that Lasmiditan prepared according to US8697876B2 is also a pale brown oily amorphous substance and Lasmiditan hydrochloride is also a white amorphous substance.
In view of the deficiencies in the prior art, there is still a need in the art for the development of crystalline polymorphic Lasmiditan solid forms with more improved properties to meet the rigorous requirements of pharmaceutical formulations for physico-chemical properties such as morphology, stability and the like of active materials.
Preparation 1 Preparation of Lasmiditan (Prior Art)
Lasmiditan was prepared as described in Example 21 of CN100352817C by the following procedure: Triethylamine (10.67 mL, 76.70 mmol, 2.4 equiv) was added to a solution of 2-amino- (6- (1-methylpiperidine -4-yl) -carbonyl) -pyridine (7 g, 31.96 mmol, 1 eq) in dry THF (100 mL). 2,4,6-Trifluorobenzoyl chloride (7.46 g, 5 mL, 38.35 mmol, 1.20 equiv.) Was added dropwise at room temperature. After 2 hours, an additional 2,4,6-trifluorobenzoyl chloride (0.75 mL, 0.15 eq) and triethylamine (1.32 mL, 0.3 eq) were added to the reaction mixture and the mixture was stirred for a further 3 h. The reaction was quenched with distilled water (10 mL) and 30% NaOH (15 mL). The resulting two-phase system was stirred for 1 hour, then the two phases were separated. By addition of H 2 to extract the organic portion O (75mL) and acetic acid (12mL), followed by addition of cyclohexane (70mL). The organic portion was washed with water (50 mL) containing acetic acid (1 mL). All aqueous phases were combined, washed and neutralized with 30% NaOH (15 mL). Extract with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (3 x 50 mL). The organic phases were combined, dried MgS04 . 4 dried, filtered, and concentrated under reduced pressure and dried in vacuo at room temperature to give the title compound as a pale brown solid (11.031g, 91% yield).
The 1 H-NMR (CDCl 3 ) data of the product are as follows:
1 H NMR (400 MHz, CHLOROFORM-D) ppm 1.54 (m, 2H) 2.02 (m, 2H) 2.13 (t, J = 18.37 Hz, 2H) 2.29 (s, 3.56 (d, J = 12.59 Hz, 1H) 6.17 (d, J = 13.6 Hz, 1H) 6.75 (m, 2H) 7.45 (t, J = 12.59 Hz, 1H) 7.53 (m, 1H ) 7.95 (s, 1H).
The isothermal adsorption curve shown in Figure 5, in the 0% to 80% relative humidity range of 9.5% weight change.
The above characterization results show that Lasmiditan obtained by the preparation method of Example 21 according to CN100352817C is amorphous.
Preparation 2 Preparation of Lasmiditan hydrochloride (Prior Art)
The Lasmiditan hydrochloride was prepared as described in Example 8 of CN100352817C by the following procedure: A mixture of 2-amino-6- (1-methylpiperidin-4-yloxy) pyridine Trifluorobenzoyl chloride (3.57 g, 18.4 mmol) and 1,4-dioxane (100 mL) were combined and heated to reflux with heating. After 3 hours, cool the reaction mixture to room temperature, reduce pressure and concentrate. The concentrated mixture was loaded onto a SCX column (10 g), washed with methanol and eluted with 2M ammonia in methanol. The eluate was concentrated to give the title compound as an oily free base (3.65 g (> 100%)). The oil was dissolved in methanol (50 mL) and treated with ammonium chloride (0.5 g, 9.2 mmol). The mixture was concentrated and dried in vacuo to give a white amorphous.
IC characterization showed that Lasmiditan hydrochloride salt formed by Lasmiditan and hydrochloric acid in a molar ratio of 1: 1.
The XRPD pattern shown in Figure 19, no diffraction peaks, no amorphous.
The PLM pattern is shown in Figure 20 as an irregular, unpolarized solid.
The isotherm adsorption curve is shown in FIG. 21, with a weight change of 8.1% in a relative humidity range of 0% to 80%.
The above characterization results show that: Lasmiditan hydrochloride obtained by the preparation method of Example 8 with reference to CN100352817C is amorphous.
Example 1
Take 500mg of Lasmiditan of Preparation 1, add 1mL methanol solution containing 5% water to clarify, evaporate the crystals at room temperature and evaporate dry after 1 day to obtain 487mg Lasmiditan Form 1 in 95% yield.

References

  1.  “Molecule of the Month July 2010: Lasmiditan hydrochloride”Prous Science. Retrieved 2011-08-03.
  2.  Dahlöf, CG; Mathew, N (1998). “Cardiovascular safety of 5HT1B/1D agonists–is there a cause for concern?”. Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache18 (8): 539–45. doi:10.1046/j.1468-2982.1998.1808539.xPMID 9827245.
  3.  Mutschler, Ernst; Geisslinger, Gerd; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Schäfer-Korting, Monika (2001). Arzneimittelwirkungen (in German) (8th ed.). Stuttgart: Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft. p. 265. ISBN 978-3-8047-1763-3OCLC 47700647.
  4.  http://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/lilly-buys-migraine-biotech-colucid-for-960m-and-drug-it-out-licensed
  5.  http://adisinsight.springer.com/drugs/800028519
  6.  Clinical trial number NCT00384774 for “A Placebo-Controlled Adaptive Treatment Assignment Study of Intravenous COL-144 in the Acute Treatment of Migraine” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  7.  Clinical trial number NCT00883051 for “Dose-ranging Study of Oral COL-144 in Acute Migraine Treatment” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  8. Clinical trial number NCT02605174 for “Three Doses of Lasmiditan (50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg) Compared to Placebo in the Acute Treatment of Migraine (SPARTAN)” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  9.  Clinical trial number NCT02565186 for “An Open-label, Long-term, Safety Study of Lasmiditan for the Acute Treatment of Migraine (GLADIATOR)” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  10.  https://investor.lilly.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=1036101
Lasmiditan
Lasmiditan skeletal.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
By mouthintravenous
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • Investigational
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C19H18F3N3O2
Molar mass 377.36 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

/////////////LASMIDITAN, phase III, LILY, COL-144 , LY-573144, CoLucid Pharmaceuticals, PHASE 3, MIGRAINE

CN1CCC(CC1)C(=O)C2=NC(=CC=C2)NC(=O)C3=C(C=C(C=C3F)F)F.CN1CCC(CC1)C(=O)C2=NC(=CC=C2)NC(=O)C3=C(C=C(C=C3F)F)F.C(CC(=O)O)C(=O)O

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ELAGOLIX


Elagolix.svgChemSpider 2D Image | Elagolix | C32H30F5N3O5Elagolix.png

ELAGOLIX

  • Molecular FormulaC32H30F5N3O5
  • Average mass631.590 Da
NBI56418, ABT 620
UNII:5B2546MB5Z
4-({(1R)-2-[5-(2-Fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydro-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-1-phenylethyl}amino)butanoic acid
834153-87-6 FREE ACID
SODIUM SALT  832720-36-2
Acide 4-({(1R)-2-[5-(2-fluoro-3-méthoxyphényl)-3-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluorométhyl)benzyl]-4-méthyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydro-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-1-phényléthyl}amino)butanoïque
Butanoic acid, 4-[[(1R)-2-[5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-[[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-3,6-dihydro-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-1-phenylethyl]amino]-

GNRH antagonist, Endometriosis

Endometriosis PREREGISTERED

Phase III Uterine leiomyoma

WO2001055119A2,

Inventors Yun-Fei ZhuChen ChenFabio C. TucciZhiqiang GuoTimothy D. GrossMartin RowbottomR. Scott Struthers,
Applicant Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc.

WO 2005007165 PDT PATENT

Image result for Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc.

Inventors Zhiqiang GuoYongsheng ChenDongpei WuChen ChenWarren WadeWesley J. DwightCharles Q. HuangFabio C. Tucci
Applicant Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc.
  • Originator Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Developer AbbVie; Neurocrine Biosciences
  • Class Antineoplastics; Fluorinated hydrocarbons; Pyrimidines; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action LHRH receptor antagonists
  • Highest Development Phases
  • Preregistration Endometriosis
  • Phase III Uterine leiomyoma
  • Discontinued Benign prostatic hyperplasia; Prostate cancer
  • Most Recent Events
  • 23 Nov 2017 AbbVie plans a phase III trial for Endometriosis (Monotherapy, Combination therapy) in USA in November 2017 (NCT03343067)
  • 01 Nov 2017 Updated efficacy and adverse events data from two phase III extension trials in Endometriosis released by AbbVie
  • 27 Oct 2017 Elagolix receives priority review status for Endometriosis in USA

 

SYN

Elagolix is a specific highly potent non-peptide, orally active antagonist of the GnRH receptor. This compound inhibits pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion directly, potentially preventing the several week delay and flare associated with peptide agonist therapy.

Image result for Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc.

In 2010, elagolix sodium was licensed to Abbott by Neurocrine Biosciences for worldwide development and commercialization for the treatment of endometriosis. In January 2013, Abbott spun-off its research-based pharmaceutical business into a newly-formed company AbbVie.

AbbVie , following its spin-out from Abbott in January 2013, under license from Neurocrine , is developing elagolix, the lead from a series of non-peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists, for treating hormone-dependent diseases, primarily endometriosis and uterine fibroids.

Elagolix sodium is an oral gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist in development at Neurocrine Biosciences and Abbvie (previously Abbott). In 2017, Abbvie submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) in the U.S. for the management of endometriosis with associated pain. The candidate is being evaluated in phase III trials for the treatment of uterine fibroids.

Elagolix (INNUSAN) (former developmental code names NBI-56418ABT-620) is a highly potent, selective, orally-active, short-duration, non-peptide antagonist of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) (KD = 54 pM) which is under development for clinical use by Neurocrine Biosciences and AbbVie.[2][3] As of 2017, it is in pre-registration for the treatment of endometriosis and phase III clinical trials for the treatment of uterine leiomyoma.[1][4] The drug was also under investigation for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia, but development for these indications was ultimately not pursued.[4] Elagolix is the first of a new class of GnRH inhibitors that have been denoted as “second-generation”, due to their non-peptide nature and oral bioavailability.[1]

Because of the relatively short elimination half-life of elagolix, the actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are not fully blocked throughout the day.[1][5] For this reason, gonadotropin and sex hormone levels are only partially suppressed, and the degree of suppression can be dose-dependently adjusted as desired.[1][5] In addition, if elagolix is discontinued, its effects are rapidly reversible.[1][5] Due to the suppression of estrogen levels by elagolix being incomplete, effects on bone mineral density are minimal, which is in contrast to first-generation GnRH inhibitors.[6][7] Moreover, the incidence and severity of menopausal side effects such as hot flashes are also reduced relative to first-generation GnRH inhibitors.[1][5]

Elagolix sodium is a non-peptide antagonist of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor and chemically known as sodium;4-[[(lR)-2-[5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-[[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl] -4-methyl-2,6-dioxopyrimidin- 1 -yl] -1 -phenylethyl] amino] butanoate as below.

The US patent number 7056927 B2 discloses, elagolix sodium salt as a white solid and process for its preparation in Example-1; Step-IH.

The US patent number 8765948 B2 discloses a process for preparation of amorphous elagolix sodium by spray drying method and solid dispersion of amorphous elagolix sodium with a polymer.

The US patent number 7056927 B2 discloses a process for preparation of elagolix sodium salt in Example -1 as given in below scheme -I.

Scheme -I

The US patent number 8765948 B2 describes a process for preparation of elagolix sodium in example- 1 and 4 as given below scheme-II:

(1c) (1e) (4a)

Scheme-II

Further, the US patent number 8765948 B2 discloses an alternate process for the preparation of compound of formula (le) as mentioned below scheme-Ill.

Scheme -III

PATENT

WO2001055119A2 * Jan 25, 2001 Aug 2, 2001 Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonists and methods relating thereto

PATENT

WO 2005007165

https://encrypted.google.com/patents/WO2005007165A1?cl=en

EXAMPLE 1

3-[2(R)-{HYD OXYCARBONYLPROPYL-AMINθ} -2-PHENYLETHYL]-5-(2-FLUORO-3- METHOXYPHENYL)-l-[2-FLUORO-6-(TRIFLUOROMETHYL)BENZYL]-6-METHYL- PYRIMIDINE-2,4(lH,3H)-DIONE

Figure imgf000027_0001

Step IA: Preparation of 2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzylamine la To 2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile (45 g, 0.238 mmol) in 60 mL of TΗF was added 1 M BΗ3:TΗF slowly at 60 °C and the resulting solution was refluxed overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to ambient temperature. Methanol (420 mL) was added slowly and stirred well. The solvents were then evaporated and the residue was partitioned between EtOAc and water. The organic layer was dried over Na2SO4. Evaporation gave la as a yellow oil (46 g, 0.238 mmol). MS (C\) m/z 194.0 (MH+).

Step IB: Preparation of N-|2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl|urea lb To 2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzylamine la (51.5 g, 0.267 mmol) in a flask, urea (64 g, 1.07 mmol), HC1 (cone, 30.9 mmol, 0.374 mmol) and water (111 mL) were added. The mixture was refluxed for 6 hours. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature, further cooled with ice and filtered to give a yellow solid. Recrystallization with 400 mL of EtOAc gave lb as a white solid (46.2 g, 0J96 mmol). MS (CI) m/z 237.0 (MH+).

Step 1C: Preparation of l-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-6- methylpyrimidine-2.4(lH.3H)-dione lc Nal (43.9 g, 293 mmol) was added to N-[2-fluoro-6- (trifluoromethyl)benzyl]urea lb (46.2 g, 19.6 mmol) in 365 mL of acetonitrile. The resulting mixture was cooled in an ice-water bath. Diketene (22.5 mL, 293 mmol) was added slowly via dropping funnel followed by addition of TMSCl (37.2 mL, 293 mmol) in the same manner. The resulting yellow suspension was allowed to warm to room temperature slowly and was stirred for 20 hours. LC-MS showed the disappearance of starting material. To the yellow mixture 525 mL of water was added and stirred overnight. After another 20 hours stirring, the precipitate was filtered via Buchnner funnel and the yellow solid was washed with water and EtOAc to give lc as a white solid (48.5 g, 16 mmol). 1H ΝMR (CDC13) δ 2.15 (s, 3Η), 5.37 (s, 2H), 5.60 (s, 1H), 7.23-7.56 (m, 3H), 9.02 (s, 1H); MS (CI) m/z 303.0 (MH+).

Step ID: Preparation of 5-bromo-l -[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl|-6- methylpyrimidine-2.4(lH.3H)-dione Id Bromine (16.5 mL, 0.32 mmol) was added to l-[2-fluoro-6-

(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-6-methylpyrimidine-2,4(lHJH)-dione lc (48.5 g, 0J6 mol) in 145 mL of acetic acid. The resulting mixture became clear then formed precipitate within an hour. After 2 hours stirring, the yellow solid was filtered and washed with cold EtOAc to an almost white solid. The filtrate was washed with sat. ΝaΗCO3 and dried over Na2SO4. Evaporation gave a yellow solid which was washed with EtOAC to give a light yellow solid. The two solids were combined to give 59.4 g of Id (0J56 mol) total. Η NMR (CDC13) δ 2.4 (s, 3H), 5.48 (s, 2H), 7.25-7.58 (m, 3H), 8.61 (s, 1H); MS (CI) m/z 380.9 (MH+). 5-Bromo-l-[2, 6-difluorobenzyl]-6-methylpyrimidine-2,4(lHJH)-dione ld.l was made using the same procedure.

Step IE: Preparation of 5-bromo-l -r2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyll-6- methyl-3-[2(R)-tert-butoxycarbonylamino-2-phenylethyll-pyrimidine-2.4(lHJH)-dione le To 5-bromo- 1 -[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-6-methylpyrimidine- 2,4(lHJH)-dione Id (15 g, 39.4 mmol) in 225 mL of TΗF were added N-t-Boc-D- phenylglycinol (11.7 g, 49.2 mmol) and triphenylphosphine (15.5 g, 59J mmol), followed by addition of di-tert-butyl azodicarboxylate (13.6 g, 59J mmol). The resulting yellow solution was stirred overnight. The volatiles were evaporated and the residue was purified by silica gel with 3:7 EtOAc Ηexane to give le as a white solid (23.6 g, 39.4 mmol). MS (CI) m/z 500.0 (MΗ+-Boc).

Step IF: Preparation of 3-[2(R)-amino-2-phenylethyll-5-(2-fluoro-3- methoxyphenyl)-l-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyll-6-methyl-pyrimidine- 2.4(lH.3H)-dione If To 5-bromo-l-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-6-methyl-3-[2(R)- tert-butoxycarbonylamino-2-phenylethyl]-pyrimidine-2,4(lH,3H)-dione le (15 g, 25 mmol) in 30 mL/90 mL of Η2O/dioxane in a pressure tube were added 2-fluoro-3- methoxyphenylboronic acid (4.25 g, 25 mmol) and sodium carbonate (15.75 g, 150 mmol). N2 gas was bubbled through for 10 min.

Tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium (2.9 g, 2.5 mmol) was added, the tube was sealed and the resulting mixture was heated with stirring at 90 °C overnight. After cooling to ambient temperature, the precipitate was removed by filtration. The volatiles were removed by evaporation and the residue was partitioned between EtOAc/sat. NaHCO3. The organic solvent was evaporated and the residue was chromatographed with 2:3 EtOAc/Hexane to give 13.4 g (20.8 mmol, 83 %) yellow solid. This yellow solid (6.9 g, 10.7 mmol) was dissolved in 20 mL/20 mL CH2C12/TFA. The resulting yellow solution was stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. The volatiles were evaporated and the residue was partitioned between EtOAc/ sat. NaHCO3. The organic phase was dried over Na2SO4. Evaporation gave If as a yellow oil (4.3 g, 7.9 mmol, 74%). Η NMR (CDC13) δ 2.03 (s, 3H), 3.72-4.59 (m, 6H), 5.32-5.61 (m, 2H), 6.74-7.56 (m, 11H); MS (CI) m/z 546.0 (MH+). 3-[2(R)-amino-2-phenylethyl]-5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-l-[2,6- difluorobenzyl]-6-methyl-pyrimidine-2,4(lH,3H)-dione lf.l was made using the same procedure described in this example.

Step 1G: Preparation of 3-[2(R)- {ethoxycarbonylpropyl-amino} -2-phenylethyll-5-

(2-fluoro-3 -methoxyphenyl)- 1 -[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl|-6-methyl- pyrimidine-2,4(lHJH)-dione lg To compound 3-[2(R)-amino-2-phenylethyl]-5-(2-fluoro-3- methoxyphenyl)-l-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-6-methyl-pyrimidine- 2,4(lH,3H)-dione If (5 g, 9.4 mmol) in 100 mL of acetonitrile were added ethyl 4- bromobutyrate (4 mL, 28.2 mmol) and Ηunig’s base (1.6 mL, 9.4 mmol). After reflux at 95 °C overnight, the reaction mixture was cooled to ambient temperature and the volatiles were removed. The residue was chromatographed with 10:10: 1 EtOAc/Ηexane/Et3N to give lg as a yellow oil (3.0 g, 4.65 mmol). MS (CI) m/z 646.2 (MH+).

Step 1H: Preparation of 3-[2(R)- {hydroxycarbonylpropyl-amino} -2-phenylethyl]- 5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-l- 2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl1-6-methyl- pyrimidine-2,4(lHJH)-dione 1-1 Compound 3-[2(R)- {ethoxycarbonylpropyl-amino} -2-phenylethyl]-5-(2- fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-l-[2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-6-methyl-pyrimidine- 2,4(lH,3H)-dione lg (2.6 g, 4.0 mmol) was dissolved in 30 mL/30 mL of TΗF/water. Solid NaOΗ (1.6 g, 40 mmol) was added and the resulting mixture was heated at 50 °C overnight. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature and the volatiles were evaporated. Citric acid was added to the aqueous solution until pΗ = 3. Extraction with EtOAc followed by evaporation of solvent gave 1.96 g of a white gel. The gel was passed through a Dowex MSC-1 macroporous strong cation-exchange column to convert to sodium salt. Lyopholization gave white solid 1-1 as the sodium salt (1.58 g, 2.47 mmol). Η NMR (CD3OD) δ 1.69-1.77 (m, 2H), 2.09 (s, 3H), 2.09-2.19 (t, J = 7.35 Hz, 2H), 2.49-2.53 (t, J = 735 H, 2H), 3.88 (s, 3H), 4.15-4.32 (m, 3H), 5.36-5.52 (m, 2H), 6.60-7.63 (m, 1 IH); HPLC-MS (CI) m/z 632.2 (MH+), tR = 26.45, (method 5)

PATENT

WO 2017221144

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017221144&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Process for the preparation of elagolix sodium and its polymorph forms and intermediates is claimed. Represents first filing from Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Limited and the inventors on this API.

n a seventh aspect, the present invention provides a process for preparation of compound of formula (VII)

(VII)

wherein R is alkyl such as methyl, ethyl, propyl, isopropyl and the like,

comprising;

a) reacting the compound of formula (II) with compound of formula (III) to obtain the compound of formula (IV)

wherein t-BOC is tertiary butoxycarbonyl group; R is as described above

b) reacting the compound of formula (IV) with the compound of formula (V) to obtain the compound formula (VI), and

c) N-deprotection of the compound of formula (VI) to obtain the compound of formula

(VII)

(VI) (VII)

The reaction of compound of formula (II) with compound of formula (III) to obtain the compound of formula (IV) is carried in the presence of triarylphosphine such as triphenyl phosphine and the like and azodicarboxylates such as diethyl azodicarboxylate, diisopropyl azodicarboxylate and di-tert-butyl azodicarboxylate (DIAD) and the like.

The seventh aspect of the present invention is depicted below scheme-IV.

Scheme-IV

The eighth aspect of the present invention is depicted below scheme-IV.

R=alkyl

Scheme-IV

Example 11: Preparation of ethyl (R)-4-((2-hydroxy-l-phenylethyl)amino)butanoate (Ilia; R is ethyl)

R-(-)-2-phenylglycinol (10 g), DMAP (0.17 g) were added in THF (80 ml) at room temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. Triethylamine (30.48 ml) was added to the reaction mixture and stirred for five minutes. Ethyl-4-bromo butyrate (15.64 ml) was added and the reaction mixture heated to 80°C then stirred for 16 hours. Water (20 volumes) followed by ethyl acetate (200 ml) were added to separate the aqueous and organic layer. The organic layer was washed with IN HC1 (100 ml) followed by neutralize the resulting aqueous layer with saturated sodium carbonate solution then extract with ethyl acetate (100 ml) and the organic layer was dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate then evaporated below 50°C under reduced pressure to obtain the title compound. Yield: 14.50 g. Purity: 94.75% (by HPLC). ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 7.17-7.30 (m, 5H), 4.83 (m, 1H), 3.99 (q, 2H), 3.58 (dd, 1H, J = 8.8, 4.4 Hz), 3.88 (m, 1H ), 3.27 (m, 1H), 2.38 (m, 1H), 2.26 (m, 3H), 2.10 (s, 1H), 1.61 (m, 2H), 1.12 (t, 3H); m/z: 252 (MH )

Example 12: Preparation of ethyl (R)-4-((tert-butoxycarbonyl)(2-hydroxy-l-phenylethyl) amino)butanoate (III; R is ethyl)

Ethyl (R)-4-((2-hydroxy-l-phenylethyl)amino)butanoate (14 g) was added to THF (140 ml) at room temperature. The reaction mixture was cooled to 0-5 °C. Triethylamine (16.9 mL) was added to the reaction mixture followed by Di-tert-butyl dicarbonate (13.37 g) was added to reaction mixture at 0-5 °C. The reaction mixture was heated to room temperature and stirred for 16 hours. Water (300 mL) and ethyl acetate (300 mL) were added and the layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with sodium chloride then died over sodium sulfate followed by evaporation at 45°C to obtain the crude compound. The crude compound was purified by silica gel (60/120 mesh) withl5-20% EtOAc/Hexane to obtain the title compound as a pale yellow syrup. Yield: 9.5 g. Purity: 95.42% (by HPLC). ¾ NMR (400 MHz, CDC13): δ 7.24-7.34 (m, 5H), 5.08 (m, 1H), 4.09 (m, 4H), 3.10 (m, 2H), 3.00 (s, 1H), 2.21(m, 2H), 1.82 (m, 2H), 1.46 (s, 9H), 1.23 (t, 3H). m/z: 352.20 (MH )

Example 13: Preparation of ethyl (R)-4-((2-(5-bromo)-3-(2-fluoro-6-trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin-l(2H)-yl)-l-phenylethyl)(tert-butoxycarbonyl) amino)butanoate (IV; R is ethyl)

Ethyl (R)-4-((tert-butoxycarbonyl)(2-hydroxy-l -phenyl ethyl) amino)butanoate (III; R is ethyl) (1.0 g), 5-bromo-l-(2-fluoro-6-trifluoromethyl)benzyl-6-methylpyrimidine-2,4 (1H, 3H)-dione (II) (1.08 g), Triphenyl phosphine (1.49 g) were added to THF (30 mL) at room temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. DIAD (1.11 mL) was added to the reaction mixture and stirred for 16 hours at room temperature. Water (60 volume) was added to the reaction mixture followed by ethylacetate (60 mL) was added then the layers were separated. The organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate and evaporated below 50°C under reduced pressure to obtain the crude compound. The crude compound was purified by silica gel (60/120 mesh) withl5-20% EtOAc/Hexane to obtain the title compound. Yield (1.3 g). Purity: 68.87% (by HPLC); l NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 1.15-2.0 (11H), 2.43-2.48 (4H), 3.9 (2H), 4.71-4.8 (5H), 5.3 -5.4 (3H), 7.28-7.3 (8H), 8.4 (2H); m/z: 616 (M-BOC)+

Example 14: Preparation of ethyl (R)-4-((tert-butoxycarbonyl)-2-(5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2-fluoro-6-trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin-l(2H)-yl)-l-phenylethyl)amino)-butanoate (VI; R is ethyl)

Ethyl (R)-4-((2-(5-bromo)-3-(2-fluoro-6-trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin-l(2H)-yl)-l-phenylethyl)(tert-butoxycarbonyl) amino)butanoate (IV; R is ethyl) (0.9 g), 2-fluoro-3-methoxy phenyl boronic acid (V) (0.214 g) and sodium carbonate (0.797 g) were added to the mixture of 1,4-dioxane (9 mL) and water (3.06 mL) at room temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. Argon gas was bubbled through for 30 minutes. Tetrakis (triphenylphosphine)palladium (0.145 g) was added to the reaction mixture at room temperature then heated to 90-95 °C and stirred for 5 hours. The reaction mixture cooled to room temperature and filtered through celite bed then the filtrate washed with ethylacetate (9 mL) and water (36 mL) was added and stirred for 30 minutes at room temperature. Ethylacetate (36 mL) was added and the separated organic layer washed with brine and dried over sodium sulfate followed by evaporation at 45°C to obtain the crude compound. The crude compound was purified by silica gel (60/120 mesh) with 20-25% EtOAc/Hexane to obtain the title compound as yellow solid. Yield: 0.5 g; Purity: 75.1% (by HPLC); m/z: 660 (M-BOC)+.

Example 15: Preparation of ethyl (R)-4-((2-(5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2-fluoro-6-trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin-l(2H)-yl)-l-phenylethyl)amino)-butanoate (VII; R is ethyl)

Ethyl(R)-4-((tert-butoxycarbonyl)-2-(5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2-fluoro-6-trifluoro methyl)benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydropyrimidin-l(2H)-yl)-l-phenylethyl)amino)-butanoate (VI; R is ethyl) (0.4 g) was added to dichloromethane (4 mL) at room temperature. The reaction mixture was cooled to 0-5 °C then trifluoroacetic acid (2 mL) was added and stirred for five hours at 0-5 °C. Saturated sodium bicarbonate solution (40 mL) was added to the reaction mixture followed by dichloromethane (40 mL) was added. The organic layer was washed with brine then dried over sodium sulfate and evaporated at 35°C to obtain the crude compound. The crude compound purified by silica gel (60/120 mesh) with 30-35% EtOAc/Hexane to obtain the title compound as yellow solid. Yield: 160 mg; Purity: 88.6% (by HPLC). ‘H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 7.64 (m, 1H), 7.54 (m, 2H), 7.15-7.27 (m, 6H), 6.85 (m, 2H), 5.31 (s, 2H), 3.99 (m, 3H), 3.87 (m, 2H), 3.83 (s, 3H), 2.30-2.16 (m, 4H), 2.10 (s, 3H), 1.50 (m, 2H), 1.10 (t, 3H). m/z: 660 (MH )

PAPER

Discovery of sodium R-(+)-4-(2-(5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2-fluoro-6-(trifluoromethyl-)benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrimidin-1-yl)-1-phenylethamino)butyrate (elagolix), a potent and orally available nonpeptide antagonist of the human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor
J Med Chem 2008, 51(23): 7478

Discovery of Sodium R-(+)-4-{2-[5-(2-Fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2-fluoro-6-[trifluoromethyl]benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrimidin-1-yl]-1-phenylethylamino}butyrate (Elagolix), a Potent and Orally Available Nonpeptide Antagonist of the Human Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Department of Endocrinology, and Department of Preclinical Development, Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc., 12790 El Camino Real, San Diego, California 92130
J. Med. Chem.200851 (23), pp 7478–7485
DOI: 10.1021/jm8006454

* To whom correspondence should be addressed. Phone: 1-858-617-7600. Fax: 1-858-617-7925. E-mail: cchen@neurocrine.comsstruthers@neurocrine.com., †

Department of Medicinal Chemistry., ‡ Department of Endocrinology., § Department of Preclinical Development.

Abstract

Abstract Image

The discovery of novel uracil phenylethylamines bearing a butyric acid as potent human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (hGnRH-R) antagonists is described. A major focus of this optimization was to improve the CYP3A4 inhibition liability of these uracils while maintaining their GnRH-R potency. R-4-{2-[5-(2-Fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2-fluoro-6-[trifluoromethyl]benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrimidin-1-yl]-1-phenylethylamino}butyric acid sodium salt, 10b (elagolix), was identified as a potent and selective hGnRH-R antagonist. Oral administration of 10b suppressed luteinizing hormone in castrated macaques. These efforts led to the identification of 10b as a clinical compound for the treatment of endometriosis.

NA SALT

(R)-4-{2-[5-(2-Fluoro-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(2-fluoro-6-[trifluoromethyl]benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrimidin-1-yl]-1-phenylethylamino}butyric Acid Sodium Salt

sodium salt as a white solid (1.58 g, 2.47 mmol, 62%). HPLC purity: 100% (220 and 254 nm). 1H NMR (CD3OD): 1.72 (m, 2H), 2.08 (s, 3H), 2.16 (t, J = 6.9 Hz, 2H), 2.50 (t, J = 6.9 Hz, 2H), 3.86 (s, 3H), 4.24 (m, 3H), 5.40 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 1H), 5.46 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 1H), 6.62 and 6.78 (m, 1H), 7.12 (m, 2H), 7.34 (m, 5H), 7.41 (m, 1H), 7.56 (m, 1H), 7.61 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H). MS: 632 (M − Na + 2H+). Anal. (C32H29F5N3O5Na·0.75H2O): C, H, N, Na.

PATENT

CN 105218389

PATENT

WO2014143669A1

“Elagolix” refers to 4-((R)-2-[5-(2-fluoro-3-methoxy-phenyl)-3-(2- fluoro-6 rifluoromethyl-benzyl)-4-methyl-2,6-dioxo-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrimidin-l-yl]-l- phenyl-ethylamino)-butyric acid or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. Elagolix is an orally active, non-peptide GnRH antagonist and is unlike other GnRH agonists and injectable (peptide) GnRH antagonists. Elagolix produces a dose dependent suppression of pituitary and ovarian hormones in women. Methods of making Elagolix and a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof are described in WO 2005/007165, the contents of which are herein incorporated by reference.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e f g Ezzati, Mohammad; Carr, Bruce R (2015). “Elagolix, a novel, orally bioavailable GnRH antagonist under investigation for the treatment of endometriosis-related pain”. Women’s Health11(1): 19–28. doi:10.2217/whe.14.68ISSN 1745-5057.
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  5. Jump up to:a b c d Struthers RS, Nicholls AJ, Grundy J, Chen T, Jimenez R, Yen SS, Bozigian HP (2009). “Suppression of gonadotropins and estradiol in premenopausal women by oral administration of the nonpeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist elagolix”J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab94 (2): 545–51. doi:10.1210/jc.2008-1695PMC 2646513Freely accessiblePMID 19033369.
  6. Jump up^ Diamond MP, Carr B, Dmowski WP, Koltun W, O’Brien C, Jiang P, Burke J, Jimenez R, Garner E, Chwalisz K (2014). “Elagolix treatment for endometriosis-associated pain: results from a phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study”. Reprod Sci21 (3): 363–71. doi:10.1177/1933719113497292PMID 23885105.
  7. Jump up^ Carr B, Dmowski WP, O’Brien C, Jiang P, Burke J, Jimenez R, Garner E, Chwalisz K (2014). “Elagolix, an oral GnRH antagonist, versus subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate for the treatment of endometriosis: effects on bone mineral density”Reprod Sci21 (11): 1341–51. doi:10.1177/1933719114549848PMC 4212335Freely accessiblePMID 25249568.

External links

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US8084614 Apr 4, 2008 Dec 27, 2011 Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonists and methods relating thereto
US8263588 Apr 4, 2008 Sep 11, 2012 Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonists and methods relating thereto
US8481738 Nov 10, 2011 Jul 9, 2013 Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonists and methods relating thereto
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US8952161 Jun 5, 2013 Feb 10, 2015 Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonists and methods relating thereto
US9034850 Nov 19, 2010 May 19, 2015 Sk Chemicals Co., Ltd. Gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist, preparation method thereof and pharmaceutical composition comprising the same
US9422310 Jan 8, 2015 Aug 23, 2016 Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor antagonists and methods relating thereto
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US9701647 Tetrazolones as a carboxylic acid bioisosteres
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Elagolix
Elagolix.svg
Clinical data
Synonyms NBI-56418; ABT-620
Routes of
administration
By mouth
Drug class GnRH analogueGnRH antagonistantigonadotropin
Pharmacokinetic data
Biological half-life 2.4–6.3 hours[1]
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C32H30F5N3O5
Molar mass 631.590 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

///////////////ELAGOLIX, NBI 56418, UNII:5B2546MB5Z, ABT 620, priority review status, PHASE 3, AbbVie, Neurocrine Biosciences, Endometriosis

CC1=C(C(=O)N(C(=O)N1CC2=C(C=CC=C2F)C(F)(F)F)CC(C3=CC=CC=C3)NCCCC(=O)O)C4=C(C(=CC=C4)OC)F

Gedatolisib, гедатолисиб , غيداتوليسيب , 吉达利塞 ,


Image result for GedatolisibImage result for Gedatolisib

Gedatolisib

Pfizer

PF-05212384; PF-5212384; PKI-587

CAS 1197160-78-3
Chemical Formula: C32H41N9O4
Molecular Weight: 615.72

1-(4-{[4-(Dimethylamino)-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl}phenyl)-3-{4-[4,6-di(4-morpholinyl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]phenyl}urea
3-{4-[bis(morpholin-4-yl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]phenyl}-1-{4-[4-(dimethylamino)piperidine-1-carbonyl]phenyl}urea
N-[4-[[4-(Dimethylamino)-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl]phenyl]-N’-[4-[4,6-di(4-morpholinyl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]phenyl]urea
гедатолисиб [Russian] [INN]
غيداتوليسيب [Arabic] [INN]
吉达利塞 [Chinese] [INN]
  • Phase III Acute myeloid leukaemia
  • Phase II Colorectal cancer; Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Phase I Breast cancer; Solid tumours
  • Discontinued Endometrial cancer

Most Recent Events

  • 22 Nov 2017Pfizer suspends patient enrolment in a phase I/II trial due to drug supply delay in Non-small cell lung cancer (Combination therapy, Inoperable/Unresectable, Metastatic disease, Late-stage disease) in USA (IV) (NCT02920450)
  • 04 Nov 2017No recent reports of development identified for phase-I development in Solid-tumours(Combination therapy, Late-stage disease, Second-line therapy or greater) in Canada (IV, Infusion)
  • 04 Nov 2017No recent reports of development identified for phase-I development in Solid-tumours(Combination therapy, Late-stage disease, Second-line therapy or greater) in Italy (IV, Infusion)

Gedatolisib, also known as PKI-587 and PF-05212384, is an agent targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway, with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon intravenous administration, PI3K/mTOR kinase inhibitor PKI-587 inhibits both PI3K and mTOR kinases, which may result in apoptosis and growth inhibition of cancer cells overexpressing PI3K/mTOR. Activation of the PI3K/mTOR pathway promotes cell growth, survival, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy; mTOR, a serine/threonine kinase downstream of PI3K, may also be activated independent of PI3K.

PKI-587 is a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, currently being developed by Pfizer. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is a key pathway in cell proliferation, growth, survival, protein synthesis, and glucose metabolism. It has been recognized recently that inhibiting this pathway might provide a viable therapy for cancer. PKI-587  has shown excellent activity in vitro and in vivo, with antitumor efficacy in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft tumor models when administered intravenously.

PATENT

WO 2009143317

WO 2010096619

WO 2012148540

WO 2014151147

PATENT

US 20170119778

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2010), 53(6), 2636-2645

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm901830p

Bis(morpholino-1,3,5-triazine) Derivatives: Potent Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Competitive Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors: Discovery of Compound 26 (PKI-587), a Highly Efficacious Dual Inhibitor

 Chemical Sciences
 Oncology
§ Drug Metabolism
Wyeth Research, 401 N. Middletown Road, Pearl River, New York 10965
J. Med. Chem.201053 (6), pp 2636–2645
DOI: 10.1021/jm901830p
Publication Date (Web): February 18, 2010
Copyright © 2010 American Chemical Society
*To whom correspondence should be addressed. Phone: (845) 602-4023. Fax (845) 602-5561. E-mail: venkata@wyeth.com or venkata699@gmail.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is a key pathway in cell proliferation, growth, survival, protein synthesis, and glucose metabolism. It has been recognized recently that inhibiting this pathway might provide a viable therapy for cancer. A series of bis(morpholino-1,3,5-triazine) derivatives were prepared and optimized to provide the highly efficacious PI3K/mTOR inhibitor 1-(4-{[4-(dimethylamino)piperidin-1-yl]carbonyl}phenyl)-3-[4-(4,6-dimorpholin-4-yl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl]urea 26 (PKI-587). Compound 26 has shown excellent activity in vitro and in vivo, with antitumor efficacy in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft tumor models when administered intravenously. The structure−activity relationships and the in vitro and in vivo activity of analogues in this series are described.

Preparation of 1-(4-{[4-(Dimethylamino)piperidin-1-yl]carbonyl}phenyl)-3-[4-(4,6-dimorpholin-4- yl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl]urea (26)

MS (ESI) m/z = 616.7. HRMS: calcd for C32H41N9O4 + H+, 616.335 43; found (ESI-FTMS, [M + H]+), 616.334 24. Purity by analytical HPLC 99.3%. (Prodigy ODS3, 0.46 cm × 15 cm, 20 min gradient acetonitrile in water, trifluoroacetic acid, detector wavelengths, 215 and 254 nm.) 1H NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 1.29−1.36 (m, 6H), 2.6 (m, 4H), 2.9 (m,1H), 3.3 (m, 4H), 3.6 (m, 8H), 3.7 (m, 8H), 7.3 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 2H), 7.51−7.57 (m, 4H), 8.3 (d, J = 8.3 Hz 2H), 8.9 (s, 1H), 9.0 (s, 1H) ppm. Anal. Calcd for C32H41N9O4: C 62.42%, H 6.71%, N 20.47%. Found: C 62.34%, H 6.67%, N 20.39%.

PAPER

Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2011), 21(16), 4773-4778.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960894X11008468

PAPER

New and Practical Synthesis of Gedatolisib

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00298

 College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, 333 Longteng Road, Shanghai 201620, China
 Key Laboratory of Tropical Medicinal Plant Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Hainan Normal University, 99 South Longkun Road, Haina 571158, China
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00298
*Fax: +86 21 67791214. E-mail: yongjun.mao@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

A new, practical, and convergent synthetic route of gedatolisib, an antitumor agent, is developed on a hectogram scale which avoids the Pd coupling method. The key step is adopting 6-(4-nitrophenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine and 2,2′-dichlorodiethyl ether to prepare the key 4,4′-(6-(4-nitrophenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diyl)dimorpholine in 77% yield and 98.8% purity. Gedatolisib is obtained in 48.6% yield over five simple steps and 99.3% purity (HPLC). Purification methods of the intermediates and the final product involved in the route are given.

off-white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 1.46 (brs, 2H), 1.89 (brs, 2H), 2.29 (s, 6H), 2.94 (brs, 2H), 3.76 (m, 8H), 3.89 (m, 8H), 7.09 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2H), 7.20 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2H), 7.50 (d, J = 8.7 Hz, 2H), 8.28 (s, 1H), 8.31 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 2H), 8.48 (s, 1H). ESI-MS (m/z) 615.9 (M + H). HPLC conditions: Column: Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5 μm); Detection: 254 nm; Flow rate: 0.8 mL/min; Temperature: 30 °C; Injection load: 1 μL; Solvent: MeOH; Concentration: 0.5 mg/mL; Run time: 20 min; Mobile phase A: water; Mobile phase B: MeOH/TEA = 100:0.1; Gradient program: time (min): 20; % of mobile phase A: 10; % of mobile phase B: 90; tR = 2.598 min, purity: 99.34%

  • ZhaoX.; TanQ.ZhangZ.ZhaoY. Med. Chem. Res. 2014235188– 5196 DOI: 10.1007/s00044-014-1084-z
  • KhafizovaG.PotoskiJ. R. PCT Int. Appl. WO 2010096619, 2010.
  • VenkatesanA. M.ChenZ.DehnhardtC. M.Dos SantosO.Delos SantosE. G.ZaskA.VerheijenJ. C.KaplanJ. A.RichardD. J.Ayral-KaloustianS.MansourT. S.GopalsamyA.CurranK. J.ShiM. PCT Int. Appl. WO 2009143317, 2009.

REFERENCES

1: Gedaly R, Galuppo R, Musgrave Y, Angulo P, Hundley J, Shah M, Daily MF, Chen C, Cohen DA, Spear BT, Evers BM. PKI-587 and sorafenib alone and in combination on inhibition of liver cancer stem cell proliferation. J Surg Res. 2013 Nov;185(1):225-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2013.05.016. Epub 2013 May 25. PubMed PMID: 23769634.

2: Gedaly R, Angulo P, Hundley J, Daily MF, Chen C, Evers BM. PKI-587 and sorafenib targeting PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK pathways synergistically inhibit HCC cell proliferation. J Surg Res. 2012 Aug;176(2):542-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2011.10.045. Epub 2011 Nov 21. PubMed PMID: 22261591.

3: Dehnhardt CM, Venkatesan AM, Chen Z, Delos-Santos E, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Brooijmans N, Yu K, Hollander I, Feldberg L, Lucas J, Mallon R. Identification of 2-oxatriazines as highly potent pan-PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2011 Aug 15;21(16):4773-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.06.063. Epub 2011 Jun 21. PubMed PMID: 21763134.

4: Mallon R, Feldberg LR, Lucas J, Chaudhary I, Dehnhardt C, Santos ED, Chen Z, dos Santos O, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Venkatesan A, Hollander I. Antitumor efficacy of PKI-587, a highly potent dual PI3K/mTOR kinase inhibitor. Clin Cancer Res. 2011 May 15;17(10):3193-203. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-1694. Epub 2011 Feb 15. PubMed PMID: 21325073.

5: Venkatesan AM, Chen Z, dos Santos O, Dehnhardt C, Santos ED, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Mallon R, Hollander I, Feldberg L, Lucas J, Yu K, Chaudhary I, Mansour TS. PKI-179: an orally efficacious dual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2010 Oct 1;20(19):5869-73. doi: 10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.07.104. Epub 2010 Jul 30. PubMed PMID: 20797855.

6: Venkatesan AM, Dehnhardt CM, Delos Santos E, Chen Z, Dos Santos O, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Khafizova G, Brooijmans N, Mallon R, Hollander I, Feldberg L, Lucas J, Yu K, Gibbons J, Abraham RT, Chaudhary I, Mansour TS. Bis(morpholino-1,3,5-triazine) derivatives: potent adenosine 5′-triphosphate competitive phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors: discovery of compound 26 (PKI-587), a highly efficacious dual inhibitor. J Med Chem. 2010 Mar 25;53(6):2636-45. doi: 10.1021/jm901830p. PubMed PMID: 20166697.

????????????PF 05212384, PF 5212384, PKI-587, PF-05212384; PF-5212384; PKI 587, gedatolisib, antitumor agent, PHASE 3, PFIZER, гедатолисиб غيداتوليسيب 吉达利塞 

O=C(NC1=CC=C(C2=NC(N3CCOCC3)=NC(N4CCOCC4)=N2)C=C1)NC5=CC=C(C(N6CCC(N(C)C)CC6)=O)C=C5

 Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2017), 60(17), 7524-7538 PQR 309

FEVIPIPRANT


Fevipiprant.svg

Fevipiprant.png

FEVIPIPRANT

Molecular Formula: C19H17F3N2O4S
Molecular Weight: 426.41 g/mol

UNII-2PEX5N7DQ4; 2PEX5N7DQ4; NVP-QAW039; QAW039;

CAS 872365-14-5

Product patent WO2005123731A2, NOVARTIS

Image result for novartis

2-[2-methyl-1-[[4-methylsulfonyl-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl]acetic acid

  • 2-Methyl-1-[[4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine-3-acetic acid
  • [1-(4-((Methane)sulfonyl)-2-trifluoromethylbenzyl)-2-methyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl]acetic acid

Fevipiprant (INN; code name QAW039) is a drug being developed by Novartis which acts as a selective, orally available antagonistof the prostaglandin D2 receptor 2 (DP2 or CRTh2).[1][2][3]

As of 2016, it is in Phase III[4] clinical trials for the treatment of asthma.[5]

Novartis is developing fevipiprant, a prostaglandin D2 receptor (PD2/CRTh2) antagonist, as an oral capsule formulation for treating asthma and moderate to severe atopic dermatitis.

Image result for FEVIPIPRANT

Inventors Kamlesh BalaCatherine LeblancDavid Andrew SandhamKatharine Louise TurnerSimon James WatsonLyndon Nigel BrownBrian Cox
Applicant Novartis AgNovartis Pharma Gmbh

PATENT

WO2005123731

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2005123731

PATENT

CN 106188040

The invention discloses a Fevipiprant and Fevipiprant intermediate preparation method. The method is characterized in that 2-amino-3-bromopyridine and 4-mesyl-2-trifluoromethylbenzaldehyde to condensation reaction to obtain a Schiff base intermediate, then performing reduction reaction to obtain 3-bormo-N-(4-(mesyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-pyridine-2-amine, subjecting the 3-bormo-N-(4-(mesyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-pyridine-2-amine to ullmann ring closing reaction with methyl levulinate or ethyl levulinate, and performing saponification reaction or decarboxylic reaction to obtain Fevipiprant namely N[1-(4-((methane)sulfonyl)-2-trifluoromethylphenyl-2-methyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine-3-yl] acetic acid. The Fevipiprant and Fevipiprant intermediate preparation method which is a brand new method is short in step, technically convenient in operation, easy in product purification and large-scale production, high yield can be achieved, and Fevipiprant industrial production can be realized easily.

Example 5: Ν [1- (4 – ((methane) sulfonyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl) -2-methyl -1H- pyrrolo [2,3-b] P ratio preparation of 3-yl] acetic acid (1).

[0056] 3-Bromo -N- (4- (methylsulfonyl) -2- (trifluoromethyl) phenyl) – pyridin-2-amine (40 · 9g, 0 · lmo 1) and levulinic acid A ester (13.0g, 0. lmo 1) was added 300 mL N, N- dimethylformamide, was added copper iodide (1 · 9g, 0 · 0lmo 1) and N, N- dimethylglycine (1.0g , 0.01 mol), after nitrogen substitution, the reaction temperature was raised to 120 degrees 12h, water was added 200mL of saturated sodium chloride solution was cooled and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phase was washed with water, dried and concentrated to give a pale yellow powder, was added 100mL ethanol and 100mL water , was added sodium hydroxide (8g, 0.2mol) the reaction temperature was raised to 60 degrees 2h, cooled to 0 ° C, acidified with 4N hydrochloric acid was added dropwise to pH 2, was filtered and the solid washed with ethanol to give the crude product after recrystallization from ethanol in pure 34.5g, yield 81%.

[0057] · ΜΚ (300ΜΗζ, (16-0Μ50) δ: 12 · 3 (ΐ3Γ, 1Η, α) 2Η), 8.24 (s, lH, PhH), 8.11 ~ 8.12 (d, lH, PhH), 8.00 ~ 8.02 (d, lH, PyH), 7.91 ~ 7.93 (d, lH, PyH), 7.09 ~ 7.10 (d, lH, PhH), 6.46 ~ 6.48 (d, lH, PhH), 5.73 (s, 2H, NCH2) , 3.70 (s, 2H, q ^ C〇2H), 3.30 (s, 3H, CH 3).

[0058] HPLC: 99.9%.

[0059] Example 6: N [l- (4 – ((methane) sulfonyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl) -2-methyl -1H- pyrrolo [2,3-b] P ratio preparation of 3-yl] acetic acid (1).

[0060] 3-Bromo -N- (4- (methylsulfonyl) -2- (trifluoromethyl) phenyl) – (. 40.9g, 0 lmo 1) pyridin-2-amine and acetyl malonate methyl ester (18.8g, 0. lmol) was added 300 mL N, N- dimethylformamide, was added copper iodide (1.9g, O.Olmol) and N, N- dimethylglycine (1. (^ , 0.01111〇1), after nitrogen substitution, the reaction temperature was raised to 120 degrees 1211, 200mL saturated brine was added after cooling, and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phase was washed with water, dried and concentrated to give a pale yellow powder, was added 100mL ethanol and 100mL of water, was added sodium hydroxide (8g, 0.2mol) the reaction temperature was raised to 60 degrees 2h, cooled to 0 ° C, acidified with 4N hydrochloric acid was added dropwise to pH 2, was filtered and the solid washed with ethanol, a crude product was obtained from ethanol crystallized to give pure 34. lg, 80% yield.

[0061] HPLC: 99.8%.

[0062] Example 7: Ν [1- (4 – ((methane) sulfonyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl) -2-methyl -1H- pyrrolo [2,3-b] P ratio preparation of 3-yl] acetic acid (1).

[0063] 3-Bromo -N- (4- (methylsulfonyl) -2- (trifluoromethyl) phenyl) – pyridin-2-amine (40 · 9g, 0 · lmo 1) and levulinic acid A ester (13. (^, 0.1111〇1) was added ^ 3,001,111, 1-dimethyl formamide, was added copper iodide (3.88,0.02111〇1) and N, N- dimethylglycine (2. (^, 0.02111〇1), after nitrogen substitution, the reaction temperature was raised to 120 degrees 1211, 200mL saturated brine was added after cooling, and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phase was washed with water, dried and concentrated to give a pale yellow powder, was added 100mL ethanol and 100mL water , was added sodium hydroxide (8g, 0.2mol) the reaction temperature was raised to 60 degrees 2h, cooled to 0 ° C, acidified with 4N hydrochloric acid was added dropwise to pH 2, was filtered and the solid washed with ethanol to give crude product was recrystallized from ethanol to give pure 34. lg, 80% yield billion

[0064] HPLC: 99.9%.

[0065] Example 8: Ν [1- (4 – ((methane) sulfonyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl) -2-methyl -1H- pyrrolo [2,3-b] P ratio preparation of 3-yl] acetic acid (1).

[0066] 3-Bromo -N- (4- (methylsulfonyl) -2- (trifluoromethyl) phenyl) – pyridin-2-amine (40.9 8,0.1111〇1) was added 300mL N, N- two after dimethylformamide, was added copper iodide (1.9g, 0.01mol) and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-heptane-3,5-dione (3.6g, 0.02mo 1), purged with nitrogen , the reaction temperature was raised to 120 degrees 12h, water was added 200mL of saturated sodium chloride solution was cooled and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phase was washed with water, dried and concentrated to give a pale yellow powder, was added 100mL ethanol and 100mL water was added sodium hydroxide (8g , 0.2 mol) the reaction temperature was raised to 60 degrees 2h, cooled to 0 ° C, acidified with 4N hydrochloric acid was added dropwise to pH 2, was filtered and the solid washed with ethanol to give crude product was recrystallized from ethanol to give pure product 30.2 g, yield 71%.

[0067] HPLC: 99.6%.

[0068] Example 9: Ν [1- (4 – ((methane) sulfonyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl) -2-methyl -1H- pyrrolo [2,3-b] P ratio preparation of 3-yl] acetic acid (1).

[0069] 3-Bromo -N- (4- (methylsulfonyl) -2- (trifluoromethyl) phenyl) – pyridin-2-amine (40.9 8,0.1111〇1) was added 1’1 ^ 3,001,111, 1 ‘| – dimethylformamide, was added copper iodide (1.98,0.011] 1〇1) and proline (1.28,0.011] 1〇1), after nitrogen substitution, the reaction temperature was raised to 120 degrees 12h, after cooling, 200mL saturated brine, and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phase was washed with water, dried and concentrated to give a pale yellow powder, was added 100mL ethanol and 100mL water was added sodium hydroxide (8g, 0.2mol) was heated to 60 degrees reaction 2h, cooled to 0 ° C, acidified with 4N hydrochloric acid was added dropwise to pH 2, was filtered and the solid washed with ethanol to give crude product was recrystallized from ethanol to give pure product 33.2 g, 78% yield.

[0070] HPLC: 99.8%.

[0071] Example 10: N [1- (4 – ((methane) sulfonyl) -2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl) -2-methyl -1H- pyrrolo [2,3-b] pyridin – preparation of 3- yl] acetic acid (1).

[0072] 3-Bromo -N- (4- (methylsulfonyl) -2- (trifluoromethyl) phenyl) – pyridin-2-amine (40.9 8,0.1111〇1) was added 300mL N, N- two after dimethylformamide, was added copper iodide (1.9g, 0. Olmol) and N, N- dimethylglycine (1.0g, 0.01 mo 1), after nitrogen substitution, the reaction temperature was raised to 120 degrees 12h, cooled was added 200mL saturated brine, and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phase was washed with water, dried and concentrated to give a pale yellow powder, was added 100mL of acetic acid and 100mL of concentrated hydrochloric acid was heated to reflux for 6h, cooled to 0 ° C, was added 100mL water analysis crystal was filtered and the solid washed with ethanol to give crude product was recrystallized from ethanol to give pure product 33.2 g, 78% yield.

[0073] HPLC: 99.1%.

PATENT

WO 2017056001

Example 3b: Preparation of Compound A

Production of C8: Compound C6, (3-[2-({[4-Methanesulfonyl-2-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]methyl}amino)pyridin-3-yl]prop-2-yn-l-ol) (20 g, 52 mmol) was dissolved in a mixture of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK, 125 g), 25.3 g (156 mmol) of 1 , 1 , 1 -triethoxy ethane, and acetic acid (0.625 g, 10 mmol). The mixture was heated within 40 minutes to 140 °C under a N2 over-pressure of 1 – 4 bar. During the reaction ethanol was formed and removed from the vessel by a pressure-regulated valve. After 3.5 h a second portion of acetic acid (0.625g) was added and the mixture was heated for 3.5 h at 140 °C under a N2 over-pressure of 1 – 4 bar. The resultant product was a solution of Ethyl 2-(l- {[4-methanesulfonyl-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl}-2-methyl-lH-pyrrolo[2,3-¾]pyridin-3-yl)acetate and the conversion rate was measured at 98% and the yield 90%. The solution was filtered and 40 g MIBK was added. The solution was heated to IT=80 °C and cooled down within 3 h to

IT=20 °C. At an IT of 65 °C seed crystals were added. At IT 20 °C intermediate C8 was isolated and washed with 40 g MIBK and dried in the oven at IT=60°C/20mbar.

Conversion to Compound A: The intermediate C8 was concentrated under vacuum at

100 °C/200 mbar and water (6000ml). A sodium hydroxide solution (1734 g, 30%, 13 mol) was added to the mixture and heated for 4 h at 50 °C. The solution was distilled again at 100 °C/100 mbar. The phases were separated at 50 °C and the water phase was extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (2000 ml). Again the phases were separated and the water phase was filtered at 50 °C. To the filtrate methyl isobutyl ketone (5000 ml) was added and the aqueous solution neutralized in 2 portions with hydrochloric acid (963 g, 37%, 9.8 mol) to pH 4 – 4.5. The phases were heated to 80 °C and the organic phases separated. Water (1000 ml) was added to wash the organic phase and after phase separation the organic phase was cooled down to 70 °C. Seed crystals of Compound A were added along with heptane (1000 ml). The resulting suspension was stirred for 30 minutes before cooling further down to 0 °C within 3 h. The suspension was stirred for 3 h at 0 °C and then filtered through a nutsche. The filter cake was washed first with pre-cooled HPTF/methyl isobutyl ketone (1000 g, 5: 1), then with acetone/water (1000 g, 1 :2) and finally with water (1000 g). Wet Compound A was dried in the oven at 60 °C for 8 h under vacuum to isolate 804 g of compound A. The conversion was calculated to be 99%; the yield was 79%.

Example 3 c: Alternative Preparation of Compound A

Molecular Weight: 426 41

Exact Mass: 384.08 Molecular Weight: 453.48

5 g of (3-[2-({[4-Methanesulfonyl-2-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]methyl}amino)pyridin-3-yl]prop-2-yn-l-ol), methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK, 50 ml), and 1 , 1 -dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylethanamine were put together in a 200 ml reactor and stirred for 15 h at 100 °C. The mixture was acidified by addition of hydrochloric acid (15 ml) and kept stirring for 15 h at 100 °C. Then water (25 ml) was added, and the temperature was decreased to 50 °C. Caustic soda (about 15 ml) was added to set the pH around 12. Then, after phase split and a second extraction with water (10 ml), the combined aqueous phases were diluted with methyl isobutyl ketone (25 ml) and acidified at 80 °C to pH 4 with hydrochloric acid. The mixture was cooled to 70 °C, seeded and cooled to 0 °C within 2 h. After 2 h aging at 0 °C, the crystalline solid was collected by filtration, washed with methyl isobutyl ketone (10 ml) and water (10 ml), and dried under vacuum at 60 °C until constant weight. Yield 2.93 g.

PATENT

WO-2017210261

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017210261&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Novel deuterated analogs of pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine compounds, particularly fevipiprant and their salts and compositions and combination comprising them are claimed. Also claims is their use for treating asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Compounds are claimed to be a prostaglandin D2 receptor 2 antagonist. Represents first PCT filing from CoNCERT Pharmaceuticals and the inventor on this API.

PAPER

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2017), 8(5), 582-586

Discovery of Fevipiprant (NVP-QAW039), a Potent and Selective DP2Receptor Antagonist for Treatment of Asthma

Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Horsham Research Centre, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB, United Kingdom
ACS Med. Chem. Lett.20178 (5), pp 582–586
DOI: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.7b00157
*E-mail: david.sandham@novartis.com. Tel: + 1 (617)-871-8000.

Abstract

Abstract Image

Further optimization of an initial DP2 receptor antagonist clinical candidate NVP-QAV680 led to the discovery of a follow-up molecule 2-(2-methyl-1-(4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)acetic acid (compound 11, NVP-QAW039, fevipiprant), which exhibits improved potency on human eosinophils and Th2 cells, together with a longer receptor residence time, and is currently in clinical trials for severe asthma.

RM  sodium methanesulfinate and 4-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzaldehyde

Step 1:

4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzaldehyde

A suspension of sodium methanesulfinate (29.6 g, 290 mmol) and 4-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzaldehyde (50 g, 260 mmol) in DMSO (200 ml) was heated at 90˚C overnight. The thick yellow suspension was poured onto crushed ice (ca 800 g), diluted with water and the solid reside collected by filtration, washed with water and dried in vacuo to afford 4- (methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzaldehyde as an off-white solid (50.7 g, 77%). LRMS mass ion not detected. 1H NMR (CDCl3) 3.14 (3H s), 8.30 (1H d J=7.5), 8.36 (1H d J=7.5), 8.40 (1H s), 10.49 (1H s).

Step 2:

(4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)methanol

(4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)methanol as an off-white solid (50.7 g, 99%). LRMS mass ion not detected. 1H NMR (CDCl3) 3.11 (3H s), 5.02 (2H s), 8.09 (1H d J=7.5), 8.19 (1H d J=7.5), 8.25 (1H s).

STEP 3

1-(bromomethyl)-4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzene

1-(bromomethyl)-4-(methylsulfonyl)-2- (trifluoromethyl)benzene (47.1 g, 74%) as a white solid. LRMS mass ion not detected. 1H NMR (CDCl3) 3.11 (3H s), 4.67 (2H s), 7.86 (1H d J=7.5), 8.14 (1H d J=7.5), 8.25 (1H s).

STEP 4

methyl 2-(2-methyl-1-(4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)acetate

(83:17) of methyl 2-(2-methyl-1-(4-(methylsulfonyl)-2- (trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)acetate (N-1 product) and methyl 2-(2-methyl-7-(4- (methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)acetate (N-7 product) as a white solid (22.5 g 42%). LRMS C20H19F3N2O4S requires M+ 440.4 found [MH]+ m/z 441. 1H NMR (CDCl3) 2.27 (3H s), 3.06 (3H s N-1 product), 3.11 (3H s N-7 product), 3.72 (3H s), 3.77 (2H s), 5.03 (2H s N-7 product), 5.82 (2H s N-1 product), 6.66 (1H d J=8.2), 7.16 (1H dd J=7.8, 4.8), 7.91 (1H d, J=8.3), 7.95 (1H d J=7.7), 8.12 (1H d J=7.8 N-7), 8.19 (1H d J=8.1 N-7), 8.17 (1H s N-7), 8.27 (1H d J=3.6), 8.30 (1H s).

FINAL

2-(2-methyl-1-(4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)acetic acid 11 as needles, m.p. 208˚C (16.3 g, 44%). HRMS C19H18F3N2O4S requires [MH]+ 427.0939 found [MH]+ 427.093. 1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) 2.28 (3H s), 3.28 (3H s), 3.73 (2H s), 5.76 (2H s), 6.49 (1H d J=8.3), 7.12 (1H dd J=7.7, 4.8), 7.95 (1H d J=7.8), 8.04 (1H d, J=8.3), 8.14 (1H d J=4.7), 8.26 (1H s), 12.28 (1H br s ). Elemental analysis calcd. for C19H17F3N2O4S: C, 53.52; H, 4.02; N, 6.57; S, 7.52%. Found C, 53.90 ± 0.04; H, 4.28 ± 0.06; N, 6.43 ± 0.02; S, 7.76 ± 0.09%.

PAPER

Drug Metabolism & Disposition (2017), 45(7), 817-825

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9169251 PYRROLOPYRIDINE DERIVATIVES AND THEIR USE AS CRTH2 ANTAGONISTS
2014-06-26
2014-10-16
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016108123 ANTIBODY MOLECULES TO PD-L1 AND USES THEREOF
2015-10-13
2016-04-21
US8455645 Organic compounds
2010-08-19
US8470848 Organic compounds
2010-08-12
US7666878 Pyrrolopyridine Derivatives And Their Use As Crth2 Antagonists
2008-05-15
2010-02-23
US8791256 Pyrrolopyridine derivatives and their use as CRTH2 antagonists
2013-06-05
2014-07-29

References

  1. Jump up to:a b Erpenbeck VJ, Vets E, Gheyle L, Osuntokun W, Larbig M, Neelakantham S, et al. (2016). “Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Fevipiprant (QAW039), a Novel CRTh2 Receptor Antagonist: Results From 2 Randomized, Phase 1, Placebo-Controlled Studies in Healthy Volunteers”Clin Pharmacol Drug Dev5 (4): 306–13. doi:10.1002/cpdd.244PMC 5071756Freely accessiblePMID 27310331.
  2. Jump up^ Sykes DA, Bradley ME, Riddy DM, Willard E, Reilly J, Miah A, Bauer C, Watson SJ, Sandham DA, Dubois G, Charlton SJ. Fevipiprant (QAW039), a Slowly Dissociating CRTh2 Antagonist with the Potential for Improved Clinical Efficacy. Mol Pharmacol. 2016 May;89(5):593-605. doi: 10.1124/mol.115.101832 PMID 26916831
  3. Jump up^ Erpenbeck VJ, Popov TA, Miller D, Weinstein SF, Spector S, Magnusson B, et al. (2016). “The oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant): A phase II study in uncontrolled allergic asthma”. Pulm Pharmacol Ther39: 54–63. doi:10.1016/j.pupt.2016.06.005PMID 27354118.
  4. Jump up^ https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02555683
  5. Jump up^ Gonem S, Berair R, Singapuri A, Hartley R, Laurencin M, Bacher G, et al. (2016). “Fevipiprant, a prostaglandin D2 receptor 2 antagonist, in patients with persistent eosinophilic asthma: a single-centre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial”. Lancet Respir Med4: 699–707. doi:10.1016/S2213-2600(16)30179-5
Fevipiprant
Fevipiprant.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • Investigational
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability Unaffected by food[1]
Metabolism Hepatic glucuronidation
Biological half-life ~20 hours
Excretion Renal (≤30%)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C19H17F3N2O4S
Molar mass 426.41 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

////////////////FEVIPIPRANT, QAW039, PHASE 3, asthma, UNII-2PEX5N7DQ4,2PEX5N7DQ4, NVP-QAW039, QAW039, 872365-14-5,

CC1=C(C2=C(N1CC3=C(C=C(C=C3)S(=O)(=O)C)C(F)(F)F)N=CC=C2)CC(=O)O

LL 3858, SUDOTERB


SUDOTERB.png

Figure imgf000023_0002

LL 3858, SUDOTERB

UNII-SK2537665A;

CAS 676266-31-2;

N-[2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-[[4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]piperazin-1-yl]methyl]pyrrol-1-yl]pyridine-4-carboxamide;

N-[2-Methyl-5-phenyl-3-[[4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1-piperazinyl]methyl]-1H-pyrrol-1-yl]-4-pyridinecarboxamide

Sudoterb(TM)

Molecular Formula: C29H28F3N5O
Molecular Weight: 519.572 g/mol
  • Originator Lupin
  • Class Antituberculars; Isonicotinic acids; Pyrroles
  • Mechanism of Action Undefined mechanism
  • Orphan Drug Status No
  • New Molecular Entity Yes

Highest Development Phases

  • No development reported Tuberculosis

Most Recent Events

  • 23 Jul 2015 No recent reports on development identified – Phase-II for Tuberculosis in India (unspecified route)
  • 11 Dec 2013 Lupin completes a phase II trial in Tuberculosis in India prior to December 2013 (CTRI2009-091-000741)
  • 31 Jul 2010 Lupin completes enrolment in its phase II trial for Tuberculosis in India (CTRI2009-091-000741)

img

Sudoterb HCl
CAS: 1044503-04-9 (2HCl)
Chemical Formula: C29H30Cl2F3N5O
Molecular Weight: 592.4882

Image result

Image result for sudoterb

SYNTHESIS

WO 2006109323

Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease, which usually runs a protracted course, ending in death in majority of the cases, with relapse being a common feature of the disease. It is one of the most important causes of prolonged disability and chronic ill health. It is caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is comparatively difficult to control. Drugs such as isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol streptomycin, para- aminosalisylic acid, ethionamide, cycloserine, capreomycin, kanamycin, thioacetazone etc. have been and are being currently used to treat TB. Amongst these, isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide are the first-line drugs of choice, which are administrated either as a single drug formulation or as a fixed-dose combination of two or more of the aforesaid drugs. Even though, each of the abovementioned first-line drug regimen is highly effective for treatment of TB, however, they are associated with shortcomings, such as unpleasant side- effects and relatively long course of treatment. The later one results in non-compliance of the patient to the treatment leading often to failure of the treatment and most importantly, development of drug resistance. The development of drug resistance has long constituted a principal difficulty in treating human tuberculosis. The second-line drugs, on the other hand are less effective, more expensive and more toxic.

It is estimated that in the next twenty years over one billion people would be newly infected with TB, with 35 million people succumbing to the disease (WHO Fact Sheet No. 104, Global

Alliance for TB Drug Development- Executive Summary of the Scientific Blueprint for TB

Development : http://www.who.int/inf-fs/en/factl04.hfaiil). With the emergence of HIV related

TB, the disease is assuming alarming proportions as one of the killer diseases in the world today.

A major thrust in research on antimycobacterials in the last decade has witnessed the development of new compounds for treatment of the disease, a) differing widely in structures, b) having different mode/mechanism of action, c) possessing favourable pharmacokinetic properties, d) which are safe and having low incidence of side-effects, and e) which provide a cost-effective dosage regimen.

Several new class of compounds have been synthesized and tested for activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the details of chemistry and biology of which could be found in a recent review by B. N. Roy et. al. in J. Ind. Chem. Soc, April 2002, 79, 320-335 and the references cited therein.

Substituted pyrrole derivatives constitute another class of compounds, which hold promise as antimycobacterial agents. The pyrrole derivatives which have been synthesized and tested for antitubercular as well as non-tubercular activity has been disclosed by : a) D. Deidda et. al. in Antimicrob. Agents and Chemother., Nov 1998, 3035-3037. This article describes the inhibitory activity shown by one pyrrole compound, viz. BM 212 having the structure shown below, against both Mycobacterium tuberculosis including drug-resistant mycobacteria and some non-tuberculosis mycobacteria.

Figure imgf000004_0001

The MIC value (μg/ml) against the M. tuberculosis strain 103471 exhibited by BM 212 was 0.70 as against 0.25 found for isoniazid.

b) M. Biava et. al. in J. Med. Chem. Res., 1999, 19-34 have reported the synthesis of several analogues of BM 212, having the general formula (The compounds disclosed by M. Biava et. al. inJ. Med. Chem. Res., 1999, 19-34.) shown hereunder

Figure imgf000005_0001

wherein,

Figure imgf000005_0002

X is H, . CH2— (Oy-Cl ; CH2-(CH2)4-CH3

Figure imgf000005_0003
Figure imgf000005_0004

Z is H ; Y

and the in vitro antimicrobial activity of the compounds against Candida albicans, Candida sp, Cryptococcus neoforma s, Gram- positive or Gram-negative bacteria, isolates of pathogenic plant fungi, Herpes simplex virus, both HSV1 and HSN2, M. tuberculosis, M. smegmαtis, M. mαrinum and M. αvium.

However, the MIC values (μg/ml) of these compounds against the M. tuberculosis strain 103471 are found to be inferior to BM 212 and are in the range of 4-16.

M. Biava et. al. in Bioorg. & Med. Chem. Lett., 1999, 9, 2983-2988. This article describes the synthesis of pyrrole compounds of formula (: The compounds disclosed by M. Biava et. al. in Bioorg. & Med. Chem. Lett., 1999, 9, 2983-2988) shown hereunder

Figure imgf000006_0001

wherein,

X is H or Cl Y is H or Cl

R is N-methyl piperazinyl or thiomorphinyl

and their respective in vitro activity against M. tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis species of mycobacteria .

However, the MIC values (μg/ml) of these compounds against the M. tuberculosis strain 103471 are found to be inferior to BM 212 and are in the range of 2-4.

d) F. Cerreto et. al. in Eur. J. Med. Chem., 1992, 27, 701-708 have reported the synthesis of certain 3-amino-l,5-diary-2 -methyl pyrrole derivatives and their in vitro anti-fungal activity against Candida albicans and Candida sp. However, there is no report on the activity of such compounds against M. tuberculosis.

e) C. Gillet et. al. in Eur. J. Med. Chem.-Chimica Therapeutica, March- April 1976, ϋ(2), 173-181 report the synthesis of several pyrrole derivatives useful as anti-inflammatory agents and as anti-allergants.

f) R. Ragno et. al., Bioorg. & Med. Chem., 2000, 8, 1423-1432. This article reports the synthesis and biological activity of several pyrrole derivatives as well as describes a structure activity relationship between the said pyrrole compounds and antimycobacterial activity. The compounds (The compounds disclosed by R. Rango et. al., Bioorg. & Med. Chem., 2000, 8, 1423-1432)synthesized and tested by the authors is summarized hereunder

Figure imgf000007_0001

wherein,

X is COOH, COOEt, CONHNH2, CH2OH, CH(OH)C6H5, NO2

Figure imgf000007_0002

Y is H, CH3, OCH3, CH2, SO2, or a group of formula

Figure imgf000007_0003

wherein,

R is H, Cl, C2H5, or OCH3 and R1 is H, Cl, F, CH3, or NO2,

A is H or R

Z is a group of formula,

Figure imgf000007_0004

R2 is H, Cl, OH, or OCH3 and R3 is H or Cl

None of the abovementioned disclosures report or suggest the in vivo efficacy including toxicity of any of the compounds described therein against experimental tuberculosis in animal model. Moreover, the higher MIC values of the compounds reported suggest that they may not be very effective in inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

NO PIC

Sudershan Kumar Arora

sudershan arora, Formerly: President R&D, Ranbaxy Lab Limited,

Experience

Inventors Sudershan Kumar AroraNeelima SinhaSanjay JainRam Shankar UpadhayayaGourhari JanaShankar AjayRakesh Kumar Sinha
Applicant Lupin Limited

PATENT

WO 2004026828

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2004026828A1?cl=en

PATENT

US 20050256128

PATENT

https://encrypted.google.com/patents/WO2005107809A2?cl=en

Thus the invention relates to an antimycobacterial combination comprising a therapeutically effective amount of N-(3-[[4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazinyl]methyl]-2- methy 1-5 -phenyl- pyrrolyl)-4-pyridylcarboxamide of formula (I) or a pharmaceutically acceptable non- toxic salt thereof

Figure imgf000011_0001

and a therapeutically effective amount of one or more first line antitubercular drugs selected from the group consisting of isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. Further according to the invention there is provided a process for preparation of an antimycobacterial pharmaceutical composition comprising combining a compound of formula I or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof

Figure imgf000011_0002

and one or more of the first line antitubercular drugs using a dry granulation method, a wet granulation method or a direct compression method. The present invention further provides an antimycobacterial combination comprising a therapeutically effective amount of N-(3-[[4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazinyl]methyl]-2- methyl-5-phenyl-pyrrolyl)-4-pyridylcarboxamide of formula (I) the compound of formula (I) or a pharmaceutically acceptable non-toxic salt thereof

Figure imgf000012_0001

and a therapeutically effective amount of one or more first line antitubercular drugs selected firom isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide for treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis including latent tuberculosis. The present invention provides an antimycobacterial combination comprising a therapeutically effective amount of N-(3-[[4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazinyl]methyl]-2- methyl-5-phenyl-pyrrolyl)-4-pyridylcarboxamide of formula (I) or a pharmaceutically acceptable non-toxic salt thereof

Figure imgf000012_0002

and a therapeutically effective amount of one or more first line antitubercular drugs selected from isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide for treatment and/or inhibition of one or more mycobacterial conditions/ cells including but not limited to sensitive and multi- drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium – intracellular complex, M. fortutium, M. kansasaii and other related mycobacterial species.

ynthesis of Compound of Formula (I) The compound of formula (I) and the pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof can be synthesized by any known method including but not limited to the methods disclosed in our PCT Application No. PCT/IN02/00189 (WO 04/026828 Al), which is incorporated herein by reference. An example of the preparation of N-(3-[[4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl) piperazinyl]methyl]-2-methyl-5-phenyl-pyrrolyl)-4-pyridylcarboxamide is as follows:

Preparation of N-(3 ~[[4-(3 -trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazinyl]methyl)] -2-methyl-5 – phenylpyrrolyl)-4-pyridylcarboxamide

Step l 1 -(4-chlorophenyl)pentane- 1 ,4-dione To a well stirred suspension of anhydrous aluminium chloride (27.0gm, 205.9mmol) in

126ml. of chlorobenzene was added oxopentanoylchloride (23.0gm, 171.6 mmol) drop-wise, over a period of 30-35 minutes at room temperature (25-30EC). The reaction mixture was stirred at the same temperature for 1 hour. After decomposition of the reaction mixture by the addition of solid ice and hydrochloric acid (10ml) the precipitated solid was filtered and the filtrate evaporated on a rotary evaporator to remove all the solvents. The residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate (400 ml), washed with water (2 x 100ml.), brine (100 ml.) and dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate and the solvent evaporated off. The crude product so obtained was chromatographed over silica gel (100-200 mesh) using chloroform as eluent to give 8.6gm (24.07%) of the title compound.

Step 2 N-(5-methyl-2-phenylpyrrolyl)-4 pyridylcarboxamide

A mixture of 1- (chlorophenyl)pentane-l,4-dione (6.0g, 28.50 mmol, as obtained in Step-1) and isonicotinic hydrazide (4.30gm, 31.35 mmol) in benzene (6.0 ml.) was refluxed by over molecular sieves. After two hours, benzene was removed under reduced pressure and the residue dissolved in ethyl acetate, washed with water (2 x 100 ml.) and brine (1 x 50 ml.). The ethyl acetate layer was dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate and the solvent evaporated off. The crude product so obtained as purified by column chromatography over silica gel (100-200 mesh) using 0.2% methanol in chloroform as eluent to give 3.50gm (39.42%) of the title compound.

Step 3 N-(3 – { [4-(3-trifuoromethylphenyl)piperazinyl]methyl} -2-methyl-5 -phenylpyrrolyl)-4- pyridylcarboxamide

To a stirred solution of N-(5-methyl-2-phenylpyrrolyl)-4-pyridylcarboxamide (0.300gm, 1.083 mmol, as obtained in Step-2) in acetonitrile (5.0 ml.) was added a mixture of l-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine hydrochloride (0.288gm, 1.083mmol), 40% formaldehyde (0.032gm, 1.083 mmol) and acetic acid (0.09 ml), drop-wise. After the completion of addition, the reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 4 hours. The reaction mixture was neutralized with sodium hydroxide (20% aq. Soln.) and extracted with ethyl acetate (2 x 50 ml.). The combined ethyl acetate extract was washed with water (2 x 25 ml.), brine (1-χ 20 ml.), and dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate and the solvent evaporated off. TLC of the crude product indicated two spots, which were separated by column chromatography over silica gel (100-200mesh). The more polar compound a eluted out using 80% ethyl acetate- hexane mixture was obtained in 24.34 % (0.130 gm) and was identified as N-(3-{[4-(3- trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazinyl]methyl}-2-methyl-5-phenylpyrrolyl)-4- pyridylcarboxamide m.p.80-82°C, MS: m/z 520 (M+l)

1HNMR(CDC13, *): 2:13 (s, 3H,CH3), 2.60 (bs, 4H, 2xN-CH2), 3.18 (bs, 4H, 2xN-CH2), 3.41 (s, 2H, N-CH2), 6.24 (s, lH,H-4), 6.97-7.03 (4H, m, ArH), 7.22-7.29 (m, 5H,AιΗ), 7.53 (d, 2H, J=6Hz, pyridyl ring), 8.50 (bs, 1H,NH D2O exchangeable), 8.70 (d, 2H, J=6Hz, pyridyl ring).

PATENT

WO 2006109323

Compounds of Formula I are known from PCT International Patent Application WO 2004026828, and were screened for antimycobacterial activity, in various in vitro and in vivo models in mice and guinea pigs. Several compounds exhibited strong antimycobacterial activity against sensitive and MDR strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. Further the compounds of Formula I were also found to be bioavailable, less toxic and safe compared to available anti TB drugs in various animal models.

Thus compounds of Formula I are useful for the effective treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection caused by sensitive/MDR strains. PCT International Patent Application WO 2004026828 also discloses the synthesis of compounds of Formula I,

Figure imgf000004_0001

wherein,

Ri is phenyl or substituted phenyl

R2 is selected from a group consisting of i) phenyl which is unsubstituted or substituted with 1 or 2 substituents, each independently selected from Cl, F, or, ii) pyridine, or iii) naphthalene, or iv) NHCOR4 wherein R4 is aryl, unsubstituted or substituted heteroaryl, unsubstituted or substituted heterocyclyl. R3 is selected from a group of formula

/~-\ /-Un

— N N-R5 and — N X

wherein R5 is phenyl which is unsubstituted or substituted with 1 or 2 substituents each independently selected from the group consisting of halogen, Ci-C4 alkyl, Ci-C4 alkoxy, nitro, amino, haloalkyl, haloalkoxy etc.; unsubstituted or substituted benzyl; unsubstituted or substituted heteroaryl; unsubstituted or substituted heteroaroyl; unsubstituted or substituted diphenylmethyl,

n = 0-2 and X = -NCH3, CH2, S, SO, or SO2

Such that when R2 is phenyl, which is unsubstituted or substituted with 1 or 2 substituents, each independently selected from Cl, F; R5 is not Ci-C4 alkyl, or X is not -NCH3, CH2, S, SO, or SO2, when n = 1, or X is not -CH2 when n = 0 which comprises reacting the compound of Formula Il

»o-i >-CH, (H)

O O

with thionyl chloride, followed by reaction with RiH (wherein Ri is phenyl or substituted phenyl) in presence of aluminium chloride, and then condensation with R2NH2 (wherein R2 is as described above) in presence of p-toluenesulphonic acid to yield the corresponding unsubstituted pyrrole derivatives of Formula V,

Figure imgf000005_0001

which on further treatment with suitable secondary amines in the presence of formaldehyde and acetic acid afforded the desired pyrrole derivatives of Formula I,

Figure imgf000006_0001

which, on reacting with hydrochloric acid give a hydrochloride salt of compound of Formula Ia. wherein m = 1-2, Ri, R2 and R3 are the same as defined earlier. The above-mentioned methods in the prior art for the synthesis of compound of the Formula I suffer from the limitations,

1. In methods described in PCT International Patent Application WO 2004026828 for the synthesis of compounds of Formula I, positional isomers, the compound of Formula I’, are formed. The necessity of their removal through column chromatography decreases the yield of final pure product.

Figure imgf000006_0002

2. The synthesis of oxopentanoyl chloride (compound of Formula III) for the synthesis of compound of Formula I has been described in J. Org. Chem.

1960, 25, 390-392. It comprises reaction of levulinic acid with thionyl chloride at 50 0C for 1h, which results in poor yield.

3. In method described in PCT International Patent Application WO 2004026828 for the synthesis of 1-aryl-pentane-1,4-dione (compound of Formula IV), impurities are formed and purification involves column chromatography which decreases the yield of the product. 4. The synthesis of the intermediate of Formula V requires the use of benzene and high temperature conditions, which involves the formation of undesired by- products.

5. The above-mentioned methods in prior art for the synthesis of all the intermediates and final compounds of Formula I involves column chromatography for purification, which is cumbersome, tedious and not practicable on an industrial scale.

Example 1: Preparation of /V-(2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-f4-C3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)- piperazin-1-ylmethyli-pyrrol-i-ylHsonicotinamide hydrochloride

Step (a): Preparation of 4-oxo-pentanoyl chloride

To a stirred mixture of levulinic acid (340.23 g, 2.93 mol) and Λ/./V- dimethylformamide (6.8 mL, catalytic amount) was added thionyl chloride (367.36 g, 3.087 mol, 1.05 equivalent) drop-wise at 20-30 0C in 1.5-2.0 h. After the complete addition of thionyl chloride, the reaction mixture was stirred at same temperature for 0.5 h (completion of reaction or formation of acid chloride was monitored by GC). After the completion of reaction, thionyl chloride was distilled off under reduced pressure at 20-30 0C. Traces of thionyl chloride were removed by adding benzene (136 mL) under reduced pressure at 30-35 0C and residue was dried at reduced pressure (1-2 mm) at 20-30 0C for 30-60 min to yield 370 g (93.8%) of 4-oxo-pentanoyl chloride as light orange oil. Step (b): Preparation of 1-phenyl-pentane-1,4-dione

Figure imgf000016_0001

(B) (A)

To a stirred suspension of benzene (3700 mL, 10 T w/v of acid chloride) and anhydrous aluminium chloride (440.02 g, 3.30 mol, 1.20 equivalent) was added A- oxo-pentanoyl chloride (370 g, 2.75 mol) drop-wise; the rate of addition was regulated so that the addition required 1.5-2 h and the temperature of the reaction mixture was kept at 25-35 0C. The reaction was completed in 2 h and monitored by GC. After completion of reaction, the reaction mixture was added slowly into cold (5-10 0C) 5% HCI (3700 mL) solution maintaining the temperature below 30 0C. The layers were separated; aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (1×1850 mL). The combined organic phase was washed with water (1 *1850 mL), 5% NaHCO3 solution (1×1850 mL), water (1×1850 mL), 5% NaCI solution (1×1850 mL), dried (Na2SO4), filtered and concentrated under reduced pressure at 35-40 0C, which was finally dried under reduced pressure (1-2 mm) at 35-400C to yield 185.6 g (38.3%) of 1-phenyl-pentane-1,4-dione as thick oil.

Step (c): Preparation of /V-(2-methyl-5-phenyl-pyrrol-1-yI)-isonicotinamide

A mixture of 1-(phenyl)-pentane-1,4-dione (185 g, 1.05 mol), isonicotinic hydrazide (158.4 g, 1.155 mol, 1.1 equivalent), p-toluenesulphonic acid (1.85 g, 1% w/w) and dichloromethane (1850 ml_) was heated under reflux at 40-50 0C under azeotropic distillation for 2-3 h (water was collected in dean stark apparatus). The completion of reaction was monitored by HPLC. After cooling to 25-30 0C the resulting mixture was washed with saturated NaHCO3 solution (1×925 mL), aqueous layer was back extracted with EtOAc (1×925 ml_). The combined organic layers were washed with water (1×925 mL), 5% brine solution (1×925 mL), dried (Na2SO4) and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure to obtain the solid product, which was further dried under reduced pressure (1-2 mm) at 35-40 0C. To this, cyclohexane (925 mL) was added and stirred for 25-30 min, solid separated out was filtered washed with cyclohexane (370 mL). This process was repeated two times more with the same amount of cyclohexane and finally solid was dried under reduced pressure (1-2 mm) at 40-500C; yield 162.23 g (55.7%). White solid, mp 177-179 0C. 1H NMR (CDCI3): δ 2.10 (s, 3H), 5.98 (d, J = 3.4 Hz, 1H), 6.22 (d, J = 3.7 Hz, 1H), 7.237.28 (m, 5H), 7.50 (d, J = 5.6 Hz, 2H), 8.55 (d, J = 5.0 Hz, 2H), 9.82 (s, 1H). MS: m/z (%) 278 (100) [M+1]. Anal. Calcd for C17H15N3O (277.32): C, 73.63; H, 5.45; N, 15.15. Found: C, 73.92; H, 5.67; N, 15.29.

Step (d): Preparation of /V-{2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl- phenyl)-piperazin-1-ylmethyl]-pyrrol-1-yl}-isonicotinamide

To a stirred solution of Λ/-(2-methyl-5-phenyl-pyrrol-1-yl)-isonicotinamide (160 g, 0.577 mol) in acetonitrile (1600 mil), was added drop-wise through pressure equalizing funnel a mixture of 1-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-piperazine monohydrochloride (153.75 g, 0.667 mol, 1.155 equivalent), formaldehyde (17.34 g, 0.577 mol, 1.0 equivalent) and acetic acid (480 mL) at 25-30 0C over a period of 60-90 min. The resulting reaction mixture was stirred for 14-16 h at same temperature and completion of reaction was monitored by TLC. After the completion of reaction, reaction mixture was treated with 20% aqueous NaOH solution (2600 mL). Layers were separated, EtOAc (4000 mL) was added to organic layer, washed with water (2×2000 mL), brine (2×1250 mL), dried (Na2SO4), and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure at 35-38 0C and then dried under reduced pressure (1-2 mm) to yield the mixture of Λ/-{5-methyl-2-phenyl-3-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-piperazin-1-ylmethyl]-pyrrol- 1-yl}-isonicotinamide (A) and Λ/-{2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl- phenyl)-piperazin-1-ylmethyl]-pyrrol-1-yl}-isonicotinamide (B), yield 289 g (97.8%). The ratio of A and B was determined by reverse phase HPLC, which was found to be 19.4% and 76.7%, respectively.

Step (e): Purification of yV-{2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)- piperazin-1-ylmethyl]-pyrrol-1-yl}-isonicotinamide i) The mixture of A and B obtained from Step (d) (279 g) was dissolved in EtOAc (1960 ml_, 7 times) by heating at 50-60 0C. To this activated charcoal (14 g) was added and stirred for 10 min at the same temperature, filtered the activated charcoal through celite bed at 50-60 0C, washed with EtOAc (560 mL). After cooled to 25-30 0C, cyclohexane (2800 mL) was added to the filtrate and stirred the reaction mixture for 14-15 h at 20-35 0C. Solid separated out was filtered, washed with cyclohexane (3500 mL) and dried under reduced pressure (1-2 mm) for 4-5 hours. Yield 151 g (52%). Ratio of A and B was found to be 1.7% and 96.6%, respectively.

ii) The mixture of A and B obtained from Step (e)(i) (151 g) was dissolved in

EtOAc (755 mL, 5 times) by heating at 50-60 0C. After cooled to 25-30 0C, cyclohexane (1510 mL) was added and stirred the reaction mixture for 14-15 h at 20-35 0C. Solid separated out was frltered, washed with cyclohexane (3000 mL) and dried under reduced pressure (1-2 mm) for 4-5 hours. Yield 140 g (92%). Ratio ofA and B was found to be 0.2% and 98.1%, respectively.

Off white solid, mp 191-193 0C. 1H NMR (CDCI3): δ 2.13 (s, 3H), 2.60 (br s, 4H), 3.13 (br s, 4H), 3.41 (s, 2H), 6.24 (s, 1H), 6.977.29 (m, 9H), 7.53 (d, J = 5.6 Hz, 2H), 8.50 (S, 1H), 8.70 (d, J = 5.6 Hz, 2H). 13C NMR (CDCI3): δ 165.93, 151.77, 150.86, 139.74, 133.02, 131.99, 131.43, 129.92, 129.01, 127.79, 127.49, 121.74, 119.09, 116.18, 115.05, 112.48, 109.51, 54.87, 52.99, 48.93, 9.77. MS: m/z (%) 520 (100) [M+U Anal. Calcd for C29H28F3N5O (519.56): C, 67.04; H, 5.43; N, 13.48. Found: C, 67.36; H, 5.71; N, 13.69.

The free base Λ/-{2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-piperazin-1- ylmethyl]-pyrrol-1-yl}-isonicotinamide is obtained in a crystalline form having characteristic powder X-ray diffraction pattern given in Figure 1 with 2Θ values 4.85, 5.99, 6.83, 7.34, 9.15, 9.78, 10.93, 11.98, 13.17, 13.98, 14.33, 14.75, 15.73, 16.42, 17.11. 17.72, 17.95, 18.32, 19.11, 19.75, 20.32, 21.36, 22.04, 23.19, 25.17

Step (f): Preparation of /V-{2-methyl-5-phenyl-3-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)- piperazin-1-ylmethyl]-pyrrol-1-yl}-isonicotinamide hydrochloride

To a stirred solution of 6% w/v HCI-EtOAc solution (821.8 mL, 1.351 mol, 7.0 equivalent) in EtOAc (2000 mL) was added a solution of Λ/-{2-methyl-5-phenyl-3- [4-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-piperazin-1-ylmethyl]-pyrrol-1-yl}-isonicotinamide (100 g, 0.193 mol) in EtOAc (2000 mL) through dropping funnel at 15-20 0C. When the addition was completed (~60 min), the reaction mixture was stirred at 10-150C for 1 h and then nitrogen gas was passed through reaction mass for 1 h until all the excess HCI fumes were removed. Solid so obtained was filtered through suction in an inert atmosphere, washed with ethyl acetate (2×500 mL), diisopropyl ether (2×500 mL) and dried in vacuum oven under reduced pressure (1-2 mm) at 35-40 0C for 15-20 h. Yield 115 g (99%).

Yellow solid, mp 177-179 0C. 1H NMR (DMSO-d6): δ 2.21 (s, 3H), 3.11-3.42 (m, 6H), 3.93-4.23 (m, 4H), 6.62 (s, 1H), 7.09-7.51 (m, 9H), 8.19-8.21 (d, 2H, J = 4.6 Hz), 8.95-8.97 (d, 2H1 J = 4.6 Hz), 11.30 (br s, 1H), 12.86 (s, 1H). MS: m/z (%) 520 (100) [M+1]. Anal. Calcd for C29H28F3N5O.2HCI.3H2O (646.53): C, 53.87; H, 5.61; N, 10.83. Found: C, 53.67; H, 5.59; N, 10.86.

The product obtained was amorphous in nature having the characteristic X-ray powder diffraction pattern given in Figure 2.

Cited Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO2004026828A1 * Sep 20, 2002 Apr 1, 2004 Lupin Limited Pyrrole derivatives as antimycobacterial compounds
WO2005107809A2 * Aug 27, 2004 Nov 17, 2005 Lupin Limited Antimycobacterial pharmaceutical composition comprising an antitubercular drug
US3168532 * Jun 12, 1963 Feb 2, 1965 Parke Davis & Co 1, 5-diarylpyrrole-2-propionic acid compounds
Reference
1 * BIAVA M ET AL: “SYNTHESIS AND MICROBIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF PYRROLE ANALOGS OF BM 212, A POTENT ANTITUBERCULAR AGENT” MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY RESEARCH, BIRKHAEUSER, BOSTON, US, vol. 9, no. 1, 1999, pages 19-34, XP008016949 ISSN: 1054-2523
2 * BIAVA, MARIANGELA ET AL: “Antimycobacterial compounds. New pyrrole derivatives of BM212” BIOORGANIC & MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY , 12(6), 1453-1458 CODEN: BMECEP; ISSN: 0968-0896, 2004, XP002390961
3 * PARLOW J.J.: “synthesis of tetrahydonaphthaenes. part II” TETRAHEDRON, vol. 50, no. 11, 1994, pages 3297-3314, XP002391102
4 * R. RIPS , CH. DERAPPE AND N. BII-HOÏ: “1,2,5-trisubstituted pyrroles of pharmacologic interest” JOURNAL OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, vol. 25, 1960, pages 390-392, XP002390960 cited in the application

REFERENCES

1: Didilescu C, Craiova UM. [Present and future in the use of anti-tubercular
drugs]. Pneumologia. 2011 Oct-Dec;60(4):198-201. Romanian. PubMed PMID: 22420168.

2: Nuermberger EL, Spigelman MK, Yew WW. Current development and future prospects
in chemotherapy of tuberculosis. Respirology. 2010 Jul;15(5):764-78. doi:
10.1111/j.1440-1843.2010.01775.x. Review. PubMed PMID: 20546189; PubMed Central
PMCID: PMC4461445.

3: LL-3858. Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2008 Mar;88(2):126. doi:
10.1016/S1472-9792(08)70015-5. Review. PubMed PMID: 18486049.

4: Ginsberg AM. Drugs in development for tuberculosis. Drugs. 2010 Dec
3;70(17):2201-14. doi: 10.2165/11538170-000000000-00000. Review. PubMed PMID:
21080738.

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016318925 IMIDAZO [1, 2-a]PYRIDINE COMPOUNDS, SYNTHESIS THEREOF, AND METHODS OF USING SAME
2016-02-29
US9309238 IMIDAZO [1, 2-a]PYRIDINE COMPOUNDS, SYNTHESIS THEREOF, AND METHODS OF USING SAME
2010-11-05
2012-08-30
US7491721 Antimycobacterial pharmaceutical composition
2005-11-17
2009-02-17
US2009118509 PREPARATION OF [2-METHYL-5-PHENYL-3-(PIPERAZIN-1-YLMETHYL)] PYRROLE DERIVATIVES
2009-05-07

///////////////LL 3858, SUDOTERB, TB, LUPIN

CC1=C(C=C(N1NC(=O)C2=CC=NC=C2)C3=CC=CC=C3)CN4CCN(CC4)C5=CC=CC(=C5)C(F)(F)F

VOXELOTOR


Image result for VOXELOTOR

VOXELOTOR

GBT 440; GTx-011, Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease

RN: 1446321-46-5
UNII: 3ZO554A4Q8

Molecular Formula, C19-H19-N3-O3, Molecular Weight, 337.3771

Benzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-(1-methylethyl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-pyridinyl)methoxy)-

2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-(propan-2-yl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde

  • Originator Global Blood Therapeutics
  • Class Antianaemics; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Abnormal haemoglobin modulators; Sickle haemoglobin modulators
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Sickle cell anaemia
  • New Molecular Entity Yes

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase III Sickle cell anaemia
  • Phase I Hypoxia; Liver disorders
  • Discontinued Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Nov 2017 Chemical structure information added
  • 28 Oct 2017 Efficacy and adverse event data from a case study under the compassionate use programme in Sickle cell anaemia released by Global Blood Therapeutics
  • 27 Oct 2017 Discontinued – Phase-II for Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in USA (PO)

Voxelotor, also known as GBT-440, is a hemoglobin S allosteric modulator. GBT440 Inhibits Sickling of Sickle Cell Trait Blood Under In Vitro Conditions Mimicking Strenuous Exercise. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease.

Image result for VOXELOTORImage result for VOXELOTOR

Image result for VOXELOTOR

PATENT

WO 2013102142

Inventors Brian MetcalfChihyuan ChuangJeffrey WarringtonKumar PAULVANNANMatthew P. JacobsonLan HUABradley Morgan
Applicant Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc.Cytokinetics, Inc.The Regents Of The University Of California

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2013102142

Hemoglobin (Hb) is a tetrameric protein in red blood cells that transports up to four oxygen molecules from the lungs to various tissues and organs throughout the body.

Hemoglobin binds and releases oxygen through conformational changes, and is in the tense (T) state when it is unbound to oxygen and in the relaxed (R) state when it is bound to oxygen. The equilibrium between the two conformational states is under allosteric regulation. Natural compounds such as 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), protons, and carbon dioxide stabilize hemoglobin in its de-oxygenated T state, while oxygen stabilizes hemoglobin in its oxygenated R state. Other relaxed R states have also been found, however their role in allosteric regulation has not been fully elucidated.

Sickle cell disease is a prevalent disease particularly among those of African and Mediterranean descent. Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) contains a point mutation where glutamic acid is replaced with valine, allowing the T state to become susceptible to polymerization to give the HbS containing red blood cells their characteristic sickle shape. The sickled cells are also more rigid than normal red blood cells, and their lack of flexibility can lead to blockage of blood vessels. Certain synthetic aldehydes have been found to shift the equilibrium from the polymer forming T state to the non-polymer forming R state (Nnamani et al. Chemistry & Biodiversity Vol. 5, 2008 pp. 1762-1769) by acting as allosteric modulators to stabilize the R state through formation of a Schiff base with an amino group on hemoglobin.

US 7, 160,910 discloses 2-furfuraldehydes and related compounds that are also allosteric modulators of hemoglobin. One particular compound 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde (5HMF) was found to be a potent hemoglobin modulator both in vitro and in vivo. Transgenic mice producing human HbS that were treated with 5HMF were found to have significantly improved survival times when exposed to extreme hypoxia (5% oxygen). Under these hypoxic conditions, the 5HMF treated mice were also found to have reduced amounts of hypoxia-induced sickled red blood cells as compared to the non-treated mice.

A need exists for therapeutics that can shift the equilibrium between the deoxygenated and oxygenated states of Hb to treat disorders that are mediated by Hb or by abnormal Hb such as HbS. A need also exists for therapeutics to treat disorders that would benefit from having Hb in the R state with an increased affinity for oxygen. Such therapeutics would have applications ranging, for example, from sensitizing hypoxic tumor cells that are resistant to standard radiotherapy or chemotherapy due to the low levels of oxygen in the cell, to treating pulmonary and hypertensive disorders, and to promoting wound healing

Example 18. Preparation of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (Compound 43).

A mixture of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (1.58 g, 11.47 mmol, 2 eq.) and K2CO3 (2.4 g, 17.22 mmol, 3 eq.) in DMF (150 mL) was stirred at rt for 10 min. To this mixture was added 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(1-isopropyI-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine hydrochloride (1.56 g, 5.74 mmol, leq.) at rt. The mixture was heated at 50 °C for 2 h, filtered, concentrated and purified on silica gel using a mixture of EtOAc and hexanes as eluent to give 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (1.71 g, 88%) as a pale yellow solid.

PAPER

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2017), 8(3), 321-326.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acsmedchemlett.6b00491

Discovery of GBT440, an Orally Bioavailable R-State Stabilizer of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

 Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc., South San Francisco, California 94080, United States
 Cytokinetics, Inc., South San Francisco, California 94080, United States
 Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, United States
 Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94158, United States
§ Tandem Sciences, Inc., Menlo Park, California 94025, United States
ACS Med. Chem. Lett.20178 (3), pp 321–326
DOI: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.6b00491

ACS Editors’ Choice – This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.

Abstract Image

We report the discovery of a new potent allosteric effector of sickle cell hemoglobin, GBT440 (36), that increases the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen and consequently inhibits its polymerization when subjected to hypoxic conditions. Unlike earlier allosteric activators that bind covalently to hemoglobin in a 2:1 stoichiometry, 36 binds with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Compound 36 is orally bioavailable and partitions highly and favorably into the red blood cell with a RBC/plasma ratio of ∼150. This partitioning onto the target protein is anticipated to allow therapeutic concentrations to be achieved in the red blood cell at low plasma concentrations. GBT440 (36) is in Phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of sickle cell disease (NCT03036813).

Figure

cheme 1. Synthesis of 36a

aReagents and conditions: (a) MOMCl, DIEPA, DCM, 0 °C to rt 2 h, 90%; (b) nBuLi, DMF, THF, −78 to 0 °C, 94%; (c) 12 N HCl, THF, rt, 1.5 h, 81%; (d) Pd(dppf)Cl2, NaHCO3, H2O/dioxane, 100 °C, 12 h, 40%; (e) SOCl2, DCM, rt, 100%; (f) Na2CO3, DMF, 65 °C, 1.5 h, 81%; (g) 12 N HCl, THF, rt, 3 h, 96%.

GBT440 (36) (15.3 g).

HRMS calcd for C19H20N3O3 (M+H + ) 338.1499, found 338.1497; MS (ESI) m/z 338.4 [M+H]+ ;

1H NMR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 11.94 (s, 1H), 10.37 (d, J = 0.6 Hz, 1H), 8.75 (dd, J = 4.8, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.97 (dd, J = 7.8, 1.6 Hz, 1H), 7.63 – 7.57 (m, 1H), 7.46 – 7.33 (m, 2H), 6.57 (dt, J = 8.6, 0.7 Hz, 1H), 6.34 (d, J = 1.9 Hz, 1H), 6.27 (dt, J = 8.3, 1.0 Hz, 1H), 5.07 (s, 2H), 4.65 (hept, J = 6.6 Hz, 1H), 1.47 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 7H);

13C NMR (101 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 194.0, 162.9, 161.1, 149.6, 149.1, 139.1, 138.2, 138.2, 138.0, 131.6, 124.0, 111.1, 110.2, 107.4, 103.5, 67.8, 50.5, 23.1.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acsmedchemlett.6b00491/suppl_file/ml6b00491_si_001.pdf

PATENT

WO 2015031285

https://www.google.co.in/patents/WO2015031285A1?cl=en

2-Hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde is a compound having the formula:

Sickle cell disease is a disorder of the red blood cells, found particularly among those of African and Mediterranean descent. The basis for sickle cell disease is found in sickle hemoglobin (HbS), which contains a point mutation relative to the prevalent peptide sequence of hemoglobin (Hb).

[ Hemoglobin (Hb) transports oxygen molecules from the lungs to various tissues and organs throughout the body. Hemoglobin binds and releases oxygen through

conformational changes. Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) contains a point mutation where glutamic acid is replaced with valine, allowing HbS to become susceptible to polymerization to give the HbS containing red blood cells their characteristic sickle shape. The sickled cells are also more rigid than normal red blood cells, and their lack of flexibility can lead to blockage of blood vessels. A need exists for therapeutics that can treat disorders that are mediated by Hb or by abnormal Hb such as HbS, such as 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde hydrochloride.

When used for treating humans, it is important that a crystalline form of a therapeutic agent, like 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde, or a salt thereof, retains its polymorphic and chemical stability, solubility, and other physicochemical properties over time and among various manufactured batches of the agent. If the physicochemical properties vary with time and among batches, the administration of a therapeutically effective dose becomes problematic and may lead to toxic side effects or to ineffective therapy, particularly if a given polymorph decomposes prior to use, to a less active, inactive, or toxic compound. Therefore, it is important to choose a form of the crystalline agent that is stable, is manufactured reproducibly, and has physicochemical properties favorable for its use as a therapeutic agent.

Example ί : Synthesis of Compound 15

OH DIPEA OMOM

(8063J To s solution of 2 >ronao enzsae-i -diol (5 g, 26.45 m ol) m. DCM (50 ml) at 0 *C was added DIPEA (11.54 mL, 66.13 aan l) and MOMCi (4.42 mL. 58.19 ratnoi). The mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 1.5 h, and then warmed to room temperature. The so ntioa was dilated with DCM, washed with sat. NaH€<¾, brum dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was purified by coinran ihexane&/EtOAc~4;l) to give desired product 15.58 g (90%).

14C

Example 2: Synthesis of Compound 13 from 15

[0064] To a solution of 2-bromo-l ,3-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzene (15) (19.9g, 71.8 mmol) in THF (150 mL) at -78 °C was added BuLi (2.5 M, 31.6 mL, 79.0 mmol) dropwise. The solution was stirred at -78 °C for 25 min (resulting white cloudy mixture), then it was warmed to 0 °C and stirred for 25 min. The reaction mixture slowly turns homogenous. To the solution was added DMF at 0 °C. After 25 min, HPLC showed reaction completed. The mixture was quenched with sat. NH4C1 (150 mL), diluted with ether (300 mL). The organic layer was separated, aq layer was further extracted with ether (2X200 mL), and organic layer was combined, washed with brine, dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was triturated to give 14.6 g desired product. The filtrate was then concentrated and purified by column to give additional 0.7 g, total mass is 15.3 g.

Example 3: Synthesis of Compound 13 from resorcinol 11

1.1 R:TMEDA R:BuLi S:THF 2 h -10°C

Journal of Organic Chemistry, 74(1 1), 431 1-4317; 2009

[0065] A three-necked round-bottom flask equipped with mechanical stirrer was charged with 0.22 mol of NaH (50 % suspension in mineral oil) under nitrogen atmosphere. NaH was washed with 2 portions (100 mL) of n-hexane and then with 300 mL of dry diethyl ether; then 80 mL of anhydrous DMF was added. Then 0.09 mol of resorcinol 11, dissolved in 100 mL of diethyl ether was added dropwise and the mixture was left under stirring at rt for 30 min. Then 0.18 mol of MOMCI was slowly added. After 1 h under stirring at rt, 250 mL of water was added and the organic layer was extracted with diethyl ether. The extracts were

15A

washed with brine, dried (Na2S04), then concentrated to give the crude product that was purified by silica gel chromatography to give compound 12 (93 % yield).

15B

[0066] A three-necked round-bottom flask was charged with 110 mL of n-hexane, 0.79 mol of BuLi and 9.4 mL of tetramethylethylendiamine (TMEDA) under nitrogen atmosphere. The mixture was cooled at -10 °C and 0.079 mol of bis-phenyl ether 12 was slowly added. The resulting mixture was left under magnetic stirring at -10 °C for 2 h. Then the temperature was raised to 0 °C and 0.067 mol of DMF was added dropwise. After 1 h, aqueous HC1 was added until the pH was acidic; the mixture was then extracted with ethyl ether. The combined extracts were washed with brine, dried (Na2S04), and concentrated to give aldehyde 13

(84%).

[0067] 2,6-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (13): mp 58-59 °C (n-hexane) ; IR (KBr) n: 1685 (C=0) cm“1; 1H-NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) δ 3.51 (s, 6H, 2 OCH3), 5.28 (s, 4H, 2 OCH20), 6.84 (d, 2H, J = 8.40 Hz, H-3, H-5), 7.41 (t, 1H, J = 8.40 Hz, H-4), 10.55 (s, 1H, CHO); MS, m/e (relative intensity) 226 (M+, 3), 180 (4), 164 (14), 122 (2), 92 (2), 45 (100); Anal. Calc’d. for CnHi405: C,58.40; H, 6.24. Found: C, 57.98; H, 6.20.

Example 4: The Synthesis of Compound 16

13 16

81 %

[0068] To a solution of 2,6-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (13) (15.3 g, 67.6 mmol) in THF (105 mL) (solvent was purged with N2) was added cone. HC1 (12N, 7 mL) under N2, then it was further stirred under N2 for 1.5 h. To the solution was added brine (100 mL) and ether (150 ml). The organic layer was separated and the aqueous layer was further extracted with ether (2×200 mL). The organic layer was combined, washed with brine, dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was purified by column (300g,

hexanes/EtOAc=85: 15) to give desired product 16 (9.9 g) as yellow liquid.

Example 5: Synthesis of Compound 17

16

[0069] To a solution of 2-hydroxy-6-(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (16) (10.88 g, 59.72 mmol) in DMF (120 mL) (DMF solution was purged with N2 for 10 min) was added K2C03 (32.05 g, 231.92 mmol) and 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine hydrochloride (10) (15.78 g, 57.98 mmol). The mixture was heated at 65 °C for 1.5 h, cooled to rt, poured into ice water (800 mL). The precipitated solids were isolated by filtration, dried and concentrated to give desired product (17, 18 g).

Example 6: Synthesis of Compound (I)

[0070] To a solution of 2-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)-6-(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (17) (18 g, 47.19 mmol) in THF (135 mL, solution was purged with N2) was added cone. HCI (12N, 20 mL). The solution was stirred at rt for 3 h when HPLC showed the reaction complete. The mixture was added to a solution of NaHC03 (15 g) in water (1.2 L), and the resulting precipitate was collected by filtration, dried to give crude solid, which was further purified by column (DCM/EtOAc=60:40) to give pure product

(15.3 g).

Example 7: Synthesis of Compound I (free base) and its HCI salt form

[0071] Compound (I) free base (40g) was obtained from the coupling of the alcohol intermediate 7 and 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldedhye 9 under Mitsunobu conditions. A procedure is also provided below:

17

Example 8: Synthesis of Compound (I) by Mitsunobu coupling

[0072] Into a 2000-mL three neck round-bottom flask, which was purged and maintained with an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, was placed a solution of [2-[l-(propan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl]pyridin-3-yl]methanol (7) (70 g, 322.18 mmol, 1.00 equiv) in tetrahydrofuran (1000 mL). 2,6-Dihydroxybenzaldehyde (9) (49.2 g, 356.21 mmol, 1.10 equiv) and PPh3 (101 g, 385.07 mmol, 1.20 equiv) were added to the reaction mixture. This was followed by the addition of a solution of DIAD (78.1 g, 386.23 mmol, 1.20 equiv) in tetrahydrofuran (200 ml) dropwise with stirring. The resulting solution was stirred overnight at room temperature. The resulting solution was diluted with 500 ml of H20. The resulting solution was extracted with 3×500 ml of dichloromethane and the combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under vacuum. The residue was applied onto a silica gel column with EA:PE (1 :50-l :3) as eluent to yield the crude product. The crude product was re-crystallized from i-propanol/H20 in the ratio of 1/1.5. This resulted in 40 g (37%) of 2-hydroxy-6-([2-[l-(propan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl]pyridin-3-yl]methoxy)benzaldehyde as a light yellow solid. The compound exhibited a melting point of 80-82 °C. MS (ES, m/z): 338.1 [M+l]. 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 11.72(s, 1H), 10.21(s, 1H), 8.76(d, J=3.6Hz, 1H), 8.24(d, J=2.7Hz, lH),7.55(m, 3H), 6.55(m,3H) ,5.21 (s, 2H), 4.65 (m, 1H), 1.37 (d, J=5.1Hz, 6H). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) δ 11.96 (s, 1H), 10.40 (s, 1H), 8.77 (dd, J= 4.8, 1.5 Hz, 1H), 8.00 (d, J= 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.63 (d, J= 1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.49 – 7.34 (m, 2H), 6.59 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 1H), 6.37 (d, J= 1.8 Hz, 1H), 6.29 (d, J= 8.2 Hz, 1H), 5.10 (s, 2H), 4.67 (sep, J= 6.7 Hz, 1H), 1.50 (d, J= 6.6 Hz, 6H).

[0073] In another approach, multiple batches of Compound (I) free base are prepared in multi gram quantities (20g). The advantage of this route is the use of mono-protected 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (16), which effectively eliminates the possibility of bis-alkylation side product. The mono-MOM ether of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (16) can be obtained from two starting points, bromoresorcinol (14) or resorcinol (11) [procedures described in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, 74(11), 4311-4317; 2009 ]. All steps and procedures are provided below. Due to the presence of phenolic aldehyde group, precautions (i.e., carry out all reactions under inert gas such as nitrogen) should be taken to avoid oxidation of the phenol and/or aldehyde group.

18

Preparation of compound I HC1 salt: A solution of compound I (55.79 g, 165.55 mmol) in acetonitrile (275 mL) was flushed with nitrogen for 10 min, then to this solution was added 3N aqueous HC1 (62 mL) at room temperature. The mixture was stirred for additional 10 min after the addition, most of the acetonitrile (about 200 mL) was then removed by evaporation on a rota

PATENT

WO2017096230

PATENT

WO-2017197083

Processes for the preparation of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (also referred to as voxelotor or Compound (I)) and its intermediates is claimed. Compound (I) binds to hemoglobin and increases it oxygen affinity and hence can be useful for the treatment of diseases such as sickle cell disease.

Disclosed herein are processes for synthesizing 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (Compound (I)) and intermediates used in such processes. Compound (I) binds to hemoglobin and increases it oxygen affinity and hence can be useful for the treatment of diseases such as sickle cell disease.

BACKGROUND

Compound (I) is disclosed in Example 17 of the International Publication No.

WO2013/102142. Compound (I) binds to hemoglobin and increases it oxygen affinity and hence can be useful for the treatment of diseases such as sickle cell disease.

In general, for a compound to be suitable as a therapeutic agent or part of a therapeutic agent, the compound synthesis must be amendable to large scale manufacturing and isolation. The large scale manufacturing and isolation should not impact the physical properties and purity of the compound nor should it negatively impact cost or efficacy of a formulated active ingredient. Accordingly, scale up of manufacturing and isolation may require significant efforts to meet these goals.

ompound (I) has been synthesized by certain methods starting with 2,6-dihydroxbenzaldehyde (compound 1) where each hydroxyl moiety is protected with an unbranched, straight-chain alkyl or alkoxyalkyl such as, for example, methyl or methoxymethyl. Following installation of the aldehyde group, various methods of deprotection of the hydroxyl group were employed to synthesize compound (1) used in the synthesis and production of Compound (I). However, the deprotection processes used lead to unwanted polymerization and decomposition reactions of compound (1) – attributed, in part, to the conditions used for

deprotection of the hydroxy groups. The undesired byproducts yield complex mixtures, lower yields of Compound (I), and require significant effort to purify Compound (I) to a degree acceptable for use as a part of a therapeutic agent, thus rendering the above processes impractical for commercial scale synthesis of Compound (I).

Provided herein are processes for the synthesis of Compound (I):

Examples

Example 1

Synthesis of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (Compound (1))

Step 1:

Tetrahydrofuran (700 mL) was added to resorcinol (170g, 1.54 mol, leq.) under inert gas protection, followed by addition of pyridinium tosylate (3.9 g, 15.4 mmol, O.Oleq.), THF 65 mL) and the reaction mixture was cooled down to 0 – 5 °C. Within 1 – 1.5 h ethylvinyl ether (444 mL, 4.63 mol, 3.0 eq.) was added while maintaining a temperature <5°C. After the addition was complete the reaction mixture was allowed to reach room temperature within 1.5 h. The reaction was stirred overnight, cooled down to 10-15 °C, and 510 mL of ½ sat. NaHC03 was added while maintaining the reaction solution below 20 °C. The phases were separated. The organic phase was washed once with 425 mL of water and once with 425 mL 12.5% NaCl solution and evaporated and azeotroped with THF to give bis-EOE-protected resorcinol (401.2 g, 1.55 mol, 102% uncorrected) as a clear colorless to yellowish oil.

Step 2:

Bis-EOE-protected resorcinol (390 g of, actual: 398.6g = 1.53 mol, 1 eq., corrected to 100%) conversion) was added under inert gas protection to a 6 L glass vessel and THF (1170 mL) was added. The reaction mixture was cooled down to -10°C to -5°C and n-BuLi (625 mL, 2.7 M in heptane, 1.687 mol, 1.1 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was agitated at -5°C- 0°C for 30-40 min and then DMF (153.4 mL, 1.99 mmol, 1.3 eq.) was added starting at -10°C to -5°C. The reaction mixture was stirred until complete and then quenched with lNHCl/EtOAc. It was also discovered, inter alia, that protection with the EOE groups not only resulted in less byproducts but appeared to increase the speed of the formylation reaction to provide 2,6-bis(l-ethoxyethoxy)benzaldehyde (compound (2)).

The mixture was worked up, phase separated and the aqueous washed with MTBE. After aqueous wash to remove salts the organic phase was concentrated to the neat oil to obtain the compound (2) as yellow oil (almost quantitative).

A batch preparation was performed using solvent swap and was completed faster than other known methods for synthesizing Compound (I) with better purity and yield. The deprotection sequence allowed in-situ use of compound (2).

Step 3:

To the reaction solution of Step 2 was added IN HC1 (1755 mL) while maintaining the temperature < 20°C. The pH was of the solution was adjusted to pH = 0.7 – 0.8 with 6 M HC1.

The reaction mixture was stirred for 16 h. After the reaction was complete the organic phase was separated and 1560 mL of methyl tert butyl ether was added. The organic phase was washed once with 1170 mL of IN HC1, once with 780 mL of ½ sat. NaCl solution and once with 780 mL of water and then concentrated to a volume of – 280mL. To the solution was added 780 mL of methyl tert butyl ether and concentrate again to 280 mL [temperature <45°C, vacuo]. To the slurry was added 780 mL of acetonitrile and the solution was concentrated in vacuo at T < 45°C to a final volume of – 280 mL. The slurry was heated to re-dissolve the solids. The solution was cooled slowly to RT and seeded at 60-65 °C to initiate crystallization of the product. The slurry was cooled down to -20°C to -15°C and agitated at this temperature for 1-2 h. The product was isolated by filtration and washed with DCM (pre-cooled to -20°C to -15°C) and dried under a stream of nitrogen to give 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde as a yellow solid. Yield: 138.9 g (1.00 mol, 65.6%).

Example 1A

Alternate Synthesis of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde compound (1)

Step 1:

In a suitable reactor under nitrogen, tetrahydrofuran (207 L) was added to resorcinol (46 kg, 0.42 kmol, leq.) followed by addition of pyridinium tosylate (1.05 kg, 4.2 mol, O.Oleq.), and the reaction mixture was cooled down to 0 – 5 °C. Within 1 – 1.5 h ethylvinyl ether (90.4 kg, 120.5 L, 125 kmol, 3.0 eq.) was added while maintaining a temperature <5°C. After the addition was complete the reaction mixture was allowed to reach room temperature within 1.5 h. The reaction was stirred overnight, cooled down to 10-15 °C, and 138 L of aqueous 4% NaHC03 was added while maintaining the reaction solution below 20 °C. The phases were separated. The organic phase was washed once with 115 L of water and once with 125.2 kg of a 12.5% NaCl solution. The organic layer was dried by azeotropic distillation with THF to a water content value < 0.05%) (by weight) to yield bis-EOE-protected resorcinol (106.2 kg, 0.42 kmol) as a solution in THF. An advantage over previously reported protection procedures is that the bis-EOE-protected resorcinol product does not need to be isolated as a neat product. The

product-containing THF solution can be used directly in the next reaction step thus increasing throughput and reducing impurity formation.

Step 2:

Bis-EOE-protected resorcinol solution (assumption is 100% conversion) was added under inert gas protection to suitable reactor. The reaction mixture was cooled down to -10°C to -5°C and n-BuLi (117.8 kg, 25% in heptane, 1.1 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was agitated at -5°C- 0°C for 30-40 min and then DMF (39.7 kg, 0.54 kmol, 1.3 eq.) was added at -10°C to -5°C. The reaction mixture was stirred until complete and then quenched with aqueous HC1 (1M, 488.8 kg) to give 2,6-bis(l-ethoxyethoxy)benzaldehyde. An advantage over previously reported procedures of using EOE protecting group is that the HC1 quenched solution can be used directly in the deprotection step, and 2,6-bis(l-ethoxyethoxy)benzaldehyde does not need to be isolated as a neat oil.

Step 3:

The pH of the quenched solution was adjusted to < 1 with aqueous HC1 (6M, ca 95.9 kg) and the reaction mixture stirred at ambient temperature for 16 h. After the reaction was complete the organic phase was separated and 279.7 kg of methyl tert butyl ether was added. The organic phase was washed once with aqueous IN HC1 (299 kg), once with aqueous 12.5% NaCl (205.8 kg) and once with 189 kg of water and then concentrated to a volume of ca. 69 L. To the slurry was added 164 kg of acetonitrile and the solution was concentrated in vacuo at T < 45°C to a final volume of ca. 69 L. The slurry was heated to re-dissolve the solids. The solution was seeded at 60-65 °C to initiate crystallization of the product and cooled slowly to RT over 8 hrs. The slurry was cooled down to -20 °C to -15°C and agitated at this temperature for l-2h. The product was isolated by filtration and washed with DCM (50.3 kg, pre-cooled to -20 °C to -15 °C) and dried under a stream of nitrogen to yield 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde as a yellow solid. Yield: 37.8 kg (0.27 kmol, 65.4% Yield). The described telescoped approach from deprotection to crystallization increases the throughput and integrity of the product.

Example 2

Synthesis of 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine

dihydrochloride salt

Step 1:

An appropriately sized flask was purged with nitrogen and charged with (2-chloropyridin-3-yl)methanol (1.0 equiv), sodium bicarbonate (3.0 equiv), [1, l ‘-bis(diphenyl-phosphino)-ferrocene]dichloropalladium (5 mol %), l-isopropyl-5-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazole (1.2 equiv), and a mixture of 2-MeTHF (17.4 vol) and deionized water (5.2 vol). The resulting solution was heated to 70°C to 75°C and conversion monitored by HPLC. Once the reaction was complete, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, diluted with deionized water, and the phases were separated. The organic layer was extracted with 2 N HC1 (10 vol) and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was washed with MTBE. The pH of the aqueous phase was adjusted to 8-9 with 6 N NaOH. The product was extracted into EtOAc, treated with Darco G-60 for 30 to 60 min, dried over MgS04, filtered through Celite®, and concentrated to give (2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methanol as a brown oil.

Step 2:

A suitably equipped reactor was charged with (2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methanol hydrochloride salt (1 equivalent) and purified water. An aqueous sodium

bicarbonate solution (8% NaHC03) was added slowly to maintain the solution temperature between 17 °C to 25 °C. After addition was complete, the reaction mixture was stirred at 17 °C to 25 °C and dichloromethane was added and the organic layer was separated. DCM solution was then distilled under atmospheric conditions at approximately 40°C and the volume was reduced. DCM was added the reactor and the contents of the reactor are stirred at 20°C to 30°C until a clear solution is formed. The contents of the reactor were cooled to 0°C to 5°C and thionyl chloride was charged to the reactor slowly to maintain a temperature of < 5 °C. The reaction solution was stirred at 17 °C to 25 °C. When the reaction was complete, a solution of HC1 (g) in 1,4-dioxane (ca. 4 N, 0.8 equiv.) was charged to the reactor slowly to maintain the solution temperature between 17 °C and 25 °C. The product 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl- lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine dihydrochloride salt was filtered washed with dichloromethane and dried.

Example 3

Synthesis of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde

Form I

(I)

tably equipped reactor was charged with 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine dihydrochloride salt (1 equivalent), sodium iodide (0.05 equivalent), sodium bicarbonate (4 equivalent), l-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), and 2,6-dihydroxy-benzaldehyde (1 to 1.05 equiv.). The reaction mixture was heated slowly to 40 °C to 50 °C and stirred until the reaction was complete. Water was then added and the reaction mixture was cooled and maintained at 17 °C to 25 °C. When the water addition was complete, the reaction mixture was stirred at 17 °C to 25 °C and slowly cooled to 0°C to 5°C and the resulting solids were collected by filtration. The solids were washed with a 0 °C to 5 °C 2: 1 water/NMP solution, followed by 0 °C to 5 °C water. The solids were filtered and dried to give 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde as Form I or a mixture of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde as Form I Form I and NMP solvates.

Alternative Synthesis:

A suitably equipped reactor was charged with 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine bishydrochloride salt (1 equivalent), sodium iodide (0.05 equivalent), sodium bicarbonate (3 to 4 equivalent), l-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (7 equivalent, NMP), and 2,6-dihydoxybenzaldehyde (1.05 equivalent). The reaction mixture was heated to 40 °C to 50° C and stirred until the reaction was complete. Water (5 equivalent) was then added while maintaining the contents of the reactor at 40 °C to 460 C and the resulting clear solution seeded with 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde Form I. Additional water (5 equivalent) was added while maintaining the contents of the reactor at 40 °C to 500 C, the reactor contents cooled to 15 °C to 25 0 C, and the reactor contents stirred for at least 1 hour at 15 °C to 25 0 C. The solids were collected, washed twice with 1 :2 NMP: water and twice with water, and dried to yield 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde Form I devoid of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde as NMP solvates.

Example 4

Preparation of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)- benzaldehyde Form II

Step 1:

A suitably equipped reactor with an inert atmosphere was charged with crude 2-hydroxy- 6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (from Example 3 above) and MTBE and the contents stirred at 17°C to 25°C until dissolution was achieved. The reaction solution was passed through a 0.45 micron filter and MTBE solvent volume reduced using vacuum distillation at approximately 50 °C. The concentrated solution was heated to 55°C to 60°C to dissolve any crystallized product. When a clear solution was obtained, the solution was cooled to 50 °C to 55 °C and n-heptane was added. 2-Hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (e.g., Form II) seeds in a slurry of n-heptane were charged and the solution was stirred at 50°C to 55°C. The solution was cooled to 45 °C to 50 °C and n-heptane was added to the reactor slowly while maintaining a reaction solution temperature of 45°C to 50°C. The reaction solution are stirred at 45°C to 50°C and then slowly cooled to 17°C to 25°C. A sample was taken for FTIR analysis and the crystallization was considered complete when FTIR analysis confirmed 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)-benzaldehyde (Form II). The contents of the reactor were then cooled to 0°C to 5°C and the solids were isolated and washed with cold n-heptane and dried.

REFERENCES

1: Oksenberg D, Dufu K, Patel MP, Chuang C, Li Z, Xu Q, Silva-Garcia A, Zhou C, Hutchaleelaha A, Patskovska L, Patskovsky Y, Almo SC, Sinha U, Metcalf BW, Archer DR. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease. Br J Haematol. 2016 Oct;175(1):141-53. doi: 10.1111/bjh.14214. PubMed PMID: 27378309.

2: Dufu K, Lehrer-Graiwer J, Ramos E, Oksenberg D. GBT440 Inhibits Sickling of Sickle Cell Trait Blood Under In Vitro Conditions Mimicking Strenuous Exercise. Hematol Rep. 2016 Sep 28;8(3):6637. PubMed PMID: 27757216; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5062624.

3: Ferrone FA. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease. Br J Haematol. 2016 Aug;174(4):499-500. doi: 10.1111/bjh.14212. PubMed PMID: 27410726.

4: Oder E, Safo MK, Abdulmalik O, Kato GJ. New developments in anti-sickling agents: can drugs directly prevent the polymerization of sickle haemoglobin in vivo? Br J Haematol. 2016 Oct;175(1):24-30. doi: 10.1111/bjh.14264. Review. PubMed PMID: 27605087; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5035193.

////////////VOXELOTOR, GBT 440, GTx-011, Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease, phase 3, gbt, 1446321-46-5, orphan drug

CC(C)n1nccc1c2ncccc2COc3cccc(O)c3C=O

DISCLAIMER

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS ” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

TAFAMIDIS


Tafamidis skeletal.svgChemSpider 2D Image | Tafamidis | C14H7Cl2NO3

Tafamidis

  • Molecular Formula C14H7Cl2NO3
  • Average mass 308.116 Da

TAFAMIDIS, Fx-1006A
PF-06291826

2-(3,5-Dichlorophenyl)-1,3-benzoxazole-6-carboxylic acid
594839-88-0 [RN]
6-Benzoxazolecarboxylic acid, 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-
Vyndaqel
Tafamidis meglumine
Familial amyloid polyneuropathy LAUNCHED PFIZER 2011 EU
ApprovedJapanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in September 2013
PHASE 3, at  FDA, Amyloidosis, PFIZER
Image result for Vyndaqel tafamidis meglumine
Molecular Formula: C21H24Cl2N2O8
Molecular Weight: 503.329 g/mol

CAS 951395-08-7

Image result for Vyndaqel tafamidis meglumine

D-Glucitol, 1-deoxy-1-(methylamino)-, 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-6-benzoxazolecarboxylate

Tafamidis (INN, or Fx-1006A,[1] trade name Vyndaqel) is a drug for the amelioration of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis(also familial amyloid polyneuropathy, or FAP), a rare but deadly neurodegenerative disease.[2][3] The drug was approved by the European Medicines Agency in November 2011 and by the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in September 2013.[4]

In 2011 and 2012, orphan drug designation was assigned in Japan and the U.S., respectively, for the treatment of transthyretin amyloid polyneuropathy. This designation was assigned in the E.U. in 2012 for the treatment of senile systemic amyloidosis. In 2017, fast drug designation was assigned in the U.S. for the treatment of transthyretin cardiomyopathy.

Tafamidis is a novel specific transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer or dissociation inhibitor. TTR is a tetramer that is responsible in transporting the retinol-binding protein-vitamin A complex and minimally transporting thyroxine in the blood. In TTR-related disorders such as transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP), tetramer dissociation is accelerated that results in unregulated amyloidogenesis and amyloid fibril formation. Eventually the failure of autonomic and peripheral nervous system is induced. Tafamidiswas approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2011 under the market name Vyndaqel for the treatment of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) in adult patients with early-stage symptomatic polyneuropathy to delay peripheral neurologic impairment. Tafamidis is an investigational drug under the FDA and in June 2017, Pfizer received FDA Fast Track Designation for tafamidis

Image result for TAFAMIDIS

The marketed drug, a meglumine salt, has completed an 18 month placebo controlled phase II/III clinical trial,[5][6] and an 12 month extension study[7] which provides evidence that tafamidis slows progression of Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.[8] Tafamidis (20 mg once daily) is used in adult patients with an early stage (stage 1) of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.[9][10]

Tafamidis was discovered in the Jeffery W. Kelly Laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute[11] using a structure-based drug design strategy[12] and was developed at FoldRx pharmaceuticals, a biotechnology company Kelly co-founded with Susan Lindquist. FoldRx was led by Richard Labaudiniere when it was acquired by Pfizer in 2010.

Tafamidis functions by kinetic stabilization of the correctly folded tetrameric form of the transthyretin (TTR) protein.[13] In patients with FAP, this protein dissociates in a process that is rate limiting for aggregation including amyloid fibril formation, causing failure of the autonomic nervous system and/or the peripheral nervous system (neurodegeneration) initially and later failure of the heart. Kinetic Stabilization of tetrameric transthyretin in familial amyloid polyneuropathy patients provides the first pharmacologic evidence that the process of amyloid fibril formation causes this disease, as treatment with tafamidis dramatically slows the process of amyloid fibril formation and the degeneration of post-mitotic tissue. Sixty % of the patients enrolled in the initial clinical trial have the same or an improved neurologic impairment score after six years of taking tafamidis, whereas 30% of the patients progress at a rate ≤ 1/5 of that predicted by the natural history. Importantly, all of the V30M FAP patients remain stage 1 patients after 6 years on tafamidis out of four stages of disease progression. [Data presented orally by Professor Coelho in Brazil in 2013][7]

The process of wild type transthyretin amyloidogenesis also appears to cause wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (WTTA), also known as senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA), leading to cardiomyopathy as the prominent phenotype.[14] Some mutants of transthyretin — including V122I, which is primarily found in individuals of African descent — are destabilizing, enabling heterotetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and subsequent misassembly of transthyretin into a variety of aggregate structures [15] including amyloid fibrils[16]leading to familial amyloid cardiomyopathy.[17] While there is clinical evidence from a small number of patients that tafamidis slows the progression of the transthyretin cardiomyopathies,[18] this has yet to be demonstrated in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Pfizer has enrolled a placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the ability of tafamidis to slow the progression of both familial amyloid cardiomyopathy and senile systemic amyloidosis (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01994889).

Regulatory Process

Tafamidis was approved for use in the European Union by the European Medicines Agency in November 2011, specifically for the treatment of early stage transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP (all mutations). In September 2013 Tafamidis was approved for use in Japan by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, specifically for the treatment of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP (all mutations). Tafamidis is also approved for use in Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Israel by the relevant authorities.[19] It is currently being considered for approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of early stage transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP.

In June 2012, the FDA Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee voted “yes” (13-4 favorable vote) when asked if the findings of the pivotal clinical study with tafamidis were “sufficiently robust to provide substantial evidence of efficacy for a surrogate endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit”. The Advisory Committee voted “no” 4-13 to reject the drug–in spite of the fact that both primary endpoints were met in the efficacy evaluable population (n=87) and were just missed in the intent to treat population (n=125), apparently because more patients than expected in the intent to treat population were selected for liver transplantation during the course of the trial, not owing to treatment failure, but because their name rose to the top of the transplant list. However, these patients were classified as treatment failures in the conservative analysis used.

Pfizer (following its acquisition of FoldRx ), under license from Scripps Research Institute , has developed and launched tafamidis, a small-molecule transthyretin stabilizer, useful for treating familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

SYN

 European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 121, 823-840; 2016

SYN 2

INNOVATORS

THE SCRIPPS RESEARCH INSTITUTE [US/US]; 10550 N Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (US)

KELLY, Jeffrey, W.; (US).
SEKIJIMA, Yoshiki; (US)

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Dr. Jeffery W. Kelly

Lita Annenberg Hazen Professor of Chemistry

Co-Chairman, Department of Molecular Medicine

Click here to download a concise version of Dr. Jeffery Kelly’s curriculum vitae.

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PATENT

WO2004056315

Example 5: Benzoxazoles as Transthyretin Amyloid Fibril Inhibitors
Transthyretin’s two thyroxine binding sites are created by its quaternary structural interface. The tetramer can be stabilized by small molecule binding to these sites, potentially providing a means to treat TTR amyloid disease with small molecule drugs. Many families of compounds have been discovered whose binding stabilizes the tetrameric ground state to a degree proportional to the small molecule dissociation constants Km and Ka2. This also effectively increases the dissociative activation barrier and inhibits amyloidosis by kinetic stabilization. Such inhibitors are typically composed of two aromatic rings, with one ring bearing halogen substituents and the other bearing hydrophilic substituents. Benzoxazoles substituted with a carboxylic acid at C(4)-C(7) and a halogenated phenyl ring at C(2) also appeared to complement the TTR thyroxine binding site. A small library of these compounds was therefore prepared by dehydrocyclization of N-acyl amino-hydroxybenzoic acids as illustrated in Scheme 1.

Scheme 1: General Synthesis of Benzoxazoles
Reagents: (a) ArCOCl, THF, pyridine (Ar = Phenyl, 3,5-Difluorophenyl, 2,6-Difluorophenyl, 3,5-Dichlorophenyl, 2,6-Dichlorophenyl, 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl, and 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl); (b) TsOH*H2O, refluxing xylenes; (c) TMSCHN2, benzene, MeOH; (d) LiOH, THF, MeOH, H2O (8-27% yield over 4 steps).

The benzoxazoles were evaluated using a series of analyses of increasing stringency. WT TTR (3.6 μM) was incubated for 30 min (pH 7, 37 °C) with a test compound (7.2 μM). Since at least one molecule ofthe test compound must bind to each molecule of TTR tetramer to be able to stabilize it, a test compound concentration of 7.2 μM is only twice the minimum effective concentration. The pH was then adjusted to 4.4, the optimal pH for fibrilization. The amount of amyloid formed after 72 h (37 °C) in the presence ofthe test compound was determined by turbidity at 400 nm and is expressed as % fibril formation (ff), 100%) being the amount formed by TTR alone. Ofthe 28 compounds tested, 11 reduced fibril formation to negligible levels (jf< 10%; FIG. 7).
The 11 most active compounds were then evaluated for their ability to bind selectively to TTR over, all other proteins in blood. Human blood plasma (TTR cone. 3.6 -5.4 μM) was incubated for 24 h with the test compound (10.8 μM) at 37 °C. The TTR and any bound inhibitor were immunoprecipitated using a sepharose-bound polyclonal TTR antibody. The TTR with or without inhibitor bound was liberated from the resin at high pH, and the inhibitor: TTR stoichiometry was ascertained by HPLC analysis (FIG. 8). Benzoxazoles with carboxylic acids in the 5- or 6-position, and 2,6-dichlorophenyl (13, 20) or 2-trifluoromethylphenyl (11, 18) substituents at the 2-position displayed the highest binding stoichiometries. In particular, 20 exhibited excellent inhibitory activity and binding selectivity. Hence, its mechanism of action was characterized further.
To confirm that 20 inhibits TTR fibril formation by binding strongly to the tetramer, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and sedimentation velocity experiments were conducted with wt TTR. ITC showed that two equivalents of 20 bind with average dissociation constants of Kdi = Kd2 = 55 (± 10) nM under physiological conditions. These are comparable to the dissociation constants of many other highly efficacious TTR
amyloidogenesis inhibitors. For the sedimentation velocity experiments, TTR (3.6 μM) was incubated with 20 (3.6 μM, 7.2 μM, 36 μM) under optimal fibrilization conditions (72 h, pH 4.4, 37 °C). The tetramer (55 kDa) was the only detectable species in solution with 20 at 7.2 or 36 μM. Some large aggregates formed with 20 at 3.6 μM, but the TTR remaining in solution was tetrameric.
T119M subunit inclusion and small molecule binding both prevent TTR amyloid formation by raising the activation barrier for tetramer dissociation. An inhibitor’s ability to do this is most rigorously tested by measuring its efficacy at slowing tetramer dissociation in 6 M urea, a severe denaturation stress. Thus, the rates of TTR tetramer dissociation in 6 M urea in the presence and absence of 20, 21 or 27 were compared (FIG. 9). TTR (1.8 μM) was completely denatured after 168 h in 6 M urea. In contrast, 20 at 3.6 μM prevented tetramer dissociation for at least 168 h (> 3 the half-life of TTR in human plasma). With an equimolar amount of 20, only 27% of TTR denatured in 168 h. Compound 27 (3.6 μM) was much less able to prevent tetramer dissociation (90% unfolding after 168 h), even though it was active in the fibril formation assay. Compound 21 did not hinder the dissociation of TTR at all. These results show that inhibitor binding to TTR is necessary but not sufficient to kinetically stabilize the TTR tetramer under strongly denaturing conditions; it is also important that the dissociation constants be very low (or that the off rates be very slow). Also, the display of functional groups on 20 is apparently optimal for stabilizing the TTR tetramer; moving the carboxylic acid from C(6) to C(7), as in 27, or removing the chlorines, as in 21, severely diminishes its activity.

The role ofthe substituents in 20 is evident from its co-crystal stracture with TTR (FIG. 10). Compound 20 orients its two chlorine atoms near halogen binding pockets 2 and 2′ (so-called because they are occupied by iodines when thyroxine binds to TTR). The 2,6 substitution pattern on the phenyl ring forces the benzoxazole and phenyl rings out of planarity, optimally positioning the carboxylic acid on the benzoxazole to hydrogen bond to the ε-NH3+ groups of Lys 15/15′. Hydrophobic interactions between the aromatic rings of 20 and the side chains of Leu 17, Leu 110, Ser 117, and Val 121 contribute additional binding energy.

PAPER

ChemMedChem (2013), 8(10), 1617-1619.

Nature Reviews Drug Discovery (2012), 11(3), 185-186

PAPER

Design and synthesis of pyrimidinone and pyrimidinedione inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV
J Med Chem 2011, 54(2): 510

PATENT

WO-2017190682

Novel crystalline forms of tafamidis methylglucamine (designated as Form E), processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them are claimed. Also claimed is their use for treating familial amyloid neuropathy. Represents first PCT filing from Crystal Pharmatech and the inventors on this API.

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=2C2DC88BD4DC90B179C38EC5283D0941.wapp2nA?docId=WO2017190682&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=FullText

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http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2016/ob/c5ob02496j/unauth#!divAbstract

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2-(3, 5-Dichlorophenyl)benzo[d]oxazole-6-carboxylic acid (Tafamidis)

m.p. = 200.4–202.7 °C; Rf = 0.37 (petroleum ether/ethyl acetate/acetic acid = 6:1:0.01).

IR (cm-1 , KBr): 3383, 1685, 1608, 1224, 769;

1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 400 MHz) (ppm) 8.27 (s, 1H), 8.18 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 8.04–8.02 (m, 1H), 7.94 (s, 1H), 7.88 (d, J = 1.6 Hz, 1H), 7.67 (dd, J = 6.8 Hz, 5.2 Hz, 1H);

13C NMR (DMSOd6, 100 MHz) (ppm) 167.2, 162.1, 150.1, 145.0, 137.8, 133.7, 131.4, 128.6, 126.8, 124.3, 120.5, 112.6.

Data was consistent with that reported in the literature. [27]Yamamoto, T.; Muto, K.; Komiyama, M.; Canivet, J.; Yamaguchi, J.; Itami, K. Chem. Eur. J. 2011, 17, 10113.

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http://synth.chem.nagoya-u.ac.jp/wordpress/publication/nicatalystscopemechanism?lang=en

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CLIP

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 12; 109(24): 9629–9634.
Published online 2012 May 29. doi:  10.1073/pnas.1121005109

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386102/

str1

The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A–retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils in elderly patients. Because tetramer dissociation is the rate-limiting step in TTR amyloidogenesis, targeted therapies have focused on small molecules that kinetically stabilize the tetramer, inhibiting TTR amyloid fibril formation. One such compound, tafamidis meglumine (Fx-1006A), has recently completed Phase II/III trials for the treatment of Transthyretin Type Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) and demonstrated a slowing of disease progression in patients heterozygous for the V30M TTR mutation. Herein we describe the molecular and structural basis of TTR tetramer stabilization by tafamidis. Tafamidis binds selectively and with negative cooperativity (Kds ∼2 nM and ∼200 nM) to the two normally unoccupied thyroxine-binding sites of the tetramer, and kinetically stabilizes TTR. Patient-derived amyloidogenic variants of TTR, including kinetically and thermodynamically less stable mutants, are also stabilized by tafamidis binding. The crystal structure of tafamidis-bound TTR suggests that binding stabilizes the weaker dimer-dimer interface against dissociation, the rate-limiting step of amyloidogenesis.

4-Amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (AHBA) is reacted with HCl (3 to 6 M equivalents) in methanol (8 to 9 L/kg). Methyl t-butyl ether (TBME) (9 to 11 L/kg) is then added to the reaction mixture. The product, methyl 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoate hydrochloride salt, is isolated by filtration and then reacted with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride (0.95 to 1.05 M equivalents) in the presence of pyridine (2.0 to 2.5 M equivalents) in dichloromethane (DCM), (8 to 9 L/kg) as a solvent. After the distillation of DCM, acetone and water are added to the reaction mixture, producing methyl 4-(3,5-dichlorobenzoylamino)-3- hydroxy-benzoate. This is recovered by filtration and reacted with p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate (0.149 to 0.151 M equivalents) in toluene (12 to 18 L/kg) at reflux with water trap. Treatment with charcoal is then performed. After the distillation of toluene, acetone (4-6 L/kg) is added. The product, methyl 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-benzoxazole-6- carboxylate, is isolated by filtration and then reacted with LiOH (1.25 to 1.29 M equivalents) in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF) (7.8 to 8.2 L/kg) and water (7.8 to 8.2 L/kg) at between 40 and 45 °C. The pH of the reaction mixture is adjusted with aqueous HCl to yield 2-(3,5-dichloro-phenyl)-benzoxazole-6-carboxylic acid, the free acid of tafamidis. This is converted to the meglumine salt by reacting with N-methyl-Dglucamine (0.95 to 1.05 M equivalents) in a mixture of water (4.95 to 5.05 L/kg)/isopropyl alcohol (19.75 to 20.25 L/kg) at 65-70 °C. Tafamidis meglumine (dglucitol, 1-deoxy-1-(methylamino)-,2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-6-benzoxazole carboxylate) is then isolated by filtration.

2 The following fragments were identified from electrospray ionization mass spectra acquired in positive-ion mode: meglumine M+ (C7H18NO5+, m/z = 196.13), M (carboxylate form) +2H (C14H6Cl2NO3, m/z = 308.13), M (salt) + H (C21H24Cl2N2O8, m/z = 504.26). 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired on a 700 MHz Bruker AVANCE II spectrometer in acetone:D2O (~8:2). Data were reported as chemical shift in ppm (δ), multiplicity (s = singlet, dd = double of doublets, m = multiplet), coupling constant (J Hz), relative integral and assignment: δ = 8.14 (m, JH2-H5 = 0.6 and JH2-H6 = 1.5, 1H, H2), 8.02 (dd, JH9-H11 = 1.9 and JH13-H11 = 1.9, 2H, H9 and H13), 7.97 (dd, JH6-H5 = 8.25, 1H, H6), 7.67 (dd, JH5-H2 = 0.6 and JH5-H6 = 8.25, 1H, H5), 7.58 (m, JH11-H9 = 1.9 and JH11-H13 = 1.9, 1H, H11), 4.08 (m, JH16-H17 = 4.9, 1H, H16), 3.79 (dd, JH17-H18 = 2.2, 1H, H17), 3.73 (dd, JH19-H20 = 3.2, 1H, H20), 3.69 (m, JH19-H20 = 3.2, 1H, H19), 3.61 (m, JH18-H19 = 12.25, 1H, H18), 3.58 (m, JH19-H20′ = 5.8 and JH20-H20′ = 11.7, 1H, H20′ ), 3.19 (m, JH15-H15′ = 12.9 and JH15′-H16 = 9.25 and JH15-H16 = 3.5, 2H, H15).

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http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1002/chem.201101091/asset/supinfo/chem_201101091_sm_miscellaneous_information.pdf?v=1&s=7badb204a12057710743c1711a744253eccd636a

Concise Synthesis of Tafamidis (Scheme 8)

4-(6-Benzoxazoyl)morpholine (8)

str1

A mixture of 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (1.53 g, 10 mmol) and trimethyl orthofomate (3 mL) was heated at 100 ºC for 5 h. After cooling to room temperature, trimethyl orthofomate was removed under reduced pressure. To a solution of benzoxazole 6-carboxylic acid in CH2Cl2 (10 mL) were added DMF (0.1 mL) and oxalyl chloride (1.8 mL, 20 mmol) and the resultant mixture was stirred at room temperature for 12 h. After cooling to room temperature, DMF and oxalyl chloride were removed under reduced pressure to yield the corresponding acid chloride as a solid. Thus-generated acid chloride and morpholine (2.2 mL) were stirred at room temperature for 3 h. After removing solvents under reduced pressure, the mixture was treated with saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate (20 mL) and ethyl acetate (20 mL). The layers were separated, and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (2 × 20 mL). The combined organic layer was washed with brine (20 mL), dried with anhydrous magnesium sulfate, and the solvent removed under reduced pressure. Purification of the resulting oil by flash column chromatography on silica (5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) afforded heteroarene 8 (1.30 g, 56%) as a white solid. Rf = 0.47 (MeOH/CHCl3 = 1:20). 1 H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.23 (s, 1H), 7.83 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 1H), 7.71 (s, 1H) 7.44 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.00–3.25 (br, 8H). 13C NMR (150 MHz, CDCl3) δ 169.52, 153.87, 149.67, 141.24, 132.90, 123.79, 120.76, 110.48, 66.81. HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C12H13N2O3 [MH]+ : 233.0926, found 233.0926.

4-(3,5-Dichlorophenyl 6-benzoxazoyl)morpholine

To a 20-mL glass vessel equipped with J. Young® O-ring tap containing a magnetic stirring bar were added Ni(cod)2 (13.9 mg, 0.05 mmol), 2,2’-bipyridyl (7.8 mg, 0.05 mmol), LiOt-Bu (60 mg, 0.75 mmol), 8 (174.2 mg, 0.5 mmol), 3,5-dichloroiodobenzene (9: 203.9 mg, 0.75 mmol), followed by dry 1,2-dimethoxyethane (2.0 mL). The vessel was sealed with an O-ring tap and then heated at 100 °C in an 8-well reaction block with stirring for 24 h. After cooling the reaction mixture to room temperature, the mixture was passed through a short silica gel pad (EtOAc). The filtrate was concentrated and the residue was subjected to preparative thin-layer chromatography (5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) to afford SI-2 (139.6 mg, 74 %) as a white foam. Rf = 0.70 (MeOH/CHCl3 = 1:20). 1 H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.16 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 2H), 7.82 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.70 (s, 1H), 7.55 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.45 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.00–3.25 (br, 8H). 13C NMR (150 MHz, CDCl3) δ 169.38, 161.78, 150.40, 142.90, 135.82, 132.95, 131.61, 129.26, 125.91, 124.23, 120.41, 110.26, 66.77. HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C18H15Cl2N2O3 [MH]+ : 377.0460 found 377.0465.

Tafamidis[19  ] Razavi, H.; Palaninathan, S. K.; Powers, E. T.; Wiseman, R. L.; Purkey, H. E.; Mohamedmohaideen, N. N.; Deechongkit, S.; Chiang, K. P.; Dendle, M. T. A.; Sacchettini, J. C.; Kelly, J. W. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 2758.]

HF·pyridine (0.5 mL) was added to a stirred solution of SI-2 (32 mg, 0.09 mmol) in THF (0.5 mL) at 70 ºC for 12 h. After cooling the reaction mixture to room temperature, the mixuture was diluted with EtOAc and washed sequentially with sat.NaHCO3, 2N HCl and brine. The organic layer was concentrated and the residue was subjected to preparative thin-layer chromatography (1% acetic acid, 5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) to afford tafamidis (24.7 mg, 94%) as a white foam.

1 H NMR (600 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.23 (s, 1H), 8.08 (d, J = 1.4 Hz, 2H), 8.00 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 1H), 7.88 (m, 2H).

13C NMR (150 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 166.6, 162.0, 150.0, 144.6, 135.1, 131.7, 129.1, 128.7, 126.5, 125.8, 120.0, 112.2.

HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C14H8Cl2NO3 [MH]+ : 307.9881, found 307.9881.

References

  1. Jump up^ Bulawa, C.E.; Connelly, S.; DeVit, M.; Wang, L. Weigel, C.;Fleming, J. Packman, J.; Powers, E.T.; Wiseman, R.L.; Foss, T.R.; Wilson, I.A.; Kelly, J.W.; Labaudiniere, R. “Tafamidis, A Potent and Selective Transthyretin Kinetic Stabilizer That Inhibits the Amyloid Cascade”. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2012 109, 9629-9634.
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  4. Jump up^ http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20111117005505/en/Pfizer%E2%80%99s-Vyndaqel%C2%AE-tafamidis-Therapy-Approved-European-Union
  5. Jump up^ Clinical trial number NCT00409175 for “Safety and Efficacy Study of Fx-1006A in Patients With Familial Amyloidosis” at ClinicalTrials.gov
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  8. Jump up^ Ando, Y.; Sekijima, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Yamashita, T.; Ueda, M.; Misumi, Y.; Morita, H.; Machii, K; Ohta, M.; Takata, A; Ikeda, S-I. “Effects of tafamidis treatment on transthyretin (TTR) stabilization, efficacy, and safety in Japanese patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) with Val30Met and non-Varl30Met: A phase III, open-label study”. J. Neur. Sci., 2016 362, 266-271, doi:10.1016/j.jns.2016.01.046.
  9. Jump up^ Andrade, C. (1952). “A peculiar form of peripheral neuropathy; familiar atypical generalized amyloidosis with special involvement of the peripheral nerves”. Brain: a Journal of Neurology, 75, 408-427.
  10. Jump up^ Coelho, T. (1996). “Familial amyloid polyneuropathy: new developments in genetics and treatment”. Current Opinion in Neurology, 9, 355-359.
  11. Jump up^ Razavi, H.; Palaninathan, S.K. Powers, E.T.; Wiseman, R.L.; Purkey, H.E.; Mohamadmohaideen, N.N.; Deechongkit, S.; Chiang, K.P.; Dendle, M.T.A.; Sacchettini, J.C.; Kelly, J.W. “Benzoxazoles as Transthyretin Amyloid Fibril Inhibitors: Synthesis, Evaluation and Mechanism of Action”. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2003, 42, 2758-2761.
  12. Jump up^ Connelly, S., Choi, S., Johnson, S.M., Kelly, J.W., and Wilson, I.A. (2010). “Structure-based design of kinetic stabilizers that ameliorate the transthyretin amyloidoses”. Current Opinion in Structural Biology, 20, 54-62.
  13. Jump up^ Hammarstrom, P.; Wiseman, R. L.; Powers, E.T.; Kelly, J.W. “Prevention of Transthyretin Amyloid Disease by Changing Protein Misfolding Energetics”. Science, 2003, 299, 713-716
  14. Jump up^ Westermark, P., Sletten, K., Johansson, B., and Cornwell, G.G., 3rd (1990). “Fibril in senile systemic amyloidosis is derived from normal transthyretin”. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 87, 2843-2845.
  15. Jump up^ Sousa, M.M., Cardoso, I., Fernandes, R., Guimaraes, A., and Saraiva, M.J. (2001). “Deposition of transthyretin in early stages of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: evidence for toxicity of nonfibrillar aggregates”. The American Journal of Pathology, 159, 1993-2000.
  16. Jump up^ Colon, W., and Kelly, J.W. (1992). “Partial denaturation of transthyretin is sufficient for amyloid fibril formation in vitro”. Biochemistry 31, 8654-8660.
  17. Jump up^ Jacobson, D.R., Pastore, R.D., Yaghoubian, R., Kane, I., Gallo, G., Buck, F.S., and Buxbaum, J.N. (1997). “Variant-sequence transthyretin (isoleucine 122) in late-onset cardiac amyloidosis in black Americans”. The New England Journal of Medicine, 336, 466-473.
  18. Jump up^ Maurer, M.S.; Grogan, D.R.; Judge, D.P.; Mundayat, R.; Lombardo, I.; Quyyumi, A.A.; Aarts, J.; Falk, R.H. “Tafamidis in transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy: effects on transthyretin stabilization and clinical outcomes.” Circ. Heart. Fail. 2015 8, 519-526.
  19. Jump up^http://www.pfizer.com/sites/default/files/news/Brazil%20Approval%20Press%20Statement%2011-7-16_0.pdf
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016185739 Solid Forms Of A Transthyretin Dissociation Inhibitor
2015-12-22
2016-06-30
US2017196985 SULFUR(VI) FLUORIDE COMPOUNDS AND METHODS FOR THE PREPARATION THEREOF
2015-06-05
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2015-08-31
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Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9771321 Small Molecules That Covalently Modify Transthyretin
2014-04-14
2014-11-13
US9610270 NEW THERAPY FOR TRANSTHYRETIN-ASSOCIATED AMYLOIDOSIS
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2014-10-31
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US9249112 SOLID FORMS OF A TRANSTHYRETIN DISSOCIATION INHIBITOR
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US9499527 COMPOSITIONS AND METHODS FOR THE TREATMENT OF FAMILIAL AMYLOID POLYNEUROPATHY
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Patent ID

Patent Title

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US9150489 1-(2-FLUOROBIPHENYL-4-YL)-ALKYL CARBOXYLIC ACID DERIVATIVES FOR THE THERAPY OF TRANSTHYRETIN AMYLOIDOSIS
2011-10-27
US2014134753 METHODS FOR TREATING TRANSTHYRETIN AMYLOID DISEASES
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US8703815 Small molecules that covalently modify transthyretin
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US8653119 Methods for treating transthyretin amyloid diseases
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Patent ID

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US8236984 COMPOUND AND USE THEREOF IN THE TREATMENT OF AMYLOIDOSIS
2010-09-30
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Tafamidis
Tafamidis skeletal.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Vyndaqel
License data
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
Chemical and physical data
Formula C14H7Cl2NO3
Molar mass 308.116 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

//////////////TTAFAMIDIS, Fx-1006A, PF-06291826, Orphan Drug, SCRIPP, PFIZER

C1=CC2=C(C=C1C(=O)O)OC(=N2)C3=CC(=CC(=C3)Cl)Cl

CNC[C@@H]([C@H]([C@@H]([C@@H](CO)O)O)O)O.c1cc2c(cc1C(=O)O)oc(n2)c3cc(cc(c3)Cl)Cl

 

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

Pracinostat


Pracinostat.svg

ChemSpider 2D Image | Pracinostat | C20H30N4O2

Pracinostat.png

2D chemical structure of 929016-96-6

Pracinostat

  • Molecular Formula C20H30N4O2
  • Average mass 358.478 Da
2-Propenamide, 3-[2-butyl-1-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]-N-hydroxy-, (2E)-
929016-96-6 [RN]
SB939
(2E)-3-{2-butyl-1-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,3-benzodiazol-5-yl}-N-hydroxyprop-2-enamide
N-hydroxy-1-[(4-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-1H-indole-6-carboxamide
PCI 34051,  UNII: GPO2JN4UON
929016-98-8 DI HCl salt, C20 H30 N4 O2 . 2 Cl H, 431.4
929016-96-6 (free base)
929016-97-7 (trifluoroacetate)
S*BIO (Originator)
Leukemia, acute myeloid, phase 3, helsinn
Image result for S*BIO
str1
CAS 929016-98-8 DI HCl salt, C20 H30 N4 O2 . 2 Cl H, 431.4
E)-3-[2-Butyl-1-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]-N-hydroxyacrylamide Dihydrochloride Salt

Pracinostat (SB939) is an orally bioavailable, small-molecule histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor based on hydroxamic acid with potential anti-tumor activity characterized by favorable physicochemical, pharmaceutical, and pharmacokinetic properties.

WO-2017192451  describes Novel polymorphic crystalline forms of pracinostat (designated as Form 3) and their hydrates, processes for their preparation and compositions and combination comprising them are claimed. Also claimed is their use for inhibiting histone deacetylase and treating cancer, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, pancreas cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, ovary cancer, melanoma and neuroblastoma.

See WO2014070948 ,  Helsinn , under sub-license from MEI Pharma (under license from S*Bio), is developing pracinostat, an oral HDAC inhibitor, for treating hematological tumors, including AML, MDS and myelofibrosis.

The oncolytic agent pracinostat hydrochloride is an antagonist of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and 2 (HDAC2) that was discovered by the Singapore-based company S*BIO. Helsinn obtained the exlusive development and commercialization rights in July 2016, and is conducting phase III clinical trials in combination with azacitidine in adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Phase II trials are also under way for the treatment of previously untreated intermediate-2 or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients and for the treatment of primary or post essential thrombocythemia/polycythemia vera) in combination with ruxolitinib.In North America, S*BIO had been conducting phase II clinical trials of pracinostat hydrochloride in patients with solid tumors and for the treatment of myeloproliferative diseases and phase I clinical trials in patients with leukemia; however, recent progress reports are not available at present. The University of Queensland had been evaluating the compound in preclinical studies for malaria.

Image result for University of Queensland

University of Queensland

Image result for MEI Pharma

MEI Pharma

The Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute (the research branch of the Canadian Cancer Society upon its integration with the National Cancer Institute of Canada to form the new Canadian Cancer Society) is conducting phase II clinical trials in Canada for the treatment of recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer.

Image result for Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute

Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute

In 2012, the product was licensed to MEI Pharma by S*BIO on a worldwide basis. In 2016, MEI Pharma and Helsinn entered into a licensing, development and commercialization agreement by which Helsinn obtained exclusive worldwide rights (including manufacturing and commercialization rights).

Image result for HELSINN

HELSINN

In 2014, the FDA assigned an orphan drug designation to MEI Pharma for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. In 2016, the product received breakthrough therapy designation in the U.S. in combination with azacitidine for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are older than 75 years of age or unfit for intensive chemotherapy.

Pracinostat is an orally available, small-molecule histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with potential antineoplastic activity. Pracinostat inhibits HDACs, which may result in the accumulation of highly acetylated histones, followed by the induction of chromatin remodeling; the selective transcription of tumor suppressor genes; the tumor suppressor protein-mediated inhibition of tumor cell division; and, finally, the induction of tumor cell apoptosis. This agent may possess improved metabolic, pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties compared to other HDAC inhibitors.

Pracinostat is a novel HDAC inhibitor with improved in vivo properties compared to other HDAC inhibitors currently in clinical trials, allowing oral dosing. Data demonstrate that Pracinostat is a potent and effective anti-tumor drug with potential as an oral therapy for a variety of human hematological and solid tumors

SYNTHESIS

Figure

Clinically tested HDAC inhibitors.

Activity

Pracinostat selectively inhibits HDAC class I,II,IV without class III and HDAC6 in class IV,[1] but has no effect on other Zn-binding enzymes, receptors, and ion channels. It accumulates in tumor cells and exerts a continuous inhibition to histone deacetylase,resulting in acetylated histones accumulation, chromatin remodeling, tumor suppressor genes transcription, and ultimately, apoptosis of tumor cells.[2]

Clinical medication

Clinical studies suggests that pracinostat has potential best pharmacokinetic properties when compared to other oral HDAC inhibitors.[3]In March 2014, pracinostat has granted Orphan Drug for acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma by the Food and Drug Administration.

Clinical Trials

CTID Title Phase Status Date
NCT03151304 A Safety and Efficacy Study of Pracinostat and Azacitidine in Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes 2 Recruiting
2017-10-27
NCT03151408 An Efficacy and Safety Study Of Pracinostat In Combination With Azacitidine In Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia 3 Recruiting
2017-10-17
NCT02267278 Ruxolitinib and Pracinostat Combination Therapy for Patients With Myelofibrosis (MF) 2 Active, not recruiting
2017-04-27
NCT01873703 Phase 2 Study of Pracinostat With Azacitidine in Patients With Previously Untreated Myelodysplastic Syndrome 2 Active, not recruiting
2017-04-21
NCT02118909 Evaluate the Effects of Itraconazole and Ciprofloxacin on Single-Dose PK of Pracinostat in Healthy Nonsmoking Subjects 1 Completed
2017-02-22
NCT02058784 Study to Evaluate the Food Effect of Single-dose Bioavailability of Pracinostat in Healthy Adult Subjects 1 Completed
2017-02-22
NCT01993641 Phase 2 Study Adding Pracinostat to a Hypomethylating Agent (HMA) in Patients With MDS Who Failed to Respond to Single Agent HMA 2 Completed
2017-02-22
NCT01112384 A Study of SB939 in Patients With Translocation-Associated Recurrent/Metastatic Sarcomas 2 Completed
2016-11-25
NCT01184274 A Phase I Study of SB939 in Pediatric Patients With Refractory Solid Tumours and Leukemia 1 Completed
2014-01-16
NCT01200498 Study of SB939 in Subjects With Myelofibrosis 2 Completed
2013-12-13

PATENT

WO2005028447

Inventors Dizhong ChenWeiping DengKanda SangthongpitagHong Yan SongEric T. SunNiefang YuYong Zou
Applicant S*Bio Pte Ltd

Scheme I

Figure imgf000041_0001

Scheme II

Figure imgf000042_0001Scheme III

Figure imgf000043_0001Scheme IV

Figure imgf000044_0001 Scheme V

Figure imgf000045_0001

PAPER

Discovery of (2E)-3-{2-Butyl-1-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl}-N-hydroxyacrylamide (SB939), an Orally Active Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor with a Superior Preclinical Profile

Chemistry Discovery, Biology Discovery, and §Pre-Clinical Development, S*BIO Pte Ltd., 1 Science Park Road, No. 05-09 The Capricorn, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117528, Singapore
J. Med. Chem.201154 (13), pp 4694–4720
DOI: 10.1021/jm2003552
Phone: +65-68275019. Fax: +65-68275005. E-mail: haishan_wang@sbio.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

A series of 3-(1,2-disubstituted-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxyacrylamides (1) were designed and synthesized as HDAC inhibitors. Extensive SARs have been established for in vitro potency (HDAC1 enzyme and COLO 205 cellular IC50), liver microsomal stability (t1/2), cytochrome P450 inhibitory (3A4 IC50), and clogP, among others. These parameters were fine-tuned by carefully adjusting the substituents at positions 1 and 2 of the benzimidazole ring. After comprehensive in vitro and in vivo profiling of the selected compounds, SB939 (3) was identified as a preclinical development candidate. 3 is a potent pan-HDAC inhibitor with excellent druglike properties, is highly efficacious in in vivo tumor models (HCT-116, PC-3, A2780, MV4-11, Ramos), and has high and dose-proportional oral exposures and very good ADME, safety, and pharmaceutical properties. When orally dosed to tumor-bearing mice, 3 is enriched in tumor tissue which may contribute to its potent antitumor activity and prolonged duration of action. 3 is currently being tested in phase I and phase II clinical trials.

(E)-3-[2-Butyl-1-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]-N-hydroxyacrylamide Dihydrochloride Salt (3)

The freebase of 3 was prepared according to procedure D. The hydroxamic acid moiety was identified by 1H–15N HSQC (DMSO-d6) with δN = 169.0 ppm (CONHOH). Other nitrogens in 3were identified by 1H–15N HMBC (DMSO-d6) with δN of 241.4 ppm for N3 of the benzimidazole ring, 152.3 ppm for N1, and 41.3 ppm for the diethylamino group (reference to nitromethane δN = 380.0 ppm in CDCl3). The dihydrochloride salt of 3 was prepared according to procedure D as white or off-white solid or powder in ∼60% yield from 9 in two steps. LC–MS m/z 359.2 ([M + H]+).
1H NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 11.79 (brs, 1H, NH or OH), 10.92 (very br s, 1H), 8.18 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.97 (s, 1H), 7.79 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.64 (d, J = 15.8 Hz, 1H), 6.65 (d, J = 15.8 Hz, 1H), 5.01 (t-like, J = 7.7 Hz, 2H), 3.48 (m, 2H), 3.30–3.19 (m, 6H), 1.87 (quintet, J = 7.8 Hz, 2H), 1.47 (sextet, J = 7.5 Hz, 2H), 1.29 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, 6H), 0.97 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 3H);
13C NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 162.3, 156.0, 137.3 (CH), 132.8, 132.3, 132.0 (br, identified by HMBC), 124.7 (CH), 120.2 (CH), 113.1 (2 × CH), 48.2, 46.3, 39.0, 28.1, 25.0, 21.7, 13.6, 8.3.
Anal. (C20H30N4O2·2HCl·0.265H2O) C, H, N, Cl. Water content = 1.09% (Karl Fisher method). HRMS (ESI) m/z [M + H]+ calcd for C20H31N4O2, 359.2442; found, 359.2449.

PATENT

WO 2007030080

http://google.com/patents/WO2007030080A1?cl=en

 
Inventors Dizhong ChenWeiping DengKen Chi Lik LeePek Ling LyeEric T. SunHaishan WangNiefang Yu
Applicant S*Bio Pte Ltd

SEE

WO 2008108741

WO 2014070948

Patent

WO-2017192451

References

  1. Jump up^ “In vitro enzyme activity of SB939 and SAHA”. 22 Aug 2014.
  2. Jump up^ “The oral HDAC inhibitor pracinostat (SB939) is efficacious and synergistic with the JAK2 inhibitor pacritinib (SB1518) in preclinical models of AML”. Blood Cancer Journaldoi:10.1038/bcj.2012.14.
  3. Jump up^ Veronica Novotny-Diermayr; et al. (March 9, 2010). “SB939, a Novel Potent and Orally Active Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor with High Tumor Exposure and Efficacy in Mouse Models of Colorectal Cancer”Mol Cancer Therdoi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-09-0689.
PATENT 
Cited Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO2005028447A1 * Sep 21, 2004 Mar 31, 2005 S*Bio Pte Ltd Benzimidazole derivates: preparation and pharmaceutical applications
US20050137234 * Dec 14, 2004 Jun 23, 2005 Syrrx, Inc. Histone deacetylase inhibitors
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1 None
2 See also references of EP1937650A1
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WO2010043953A3 * Oct 14, 2009 Mar 24, 2011 Orchid Research Laboratories Ltd. Novel bridged cyclic compounds as histone deacetylase inhibitors
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US8865912 Jan 27, 2014 Oct 21, 2014 Glaxosmithkline Llc Benzimidazole derivatives as PI3 kinase inhibitors
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US9156797 May 15, 2015 Oct 13, 2015 Glaxosmithkline Llc Benzimidazole derivatives as PI3 kinase inhibitors
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Pracinostat
Pracinostat.svg
Names
IUPAC name

(E)-3-(2-Butyl-1-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxyacrylamide
Other names

Pracinostat
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
PubChem CID
Properties
C20H30N4O2
Molar mass 358.49 g·mol−1
Density 1.1±0.1 g/cm3
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

//////////////Pracinostat, PCI 34051, SB939, orphan drug designation, Leukemia, acute myeloid, phase 3, helsinn

CCCCC1=NC2=C(N1CCN(CC)CC)C=CC(=C2)C=CC(=O)NO

 

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

Ubrogepant, MK-1602


imgUbrogepant.pngImage result for UbrogepantImage result for Ubrogepant

Ubrogepant, MK-1602

(S)-N-((3S,5S,6R)-6-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidin-3-yl)-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide

(3’S)-N-[(3S,5S,6R)-6-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidin-3-yl]-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide
(6S)-N-[(3S,5S,6R)-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3-piperidinyl]-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide
Spiro[6H-cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-[3H]pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide, 1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydro-N-[(3S,5S,6R)-6-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3-piperidinyl]-2′-oxo-, (6S)-

CAS: 1374248-77-7
Chemical Formula: C29H26F3N5O3

Molecular Weight: 549.5542

UNII-AD0O8X2QJR

CAS TRIHYDRATE 1488325-95-6

CAS MONOHYDRATE 1488327-13-4

  • Originator Merck & Co
  • Class Amides; Antimigraines; Fluorine compounds; Small molecules; Spiro compounds
  • Mechanism of Action Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists
  • Phase III Migraine, Allergan

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Sep 2016 Allergan initiates a phase III extension trial for Migraine in USA (PO, Tablet) (NCT02873221)
  • 12 Aug 2016 Allergan plans a phase III trial for Migraine in USA (PO) (NCT02867709)
  • 01 Aug 2016 Allergan initiates a phase III trial for Migraine in USA (PO) (NCT02867709)

Image result for Ubrogepant

Image result for Ubrogepant

Process for making piperidinone carboxamide indane and azainane derivatives, which are CGRP receptor antagonists useful for the treatment of migraine. This class of compounds is described in U.S. Patent Application Nos. 13/293,166 filed November 10, 2011 , 13/293, 177 filed November 10, 2011 and 13/293,186 filed November 10, 2011, and PCT International Application Nos. PCT/US11/60081 filed November 10, 2011 and PCT/US 11/60083 filed November 10, 2011.

CGRP (Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide) is a naturally occurring 37-amino acid peptide that is generated by tissue-specific alternate processing of calcitonin messehger RNA and is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system. CGRP is localized predominantly in sensory afferent and central neurons and mediates several biological actions, including vasodilation. CGRP is expressed in alpha- and beta-forms that vary by one and three amino acids in the rat and human, respectively. CGRP-alpha and CGRP-beta display similar biological properties. When released from the cell, CGRP initiates its biological responses by binding to specific cell surface receptors that are predominantly coupled to the activation of adenylyl cyclase. CGRP receptors have been identified and pharmacologically evaluated in several tissues and cells, including those of brain, cardiovascular, endothelial, and smooth muscle origin.

Based on pharmacological properties, these receptors are divided into at least two subtypes, denoted CGRPi and CGRP2. Human oc-CGRP-(8-37), a fragment of CGRP that lacks seven N-terminal amino acid residues, is a selective antagonist of CGRP l, whereas the linear analogue of CGRP, diacetoamido methyl cysteine CGRP ([Cys(ACM)2,7]CGRP), is a selective agonist of CGRP2. CGRP is a potent neuromodulator that has been implicated in the pathology of cerebrovascular disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. In clinical studies, elevated levels of CGRP in the jugular vein were found to occur during migraine attacks (Goadsby et al., Ann. Neurol., 1990, 28, 183-187), salivary levels of CGRP are elevated in migraine subjects between attacks (Bellamy et al., Headache, 2006, 46, 24-33), and CGRP itself has been shown to trigger migrainous headache (Lassen et al., Cephalalgia, 2002, 22, 54-61). In clinical trials, the CGRP antagonist BIBN4096BS has been shown to be effective in treating acute attacks of migraine (Olesen et al., New Engl. J. Med., 2004, 350, 1104-1110) and was able to prevent headache induced by CGRP infusion in a control group (Petersen et al., Clin. Pharmacol. Ther., 2005, 77, 202-213).

CGRP-mediated activation of the trigeminovascular system may play a key role in migraine pathogenesis. Additionally, CGRP activates receptors on the smooth muscle of intracranial vessels, leading to increased vasodilation, which is thought to contribute to headache pain during migraine attacks (Lance, Headache Pathogenesis: Monoamines, Neuropeptides, Purines and Nitric Oxide, Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 1997, 3-9). The middle meningeal artery, the principle artery in the dura mater, is innervated by sensory fibers from the trigeminal ganglion which contain several neuropeptides, including CGRP. Trigeminal ganglion stimulation in the cat resulted in increased levels of CGRP, and in humans, activation of the trigeminal system caused facial flushing and increased levels of CGRP in the external jugular vein (Goadsby et al, Ann. Neurol., 1988, 23, 193-196). Electrical stimulation of the dura mater in rats increased the diameter of the middle meningeal artery, an effect that was blocked by prior administration of CGRP(8-37), a peptide CGRP antagonist (Williamson et al., Cephalalgia, 1997, 17, 525-531). Trigeminal ganglion stimulation increased facial blood flow in the rat, which was inhibited by CGRP(8-37) (Escott et al., Brain Res. 1995, 669, 93-99). Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion in marmoset produced an increase in facial blood flow that could be blocked by the non-peptide CGRP antagonist BIBN4096BS (Doods et al., Br. J.Pharmacol., 2000, 129, 420-423). Thus the vascular effects of CGRP may be attenuated, prevented or reversed by a CGRP antagonist.

CGRP-mediated vasodilation of rat middle meningeal artery was shown to sensitize neurons of the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Williamson et al., The CGRP Family: Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP), Amylin, and Adrenomedullin, Landes Bioscience, 2000, 245-247). Similarly, distention of dural blood vessels during migraine headache may sensitize trigeminal neurons. Some of the associated symptoms of migraine, including extracranial pain and facial allodynia, may be the result of sensitized trigeminal neurons (Burstein et al., Ann. Neurol. 2000, 47, 614-624). A CGRP antagonist may be beneficial in attenuating, preventing or reversing the effects of neuronal sensitization.

The ability of the compounds to act as CGRP antagonists makes them useful pharmacological agents for disorders that involve CGRP in humans and animals, but particularly in humans. Such disorders include migraine and cluster headache (Doods, Curr Opin Inves Drugs, 2001, 2 (9), 1261-1268; Edvinsson et al., Cephalalgia, 1994, 14, 320-327); chronic tension type headache (Ashina et al., Neurology, 2000, 14, 1335-1340); pain (Yu et al., Eur. J. Pharm., 1998, 347, 275-282); chronic pain (Hulsebosch et al., Pain, 2000, 86, 163-175);neurogenic inflammation and inflammatory pain (Holzer, Neurosci., 1988, 24, 739-768; Delay-Goyet et al., Acta Physiol. Scanda. 1992, 146, 537-538; Salmon et al., Nature Neurosci., 2001, 4(4), 357-358); eye pain (May et al. Cephalalgia, 2002, 22, 195-196), tooth pain (Awawdeh et al., Int. Endocrin. J., 2002, 35, 30-36), non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (Molina et al., Diabetes, 1990, 39, 260-265); vascular disorders; inflammation (Zhang et al, Pain, 2001, 89, 265), arthritis, bronchial hyperreactivity, asthma, (Foster et al., Ann. NY Acad. Sci., 1992, 657, 397-404; Schini et al., Am. J. Physiol., 1994, 267, H2483-H2490; Zheng et al., J. Virol., 1993, 67, 5786-5791); shock, sepsis (Beer et al., Crit. Care Med., 2002, 30 (8), 1794-1798); opiate withdrawal syndrome (Salmon et al., Nature Neurosci., 2001, 4(4), 357-358); morphine tolerance (Menard et al., J. Neurosci., 1996, 16 (7), 2342-2351); hot flashes in men and women (Chen et al., Lancet, 1993, 342, 49; Spetz et al., J. Urology, 2001, 166, 1720-1723); allergic dermatitis (Wallengren, Contact Dermatitis, 2000, 43 (3), 137-143); psoriasis; encephalitis, brain trauma, ischaemia, stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases (Rohrenbeck et al., Neurobiol. of Disease 1999, 6, 15-34); skin diseases (Geppetti and Holzer, Eds., Neurogenic Inflammation, 1996, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL), neurogenic cutaneous redness, skin rosaceousness and erythema; tinnitus (Herzog et al., J. Membrane Biology, 2002, 189(3), 225); inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, (Hoffman et al. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology,2002, 37(4) 414-422) and cystitis. Of particular importance is the acute or prophylactic treatment of headache, including migraine and cluster headache.

Ubrogepant (MK-1602), an oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist, is in phase III clinical development at Allergan for the acute treatment of migraine attacks.

In August 2015, the product was licensed to Allergan by Merck, for the development and marketing worldwide for the treatment of migraine.

Synthesis

WO 2013138418

CONTD………..

CONTD……….

Inventors Ian M. BellMark E. FraleySteven N. GallicchioAnthony GinnettiHelen J. MitchellDaniel V. PaoneDonnette D. StaasHeather E. StevensonCheng WangC. Blair Zartman
Applicant Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.

Ian Bell

Ian Bell

Principal Scientist at Merck
Merck
Mark Fraley

Mark Fraley

Principal Scientist, Merck
Steven Gallicchio

Steven Gallicchio

Patent

 WO 2012064910

EXAMPLE 1

Figure imgf000072_0002

(65yN-[(3£5£ )-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-pheny

i’,2′,5 J-tetrahvdrospiro[cyclopenta|^lpyridine-6,3′-pyrroloj2,3-¾lpyridine1-3-carboxamide (Benzotriazol- 1 -yloxy)tr/i,(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (1.89 g, 4.28 mmol) was added to a solution of (6S -2′-oxo- ,2,,5,7- tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[&]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-&]pyridine]-3-carboxylic acid (described in Intermediate 1) (1.10 g, 3.92 mmol), (3JS’,55′,6J?)-3-amino-6-methyl~5~phenyl-l-(2,2,2- trifluoroethyl)piperidin-2-one hydrochloride (described in Intermediate 4) (1.15 g, 3.56 mmol), and NjiV-diisopropylethylamine (3.1 1 m.L, 17.8 mmol) in DMF (40 mL), and the resulting mixture was stirred at 23 °C for 3 h. The reaction mixture was then partitioned between saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (200 mL) and ethyl actetate (3 χ 200 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, and concentrated. The residue was purified by flash column chromatography on silica gel, eluting with hexanes initially, then grading to 100% EtOAc before stepping to 5% MeOH in EtOAc to afford the title compound as an amorphous solid, which was further purified by the following crystallization procedure. A solution of the amorphous product in a minimal amount of methanol required for dissolution was diluted with 10 volumes water, and the resulting slurry was seeded with crystalline product and stirred at 23 °C for 4 h. The solids were filtered, washed with water, and dried under a stream of nitrogen to give the title compound as a crystalline solid. HRMS: m/z = 550.2068, calculated m/z – 550.2061 for C29H27F3N503. lH NMR (500 MHz, CDC13) δ 8.91 (s, 1H), 8.70 (s, 1H), 8.17 (dd, 1H, J- 5.4, 1.5 Hz), 8.04 (s5 1H), 7.37 (m, 3H), 7.29 (t, 1H, J= 7.3 Hz), 7.21 (d, 2H, J= 7.3 Hz), 7.13 (dd, 1H, J = 7.3, 1.2 Hz), 6.89 (dd, 1H, J = 7.3, 5.4 Hz), 4.99- 4.90 (m, 1H), 4.53 (dt, 1H, J= 10.7, 6.6 Hz), 3.94 (p, 1H, J = 5.9 Hz), 3.78 (d, 1H, J = 17.1 Hz), 3.67 (d, 1H, J- 16.4 Hz), 3.65 (m, 1H), 3.34-3.26 (m, 1H), 3.28 (d, 1H, J- 17.1 Hz), 3.17 (d, 1H, J = 16.6 Hz), 2.79 (m, 1H), 2.58 (q, 1H, J – 12.7 Hz), 1.07 (d, 3H, J= 6.6 Hz).

PATENT

WO 2013169348

(5)-N-((3^,5^,6i?)-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidine-3-yl)-2*-oxo- l\2 5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[¾]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-¾]pyridine]-3-carboxam trihydrate (15)

Figure imgf000054_0001

To a suspension of 11 (465 g, 96% wt, 0.99 mol) in iPAc (4.6 L) was added 5% aqueous K3PO4 (4.6 L). The mixture was stirred for 5 min. The organic layer was separated and washed with 5%> aqueous K3PO4 (4.6 L) twice and concentrated in vacuo and dissolved in acetonitrile (1.8 L).

To another flask was added 14 (303 g, 91.4 wt%>), acetonitrile (1.8 L) and water (1.8 L) followed by 10 N NaOH (99 mL). The resulting solution was stirred for 5 min at room temperature and the chiral amine solution made above was charged to the mixture and the container was rinsed with acetonitrile (900 mL). HOBT hydrate (164 g) was charged followed by EDC hydrochloride (283 g). The mixture was agitated at room temperature for 2.5 h. To the mixture was added iPAc (4.6 L) and organic layer was separated, washed with 5%> aqueous NaHC03 (2.3 L) followed by a mixture of 15%> aqueous citric acid (3.2 L) and saturated aqueous NaCl (1.2 L). The resulting organic layer was finally washed with 5%> aqueous NaHC03 (2.3 L). The organic solution was concentrated below 50 °C and dissolved in methanol (2.3 L). The solution was slowly added to a mixture of water (6 L) and methanol (600 mL) with ~ 2 g of seed crystal. And the resulting suspension was stirred overnight at room temperature. Crystals were filtered, rinsed with water/methanol (4 L, 10 : 1), and dried under nitrogen flow at room temperature to provide 15 (576 g, 97 % yield) as trihydrate.

Ή NMR (500 MHz, CDCI3): δ 10.15 (br s, 1 H), 8.91 (br s, 1 H), 8.21 (d, J= 6.0 Hz, 1 H), 8.16 (dd, J= 5.3, 1.5 Hz, 1 H), 8.01 (br s, 1 H), 7.39-7.33 (m, 2 H), 7.31-7.25 (m, 1 H), 7.22-7.20 (m, 2 H), 7.17 (dd, J= 7.4, 1.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.88 (dd, J= 7.4, 5.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.94 (dq, J= 9.3, 7.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.45-4.37 (m, 1 H), 3.94-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.72 (d, J= 17.2 Hz, 1 H), 3.63-3.56 (m, 2 H), 3.38-3.26 (m, 1 H), 3.24 (d, J= 17.3 Hz, 1 H), 3.13 (d, J= 16.5 Hz, 1 H), 2.78 (q, J= 12.5 Hz, 1 H), 2.62-2.56 (m, 1 H), 1.11 (d, J= 6.5 Hz, 3 H); 13C NMR (126 MHz, CD3CN): δ 181.42, 170.63, 166.73, 166.63, 156.90, 148.55, 148.08, 141.74, 135.77, 132.08, 131.09, 130.08, 129.66, 129.56, 128.78, 128.07, 126.25 (q, J= 280.1 Hz), 119.41, 60.14, 53.07, 52.00, 46.41 (q, J= 33.3 Hz), 45.18, 42.80, 41.72, 27.79, 13.46; HRMS m/z: calcd for C29H26F3N503 550.2061 (M+H): found 550.2059.

Alternative procedure for 15:

Figure imgf000055_0001

13

To a suspension of 13 (10 g, 98 wt%, 23.2 mmol) in MTBE (70 mL) was added 0.6 N HCI (42 mL). The organic layer was separated and extracted with another 0.6 N HCI (8 mL). The combined aqueous solution was washed with MTBE (10 mL x3). To the resulting aqueous solution was added acetonitrile (35 mL) and 14 (6.66 g, 99 wt%). To the resulting suspension was neutralized with 29 % NaOH solution to pH 6. HOPO (0.26 g) was added followed by EDC hydrochloride (5.34 g). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 6-12 h until the conversion was complete (>99%). Ethanol (30 ml) was added and the mixture was heated to 35 °C. The resulting solution was added over 2 h to another three neck flask containing ethanol (10 mL), water (30 mL) and 15 seeds (0.4 g). Simultaneously, water (70 mL) was also added to the mixture. The suspension was then cooled to 5 °C over 30 min and filtered. The cake was washed with a mixture of ethanol/water (1 :3, 40 mL). The cake was dried in a vacuum oven at 40 °C to give 15 trihydrate (13.7 g, 95%) as crystals.

PATENT

WO 2013138418

PATENT

US 9174989

CLIP

Practical Asymmetric Synthesis of a Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) Receptor Antagonist Ubrogepant

 Department of Process Chemistry, MRL, 126 East Lincoln Avenues, Rahway, New Jersey 07065, United States
 Department of Process Chemistry, MSD Research Laboratories, Hertford Road, Hoddesdon, Hertford, Hertfordshire EN11 9BU, United Kingdom
§ Department of Process Chemistry, MRL, 770 Sumneytown Pike, West Point, Pennsylvania 19486, United States
 Codexis, Inc., 200 Penobscot Drive, Redwood City, California 94063, United States
 Shanghai SynTheAll Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 9 Yuegong Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai, 201507, China
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00293

Abstract

Abstract Image

The development of a scalable asymmetric route to a new calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist is described. The synthesis of the two key fragments was redefined, and the intermediates were accessed through novel chemistry. Chiral lactam 2 was prepared by an enzyme mediated dynamic kinetic transamination which simultaneously set two stereocenters. Enzyme evolution resulted in an optimized transaminase providing the desired configuration in >60:1 syn/anti. The final chiral center was set via a crystallization induced diastereomeric transformation. The asymmetric spirocyclization to form the second fragment, chiral spiro acid intermediate 3, was catalyzed by a novel doubly quaternized phase transfer catalyst and provided optically pure material on isolation. With the two fragments in hand, development of their final union by amide bond formation and subsequent direct isolation is described. The described chemistry has been used to deliver over 100 kg of our desired target, ubrogepant.

(S)-N-((3S,5S,6R)-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidin-3-yl)-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide Trihydrate (1)

………..of white solids as 1 trihydrate (95%).
1H NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3): δ 10.15 (br s, 1H); 8.91 (br s, 1H); 8.21 (d, J = 6.0 Hz, 1H); 8.16 (dd, J = 5.3, 1.5 Hz, 1H); 8.01 (br s, 1H); 7.39–7.33 (m, 2H); 7.31–7.25 (m, 1H); 7.22–7.20 (m, 2H); 7.17 (dd, J = 7.4, 1.6 Hz, 1H); 6.88 (dd, J = 7.4, 5.3 Hz, 1H); 4.94 (dq, J = 9.3, 7.6 Hz, 1H); 4.45–4.37 (m, 1H); 3.94–3.87 (m, 1H); 3.72 (d, J = 17.2 Hz, 1H); 3.63–3.56 (m, 2H); 3.38–3.26 (m, 1H); 3.24 (d, J = 17.3 Hz, 1H); 3.13 (d, J = 16.5 Hz, 1H); 2.78 (q, J = 12.5 Hz, 1H); 2.62–2.56 (m, 1H); 1.11 (d, J = 6.5 Hz, 3H);
13C NMR (126 MHz, CDCl3): δ 181.4, 170.6, 166.7, 166.6, 156.9, 148.6, 148.1, 141.7, 135.8, 132.1, 131.1, 130.1, 129.7, 129.6, 128.8, 128.1, 126.3 (q, J = 280.1 Hz), 119.4, 60.1, 53.1, 52.0, 46.4 (q, J = 33.3 Hz), 45.2, 42.8, 41.7, 27.8, 13.5;
HRMS m/z: calcd for C29H27F3N5O3: 550.2061 (M + H); found: 550.2059.

US7390798 * Feb 9, 2005 Jun 24, 2008 Merck & Co., Inc. Carboxamide spirolactam CGRP receptor antagonists
US20090054408 * Sep 6, 2005 Feb 26, 2009 Bell Ian M Monocyclic anilide spirolactam cgrp receptor antagonists
US20100160334 * Mar 5, 2010 Jun 24, 2010 Bell Ian M Tricyclic anilide spirolactam cgrp receptor antagonists
US20100179166 * Jun 2, 2008 Jul 15, 2010 Ian Bell Carboxamide heterocyclic cgrp receptor antagonists
US20120122899 * Nov 10, 2011 May 17, 2012 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane cgrp receptor antagonists
US20120122900 * Nov 10, 2011 May 17, 2012 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane cgrp receptor antagonists
US20120122911 * Nov 10, 2011 May 17, 2012 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane cgrp receptor antagonists
Reference
1 * See also references of EP2849568A4
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
CN105037210A * May 27, 2015 Nov 11, 2015 江苏大学 Alpha,beta-dehydrogenated-alpha-amino acid synthesis method
US9688660 Oct 28, 2016 Jun 27, 2017 Heptares Therapeutics Limited CGRP receptor antagonists
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016346198 NOVEL DISINTEGRATION SYSTEMS FOR PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORMS
2015-02-04
US2016346214 TABLET FORMULATION FOR CGRP ACTIVE COMPOUNDS
2015-01-30
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2015112067 PROCESS FOR MAKING CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2013-03-13
2015-04-23
US9174989 Process for making CGRP receptor antagonists
2013-03-12
2015-11-03
US2016220552 FORMULATIONS FOR CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2014-09-11
2016-08-04
US2016130273 Process for Making CGRP Receptor Antagonists
2015-09-15
2016-05-12
US2017027925 PIPERIDINONE CARBOXAMIDE AZAINDANE CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2016-10-14
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US8754096 Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane CGRP receptor antagonists
2011-11-10
2014-06-17
US8912210 Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane CGRP receptor antagonists
2011-11-10
2014-12-16
US8481556 Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane CGRP receptor antagonists
2011-11-10
2013-07-09
US9499545 PIPERIDINONE CARBOXAMIDE AZAINDANE CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2014-09-12
2015-01-01
US9487523 PROCESS FOR MAKING CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2013-09-19
2015-02-05

REFERENCES

1: Voss T, Lipton RB, Dodick DW, Dupre N, Ge JY, Bachman R, Assaid C, Aurora SK, Michelson D. A phase IIb randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ubrogepant for the acute treatment of migraine. Cephalalgia. 2016 Aug;36(9):887-98. doi: 10.1177/0333102416653233. PubMed PMID: 27269043.

/////////////ubrogepant, MK-1602, Phase III,  Migraine

 O=C(C1=CN=C2C(C[C@@]3(C4=CC=CN=C4NC3=O)C2)=C1)N[C@@H]5C(N(CC(F)(F)F)[C@H](C)[C@H](C6=CC=CC=C6)C5)=O

ELAMIPRETIDE


Elamipretide.pngimg

Elamipretide

Elamipretide biologic depiction

H-D-Arg-Tyr(2,6-diMe)-Lys-Phe-NH2

D-arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-L-phenylalaninamide

(2S)-6-amino-2-[[(2S)-2-[[(2R)-2-amino-5-(diaminomethylideneamino)pentanoyl]amino]-3-(4-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylphenyl)propanoyl]amino]-N-[(2S)-1-amino-1-oxo-3-phenylpropan-2-yl]hexanamide

CAS 736992-21-5

Chemical Formula: C32H49N9O5

Molecular Weight: 639.8

  • A free radical scavenger and antioxidant that localizes in the inner mitochondrial membrane.
  • Mitochondrial Protective Agent to Improve Cell Viability
  1. Elamipretide
  2. bendavia
  3. UNII-87GWG91S09
  4. 736992-21-5
  5. MTP 131
  6. RX 31
  7. SS 31
  8. 87GWG91S09
  9. L-Phenylalaninamide, D-arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-
  10. SS-31 peptide
  11. Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2
  12. D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2
  13. SS31 peptide
  14. Elamipretide [USAN:INN]
  15. MTP-131
  16. Elamipretide (USAN/INN)
  17. arginyl-2,’6′-dimethyltyrosyl-lysyl-phenylalaninamide
  18. CHEMBL3833370
  19. SCHEMBL15028020
  20. CTK2H1007

Elamipretide is a cardiolipin peroxidase inhibitor and mitochondria-targeting peptide, Improves Left Ventricular and Mitochondrial Function. In vitro: Elamipretide significantly increases enzymatic activities of both complexes to near normal levels.

Background Information

Elamipretide is a cardiolipin peroxidase inhibitor and mitochondria-targeting peptide, Improves Left Ventricular and Mitochondrial Function. In vitro: Elamipretide significantly increases enzymatic activities of both complexes to near normal levels. long-term therapy with elamipretide reduces ROS formation, attenuated mPTP openings, and significantly decreases the levels of cytosolic cytochrome c and active caspase-3, thus suppressing a major signaling pathway for apoptosis. Elamipretide represents a new class of compounds that can improve the availability of energy to failing heart and reduce the burden of tissue injury caused by excessive ROS production. [1] In vivo: Fourteen dogs with microembolization-induced HF are randomized to 3 months monotherapy with subcutaneous injections of elamipretide (0.5 mg/kg once daily. Elamipretide has been shown to enhance ATP synthesis in multiple organs, including heart, kidney, neurons, and skeletal muscle. [1] ……by MedChemexpress Co., Ltd.

Elamipretide (also known as SS-31 and Bendavia)[1][2] is a small mitochondrially-targeted tetrapeptide (D-Arg-dimethylTyr-Lys-Phe-NH2) that appears to reduce the production of toxic reactive oxygen species and stabilize cardiolipin.[3]

Stealth Peptides, a privately held company, was founded in 2006 to develop intellectual property licensed from several universities including elamipretide; it subsequently changed its name to Stealth BioTherapeutics.[4][5]

Acute coronary syndrome; Age related macular degeneration; Cardiac failure; Corneal dystrophy; Diabetic macular edema; Lebers hereditary optic atrophy

  • Originator Stealth Peptides
  • Developer Stealth BioTherapeutics
  • Class Eye disorder therapies; Ischaemic heart disorder therapies; Oligopeptides; Peptides; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Free radical scavengers; Mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors
  • Phase II/III Barth syndrome
    • Phase II Acute kidney injury; Corneal disorders; Heart failure; Leber’s hereditary optic atrophy; Mitochondrial disorders; Reperfusion injury
    • Phase I/II Diabetic macular oedema; Dry age-related macular degeneration; Mitochondrial myopathies
    • Phase I Age-related macular degeneration
    • No development reported Chronic heart failure; Diabetes mellitus; Eye disorders; Neurodegenerative disorders

    Most Recent Events

    • 29 Jun 2017 Initial efficacy and adverse events data from phase II MMPOWER-2 trial in Mitochondrial-myopathies released by Stealth
    • 02 Jun 2017 Stealth BioTherapeutics completes a phase II trial in Heart failure in Germany and Serbia (SC) (NCT02814097)
    • 01 May 2017 Phase-II/III clinical trials in Barth syndrome (In children, In adolescents, In adults, In the elderly) in USA (SC) (NCT03098797)

Novel crystalline salt (eg hydrochloride, mesylate and tosylate salts) forms of D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2 (referred to as MTP-131 or elamipretide ) and composition comprising them are claimed. See WO2016190852 , claiming therapeutic compositions including chromanyl compounds, variants and analogues and uses thereof. Stealth BioTherapeutics (formerly known as Stealth Peptides) is developing elamipretide, which targets mitochondria, for the potential iv/sc treatment of cardiac reperfusion injury, acute coronary syndrome, acute kidney injury, mitochondrial myopathy, skeletal muscle disorders and congestive heart failure.

Also, the company is developing an oral formulation of elamipretide , which targets mitochondria and reduces the production of excess reactive oxygen species, for treating chronic heart failure. In January 2015, a phase II trial was ongoing . In July 2016, a phase II trial was initiated in Latvia, Spain and Hungary .

Further, the company is developing an ophthalmic formulation of elamipretide , a mitochondria targeting peptide, for treating ocular diseases including diabetic macular edema, age-related macular degeneration and fuchs’ corneal endothelial dystrophy and Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy.

In April 2016, a phase II trial was initiated for LHON . Family members of the product case of elamipretide ( WO2007035640 ) hold protection in the EU until 2026 and expires in the US in 2027 with US154 extension.

Acute coronary syndrome; Age related macular degeneration; Cardiac failure; Corneal dystrophy; Diabetic macular edema; Lebers hereditary optic atrophy

SYNTHESIS

NEXT………………………

PATENT 2

ELAMIPRETIDE BY STEALTH

WO-2017156403

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017156403&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription


; MTP-131; D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-Nth). Compound

1 has been shown to affect the mitochondrial disease process by helping to protect organs from oxidative damage caused by excess ROS production and to restore normal ATP production.

PATENT

US 20110082084

WO 2011091357

WO 2012129427

WO 2013059071

WO 2013126775

US 20140378396

US 20140093897

WO 2015134096

WO 2015100376

WO 2015060462

US 20150010588

PATENNT

WO 2015197723

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015197723

PROCESS FOR PREPARING

D-ARGINYL-2,6-DIMETHYL-L-TYROSYL-L-LYSYL-L-PHENYLALANINAMIDE

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention relates to a process for solution-phase synthesis of D- Arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-L-phenylalaninamide (abbreviated H-D-Arg-(2,6-Dimethyl)Tyr-L-Lys-L-Phe-NH2, development code SS-31 , MTP-131 , X-31) of Formula (I), an active ingredient developed by Stealth BioTherapeutics under the investigational drug brand names Bendavia® and Ocuvia®, for both common and rare diseases including a mitochondrial targeted therapy for ischemia reperfusion injury.

Formula (I)

BACKGROUND

The product belongs to the class of so-called “Szeto-Schiller peptides”. Szeto-Sciller peptides or “SS peptides” are small, aromatic-cationic, water soluble, highly polar peptides, such as disclosed in US 6703483 and US 7576061 , which can readily penetrate cell membranes. The aromatic-cationic peptides include a minimum of two amino acids, and preferably include a minimum of four amino acids, covalently joined by peptide bonds. The maximum number of amino acids is about twenty amino acids covalently joined by peptide bonds. As described by EP 2012/2436390, optimally, the number of amino acids present in the SS peptides is four.

Bendavia® is being tested for the treatment of ischemia reperfusion injury in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), for the treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and renal microvascular dysfunction in hypertension, for the treatment of skeletal muscle dysfunction, for the treatment of mitochondrial myopathy and for the treatment of chronic heart failure. Trials are ongoing to assess the Ocuvia’s potential to treat Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) a devastating inherited disease that causes sudden blindness, often in young adults.

Mitochondria are the cell’s powerhouse, responsible for more than 90% of the energy our bodies need to sustain life and support growth. The energetics from mitochondria maintains healthy physiology and prevents disease. In many common and rare diseases, dysfunctional mitochondria are a key component of disease progression.

D-Arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-L-phenylalaninamide is a cell-permeable and mitochondria-targeted peptide that showed antioxidant activity and was concentrated in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compound (< 1 nM) significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species, increased mitochondrial potential and prevented tBHP-induced apoptosis in both N2A and SH-SY5Y neuronal cell lines. In rats, intraperitoneal treatment (1 and 3 mg/kg) 1 day prior to unilateral ureteral obstruction and every day thereafter for 14 days significantly decreased tubular damage, macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Compound (3 mg/kg i.p. qd for 2 weeks) also prevented apoptosis and insulin reduction in mouse pancreatic islets caused by streptozotocin.

Further studies performed in a G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) demonstrated that the compound (5 mg/kg/day i.p. starting at 30 days of age) led to a significant delay in disease onset.

Potentially useful for the treatment of ALS and may be beneficial in the treatment of aging and diseases associated with oxidative stress.

In the last few years the peptide H-D-Arg-(2,6-Dimethyl)Tyr-L-Lys-L-Phe-NH2, shown in Fig 1 , and its therapeutic activity have been disclosed and

claimed by in several patent applications.

EP 2436390, US 201 10245182 and US 201 10245183 claim topical anesthetic compositions for application to the skin for pain management or anti-skin aging agents, respectively, comprising Szeto-Schiller peptides; SS-31 is specifically claimed as active ingredient. Sequence of solid-phase synthesis is indicated as the preferred preparation process.

US 7718620 claims a process of treating or preventing ischemia-reperfusion injury of the kidney in a mammal by administrating an effective amount of an aromatic-cationic peptide. SS-31 is specifically claimed as active ingredient.

WO2005/001023 discloses a generical process and carrier complexes for delivering molecules to cells comprising a molecule and an aromatic cationic peptide of type D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2. The tetrapeptide SS-31 is

specifically claimed as product useful for the process at claim 18.

WO2012/1741 17 and WO2014/210056 claim therapeutic compositions based on SS peptides and the aromatic-cationic peptide D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2 as active agent.

WO 2013/086020, WO 2004/070054 and WO 2005/072295 provide processes for preventing mithochondrial permeability transition and reducing oxidative damage in a mammal, a removed organ, or a cell in need thereof and specifically claims the process wherein the peptide does not have mu-opioid receptor agonist activity, i.e., D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2.

WO 2009/108695 discloses a process for protecting a kidney from renal injury which may be associated with decreased or blocked blood flow in the subject’s kidney or exposure to a nephrotoxic agent, such as a radiocontrast dye. The processes include administering to the subject an effective amount of an aromatic-cationic peptide to a subject in need thereof and one of the selected peptide is D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2.

US 6703483 discloses a detailed procedure for the preparation of novel analogs of DALDA [H-Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2], namely H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2 using the solid-phase techniques and /?-methylbenzhydrylamine

resin and protocols that have been extensively used by inventor’s laboratory.

Most prior art processes for preparing the compound typically comprise conventionally performed peptide solid-phase synthesis with further purification by chromatography in order to obtain the requested purity for therapeutic use.

It is well known that solid-phase synthesis followed by chromatographic purification is time consuming, very expensive and very difficult to be scaled up on industrial scale, so the need of developing a process for large scale production is obvious. The compound is isolated as organic acid salt, as acetate or trifluoro acetate.

eddy et al., Adv. Exp. Med. Biol, 2009, 61 1 , 473 generally describes the liquid-phase synthesis of antioxidant peptides of Figure 1 and similar others (SS-02, SS-20), involving routinely used side chain protecting groups for amino acid building blocks. The guanidine group was protected with NO2 and the ε-ΝΗ2 of Lys was protected by Cbz or 2-Cl-Cbz. These peptides were

synthesized using Boc/Cbz chemistry and BOP reagent coupling. Starting with the C-terminal Lys residue protected as H-Lys(2-Cl-Cbz)-NH2, (prepared

from the commercially available Boc-Lys(2-Cl-Cbz)-OH in two steps by amidation with NH4HCO3 in the presence of DCC/HOBt following a literature procedure [Ueyama et all, Biopolymers, 1992, 32, 1535, PubMed: 1457730], followed by exposure to TFA). Selective removal of the 2-Cl-Cbz in the

presence of the NO2 group was accomplished using catalytic transfer hydrogenolysis (CTH) [Gowda et al., Lett. Pept. Sci., 2002, 9, 153].

A stepwise procedure by standard solution peptide synthesis for preparation of potent μ agonist [DmtJDALDA and its conversion into a potent δ antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH by substitution of D-Arg with Tic to enhance the δ opioid agonist activity is described by Balboni et al., J. Med.

Chem., 2005, 48, 5608. A general synthetic procedure for a similar tetrapeptide ([Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2 is described by Ballet et al., J. Med.

Chem. 2011, 54, 2467.

Similar DALDA analog tetrapeptides were prepared by the manual solid-phase technique using Boc protection for the a-amino group and DIC/HOBt or HBTU/DIEA as coupling agent [Berezowska et al., J. Med. Chem., 2009, 52, 6941 ; Olma et al., Acta Biochim. Polonica, 2001, 48, 4, 1 121 ; Schiller at al., Eur. J. Med. Chem., 2000, 35, 895].

Despite the high overall yield in the solid-phase approach, it has several drawbacks for the scale-up process such as:

a. the application of the highly toxic and corrosive hydrogen fluoride for cleavage of the peptide from the resin,

b. low loading (0.3-0.35 mmol/g of resin) proved necessary for successful end-step, and

c. use of excess amounts of reagents (3-fold of DIC, 2.4-fold of HOBt, etc.) on each step [ yakhovsky et al., Beilstein J. Org. Chem., 2008, 4(39), 1 , doi: 10.376/bjoc.4.39]

SUMMARY

The invention relates to a more efficient process avoiding either solid-phase synthesis or chromatographic purification, more suitable for large scale production. The process of the invention is described in Scheme A.

The following abbreviations are used:

Dmt = 2,6-dimethyl tyrosine; Z= benzyloxycarbonyl; MeSO3H = methane sulphonic acid; Boc = Tert-butyloxycarbonyl; NMM = N-methyl morpholine; TBTU= N,N,N’,N’-Tetramethyl-O-(benzotriazol- l-yl)uronium tetrafluoroborate; DMF = dimethyl formamide; TFA = trifluoroacetic acid

Scheme A shows the process for the solution phase synthesis of peptide

1 for assembly of the tetrapeptide backbone using O-Benzyl (Bzl) group and benzyloxycarbonyl (Z) group respectively, as the temporary protection for amino acids’ N-termini (Scheme Figure 2), followed by a final catalytic hydrogenolysis. The final product is isolated as organic acid salt, for example, acetic acid salt.

H-Phe-NH 2 + Boc-Lys(Z)-OH

Boc-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2

(IV)

(V) I MeS03H/CH2CI2

Boc-DMTyr(Bzl)-OH + MeS03H.H-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2

(

Boc-DMTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2

(VIII)

I MeS03H/CH2CI2

Z-D-Arg-ONa + H-DMTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2.MeS03H

(X) (IX)

TBTU/NMM/DMF

Z-D-Arg-DMTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH

(XI)

I H2, Pd/C

X ACOH

H-D-Arg-DMTyr-Lys-Phe-NH

(I)

Scheme A

This process is a notable improvement with respect to the prior art and its advantages can be summarized as follows:

• The synthesis is performed in liquid phase allowing the scale up on industrial scale without need of special equipment; · The selection of the protecting group in the building blocks allows a straightforward synthesis with very simple deprotection at each step and minimize the formation of undesired by-product;

• Each intermediate can be crystallized allowing removal of impurities which are not transferred to the following step;

· The purity of each intermediate is very high and usually close to

99%.

EXAMPLES

Example 1: Preparation of Boc-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2

Charge 200 mL of DMF, 44 g of Boc-Lys(Z)-OH and 15.6 g of H-Phe-NH2 in a flask. Stir the mixture at room temperature for 10 min. Add 19.2 g of

N-methylmorpholine and 32.1 g of TBTU successively at room temperature. Stir the mixture at room temperature for 1 h. Add 500 mL of water into the reaction mixture to precipitate the product at room temperature. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product and wash the filter cake with water.

Transfer the filter cake into a flask containing 360 mL of ethyl acetate and heat the mixture at 50°C till all the solid is dissolved. Separate the organic phase of product and discard the small aqueous phase. Concentrate the organic phase at 40~45°C and under vacuum to remove the solvent till lots of solid is formed. Filter the residue to isolate the solid product. Transfer the filter cake into a flask containing 2000 mL of MTBE and heat the mixture at refluxing for 20 min. Then, cool down the mixture to room temperature. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the filter cake at 30 °C and under vacuum to give 35 g of solid product.

Example 2: Preparation of H-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeSC>3H

Charge 26.3 g of Boc-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2, 200 mL of methylene chloride

and 9.6 g of methanesulfonic acid. Stir the mixture at 15-20 °C for 18 h. Add 100 mL of MTBE into the mixture and stir at 15-20 °C for 1 h. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the wet cake in air at room temperature to give 26.4 g of white solid product.

Example 3: Preparation of Boc-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2

Charge 8.4 g of Boc-DMeTyr(Bzl)-OH, 1 1 g of H-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeSO3H, 7.4 g of TBTU and 80 mL of THF in a flask. Stir the mixture

at room temperature for 15 min, and then cool down to 10°C. Add 6.36 g of N-methylmorpholine and stir the mixture at 20-25°C for 3 h. Add the reaction mixture into a flask containing 240 mL of water. Add 32 mL of methylene chloride into the mixture obtained in the previous operation of. Stir the resultant mixture at room temperature for 20 min. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product and wash the filter cake with acetone (300 mL X 2). Dry the filter cake in air at room temperature to give 14.3 g of white solid product.

Example 4: Preparation of H-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeS03H

Charge 14 g of Boc-BMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2, 280 mL of methylene chloride and 3.3 g of methanesulfonic acid in a flask. Stir the mixture at 18 ~ 22 °C for 10 h. Add 560 mL of heptanes into the mixture and stir the mixture at room temperature for 30 min. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the wet cake in air at room temperature to give 14 g of white solid product.

Example 5: Preparation of Z-D-Arg-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2

Charge 6.34 g of Z-D-Arg-ONa, 100 mL of DMF and 2.0 g of methanesulfonic acid in a flask. Stir the mixture at room temperature till a clear solution was formed. Add 14 g of H-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeSO3H and cool down the mixture to 10°C. Add 6.15 g of TBTU and

9.67 g of N-methylmorpholine successively. Stir the mixture at room temperature for 4 h. Add aqueous solution of LiOH prepared by dissolving 2.9 g of LiOH.L O in 8 mL of water. Stir the mixture for 30 min. Add the resultant mixture slowly into a flask containing 420 mL of water under stirring. Add 56 mL of methylene chloride into the mixture. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Transfer the filter cake into a flask containing 150 mL of acetic acid, and heat the mixture at 35-40 °C till most of the solid was dissolved. Add 450 mL of MTBE into the mixture and cool down the mixture under stirring to room temperature. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the filter cake in air at room temperature to give 17.3 g of the white solid product.

Example 6 Preparation of H-D-Arg-DMeTyr-Lys-Phe-NH2.3AcOH

Charge 2.0 g of Z-D-Arg-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2, 20 mL of acetic acid and 5% Pd/C catalyst (which is obtained by washing 5.0 g of 5% Pd/C containing 60% of water with 30 mL of acetic acid) in a flask. Change the atmosphere of the flask with hydrogen. Stir the mixture at room temperature and pressure of 1 atm of hydrogen for 2 h. Filter the mixture to remove the Pd/C catalyst and wash the filter cake with 10 mL of acetic acid. Combine the filtrate and washing solution and concentrate the solution at 20°C and under vacuum to remove most the solvent. Add 100 mL of acetonitrile into the residue and stir the mixture at room temperature for 20 min. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the filter cake at room temperature and under vacuum to give 0.7 g of the white product.

PATENT

WO 2016001042

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016001042&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

References

  1. Jump up^ “Recommended INN List 75” (PDF). WHO Drug Information30 (1): 111. 2016.
  2. Jump up^ “Elamipretide”. AdisInsight. Retrieved 24 April 2017.
  3. Jump up^ Kloner, RA; Shi, J; Dai, W (February 2015). “New therapies for reducing post-myocardial left ventricular remodeling.”Annals of translational medicine3 (2): 20. PMC 4322169Freely accessiblePMID 25738140.
  4. Jump up^ Valigra, Lori (April 9, 2012). “Stealth Peptides sees positive results from Bendavia”Boston Business Journal.
  5. Jump up^ Dolgin, Elie (11 February 2016). “New drugs offer hope for mitochondrial disease”STAT.
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017152289 PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF D-ARGINYL-2, 6-DIMETHYL-L-TYROSYL-L-LYSYL-L-PHENYLALANINAMIDE 2015-06-24
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2014294796 AROMATIC-CATIONIC PEPTIDES AND USES OF SAME 2012-12-05 2014-10-02
US2016264623 TETRAPEPTIDE COMPOUND AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING SAME 2014-10-23 2016-09-15
US2017081363 PHARMACEUTICALLY RELEVANT AROMATIC-CATIONIC PEPTIDES 2014-12-23
US2016340389 PHARMACEUTICALLY RELEVANT AROMATIC-CATIONIC PEPTIDES 2014-12-23
US2017129920 Process for Preparing D-Arginyl-2, 6-Dimethyl-L-Tyrosyl-L-Lysyl-L-Phenylalaninamide 2015-06-24

REFERENCES

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3: Dai W, Shi J, Gupta RC, Sabbah HN, Hale SL, Kloner RA. Bendavia, a mitochondria-targeting peptide, improves postinfarction cardiac function, prevents adverse left ventricular remodeling, and restores mitochondria-related gene expression in rats. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2014 Dec;64(6):543-53. PubMed PMID: 25165999.

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8: Szeto HH. First-in-class cardiolipin-protective compound as a therapeutic agent to restore mitochondrial bioenergetics. Br J Pharmacol. 2014 Apr;171(8):2029-50. doi: 10.1111/bph.12461. Review. PubMed PMID: 24117165; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3976620.

9: Zhao WY, Han S, Zhang L, Zhu YH, Wang LM, Zeng L. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant peptide SS31 prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis by down-regulating p66Shc in renal tubular epithelial cells. Cell Physiol Biochem. 2013;32(3):591-600. doi: 10.1159/000354463. Epub 2013 Sep 6. PubMed PMID: 24021885.

10: Dai DF, Hsieh EJ, Chen T, Menendez LG, Basisty NB, Tsai L, Beyer RP, Crispin DA, Shulman NJ, Szeto HH, Tian R, MacCoss MJ, Rabinovitch PS. Global proteomics and pathway analysis of pressure-overload-induced heart failure and its attenuation by mitochondrial-targeted peptides. Circ Heart Fail. 2013 Sep 1;6(5):1067-76. doi: 10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.113.000406. Epub 2013 Aug 9. PubMed PMID: 23935006; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3856238.

/////////////////////Elamipretide,  SS-31,  Bendavia, PEPTIDE

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