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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 29 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 29 year tenure till date Aug 2016, Around 30 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 25 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 13 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 212 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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TAFAMIDIS


Tafamidis skeletal.svgChemSpider 2D Image | Tafamidis | C14H7Cl2NO3

Tafamidis

  • Molecular Formula C14H7Cl2NO3
  • Average mass 308.116 Da

TAFAMIDIS, Fx-1006A
PF-06291826

2-(3,5-Dichlorophenyl)-1,3-benzoxazole-6-carboxylic acid
594839-88-0 [RN]
6-Benzoxazolecarboxylic acid, 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-
Vyndaqel
Tafamidis meglumine
Familial amyloid polyneuropathy LAUNCHED PFIZER 2011 EU
ApprovedJapanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in September 2013
PHASE 3, at  FDA, Amyloidosis, PFIZER
Image result for Vyndaqel tafamidis meglumine
Molecular Formula: C21H24Cl2N2O8
Molecular Weight: 503.329 g/mol

CAS 951395-08-7

Image result for Vyndaqel tafamidis meglumine

D-Glucitol, 1-deoxy-1-(methylamino)-, 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-6-benzoxazolecarboxylate

Tafamidis (INN, or Fx-1006A,[1] trade name Vyndaqel) is a drug for the amelioration of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis(also familial amyloid polyneuropathy, or FAP), a rare but deadly neurodegenerative disease.[2][3] The drug was approved by the European Medicines Agency in November 2011 and by the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in September 2013.[4]

In 2011 and 2012, orphan drug designation was assigned in Japan and the U.S., respectively, for the treatment of transthyretin amyloid polyneuropathy. This designation was assigned in the E.U. in 2012 for the treatment of senile systemic amyloidosis. In 2017, fast drug designation was assigned in the U.S. for the treatment of transthyretin cardiomyopathy.

Tafamidis is a novel specific transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer or dissociation inhibitor. TTR is a tetramer that is responsible in transporting the retinol-binding protein-vitamin A complex and minimally transporting thyroxine in the blood. In TTR-related disorders such as transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP), tetramer dissociation is accelerated that results in unregulated amyloidogenesis and amyloid fibril formation. Eventually the failure of autonomic and peripheral nervous system is induced. Tafamidiswas approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2011 under the market name Vyndaqel for the treatment of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) in adult patients with early-stage symptomatic polyneuropathy to delay peripheral neurologic impairment. Tafamidis is an investigational drug under the FDA and in June 2017, Pfizer received FDA Fast Track Designation for tafamidis

Image result for TAFAMIDIS

The marketed drug, a meglumine salt, has completed an 18 month placebo controlled phase II/III clinical trial,[5][6] and an 12 month extension study[7] which provides evidence that tafamidis slows progression of Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.[8] Tafamidis (20 mg once daily) is used in adult patients with an early stage (stage 1) of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.[9][10]

Tafamidis was discovered in the Jeffery W. Kelly Laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute[11] using a structure-based drug design strategy[12] and was developed at FoldRx pharmaceuticals, a biotechnology company Kelly co-founded with Susan Lindquist. FoldRx was led by Richard Labaudiniere when it was acquired by Pfizer in 2010.

Tafamidis functions by kinetic stabilization of the correctly folded tetrameric form of the transthyretin (TTR) protein.[13] In patients with FAP, this protein dissociates in a process that is rate limiting for aggregation including amyloid fibril formation, causing failure of the autonomic nervous system and/or the peripheral nervous system (neurodegeneration) initially and later failure of the heart. Kinetic Stabilization of tetrameric transthyretin in familial amyloid polyneuropathy patients provides the first pharmacologic evidence that the process of amyloid fibril formation causes this disease, as treatment with tafamidis dramatically slows the process of amyloid fibril formation and the degeneration of post-mitotic tissue. Sixty % of the patients enrolled in the initial clinical trial have the same or an improved neurologic impairment score after six years of taking tafamidis, whereas 30% of the patients progress at a rate ≤ 1/5 of that predicted by the natural history. Importantly, all of the V30M FAP patients remain stage 1 patients after 6 years on tafamidis out of four stages of disease progression. [Data presented orally by Professor Coelho in Brazil in 2013][7]

The process of wild type transthyretin amyloidogenesis also appears to cause wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (WTTA), also known as senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA), leading to cardiomyopathy as the prominent phenotype.[14] Some mutants of transthyretin — including V122I, which is primarily found in individuals of African descent — are destabilizing, enabling heterotetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and subsequent misassembly of transthyretin into a variety of aggregate structures [15] including amyloid fibrils[16]leading to familial amyloid cardiomyopathy.[17] While there is clinical evidence from a small number of patients that tafamidis slows the progression of the transthyretin cardiomyopathies,[18] this has yet to be demonstrated in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Pfizer has enrolled a placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the ability of tafamidis to slow the progression of both familial amyloid cardiomyopathy and senile systemic amyloidosis (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01994889).

Regulatory Process

Tafamidis was approved for use in the European Union by the European Medicines Agency in November 2011, specifically for the treatment of early stage transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP (all mutations). In September 2013 Tafamidis was approved for use in Japan by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, specifically for the treatment of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP (all mutations). Tafamidis is also approved for use in Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Israel by the relevant authorities.[19] It is currently being considered for approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of early stage transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP.

In June 2012, the FDA Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee voted “yes” (13-4 favorable vote) when asked if the findings of the pivotal clinical study with tafamidis were “sufficiently robust to provide substantial evidence of efficacy for a surrogate endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit”. The Advisory Committee voted “no” 4-13 to reject the drug–in spite of the fact that both primary endpoints were met in the efficacy evaluable population (n=87) and were just missed in the intent to treat population (n=125), apparently because more patients than expected in the intent to treat population were selected for liver transplantation during the course of the trial, not owing to treatment failure, but because their name rose to the top of the transplant list. However, these patients were classified as treatment failures in the conservative analysis used.

Pfizer (following its acquisition of FoldRx ), under license from Scripps Research Institute , has developed and launched tafamidis, a small-molecule transthyretin stabilizer, useful for treating familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

SYN

 European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 121, 823-840; 2016

SYN 2

INNOVATORS

THE SCRIPPS RESEARCH INSTITUTE [US/US]; 10550 N Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (US)

KELLY, Jeffrey, W.; (US).
SEKIJIMA, Yoshiki; (US)

Image result for The Scripps Research Institute

Dr. Jeffery W. Kelly

Lita Annenberg Hazen Professor of Chemistry

Co-Chairman, Department of Molecular Medicine

Click here to download a concise version of Dr. Jeffery Kelly’s curriculum vitae.

Image result for The Scripps Research Institute

PATENT

WO2004056315

Example 5: Benzoxazoles as Transthyretin Amyloid Fibril Inhibitors
Transthyretin’s two thyroxine binding sites are created by its quaternary structural interface. The tetramer can be stabilized by small molecule binding to these sites, potentially providing a means to treat TTR amyloid disease with small molecule drugs. Many families of compounds have been discovered whose binding stabilizes the tetrameric ground state to a degree proportional to the small molecule dissociation constants Km and Ka2. This also effectively increases the dissociative activation barrier and inhibits amyloidosis by kinetic stabilization. Such inhibitors are typically composed of two aromatic rings, with one ring bearing halogen substituents and the other bearing hydrophilic substituents. Benzoxazoles substituted with a carboxylic acid at C(4)-C(7) and a halogenated phenyl ring at C(2) also appeared to complement the TTR thyroxine binding site. A small library of these compounds was therefore prepared by dehydrocyclization of N-acyl amino-hydroxybenzoic acids as illustrated in Scheme 1.

Scheme 1: General Synthesis of Benzoxazoles
Reagents: (a) ArCOCl, THF, pyridine (Ar = Phenyl, 3,5-Difluorophenyl, 2,6-Difluorophenyl, 3,5-Dichlorophenyl, 2,6-Dichlorophenyl, 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl, and 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl); (b) TsOH*H2O, refluxing xylenes; (c) TMSCHN2, benzene, MeOH; (d) LiOH, THF, MeOH, H2O (8-27% yield over 4 steps).

The benzoxazoles were evaluated using a series of analyses of increasing stringency. WT TTR (3.6 μM) was incubated for 30 min (pH 7, 37 °C) with a test compound (7.2 μM). Since at least one molecule ofthe test compound must bind to each molecule of TTR tetramer to be able to stabilize it, a test compound concentration of 7.2 μM is only twice the minimum effective concentration. The pH was then adjusted to 4.4, the optimal pH for fibrilization. The amount of amyloid formed after 72 h (37 °C) in the presence ofthe test compound was determined by turbidity at 400 nm and is expressed as % fibril formation (ff), 100%) being the amount formed by TTR alone. Ofthe 28 compounds tested, 11 reduced fibril formation to negligible levels (jf< 10%; FIG. 7).
The 11 most active compounds were then evaluated for their ability to bind selectively to TTR over, all other proteins in blood. Human blood plasma (TTR cone. 3.6 -5.4 μM) was incubated for 24 h with the test compound (10.8 μM) at 37 °C. The TTR and any bound inhibitor were immunoprecipitated using a sepharose-bound polyclonal TTR antibody. The TTR with or without inhibitor bound was liberated from the resin at high pH, and the inhibitor: TTR stoichiometry was ascertained by HPLC analysis (FIG. 8). Benzoxazoles with carboxylic acids in the 5- or 6-position, and 2,6-dichlorophenyl (13, 20) or 2-trifluoromethylphenyl (11, 18) substituents at the 2-position displayed the highest binding stoichiometries. In particular, 20 exhibited excellent inhibitory activity and binding selectivity. Hence, its mechanism of action was characterized further.
To confirm that 20 inhibits TTR fibril formation by binding strongly to the tetramer, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and sedimentation velocity experiments were conducted with wt TTR. ITC showed that two equivalents of 20 bind with average dissociation constants of Kdi = Kd2 = 55 (± 10) nM under physiological conditions. These are comparable to the dissociation constants of many other highly efficacious TTR
amyloidogenesis inhibitors. For the sedimentation velocity experiments, TTR (3.6 μM) was incubated with 20 (3.6 μM, 7.2 μM, 36 μM) under optimal fibrilization conditions (72 h, pH 4.4, 37 °C). The tetramer (55 kDa) was the only detectable species in solution with 20 at 7.2 or 36 μM. Some large aggregates formed with 20 at 3.6 μM, but the TTR remaining in solution was tetrameric.
T119M subunit inclusion and small molecule binding both prevent TTR amyloid formation by raising the activation barrier for tetramer dissociation. An inhibitor’s ability to do this is most rigorously tested by measuring its efficacy at slowing tetramer dissociation in 6 M urea, a severe denaturation stress. Thus, the rates of TTR tetramer dissociation in 6 M urea in the presence and absence of 20, 21 or 27 were compared (FIG. 9). TTR (1.8 μM) was completely denatured after 168 h in 6 M urea. In contrast, 20 at 3.6 μM prevented tetramer dissociation for at least 168 h (> 3 the half-life of TTR in human plasma). With an equimolar amount of 20, only 27% of TTR denatured in 168 h. Compound 27 (3.6 μM) was much less able to prevent tetramer dissociation (90% unfolding after 168 h), even though it was active in the fibril formation assay. Compound 21 did not hinder the dissociation of TTR at all. These results show that inhibitor binding to TTR is necessary but not sufficient to kinetically stabilize the TTR tetramer under strongly denaturing conditions; it is also important that the dissociation constants be very low (or that the off rates be very slow). Also, the display of functional groups on 20 is apparently optimal for stabilizing the TTR tetramer; moving the carboxylic acid from C(6) to C(7), as in 27, or removing the chlorines, as in 21, severely diminishes its activity.

The role ofthe substituents in 20 is evident from its co-crystal stracture with TTR (FIG. 10). Compound 20 orients its two chlorine atoms near halogen binding pockets 2 and 2′ (so-called because they are occupied by iodines when thyroxine binds to TTR). The 2,6 substitution pattern on the phenyl ring forces the benzoxazole and phenyl rings out of planarity, optimally positioning the carboxylic acid on the benzoxazole to hydrogen bond to the ε-NH3+ groups of Lys 15/15′. Hydrophobic interactions between the aromatic rings of 20 and the side chains of Leu 17, Leu 110, Ser 117, and Val 121 contribute additional binding energy.

PAPER

ChemMedChem (2013), 8(10), 1617-1619.

Nature Reviews Drug Discovery (2012), 11(3), 185-186

PAPER

Design and synthesis of pyrimidinone and pyrimidinedione inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV
J Med Chem 2011, 54(2): 510

PATENT

WO-2017190682

Novel crystalline forms of tafamidis methylglucamine (designated as Form E), processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them are claimed. Also claimed is their use for treating familial amyloid neuropathy. Represents first PCT filing from Crystal Pharmatech and the inventors on this API.

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=2C2DC88BD4DC90B179C38EC5283D0941.wapp2nA?docId=WO2017190682&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=FullText

CLIP

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2016/ob/c5ob02496j/unauth#!divAbstract

Image result for TAFAMIDIS

2-(3, 5-Dichlorophenyl)benzo[d]oxazole-6-carboxylic acid (Tafamidis)

m.p. = 200.4–202.7 °C; Rf = 0.37 (petroleum ether/ethyl acetate/acetic acid = 6:1:0.01).

IR (cm-1 , KBr): 3383, 1685, 1608, 1224, 769;

1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 400 MHz) (ppm) 8.27 (s, 1H), 8.18 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 8.04–8.02 (m, 1H), 7.94 (s, 1H), 7.88 (d, J = 1.6 Hz, 1H), 7.67 (dd, J = 6.8 Hz, 5.2 Hz, 1H);

13C NMR (DMSOd6, 100 MHz) (ppm) 167.2, 162.1, 150.1, 145.0, 137.8, 133.7, 131.4, 128.6, 126.8, 124.3, 120.5, 112.6.

Data was consistent with that reported in the literature. [27]Yamamoto, T.; Muto, K.; Komiyama, M.; Canivet, J.; Yamaguchi, J.; Itami, K. Chem. Eur. J. 2011, 17, 10113.

Clip

http://synth.chem.nagoya-u.ac.jp/wordpress/publication/nicatalystscopemechanism?lang=en

Image result for TAFAMIDIS

CLIP

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 12; 109(24): 9629–9634.
Published online 2012 May 29. doi:  10.1073/pnas.1121005109

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386102/

str1

The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A–retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils in elderly patients. Because tetramer dissociation is the rate-limiting step in TTR amyloidogenesis, targeted therapies have focused on small molecules that kinetically stabilize the tetramer, inhibiting TTR amyloid fibril formation. One such compound, tafamidis meglumine (Fx-1006A), has recently completed Phase II/III trials for the treatment of Transthyretin Type Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) and demonstrated a slowing of disease progression in patients heterozygous for the V30M TTR mutation. Herein we describe the molecular and structural basis of TTR tetramer stabilization by tafamidis. Tafamidis binds selectively and with negative cooperativity (Kds ∼2 nM and ∼200 nM) to the two normally unoccupied thyroxine-binding sites of the tetramer, and kinetically stabilizes TTR. Patient-derived amyloidogenic variants of TTR, including kinetically and thermodynamically less stable mutants, are also stabilized by tafamidis binding. The crystal structure of tafamidis-bound TTR suggests that binding stabilizes the weaker dimer-dimer interface against dissociation, the rate-limiting step of amyloidogenesis.

4-Amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (AHBA) is reacted with HCl (3 to 6 M equivalents) in methanol (8 to 9 L/kg). Methyl t-butyl ether (TBME) (9 to 11 L/kg) is then added to the reaction mixture. The product, methyl 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoate hydrochloride salt, is isolated by filtration and then reacted with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride (0.95 to 1.05 M equivalents) in the presence of pyridine (2.0 to 2.5 M equivalents) in dichloromethane (DCM), (8 to 9 L/kg) as a solvent. After the distillation of DCM, acetone and water are added to the reaction mixture, producing methyl 4-(3,5-dichlorobenzoylamino)-3- hydroxy-benzoate. This is recovered by filtration and reacted with p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate (0.149 to 0.151 M equivalents) in toluene (12 to 18 L/kg) at reflux with water trap. Treatment with charcoal is then performed. After the distillation of toluene, acetone (4-6 L/kg) is added. The product, methyl 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-benzoxazole-6- carboxylate, is isolated by filtration and then reacted with LiOH (1.25 to 1.29 M equivalents) in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF) (7.8 to 8.2 L/kg) and water (7.8 to 8.2 L/kg) at between 40 and 45 °C. The pH of the reaction mixture is adjusted with aqueous HCl to yield 2-(3,5-dichloro-phenyl)-benzoxazole-6-carboxylic acid, the free acid of tafamidis. This is converted to the meglumine salt by reacting with N-methyl-Dglucamine (0.95 to 1.05 M equivalents) in a mixture of water (4.95 to 5.05 L/kg)/isopropyl alcohol (19.75 to 20.25 L/kg) at 65-70 °C. Tafamidis meglumine (dglucitol, 1-deoxy-1-(methylamino)-,2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-6-benzoxazole carboxylate) is then isolated by filtration.

2 The following fragments were identified from electrospray ionization mass spectra acquired in positive-ion mode: meglumine M+ (C7H18NO5+, m/z = 196.13), M (carboxylate form) +2H (C14H6Cl2NO3, m/z = 308.13), M (salt) + H (C21H24Cl2N2O8, m/z = 504.26). 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired on a 700 MHz Bruker AVANCE II spectrometer in acetone:D2O (~8:2). Data were reported as chemical shift in ppm (δ), multiplicity (s = singlet, dd = double of doublets, m = multiplet), coupling constant (J Hz), relative integral and assignment: δ = 8.14 (m, JH2-H5 = 0.6 and JH2-H6 = 1.5, 1H, H2), 8.02 (dd, JH9-H11 = 1.9 and JH13-H11 = 1.9, 2H, H9 and H13), 7.97 (dd, JH6-H5 = 8.25, 1H, H6), 7.67 (dd, JH5-H2 = 0.6 and JH5-H6 = 8.25, 1H, H5), 7.58 (m, JH11-H9 = 1.9 and JH11-H13 = 1.9, 1H, H11), 4.08 (m, JH16-H17 = 4.9, 1H, H16), 3.79 (dd, JH17-H18 = 2.2, 1H, H17), 3.73 (dd, JH19-H20 = 3.2, 1H, H20), 3.69 (m, JH19-H20 = 3.2, 1H, H19), 3.61 (m, JH18-H19 = 12.25, 1H, H18), 3.58 (m, JH19-H20′ = 5.8 and JH20-H20′ = 11.7, 1H, H20′ ), 3.19 (m, JH15-H15′ = 12.9 and JH15′-H16 = 9.25 and JH15-H16 = 3.5, 2H, H15).

CLIP

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1002/chem.201101091/asset/supinfo/chem_201101091_sm_miscellaneous_information.pdf?v=1&s=7badb204a12057710743c1711a744253eccd636a

Concise Synthesis of Tafamidis (Scheme 8)

4-(6-Benzoxazoyl)morpholine (8)

str1

A mixture of 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (1.53 g, 10 mmol) and trimethyl orthofomate (3 mL) was heated at 100 ºC for 5 h. After cooling to room temperature, trimethyl orthofomate was removed under reduced pressure. To a solution of benzoxazole 6-carboxylic acid in CH2Cl2 (10 mL) were added DMF (0.1 mL) and oxalyl chloride (1.8 mL, 20 mmol) and the resultant mixture was stirred at room temperature for 12 h. After cooling to room temperature, DMF and oxalyl chloride were removed under reduced pressure to yield the corresponding acid chloride as a solid. Thus-generated acid chloride and morpholine (2.2 mL) were stirred at room temperature for 3 h. After removing solvents under reduced pressure, the mixture was treated with saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate (20 mL) and ethyl acetate (20 mL). The layers were separated, and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (2 × 20 mL). The combined organic layer was washed with brine (20 mL), dried with anhydrous magnesium sulfate, and the solvent removed under reduced pressure. Purification of the resulting oil by flash column chromatography on silica (5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) afforded heteroarene 8 (1.30 g, 56%) as a white solid. Rf = 0.47 (MeOH/CHCl3 = 1:20). 1 H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.23 (s, 1H), 7.83 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 1H), 7.71 (s, 1H) 7.44 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.00–3.25 (br, 8H). 13C NMR (150 MHz, CDCl3) δ 169.52, 153.87, 149.67, 141.24, 132.90, 123.79, 120.76, 110.48, 66.81. HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C12H13N2O3 [MH]+ : 233.0926, found 233.0926.

4-(3,5-Dichlorophenyl 6-benzoxazoyl)morpholine

To a 20-mL glass vessel equipped with J. Young® O-ring tap containing a magnetic stirring bar were added Ni(cod)2 (13.9 mg, 0.05 mmol), 2,2’-bipyridyl (7.8 mg, 0.05 mmol), LiOt-Bu (60 mg, 0.75 mmol), 8 (174.2 mg, 0.5 mmol), 3,5-dichloroiodobenzene (9: 203.9 mg, 0.75 mmol), followed by dry 1,2-dimethoxyethane (2.0 mL). The vessel was sealed with an O-ring tap and then heated at 100 °C in an 8-well reaction block with stirring for 24 h. After cooling the reaction mixture to room temperature, the mixture was passed through a short silica gel pad (EtOAc). The filtrate was concentrated and the residue was subjected to preparative thin-layer chromatography (5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) to afford SI-2 (139.6 mg, 74 %) as a white foam. Rf = 0.70 (MeOH/CHCl3 = 1:20). 1 H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.16 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 2H), 7.82 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.70 (s, 1H), 7.55 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.45 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.00–3.25 (br, 8H). 13C NMR (150 MHz, CDCl3) δ 169.38, 161.78, 150.40, 142.90, 135.82, 132.95, 131.61, 129.26, 125.91, 124.23, 120.41, 110.26, 66.77. HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C18H15Cl2N2O3 [MH]+ : 377.0460 found 377.0465.

Tafamidis[19  ] Razavi, H.; Palaninathan, S. K.; Powers, E. T.; Wiseman, R. L.; Purkey, H. E.; Mohamedmohaideen, N. N.; Deechongkit, S.; Chiang, K. P.; Dendle, M. T. A.; Sacchettini, J. C.; Kelly, J. W. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 2758.]

HF·pyridine (0.5 mL) was added to a stirred solution of SI-2 (32 mg, 0.09 mmol) in THF (0.5 mL) at 70 ºC for 12 h. After cooling the reaction mixture to room temperature, the mixuture was diluted with EtOAc and washed sequentially with sat.NaHCO3, 2N HCl and brine. The organic layer was concentrated and the residue was subjected to preparative thin-layer chromatography (1% acetic acid, 5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) to afford tafamidis (24.7 mg, 94%) as a white foam.

1 H NMR (600 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.23 (s, 1H), 8.08 (d, J = 1.4 Hz, 2H), 8.00 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 1H), 7.88 (m, 2H).

13C NMR (150 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 166.6, 162.0, 150.0, 144.6, 135.1, 131.7, 129.1, 128.7, 126.5, 125.8, 120.0, 112.2.

HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C14H8Cl2NO3 [MH]+ : 307.9881, found 307.9881.

References

  1. Jump up^ Bulawa, C.E.; Connelly, S.; DeVit, M.; Wang, L. Weigel, C.;Fleming, J. Packman, J.; Powers, E.T.; Wiseman, R.L.; Foss, T.R.; Wilson, I.A.; Kelly, J.W.; Labaudiniere, R. “Tafamidis, A Potent and Selective Transthyretin Kinetic Stabilizer That Inhibits the Amyloid Cascade”. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2012 109, 9629-9634.
  2. Jump up^ Ando, Y., and Suhr, O.B. (1998). Autonomic dysfunction in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP). Amyloid, 5, 288-300.
  3. Jump up^ Benson, M.D. (1989). “Familial Amyloidotic polyneuropathy”. Trends in Neurosciences, 12.3, 88-92, PMID 2469222doi:10.1016/0166-2236(89)90162-8.
  4. Jump up^ http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20111117005505/en/Pfizer%E2%80%99s-Vyndaqel%C2%AE-tafamidis-Therapy-Approved-European-Union
  5. Jump up^ Clinical trial number NCT00409175 for “Safety and Efficacy Study of Fx-1006A in Patients With Familial Amyloidosis” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  6. Jump up^ Coelho, T.; Maia, L.F.; Martins da Silva, A.; Cruz, M.W.; Planté-Bordeneuve, V.; Lozeron, P.; Suhr, O.B.; Campistol, J.M.; Conceiçao, I.; Schmidt, H.; Trigo, P. Kelly, J.W.; Labaudiniere, R.; Chan, J., Packman, J.; Wilson, A.; Grogan, D.R. “Tafamidis for transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy: a randomized, controlled trial”. Neurology, 2012, 79, 785-792.
  7. Jump up to:a b Coelho, T.; Maia, L.F.; Martins da Silva, A.; Cruz, M.W.; Planté-Bordeneuve, V.; Suhr, O.B.; Conceiçao, I.; Schmidt, H. H. J.; Trigo, P. Kelly, J.W.; Labaudiniere, R.; Chan, J., Packman, J.; Grogan, D.R. “Long-term Effects of Tafamidis for the Treatment of Transthyretin Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy”. J. Neurology, 2013 260, 2802-2814.
  8. Jump up^ Ando, Y.; Sekijima, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Yamashita, T.; Ueda, M.; Misumi, Y.; Morita, H.; Machii, K; Ohta, M.; Takata, A; Ikeda, S-I. “Effects of tafamidis treatment on transthyretin (TTR) stabilization, efficacy, and safety in Japanese patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) with Val30Met and non-Varl30Met: A phase III, open-label study”. J. Neur. Sci., 2016 362, 266-271, doi:10.1016/j.jns.2016.01.046.
  9. Jump up^ Andrade, C. (1952). “A peculiar form of peripheral neuropathy; familiar atypical generalized amyloidosis with special involvement of the peripheral nerves”. Brain: a Journal of Neurology, 75, 408-427.
  10. Jump up^ Coelho, T. (1996). “Familial amyloid polyneuropathy: new developments in genetics and treatment”. Current Opinion in Neurology, 9, 355-359.
  11. Jump up^ Razavi, H.; Palaninathan, S.K. Powers, E.T.; Wiseman, R.L.; Purkey, H.E.; Mohamadmohaideen, N.N.; Deechongkit, S.; Chiang, K.P.; Dendle, M.T.A.; Sacchettini, J.C.; Kelly, J.W. “Benzoxazoles as Transthyretin Amyloid Fibril Inhibitors: Synthesis, Evaluation and Mechanism of Action”. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2003, 42, 2758-2761.
  12. Jump up^ Connelly, S., Choi, S., Johnson, S.M., Kelly, J.W., and Wilson, I.A. (2010). “Structure-based design of kinetic stabilizers that ameliorate the transthyretin amyloidoses”. Current Opinion in Structural Biology, 20, 54-62.
  13. Jump up^ Hammarstrom, P.; Wiseman, R. L.; Powers, E.T.; Kelly, J.W. “Prevention of Transthyretin Amyloid Disease by Changing Protein Misfolding Energetics”. Science, 2003, 299, 713-716
  14. Jump up^ Westermark, P., Sletten, K., Johansson, B., and Cornwell, G.G., 3rd (1990). “Fibril in senile systemic amyloidosis is derived from normal transthyretin”. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 87, 2843-2845.
  15. Jump up^ Sousa, M.M., Cardoso, I., Fernandes, R., Guimaraes, A., and Saraiva, M.J. (2001). “Deposition of transthyretin in early stages of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: evidence for toxicity of nonfibrillar aggregates”. The American Journal of Pathology, 159, 1993-2000.
  16. Jump up^ Colon, W., and Kelly, J.W. (1992). “Partial denaturation of transthyretin is sufficient for amyloid fibril formation in vitro”. Biochemistry 31, 8654-8660.
  17. Jump up^ Jacobson, D.R., Pastore, R.D., Yaghoubian, R., Kane, I., Gallo, G., Buck, F.S., and Buxbaum, J.N. (1997). “Variant-sequence transthyretin (isoleucine 122) in late-onset cardiac amyloidosis in black Americans”. The New England Journal of Medicine, 336, 466-473.
  18. Jump up^ Maurer, M.S.; Grogan, D.R.; Judge, D.P.; Mundayat, R.; Lombardo, I.; Quyyumi, A.A.; Aarts, J.; Falk, R.H. “Tafamidis in transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy: effects on transthyretin stabilization and clinical outcomes.” Circ. Heart. Fail. 2015 8, 519-526.
  19. Jump up^http://www.pfizer.com/sites/default/files/news/Brazil%20Approval%20Press%20Statement%2011-7-16_0.pdf
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016185739 Solid Forms Of A Transthyretin Dissociation Inhibitor
2015-12-22
2016-06-30
US2017196985 SULFUR(VI) FLUORIDE COMPOUNDS AND METHODS FOR THE PREPARATION THEREOF
2015-06-05
US9770441 Crystalline solid forms of 6-carboxy-2-(3, 5-dichlorophenyl)-benzoxazole
2015-08-31
2017-09-26
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9771321 Small Molecules That Covalently Modify Transthyretin
2014-04-14
2014-11-13
US9610270 NEW THERAPY FOR TRANSTHYRETIN-ASSOCIATED AMYLOIDOSIS
2012-10-23
2014-10-02
US2015057320 TRANSTHYRETIN LIGANDS CAPABLE OF INHIBITING RETINOL-DEPENDENT RBP4-TTR INTERACTION FOR TREATMENT OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION, STARGARDT DISEASE, AND OTHER RETINAL DISEASE CHARACTERIZED BY EXCESSIVE LIPOFUSCIN ACCUMULATION
2014-10-31
2015-02-26
US9249112 SOLID FORMS OF A TRANSTHYRETIN DISSOCIATION INHIBITOR
2012-09-12
2015-01-29
US9499527 COMPOSITIONS AND METHODS FOR THE TREATMENT OF FAMILIAL AMYLOID POLYNEUROPATHY
2013-02-27
2015-05-07
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9150489 1-(2-FLUOROBIPHENYL-4-YL)-ALKYL CARBOXYLIC ACID DERIVATIVES FOR THE THERAPY OF TRANSTHYRETIN AMYLOIDOSIS
2011-10-27
US2014134753 METHODS FOR TREATING TRANSTHYRETIN AMYLOID DISEASES
2014-01-15
2014-05-15
US8703815 Small molecules that covalently modify transthyretin
2010-10-14
2014-04-22
US8653119 Methods for treating transthyretin amyloid diseases
2011-11-22
2014-02-18
US2008131907 ASSAYS FOR DETECTING NATIVE-STATE PROTEINS AND IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS THAT MODULATE THE STABILITY OF NATIVE-STATE PROTEINS
2007-09-14
2008-06-05
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US7214695 Compositions and methods for stabilizing transthyretin and inhibiting transthyretin misfolding
2004-08-05
2007-05-08
US7214696 Compositions and methods for stabilizing transthyretin and inhibiting transthyretin misfolding
2006-03-16
2007-05-08
US7560488 Methods for treating transthyretin amyloid diseases
2007-04-05
2009-07-14
US8168663 Pharmaceutically acceptable salt of 6-carboxy-2-(3, 5 dichlorophenyl)-benzoxazole, and a pharmaceutical composition comprising the salt thereof
2010-05-13
2012-05-01
US8236984 COMPOUND AND USE THEREOF IN THE TREATMENT OF AMYLOIDOSIS
2010-09-30
2012-08-07
Tafamidis
Tafamidis skeletal.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Vyndaqel
License data
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
Chemical and physical data
Formula C14H7Cl2NO3
Molar mass 308.116 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

//////////////TTAFAMIDIS, Fx-1006A, PF-06291826, Orphan Drug, SCRIPP, PFIZER

C1=CC2=C(C=C1C(=O)O)OC(=N2)C3=CC(=CC(=C3)Cl)Cl

CNC[C@@H]([C@H]([C@@H]([C@@H](CO)O)O)O)O.c1cc2c(cc1C(=O)O)oc(n2)c3cc(cc(c3)Cl)Cl

 

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

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Pracinostat


Pracinostat.svg

ChemSpider 2D Image | Pracinostat | C20H30N4O2

Pracinostat.png

2D chemical structure of 929016-96-6

Pracinostat

  • Molecular Formula C20H30N4O2
  • Average mass 358.478 Da
2-Propenamide, 3-[2-butyl-1-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]-N-hydroxy-, (2E)-
929016-96-6 [RN]
SB939
(2E)-3-{2-butyl-1-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1,3-benzodiazol-5-yl}-N-hydroxyprop-2-enamide
N-hydroxy-1-[(4-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-1H-indole-6-carboxamide
PCI 34051,  UNII: GPO2JN4UON
929016-98-8 DI HCl salt, C20 H30 N4 O2 . 2 Cl H, 431.4
929016-96-6 (free base)
929016-97-7 (trifluoroacetate)
S*BIO (Originator)
Leukemia, acute myeloid, phase 3, helsinn
Image result for S*BIO
str1
CAS 929016-98-8 DI HCl salt, C20 H30 N4 O2 . 2 Cl H, 431.4
E)-3-[2-Butyl-1-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]-N-hydroxyacrylamide Dihydrochloride Salt

Pracinostat (SB939) is an orally bioavailable, small-molecule histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor based on hydroxamic acid with potential anti-tumor activity characterized by favorable physicochemical, pharmaceutical, and pharmacokinetic properties.

WO-2017192451  describes Novel polymorphic crystalline forms of pracinostat (designated as Form 3) and their hydrates, processes for their preparation and compositions and combination comprising them are claimed. Also claimed is their use for inhibiting histone deacetylase and treating cancer, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, pancreas cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, ovary cancer, melanoma and neuroblastoma.

See WO2014070948 ,  Helsinn , under sub-license from MEI Pharma (under license from S*Bio), is developing pracinostat, an oral HDAC inhibitor, for treating hematological tumors, including AML, MDS and myelofibrosis.

The oncolytic agent pracinostat hydrochloride is an antagonist of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and 2 (HDAC2) that was discovered by the Singapore-based company S*BIO. Helsinn obtained the exlusive development and commercialization rights in July 2016, and is conducting phase III clinical trials in combination with azacitidine in adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Phase II trials are also under way for the treatment of previously untreated intermediate-2 or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients and for the treatment of primary or post essential thrombocythemia/polycythemia vera) in combination with ruxolitinib.In North America, S*BIO had been conducting phase II clinical trials of pracinostat hydrochloride in patients with solid tumors and for the treatment of myeloproliferative diseases and phase I clinical trials in patients with leukemia; however, recent progress reports are not available at present. The University of Queensland had been evaluating the compound in preclinical studies for malaria.

Image result for University of Queensland

University of Queensland

Image result for MEI Pharma

MEI Pharma

The Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute (the research branch of the Canadian Cancer Society upon its integration with the National Cancer Institute of Canada to form the new Canadian Cancer Society) is conducting phase II clinical trials in Canada for the treatment of recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer.

Image result for Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute

Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute

In 2012, the product was licensed to MEI Pharma by S*BIO on a worldwide basis. In 2016, MEI Pharma and Helsinn entered into a licensing, development and commercialization agreement by which Helsinn obtained exclusive worldwide rights (including manufacturing and commercialization rights).

Image result for HELSINN

HELSINN

In 2014, the FDA assigned an orphan drug designation to MEI Pharma for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. In 2016, the product received breakthrough therapy designation in the U.S. in combination with azacitidine for the treatment of patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are older than 75 years of age or unfit for intensive chemotherapy.

Pracinostat is an orally available, small-molecule histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with potential antineoplastic activity. Pracinostat inhibits HDACs, which may result in the accumulation of highly acetylated histones, followed by the induction of chromatin remodeling; the selective transcription of tumor suppressor genes; the tumor suppressor protein-mediated inhibition of tumor cell division; and, finally, the induction of tumor cell apoptosis. This agent may possess improved metabolic, pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties compared to other HDAC inhibitors.

Pracinostat is a novel HDAC inhibitor with improved in vivo properties compared to other HDAC inhibitors currently in clinical trials, allowing oral dosing. Data demonstrate that Pracinostat is a potent and effective anti-tumor drug with potential as an oral therapy for a variety of human hematological and solid tumors

SYNTHESIS

Figure

Clinically tested HDAC inhibitors.

Activity

Pracinostat selectively inhibits HDAC class I,II,IV without class III and HDAC6 in class IV,[1] but has no effect on other Zn-binding enzymes, receptors, and ion channels. It accumulates in tumor cells and exerts a continuous inhibition to histone deacetylase,resulting in acetylated histones accumulation, chromatin remodeling, tumor suppressor genes transcription, and ultimately, apoptosis of tumor cells.[2]

Clinical medication

Clinical studies suggests that pracinostat has potential best pharmacokinetic properties when compared to other oral HDAC inhibitors.[3]In March 2014, pracinostat has granted Orphan Drug for acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma by the Food and Drug Administration.

Clinical Trials

CTID Title Phase Status Date
NCT03151304 A Safety and Efficacy Study of Pracinostat and Azacitidine in Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes 2 Recruiting
2017-10-27
NCT03151408 An Efficacy and Safety Study Of Pracinostat In Combination With Azacitidine In Adults With Acute Myeloid Leukemia 3 Recruiting
2017-10-17
NCT02267278 Ruxolitinib and Pracinostat Combination Therapy for Patients With Myelofibrosis (MF) 2 Active, not recruiting
2017-04-27
NCT01873703 Phase 2 Study of Pracinostat With Azacitidine in Patients With Previously Untreated Myelodysplastic Syndrome 2 Active, not recruiting
2017-04-21
NCT02118909 Evaluate the Effects of Itraconazole and Ciprofloxacin on Single-Dose PK of Pracinostat in Healthy Nonsmoking Subjects 1 Completed
2017-02-22
NCT02058784 Study to Evaluate the Food Effect of Single-dose Bioavailability of Pracinostat in Healthy Adult Subjects 1 Completed
2017-02-22
NCT01993641 Phase 2 Study Adding Pracinostat to a Hypomethylating Agent (HMA) in Patients With MDS Who Failed to Respond to Single Agent HMA 2 Completed
2017-02-22
NCT01112384 A Study of SB939 in Patients With Translocation-Associated Recurrent/Metastatic Sarcomas 2 Completed
2016-11-25
NCT01184274 A Phase I Study of SB939 in Pediatric Patients With Refractory Solid Tumours and Leukemia 1 Completed
2014-01-16
NCT01200498 Study of SB939 in Subjects With Myelofibrosis 2 Completed
2013-12-13

PATENT

WO2005028447

Inventors Dizhong ChenWeiping DengKanda SangthongpitagHong Yan SongEric T. SunNiefang YuYong Zou
Applicant S*Bio Pte Ltd

Scheme I

Figure imgf000041_0001

Scheme II

Figure imgf000042_0001Scheme III

Figure imgf000043_0001Scheme IV

Figure imgf000044_0001 Scheme V

Figure imgf000045_0001

PAPER

Discovery of (2E)-3-{2-Butyl-1-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl}-N-hydroxyacrylamide (SB939), an Orally Active Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor with a Superior Preclinical Profile

Chemistry Discovery, Biology Discovery, and §Pre-Clinical Development, S*BIO Pte Ltd., 1 Science Park Road, No. 05-09 The Capricorn, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117528, Singapore
J. Med. Chem.201154 (13), pp 4694–4720
DOI: 10.1021/jm2003552
Phone: +65-68275019. Fax: +65-68275005. E-mail: haishan_wang@sbio.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

A series of 3-(1,2-disubstituted-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxyacrylamides (1) were designed and synthesized as HDAC inhibitors. Extensive SARs have been established for in vitro potency (HDAC1 enzyme and COLO 205 cellular IC50), liver microsomal stability (t1/2), cytochrome P450 inhibitory (3A4 IC50), and clogP, among others. These parameters were fine-tuned by carefully adjusting the substituents at positions 1 and 2 of the benzimidazole ring. After comprehensive in vitro and in vivo profiling of the selected compounds, SB939 (3) was identified as a preclinical development candidate. 3 is a potent pan-HDAC inhibitor with excellent druglike properties, is highly efficacious in in vivo tumor models (HCT-116, PC-3, A2780, MV4-11, Ramos), and has high and dose-proportional oral exposures and very good ADME, safety, and pharmaceutical properties. When orally dosed to tumor-bearing mice, 3 is enriched in tumor tissue which may contribute to its potent antitumor activity and prolonged duration of action. 3 is currently being tested in phase I and phase II clinical trials.

(E)-3-[2-Butyl-1-(2-diethylaminoethyl)-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl]-N-hydroxyacrylamide Dihydrochloride Salt (3)

The freebase of 3 was prepared according to procedure D. The hydroxamic acid moiety was identified by 1H–15N HSQC (DMSO-d6) with δN = 169.0 ppm (CONHOH). Other nitrogens in 3were identified by 1H–15N HMBC (DMSO-d6) with δN of 241.4 ppm for N3 of the benzimidazole ring, 152.3 ppm for N1, and 41.3 ppm for the diethylamino group (reference to nitromethane δN = 380.0 ppm in CDCl3). The dihydrochloride salt of 3 was prepared according to procedure D as white or off-white solid or powder in ∼60% yield from 9 in two steps. LC–MS m/z 359.2 ([M + H]+).
1H NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 11.79 (brs, 1H, NH or OH), 10.92 (very br s, 1H), 8.18 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.97 (s, 1H), 7.79 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 7.64 (d, J = 15.8 Hz, 1H), 6.65 (d, J = 15.8 Hz, 1H), 5.01 (t-like, J = 7.7 Hz, 2H), 3.48 (m, 2H), 3.30–3.19 (m, 6H), 1.87 (quintet, J = 7.8 Hz, 2H), 1.47 (sextet, J = 7.5 Hz, 2H), 1.29 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, 6H), 0.97 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 3H);
13C NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 162.3, 156.0, 137.3 (CH), 132.8, 132.3, 132.0 (br, identified by HMBC), 124.7 (CH), 120.2 (CH), 113.1 (2 × CH), 48.2, 46.3, 39.0, 28.1, 25.0, 21.7, 13.6, 8.3.
Anal. (C20H30N4O2·2HCl·0.265H2O) C, H, N, Cl. Water content = 1.09% (Karl Fisher method). HRMS (ESI) m/z [M + H]+ calcd for C20H31N4O2, 359.2442; found, 359.2449.

PATENT

WO 2007030080

http://google.com/patents/WO2007030080A1?cl=en

 
Inventors Dizhong ChenWeiping DengKen Chi Lik LeePek Ling LyeEric T. SunHaishan WangNiefang Yu
Applicant S*Bio Pte Ltd

SEE

WO 2008108741

WO 2014070948

Patent

WO-2017192451

References

  1. Jump up^ “In vitro enzyme activity of SB939 and SAHA”. 22 Aug 2014.
  2. Jump up^ “The oral HDAC inhibitor pracinostat (SB939) is efficacious and synergistic with the JAK2 inhibitor pacritinib (SB1518) in preclinical models of AML”. Blood Cancer Journaldoi:10.1038/bcj.2012.14.
  3. Jump up^ Veronica Novotny-Diermayr; et al. (March 9, 2010). “SB939, a Novel Potent and Orally Active Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor with High Tumor Exposure and Efficacy in Mouse Models of Colorectal Cancer”Mol Cancer Therdoi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-09-0689.
PATENT 
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Pracinostat
Pracinostat.svg
Names
IUPAC name

(E)-3-(2-Butyl-1-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxyacrylamide
Other names

Pracinostat
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
PubChem CID
Properties
C20H30N4O2
Molar mass 358.49 g·mol−1
Density 1.1±0.1 g/cm3
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

//////////////Pracinostat, PCI 34051, SB939, orphan drug designation, Leukemia, acute myeloid, phase 3, helsinn

CCCCC1=NC2=C(N1CCN(CC)CC)C=CC(=C2)C=CC(=O)NO

 

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

Ubrogepant, MK-1602


imgUbrogepant.pngImage result for UbrogepantImage result for Ubrogepant

Ubrogepant, MK-1602

(S)-N-((3S,5S,6R)-6-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidin-3-yl)-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide

(3’S)-N-[(3S,5S,6R)-6-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidin-3-yl]-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide
(6S)-N-[(3S,5S,6R)-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3-piperidinyl]-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide
Spiro[6H-cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-[3H]pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide, 1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydro-N-[(3S,5S,6R)-6-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-3-piperidinyl]-2′-oxo-, (6S)-

CAS: 1374248-77-7
Chemical Formula: C29H26F3N5O3

Molecular Weight: 549.5542

UNII-AD0O8X2QJR

CAS TRIHYDRATE 1488325-95-6

CAS MONOHYDRATE 1488327-13-4

  • Originator Merck & Co
  • Class Amides; Antimigraines; Fluorine compounds; Small molecules; Spiro compounds
  • Mechanism of Action Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists
  • Phase III Migraine, Allergan

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Sep 2016 Allergan initiates a phase III extension trial for Migraine in USA (PO, Tablet) (NCT02873221)
  • 12 Aug 2016 Allergan plans a phase III trial for Migraine in USA (PO) (NCT02867709)
  • 01 Aug 2016 Allergan initiates a phase III trial for Migraine in USA (PO) (NCT02867709)

Image result for Ubrogepant

Image result for Ubrogepant

Process for making piperidinone carboxamide indane and azainane derivatives, which are CGRP receptor antagonists useful for the treatment of migraine. This class of compounds is described in U.S. Patent Application Nos. 13/293,166 filed November 10, 2011 , 13/293, 177 filed November 10, 2011 and 13/293,186 filed November 10, 2011, and PCT International Application Nos. PCT/US11/60081 filed November 10, 2011 and PCT/US 11/60083 filed November 10, 2011.

CGRP (Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide) is a naturally occurring 37-amino acid peptide that is generated by tissue-specific alternate processing of calcitonin messehger RNA and is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system. CGRP is localized predominantly in sensory afferent and central neurons and mediates several biological actions, including vasodilation. CGRP is expressed in alpha- and beta-forms that vary by one and three amino acids in the rat and human, respectively. CGRP-alpha and CGRP-beta display similar biological properties. When released from the cell, CGRP initiates its biological responses by binding to specific cell surface receptors that are predominantly coupled to the activation of adenylyl cyclase. CGRP receptors have been identified and pharmacologically evaluated in several tissues and cells, including those of brain, cardiovascular, endothelial, and smooth muscle origin.

Based on pharmacological properties, these receptors are divided into at least two subtypes, denoted CGRPi and CGRP2. Human oc-CGRP-(8-37), a fragment of CGRP that lacks seven N-terminal amino acid residues, is a selective antagonist of CGRP l, whereas the linear analogue of CGRP, diacetoamido methyl cysteine CGRP ([Cys(ACM)2,7]CGRP), is a selective agonist of CGRP2. CGRP is a potent neuromodulator that has been implicated in the pathology of cerebrovascular disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. In clinical studies, elevated levels of CGRP in the jugular vein were found to occur during migraine attacks (Goadsby et al., Ann. Neurol., 1990, 28, 183-187), salivary levels of CGRP are elevated in migraine subjects between attacks (Bellamy et al., Headache, 2006, 46, 24-33), and CGRP itself has been shown to trigger migrainous headache (Lassen et al., Cephalalgia, 2002, 22, 54-61). In clinical trials, the CGRP antagonist BIBN4096BS has been shown to be effective in treating acute attacks of migraine (Olesen et al., New Engl. J. Med., 2004, 350, 1104-1110) and was able to prevent headache induced by CGRP infusion in a control group (Petersen et al., Clin. Pharmacol. Ther., 2005, 77, 202-213).

CGRP-mediated activation of the trigeminovascular system may play a key role in migraine pathogenesis. Additionally, CGRP activates receptors on the smooth muscle of intracranial vessels, leading to increased vasodilation, which is thought to contribute to headache pain during migraine attacks (Lance, Headache Pathogenesis: Monoamines, Neuropeptides, Purines and Nitric Oxide, Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 1997, 3-9). The middle meningeal artery, the principle artery in the dura mater, is innervated by sensory fibers from the trigeminal ganglion which contain several neuropeptides, including CGRP. Trigeminal ganglion stimulation in the cat resulted in increased levels of CGRP, and in humans, activation of the trigeminal system caused facial flushing and increased levels of CGRP in the external jugular vein (Goadsby et al, Ann. Neurol., 1988, 23, 193-196). Electrical stimulation of the dura mater in rats increased the diameter of the middle meningeal artery, an effect that was blocked by prior administration of CGRP(8-37), a peptide CGRP antagonist (Williamson et al., Cephalalgia, 1997, 17, 525-531). Trigeminal ganglion stimulation increased facial blood flow in the rat, which was inhibited by CGRP(8-37) (Escott et al., Brain Res. 1995, 669, 93-99). Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion in marmoset produced an increase in facial blood flow that could be blocked by the non-peptide CGRP antagonist BIBN4096BS (Doods et al., Br. J.Pharmacol., 2000, 129, 420-423). Thus the vascular effects of CGRP may be attenuated, prevented or reversed by a CGRP antagonist.

CGRP-mediated vasodilation of rat middle meningeal artery was shown to sensitize neurons of the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Williamson et al., The CGRP Family: Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP), Amylin, and Adrenomedullin, Landes Bioscience, 2000, 245-247). Similarly, distention of dural blood vessels during migraine headache may sensitize trigeminal neurons. Some of the associated symptoms of migraine, including extracranial pain and facial allodynia, may be the result of sensitized trigeminal neurons (Burstein et al., Ann. Neurol. 2000, 47, 614-624). A CGRP antagonist may be beneficial in attenuating, preventing or reversing the effects of neuronal sensitization.

The ability of the compounds to act as CGRP antagonists makes them useful pharmacological agents for disorders that involve CGRP in humans and animals, but particularly in humans. Such disorders include migraine and cluster headache (Doods, Curr Opin Inves Drugs, 2001, 2 (9), 1261-1268; Edvinsson et al., Cephalalgia, 1994, 14, 320-327); chronic tension type headache (Ashina et al., Neurology, 2000, 14, 1335-1340); pain (Yu et al., Eur. J. Pharm., 1998, 347, 275-282); chronic pain (Hulsebosch et al., Pain, 2000, 86, 163-175);neurogenic inflammation and inflammatory pain (Holzer, Neurosci., 1988, 24, 739-768; Delay-Goyet et al., Acta Physiol. Scanda. 1992, 146, 537-538; Salmon et al., Nature Neurosci., 2001, 4(4), 357-358); eye pain (May et al. Cephalalgia, 2002, 22, 195-196), tooth pain (Awawdeh et al., Int. Endocrin. J., 2002, 35, 30-36), non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (Molina et al., Diabetes, 1990, 39, 260-265); vascular disorders; inflammation (Zhang et al, Pain, 2001, 89, 265), arthritis, bronchial hyperreactivity, asthma, (Foster et al., Ann. NY Acad. Sci., 1992, 657, 397-404; Schini et al., Am. J. Physiol., 1994, 267, H2483-H2490; Zheng et al., J. Virol., 1993, 67, 5786-5791); shock, sepsis (Beer et al., Crit. Care Med., 2002, 30 (8), 1794-1798); opiate withdrawal syndrome (Salmon et al., Nature Neurosci., 2001, 4(4), 357-358); morphine tolerance (Menard et al., J. Neurosci., 1996, 16 (7), 2342-2351); hot flashes in men and women (Chen et al., Lancet, 1993, 342, 49; Spetz et al., J. Urology, 2001, 166, 1720-1723); allergic dermatitis (Wallengren, Contact Dermatitis, 2000, 43 (3), 137-143); psoriasis; encephalitis, brain trauma, ischaemia, stroke, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases (Rohrenbeck et al., Neurobiol. of Disease 1999, 6, 15-34); skin diseases (Geppetti and Holzer, Eds., Neurogenic Inflammation, 1996, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL), neurogenic cutaneous redness, skin rosaceousness and erythema; tinnitus (Herzog et al., J. Membrane Biology, 2002, 189(3), 225); inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, (Hoffman et al. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology,2002, 37(4) 414-422) and cystitis. Of particular importance is the acute or prophylactic treatment of headache, including migraine and cluster headache.

Ubrogepant (MK-1602), an oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist, is in phase III clinical development at Allergan for the acute treatment of migraine attacks.

In August 2015, the product was licensed to Allergan by Merck, for the development and marketing worldwide for the treatment of migraine.

Synthesis

WO 2013138418

CONTD………..

CONTD……….

Inventors Ian M. BellMark E. FraleySteven N. GallicchioAnthony GinnettiHelen J. MitchellDaniel V. PaoneDonnette D. StaasHeather E. StevensonCheng WangC. Blair Zartman
Applicant Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.

Ian Bell

Ian Bell

Principal Scientist at Merck
Merck
Mark Fraley

Mark Fraley

Principal Scientist, Merck
Steven Gallicchio

Steven Gallicchio

Patent

 WO 2012064910

EXAMPLE 1

Figure imgf000072_0002

(65yN-[(3£5£ )-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-pheny

i’,2′,5 J-tetrahvdrospiro[cyclopenta|^lpyridine-6,3′-pyrroloj2,3-¾lpyridine1-3-carboxamide (Benzotriazol- 1 -yloxy)tr/i,(dimethylamino)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (1.89 g, 4.28 mmol) was added to a solution of (6S -2′-oxo- ,2,,5,7- tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[&]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-&]pyridine]-3-carboxylic acid (described in Intermediate 1) (1.10 g, 3.92 mmol), (3JS’,55′,6J?)-3-amino-6-methyl~5~phenyl-l-(2,2,2- trifluoroethyl)piperidin-2-one hydrochloride (described in Intermediate 4) (1.15 g, 3.56 mmol), and NjiV-diisopropylethylamine (3.1 1 m.L, 17.8 mmol) in DMF (40 mL), and the resulting mixture was stirred at 23 °C for 3 h. The reaction mixture was then partitioned between saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (200 mL) and ethyl actetate (3 χ 200 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, and concentrated. The residue was purified by flash column chromatography on silica gel, eluting with hexanes initially, then grading to 100% EtOAc before stepping to 5% MeOH in EtOAc to afford the title compound as an amorphous solid, which was further purified by the following crystallization procedure. A solution of the amorphous product in a minimal amount of methanol required for dissolution was diluted with 10 volumes water, and the resulting slurry was seeded with crystalline product and stirred at 23 °C for 4 h. The solids were filtered, washed with water, and dried under a stream of nitrogen to give the title compound as a crystalline solid. HRMS: m/z = 550.2068, calculated m/z – 550.2061 for C29H27F3N503. lH NMR (500 MHz, CDC13) δ 8.91 (s, 1H), 8.70 (s, 1H), 8.17 (dd, 1H, J- 5.4, 1.5 Hz), 8.04 (s5 1H), 7.37 (m, 3H), 7.29 (t, 1H, J= 7.3 Hz), 7.21 (d, 2H, J= 7.3 Hz), 7.13 (dd, 1H, J = 7.3, 1.2 Hz), 6.89 (dd, 1H, J = 7.3, 5.4 Hz), 4.99- 4.90 (m, 1H), 4.53 (dt, 1H, J= 10.7, 6.6 Hz), 3.94 (p, 1H, J = 5.9 Hz), 3.78 (d, 1H, J = 17.1 Hz), 3.67 (d, 1H, J- 16.4 Hz), 3.65 (m, 1H), 3.34-3.26 (m, 1H), 3.28 (d, 1H, J- 17.1 Hz), 3.17 (d, 1H, J = 16.6 Hz), 2.79 (m, 1H), 2.58 (q, 1H, J – 12.7 Hz), 1.07 (d, 3H, J= 6.6 Hz).

PATENT

WO 2013169348

(5)-N-((3^,5^,6i?)-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidine-3-yl)-2*-oxo- l\2 5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[¾]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-¾]pyridine]-3-carboxam trihydrate (15)

Figure imgf000054_0001

To a suspension of 11 (465 g, 96% wt, 0.99 mol) in iPAc (4.6 L) was added 5% aqueous K3PO4 (4.6 L). The mixture was stirred for 5 min. The organic layer was separated and washed with 5%> aqueous K3PO4 (4.6 L) twice and concentrated in vacuo and dissolved in acetonitrile (1.8 L).

To another flask was added 14 (303 g, 91.4 wt%>), acetonitrile (1.8 L) and water (1.8 L) followed by 10 N NaOH (99 mL). The resulting solution was stirred for 5 min at room temperature and the chiral amine solution made above was charged to the mixture and the container was rinsed with acetonitrile (900 mL). HOBT hydrate (164 g) was charged followed by EDC hydrochloride (283 g). The mixture was agitated at room temperature for 2.5 h. To the mixture was added iPAc (4.6 L) and organic layer was separated, washed with 5%> aqueous NaHC03 (2.3 L) followed by a mixture of 15%> aqueous citric acid (3.2 L) and saturated aqueous NaCl (1.2 L). The resulting organic layer was finally washed with 5%> aqueous NaHC03 (2.3 L). The organic solution was concentrated below 50 °C and dissolved in methanol (2.3 L). The solution was slowly added to a mixture of water (6 L) and methanol (600 mL) with ~ 2 g of seed crystal. And the resulting suspension was stirred overnight at room temperature. Crystals were filtered, rinsed with water/methanol (4 L, 10 : 1), and dried under nitrogen flow at room temperature to provide 15 (576 g, 97 % yield) as trihydrate.

Ή NMR (500 MHz, CDCI3): δ 10.15 (br s, 1 H), 8.91 (br s, 1 H), 8.21 (d, J= 6.0 Hz, 1 H), 8.16 (dd, J= 5.3, 1.5 Hz, 1 H), 8.01 (br s, 1 H), 7.39-7.33 (m, 2 H), 7.31-7.25 (m, 1 H), 7.22-7.20 (m, 2 H), 7.17 (dd, J= 7.4, 1.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.88 (dd, J= 7.4, 5.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.94 (dq, J= 9.3, 7.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.45-4.37 (m, 1 H), 3.94-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.72 (d, J= 17.2 Hz, 1 H), 3.63-3.56 (m, 2 H), 3.38-3.26 (m, 1 H), 3.24 (d, J= 17.3 Hz, 1 H), 3.13 (d, J= 16.5 Hz, 1 H), 2.78 (q, J= 12.5 Hz, 1 H), 2.62-2.56 (m, 1 H), 1.11 (d, J= 6.5 Hz, 3 H); 13C NMR (126 MHz, CD3CN): δ 181.42, 170.63, 166.73, 166.63, 156.90, 148.55, 148.08, 141.74, 135.77, 132.08, 131.09, 130.08, 129.66, 129.56, 128.78, 128.07, 126.25 (q, J= 280.1 Hz), 119.41, 60.14, 53.07, 52.00, 46.41 (q, J= 33.3 Hz), 45.18, 42.80, 41.72, 27.79, 13.46; HRMS m/z: calcd for C29H26F3N503 550.2061 (M+H): found 550.2059.

Alternative procedure for 15:

Figure imgf000055_0001

13

To a suspension of 13 (10 g, 98 wt%, 23.2 mmol) in MTBE (70 mL) was added 0.6 N HCI (42 mL). The organic layer was separated and extracted with another 0.6 N HCI (8 mL). The combined aqueous solution was washed with MTBE (10 mL x3). To the resulting aqueous solution was added acetonitrile (35 mL) and 14 (6.66 g, 99 wt%). To the resulting suspension was neutralized with 29 % NaOH solution to pH 6. HOPO (0.26 g) was added followed by EDC hydrochloride (5.34 g). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 6-12 h until the conversion was complete (>99%). Ethanol (30 ml) was added and the mixture was heated to 35 °C. The resulting solution was added over 2 h to another three neck flask containing ethanol (10 mL), water (30 mL) and 15 seeds (0.4 g). Simultaneously, water (70 mL) was also added to the mixture. The suspension was then cooled to 5 °C over 30 min and filtered. The cake was washed with a mixture of ethanol/water (1 :3, 40 mL). The cake was dried in a vacuum oven at 40 °C to give 15 trihydrate (13.7 g, 95%) as crystals.

PATENT

WO 2013138418

PATENT

US 9174989

CLIP

Practical Asymmetric Synthesis of a Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) Receptor Antagonist Ubrogepant

 Department of Process Chemistry, MRL, 126 East Lincoln Avenues, Rahway, New Jersey 07065, United States
 Department of Process Chemistry, MSD Research Laboratories, Hertford Road, Hoddesdon, Hertford, Hertfordshire EN11 9BU, United Kingdom
§ Department of Process Chemistry, MRL, 770 Sumneytown Pike, West Point, Pennsylvania 19486, United States
 Codexis, Inc., 200 Penobscot Drive, Redwood City, California 94063, United States
 Shanghai SynTheAll Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 9 Yuegong Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai, 201507, China
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00293

Abstract

Abstract Image

The development of a scalable asymmetric route to a new calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist is described. The synthesis of the two key fragments was redefined, and the intermediates were accessed through novel chemistry. Chiral lactam 2 was prepared by an enzyme mediated dynamic kinetic transamination which simultaneously set two stereocenters. Enzyme evolution resulted in an optimized transaminase providing the desired configuration in >60:1 syn/anti. The final chiral center was set via a crystallization induced diastereomeric transformation. The asymmetric spirocyclization to form the second fragment, chiral spiro acid intermediate 3, was catalyzed by a novel doubly quaternized phase transfer catalyst and provided optically pure material on isolation. With the two fragments in hand, development of their final union by amide bond formation and subsequent direct isolation is described. The described chemistry has been used to deliver over 100 kg of our desired target, ubrogepant.

(S)-N-((3S,5S,6R)-6-Methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)piperidin-3-yl)-2′-oxo-1′,2′,5,7-tetrahydrospiro[cyclopenta[b]pyridine-6,3′-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine]-3-carboxamide Trihydrate (1)

………..of white solids as 1 trihydrate (95%).
1H NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3): δ 10.15 (br s, 1H); 8.91 (br s, 1H); 8.21 (d, J = 6.0 Hz, 1H); 8.16 (dd, J = 5.3, 1.5 Hz, 1H); 8.01 (br s, 1H); 7.39–7.33 (m, 2H); 7.31–7.25 (m, 1H); 7.22–7.20 (m, 2H); 7.17 (dd, J = 7.4, 1.6 Hz, 1H); 6.88 (dd, J = 7.4, 5.3 Hz, 1H); 4.94 (dq, J = 9.3, 7.6 Hz, 1H); 4.45–4.37 (m, 1H); 3.94–3.87 (m, 1H); 3.72 (d, J = 17.2 Hz, 1H); 3.63–3.56 (m, 2H); 3.38–3.26 (m, 1H); 3.24 (d, J = 17.3 Hz, 1H); 3.13 (d, J = 16.5 Hz, 1H); 2.78 (q, J = 12.5 Hz, 1H); 2.62–2.56 (m, 1H); 1.11 (d, J = 6.5 Hz, 3H);
13C NMR (126 MHz, CDCl3): δ 181.4, 170.6, 166.7, 166.6, 156.9, 148.6, 148.1, 141.7, 135.8, 132.1, 131.1, 130.1, 129.7, 129.6, 128.8, 128.1, 126.3 (q, J = 280.1 Hz), 119.4, 60.1, 53.1, 52.0, 46.4 (q, J = 33.3 Hz), 45.2, 42.8, 41.7, 27.8, 13.5;
HRMS m/z: calcd for C29H27F3N5O3: 550.2061 (M + H); found: 550.2059.

US7390798 * Feb 9, 2005 Jun 24, 2008 Merck & Co., Inc. Carboxamide spirolactam CGRP receptor antagonists
US20090054408 * Sep 6, 2005 Feb 26, 2009 Bell Ian M Monocyclic anilide spirolactam cgrp receptor antagonists
US20100160334 * Mar 5, 2010 Jun 24, 2010 Bell Ian M Tricyclic anilide spirolactam cgrp receptor antagonists
US20100179166 * Jun 2, 2008 Jul 15, 2010 Ian Bell Carboxamide heterocyclic cgrp receptor antagonists
US20120122899 * Nov 10, 2011 May 17, 2012 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane cgrp receptor antagonists
US20120122900 * Nov 10, 2011 May 17, 2012 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane cgrp receptor antagonists
US20120122911 * Nov 10, 2011 May 17, 2012 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp. Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane cgrp receptor antagonists
Reference
1 * See also references of EP2849568A4
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
CN105037210A * May 27, 2015 Nov 11, 2015 江苏大学 Alpha,beta-dehydrogenated-alpha-amino acid synthesis method
US9688660 Oct 28, 2016 Jun 27, 2017 Heptares Therapeutics Limited CGRP receptor antagonists
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016346198 NOVEL DISINTEGRATION SYSTEMS FOR PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORMS
2015-02-04
US2016346214 TABLET FORMULATION FOR CGRP ACTIVE COMPOUNDS
2015-01-30
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2015112067 PROCESS FOR MAKING CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2013-03-13
2015-04-23
US9174989 Process for making CGRP receptor antagonists
2013-03-12
2015-11-03
US2016220552 FORMULATIONS FOR CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2014-09-11
2016-08-04
US2016130273 Process for Making CGRP Receptor Antagonists
2015-09-15
2016-05-12
US2017027925 PIPERIDINONE CARBOXAMIDE AZAINDANE CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2016-10-14
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US8754096 Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane CGRP receptor antagonists
2011-11-10
2014-06-17
US8912210 Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane CGRP receptor antagonists
2011-11-10
2014-12-16
US8481556 Piperidinone carboxamide azaindane CGRP receptor antagonists
2011-11-10
2013-07-09
US9499545 PIPERIDINONE CARBOXAMIDE AZAINDANE CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2014-09-12
2015-01-01
US9487523 PROCESS FOR MAKING CGRP RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS
2013-09-19
2015-02-05

REFERENCES

1: Voss T, Lipton RB, Dodick DW, Dupre N, Ge JY, Bachman R, Assaid C, Aurora SK, Michelson D. A phase IIb randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ubrogepant for the acute treatment of migraine. Cephalalgia. 2016 Aug;36(9):887-98. doi: 10.1177/0333102416653233. PubMed PMID: 27269043.

/////////////ubrogepant, MK-1602, Phase III,  Migraine

 O=C(C1=CN=C2C(C[C@@]3(C4=CC=CN=C4NC3=O)C2)=C1)N[C@@H]5C(N(CC(F)(F)F)[C@H](C)[C@H](C6=CC=CC=C6)C5)=O

ELAMIPRETIDE


Elamipretide.pngimg

Elamipretide

Elamipretide biologic depiction

H-D-Arg-Tyr(2,6-diMe)-Lys-Phe-NH2

D-arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-L-phenylalaninamide

(2S)-6-amino-2-[[(2S)-2-[[(2R)-2-amino-5-(diaminomethylideneamino)pentanoyl]amino]-3-(4-hydroxy-2,6-dimethylphenyl)propanoyl]amino]-N-[(2S)-1-amino-1-oxo-3-phenylpropan-2-yl]hexanamide

CAS 736992-21-5

Chemical Formula: C32H49N9O5

Molecular Weight: 639.8

  • A free radical scavenger and antioxidant that localizes in the inner mitochondrial membrane.
  • Mitochondrial Protective Agent to Improve Cell Viability
  1. Elamipretide
  2. bendavia
  3. UNII-87GWG91S09
  4. 736992-21-5
  5. MTP 131
  6. RX 31
  7. SS 31
  8. 87GWG91S09
  9. L-Phenylalaninamide, D-arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-
  10. SS-31 peptide
  11. Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2
  12. D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2
  13. SS31 peptide
  14. Elamipretide [USAN:INN]
  15. MTP-131
  16. Elamipretide (USAN/INN)
  17. arginyl-2,’6′-dimethyltyrosyl-lysyl-phenylalaninamide
  18. CHEMBL3833370
  19. SCHEMBL15028020
  20. CTK2H1007

Elamipretide is a cardiolipin peroxidase inhibitor and mitochondria-targeting peptide, Improves Left Ventricular and Mitochondrial Function. In vitro: Elamipretide significantly increases enzymatic activities of both complexes to near normal levels.

Background Information

Elamipretide is a cardiolipin peroxidase inhibitor and mitochondria-targeting peptide, Improves Left Ventricular and Mitochondrial Function. In vitro: Elamipretide significantly increases enzymatic activities of both complexes to near normal levels. long-term therapy with elamipretide reduces ROS formation, attenuated mPTP openings, and significantly decreases the levels of cytosolic cytochrome c and active caspase-3, thus suppressing a major signaling pathway for apoptosis. Elamipretide represents a new class of compounds that can improve the availability of energy to failing heart and reduce the burden of tissue injury caused by excessive ROS production. [1] In vivo: Fourteen dogs with microembolization-induced HF are randomized to 3 months monotherapy with subcutaneous injections of elamipretide (0.5 mg/kg once daily. Elamipretide has been shown to enhance ATP synthesis in multiple organs, including heart, kidney, neurons, and skeletal muscle. [1] ……by MedChemexpress Co., Ltd.

Elamipretide (also known as SS-31 and Bendavia)[1][2] is a small mitochondrially-targeted tetrapeptide (D-Arg-dimethylTyr-Lys-Phe-NH2) that appears to reduce the production of toxic reactive oxygen species and stabilize cardiolipin.[3]

Stealth Peptides, a privately held company, was founded in 2006 to develop intellectual property licensed from several universities including elamipretide; it subsequently changed its name to Stealth BioTherapeutics.[4][5]

Acute coronary syndrome; Age related macular degeneration; Cardiac failure; Corneal dystrophy; Diabetic macular edema; Lebers hereditary optic atrophy

  • Originator Stealth Peptides
  • Developer Stealth BioTherapeutics
  • Class Eye disorder therapies; Ischaemic heart disorder therapies; Oligopeptides; Peptides; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Free radical scavengers; Mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors
  • Phase II/III Barth syndrome
    • Phase II Acute kidney injury; Corneal disorders; Heart failure; Leber’s hereditary optic atrophy; Mitochondrial disorders; Reperfusion injury
    • Phase I/II Diabetic macular oedema; Dry age-related macular degeneration; Mitochondrial myopathies
    • Phase I Age-related macular degeneration
    • No development reported Chronic heart failure; Diabetes mellitus; Eye disorders; Neurodegenerative disorders

    Most Recent Events

    • 29 Jun 2017 Initial efficacy and adverse events data from phase II MMPOWER-2 trial in Mitochondrial-myopathies released by Stealth
    • 02 Jun 2017 Stealth BioTherapeutics completes a phase II trial in Heart failure in Germany and Serbia (SC) (NCT02814097)
    • 01 May 2017 Phase-II/III clinical trials in Barth syndrome (In children, In adolescents, In adults, In the elderly) in USA (SC) (NCT03098797)

Novel crystalline salt (eg hydrochloride, mesylate and tosylate salts) forms of D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2 (referred to as MTP-131 or elamipretide ) and composition comprising them are claimed. See WO2016190852 , claiming therapeutic compositions including chromanyl compounds, variants and analogues and uses thereof. Stealth BioTherapeutics (formerly known as Stealth Peptides) is developing elamipretide, which targets mitochondria, for the potential iv/sc treatment of cardiac reperfusion injury, acute coronary syndrome, acute kidney injury, mitochondrial myopathy, skeletal muscle disorders and congestive heart failure.

Also, the company is developing an oral formulation of elamipretide , which targets mitochondria and reduces the production of excess reactive oxygen species, for treating chronic heart failure. In January 2015, a phase II trial was ongoing . In July 2016, a phase II trial was initiated in Latvia, Spain and Hungary .

Further, the company is developing an ophthalmic formulation of elamipretide , a mitochondria targeting peptide, for treating ocular diseases including diabetic macular edema, age-related macular degeneration and fuchs’ corneal endothelial dystrophy and Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy.

In April 2016, a phase II trial was initiated for LHON . Family members of the product case of elamipretide ( WO2007035640 ) hold protection in the EU until 2026 and expires in the US in 2027 with US154 extension.

Acute coronary syndrome; Age related macular degeneration; Cardiac failure; Corneal dystrophy; Diabetic macular edema; Lebers hereditary optic atrophy

SYNTHESIS

NEXT………………………

PATENT 2

ELAMIPRETIDE BY STEALTH

WO-2017156403

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017156403&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription


; MTP-131; D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-Nth). Compound

1 has been shown to affect the mitochondrial disease process by helping to protect organs from oxidative damage caused by excess ROS production and to restore normal ATP production.

PATENT

US 20110082084

WO 2011091357

WO 2012129427

WO 2013059071

WO 2013126775

US 20140378396

US 20140093897

WO 2015134096

WO 2015100376

WO 2015060462

US 20150010588

PATENNT

WO 2015197723

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015197723

PROCESS FOR PREPARING

D-ARGINYL-2,6-DIMETHYL-L-TYROSYL-L-LYSYL-L-PHENYLALANINAMIDE

TECHNICAL FIELD

The invention relates to a process for solution-phase synthesis of D- Arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-L-phenylalaninamide (abbreviated H-D-Arg-(2,6-Dimethyl)Tyr-L-Lys-L-Phe-NH2, development code SS-31 , MTP-131 , X-31) of Formula (I), an active ingredient developed by Stealth BioTherapeutics under the investigational drug brand names Bendavia® and Ocuvia®, for both common and rare diseases including a mitochondrial targeted therapy for ischemia reperfusion injury.

Formula (I)

BACKGROUND

The product belongs to the class of so-called “Szeto-Schiller peptides”. Szeto-Sciller peptides or “SS peptides” are small, aromatic-cationic, water soluble, highly polar peptides, such as disclosed in US 6703483 and US 7576061 , which can readily penetrate cell membranes. The aromatic-cationic peptides include a minimum of two amino acids, and preferably include a minimum of four amino acids, covalently joined by peptide bonds. The maximum number of amino acids is about twenty amino acids covalently joined by peptide bonds. As described by EP 2012/2436390, optimally, the number of amino acids present in the SS peptides is four.

Bendavia® is being tested for the treatment of ischemia reperfusion injury in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), for the treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and renal microvascular dysfunction in hypertension, for the treatment of skeletal muscle dysfunction, for the treatment of mitochondrial myopathy and for the treatment of chronic heart failure. Trials are ongoing to assess the Ocuvia’s potential to treat Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) a devastating inherited disease that causes sudden blindness, often in young adults.

Mitochondria are the cell’s powerhouse, responsible for more than 90% of the energy our bodies need to sustain life and support growth. The energetics from mitochondria maintains healthy physiology and prevents disease. In many common and rare diseases, dysfunctional mitochondria are a key component of disease progression.

D-Arginyl-2,6-dimethyl-L-tyrosyl-L-lysyl-L-phenylalaninamide is a cell-permeable and mitochondria-targeted peptide that showed antioxidant activity and was concentrated in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compound (< 1 nM) significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species, increased mitochondrial potential and prevented tBHP-induced apoptosis in both N2A and SH-SY5Y neuronal cell lines. In rats, intraperitoneal treatment (1 and 3 mg/kg) 1 day prior to unilateral ureteral obstruction and every day thereafter for 14 days significantly decreased tubular damage, macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Compound (3 mg/kg i.p. qd for 2 weeks) also prevented apoptosis and insulin reduction in mouse pancreatic islets caused by streptozotocin.

Further studies performed in a G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) demonstrated that the compound (5 mg/kg/day i.p. starting at 30 days of age) led to a significant delay in disease onset.

Potentially useful for the treatment of ALS and may be beneficial in the treatment of aging and diseases associated with oxidative stress.

In the last few years the peptide H-D-Arg-(2,6-Dimethyl)Tyr-L-Lys-L-Phe-NH2, shown in Fig 1 , and its therapeutic activity have been disclosed and

claimed by in several patent applications.

EP 2436390, US 201 10245182 and US 201 10245183 claim topical anesthetic compositions for application to the skin for pain management or anti-skin aging agents, respectively, comprising Szeto-Schiller peptides; SS-31 is specifically claimed as active ingredient. Sequence of solid-phase synthesis is indicated as the preferred preparation process.

US 7718620 claims a process of treating or preventing ischemia-reperfusion injury of the kidney in a mammal by administrating an effective amount of an aromatic-cationic peptide. SS-31 is specifically claimed as active ingredient.

WO2005/001023 discloses a generical process and carrier complexes for delivering molecules to cells comprising a molecule and an aromatic cationic peptide of type D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2. The tetrapeptide SS-31 is

specifically claimed as product useful for the process at claim 18.

WO2012/1741 17 and WO2014/210056 claim therapeutic compositions based on SS peptides and the aromatic-cationic peptide D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2 as active agent.

WO 2013/086020, WO 2004/070054 and WO 2005/072295 provide processes for preventing mithochondrial permeability transition and reducing oxidative damage in a mammal, a removed organ, or a cell in need thereof and specifically claims the process wherein the peptide does not have mu-opioid receptor agonist activity, i.e., D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2.

WO 2009/108695 discloses a process for protecting a kidney from renal injury which may be associated with decreased or blocked blood flow in the subject’s kidney or exposure to a nephrotoxic agent, such as a radiocontrast dye. The processes include administering to the subject an effective amount of an aromatic-cationic peptide to a subject in need thereof and one of the selected peptide is D-Arg-Dmt-Lys-Phe-NH2.

US 6703483 discloses a detailed procedure for the preparation of novel analogs of DALDA [H-Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2], namely H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2 using the solid-phase techniques and /?-methylbenzhydrylamine

resin and protocols that have been extensively used by inventor’s laboratory.

Most prior art processes for preparing the compound typically comprise conventionally performed peptide solid-phase synthesis with further purification by chromatography in order to obtain the requested purity for therapeutic use.

It is well known that solid-phase synthesis followed by chromatographic purification is time consuming, very expensive and very difficult to be scaled up on industrial scale, so the need of developing a process for large scale production is obvious. The compound is isolated as organic acid salt, as acetate or trifluoro acetate.

eddy et al., Adv. Exp. Med. Biol, 2009, 61 1 , 473 generally describes the liquid-phase synthesis of antioxidant peptides of Figure 1 and similar others (SS-02, SS-20), involving routinely used side chain protecting groups for amino acid building blocks. The guanidine group was protected with NO2 and the ε-ΝΗ2 of Lys was protected by Cbz or 2-Cl-Cbz. These peptides were

synthesized using Boc/Cbz chemistry and BOP reagent coupling. Starting with the C-terminal Lys residue protected as H-Lys(2-Cl-Cbz)-NH2, (prepared

from the commercially available Boc-Lys(2-Cl-Cbz)-OH in two steps by amidation with NH4HCO3 in the presence of DCC/HOBt following a literature procedure [Ueyama et all, Biopolymers, 1992, 32, 1535, PubMed: 1457730], followed by exposure to TFA). Selective removal of the 2-Cl-Cbz in the

presence of the NO2 group was accomplished using catalytic transfer hydrogenolysis (CTH) [Gowda et al., Lett. Pept. Sci., 2002, 9, 153].

A stepwise procedure by standard solution peptide synthesis for preparation of potent μ agonist [DmtJDALDA and its conversion into a potent δ antagonist H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Lys(Z)-OH by substitution of D-Arg with Tic to enhance the δ opioid agonist activity is described by Balboni et al., J. Med.

Chem., 2005, 48, 5608. A general synthetic procedure for a similar tetrapeptide ([Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2 is described by Ballet et al., J. Med.

Chem. 2011, 54, 2467.

Similar DALDA analog tetrapeptides were prepared by the manual solid-phase technique using Boc protection for the a-amino group and DIC/HOBt or HBTU/DIEA as coupling agent [Berezowska et al., J. Med. Chem., 2009, 52, 6941 ; Olma et al., Acta Biochim. Polonica, 2001, 48, 4, 1 121 ; Schiller at al., Eur. J. Med. Chem., 2000, 35, 895].

Despite the high overall yield in the solid-phase approach, it has several drawbacks for the scale-up process such as:

a. the application of the highly toxic and corrosive hydrogen fluoride for cleavage of the peptide from the resin,

b. low loading (0.3-0.35 mmol/g of resin) proved necessary for successful end-step, and

c. use of excess amounts of reagents (3-fold of DIC, 2.4-fold of HOBt, etc.) on each step [ yakhovsky et al., Beilstein J. Org. Chem., 2008, 4(39), 1 , doi: 10.376/bjoc.4.39]

SUMMARY

The invention relates to a more efficient process avoiding either solid-phase synthesis or chromatographic purification, more suitable for large scale production. The process of the invention is described in Scheme A.

The following abbreviations are used:

Dmt = 2,6-dimethyl tyrosine; Z= benzyloxycarbonyl; MeSO3H = methane sulphonic acid; Boc = Tert-butyloxycarbonyl; NMM = N-methyl morpholine; TBTU= N,N,N’,N’-Tetramethyl-O-(benzotriazol- l-yl)uronium tetrafluoroborate; DMF = dimethyl formamide; TFA = trifluoroacetic acid

Scheme A shows the process for the solution phase synthesis of peptide

1 for assembly of the tetrapeptide backbone using O-Benzyl (Bzl) group and benzyloxycarbonyl (Z) group respectively, as the temporary protection for amino acids’ N-termini (Scheme Figure 2), followed by a final catalytic hydrogenolysis. The final product is isolated as organic acid salt, for example, acetic acid salt.

H-Phe-NH 2 + Boc-Lys(Z)-OH

Boc-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2

(IV)

(V) I MeS03H/CH2CI2

Boc-DMTyr(Bzl)-OH + MeS03H.H-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2

(

Boc-DMTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2

(VIII)

I MeS03H/CH2CI2

Z-D-Arg-ONa + H-DMTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH 2.MeS03H

(X) (IX)

TBTU/NMM/DMF

Z-D-Arg-DMTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH

(XI)

I H2, Pd/C

X ACOH

H-D-Arg-DMTyr-Lys-Phe-NH

(I)

Scheme A

This process is a notable improvement with respect to the prior art and its advantages can be summarized as follows:

• The synthesis is performed in liquid phase allowing the scale up on industrial scale without need of special equipment; · The selection of the protecting group in the building blocks allows a straightforward synthesis with very simple deprotection at each step and minimize the formation of undesired by-product;

• Each intermediate can be crystallized allowing removal of impurities which are not transferred to the following step;

· The purity of each intermediate is very high and usually close to

99%.

EXAMPLES

Example 1: Preparation of Boc-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2

Charge 200 mL of DMF, 44 g of Boc-Lys(Z)-OH and 15.6 g of H-Phe-NH2 in a flask. Stir the mixture at room temperature for 10 min. Add 19.2 g of

N-methylmorpholine and 32.1 g of TBTU successively at room temperature. Stir the mixture at room temperature for 1 h. Add 500 mL of water into the reaction mixture to precipitate the product at room temperature. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product and wash the filter cake with water.

Transfer the filter cake into a flask containing 360 mL of ethyl acetate and heat the mixture at 50°C till all the solid is dissolved. Separate the organic phase of product and discard the small aqueous phase. Concentrate the organic phase at 40~45°C and under vacuum to remove the solvent till lots of solid is formed. Filter the residue to isolate the solid product. Transfer the filter cake into a flask containing 2000 mL of MTBE and heat the mixture at refluxing for 20 min. Then, cool down the mixture to room temperature. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the filter cake at 30 °C and under vacuum to give 35 g of solid product.

Example 2: Preparation of H-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeSC>3H

Charge 26.3 g of Boc-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2, 200 mL of methylene chloride

and 9.6 g of methanesulfonic acid. Stir the mixture at 15-20 °C for 18 h. Add 100 mL of MTBE into the mixture and stir at 15-20 °C for 1 h. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the wet cake in air at room temperature to give 26.4 g of white solid product.

Example 3: Preparation of Boc-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2

Charge 8.4 g of Boc-DMeTyr(Bzl)-OH, 1 1 g of H-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeSO3H, 7.4 g of TBTU and 80 mL of THF in a flask. Stir the mixture

at room temperature for 15 min, and then cool down to 10°C. Add 6.36 g of N-methylmorpholine and stir the mixture at 20-25°C for 3 h. Add the reaction mixture into a flask containing 240 mL of water. Add 32 mL of methylene chloride into the mixture obtained in the previous operation of. Stir the resultant mixture at room temperature for 20 min. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product and wash the filter cake with acetone (300 mL X 2). Dry the filter cake in air at room temperature to give 14.3 g of white solid product.

Example 4: Preparation of H-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeS03H

Charge 14 g of Boc-BMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2, 280 mL of methylene chloride and 3.3 g of methanesulfonic acid in a flask. Stir the mixture at 18 ~ 22 °C for 10 h. Add 560 mL of heptanes into the mixture and stir the mixture at room temperature for 30 min. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the wet cake in air at room temperature to give 14 g of white solid product.

Example 5: Preparation of Z-D-Arg-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2

Charge 6.34 g of Z-D-Arg-ONa, 100 mL of DMF and 2.0 g of methanesulfonic acid in a flask. Stir the mixture at room temperature till a clear solution was formed. Add 14 g of H-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2.MeSO3H and cool down the mixture to 10°C. Add 6.15 g of TBTU and

9.67 g of N-methylmorpholine successively. Stir the mixture at room temperature for 4 h. Add aqueous solution of LiOH prepared by dissolving 2.9 g of LiOH.L O in 8 mL of water. Stir the mixture for 30 min. Add the resultant mixture slowly into a flask containing 420 mL of water under stirring. Add 56 mL of methylene chloride into the mixture. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Transfer the filter cake into a flask containing 150 mL of acetic acid, and heat the mixture at 35-40 °C till most of the solid was dissolved. Add 450 mL of MTBE into the mixture and cool down the mixture under stirring to room temperature. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the filter cake in air at room temperature to give 17.3 g of the white solid product.

Example 6 Preparation of H-D-Arg-DMeTyr-Lys-Phe-NH2.3AcOH

Charge 2.0 g of Z-D-Arg-DMeTyr(Bzl)-Lys(Z)-Phe-NH2, 20 mL of acetic acid and 5% Pd/C catalyst (which is obtained by washing 5.0 g of 5% Pd/C containing 60% of water with 30 mL of acetic acid) in a flask. Change the atmosphere of the flask with hydrogen. Stir the mixture at room temperature and pressure of 1 atm of hydrogen for 2 h. Filter the mixture to remove the Pd/C catalyst and wash the filter cake with 10 mL of acetic acid. Combine the filtrate and washing solution and concentrate the solution at 20°C and under vacuum to remove most the solvent. Add 100 mL of acetonitrile into the residue and stir the mixture at room temperature for 20 min. Filter the mixture to isolate the solid product. Dry the filter cake at room temperature and under vacuum to give 0.7 g of the white product.

PATENT

WO 2016001042

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016001042&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

References

  1. Jump up^ “Recommended INN List 75” (PDF). WHO Drug Information30 (1): 111. 2016.
  2. Jump up^ “Elamipretide”. AdisInsight. Retrieved 24 April 2017.
  3. Jump up^ Kloner, RA; Shi, J; Dai, W (February 2015). “New therapies for reducing post-myocardial left ventricular remodeling.”Annals of translational medicine3 (2): 20. PMC 4322169Freely accessiblePMID 25738140.
  4. Jump up^ Valigra, Lori (April 9, 2012). “Stealth Peptides sees positive results from Bendavia”Boston Business Journal.
  5. Jump up^ Dolgin, Elie (11 February 2016). “New drugs offer hope for mitochondrial disease”STAT.
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017152289 PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF D-ARGINYL-2, 6-DIMETHYL-L-TYROSYL-L-LYSYL-L-PHENYLALANINAMIDE 2015-06-24
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2014294796 AROMATIC-CATIONIC PEPTIDES AND USES OF SAME 2012-12-05 2014-10-02
US2016264623 TETRAPEPTIDE COMPOUND AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING SAME 2014-10-23 2016-09-15
US2017081363 PHARMACEUTICALLY RELEVANT AROMATIC-CATIONIC PEPTIDES 2014-12-23
US2016340389 PHARMACEUTICALLY RELEVANT AROMATIC-CATIONIC PEPTIDES 2014-12-23
US2017129920 Process for Preparing D-Arginyl-2, 6-Dimethyl-L-Tyrosyl-L-Lysyl-L-Phenylalaninamide 2015-06-24

REFERENCES

1: Alam NM, Mills WC 4th, Wong AA, Douglas RM, Szeto HH, Prusky GT. A mitochondrial therapeutic reverses visual decline in mouse models of diabetes. Dis Model Mech. 2015 Jul 1;8(7):701-10. doi: 10.1242/dmm.020248. Epub 2015 Apr 23. PubMed PMID: 26035391; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4486862.

2: Szeto HH, Birk AV. Serendipity and the discovery of novel compounds that restore mitochondrial plasticity. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Dec;96(6):672-83. doi: 10.1038/clpt.2014.174. Epub 2014 Sep 4. Review. PubMed PMID: 25188726; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4267688.

3: Dai W, Shi J, Gupta RC, Sabbah HN, Hale SL, Kloner RA. Bendavia, a mitochondria-targeting peptide, improves postinfarction cardiac function, prevents adverse left ventricular remodeling, and restores mitochondria-related gene expression in rats. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol. 2014 Dec;64(6):543-53. PubMed PMID: 25165999.

4: Eirin A, Ebrahimi B, Zhang X, Zhu XY, Woollard JR, He Q, Textor SC, Lerman A, Lerman LO. Mitochondrial protection restores renal function in swine atherosclerotic renovascular disease. Cardiovasc Res. 2014 Sep 1;103(4):461-72. doi: 10.1093/cvr/cvu157. Epub 2014 Jun 19. PubMed PMID: 24947415; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4155472.

5: Liu S, Soong Y, Seshan SV, Szeto HH. Novel cardiolipin therapeutic protects endothelial mitochondria during renal ischemia and mitigates microvascular rarefaction, inflammation, and fibrosis. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2014 May 1;306(9):F970-80. doi: 10.1152/ajprenal.00697.2013. Epub 2014 Feb 19. PubMed PMID: 24553434.

6: Brown DA, Hale SL, Baines CP, del Rio CL, Hamlin RL, Yueyama Y, Kijtawornrat A, Yeh ST, Frasier CR, Stewart LM, Moukdar F, Shaikh SR, Fisher-Wellman KH, Neufer PD, Kloner RA. Reduction of early reperfusion injury with the mitochondria-targeting peptide bendavia. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther. 2014 Jan;19(1):121-32. doi: 10.1177/1074248413508003. Epub 2013 Nov 28. PubMed PMID: 24288396; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4103197.

7: Birk AV, Chao WM, Bracken C, Warren JD, Szeto HH. Targeting mitochondrial cardiolipin and the cytochrome c/cardiolipin complex to promote electron transport and optimize mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Br J Pharmacol. 2014 Apr;171(8):2017-28. doi: 10.1111/bph.12468. PubMed PMID: 24134698; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3976619.

8: Szeto HH. First-in-class cardiolipin-protective compound as a therapeutic agent to restore mitochondrial bioenergetics. Br J Pharmacol. 2014 Apr;171(8):2029-50. doi: 10.1111/bph.12461. Review. PubMed PMID: 24117165; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3976620.

9: Zhao WY, Han S, Zhang L, Zhu YH, Wang LM, Zeng L. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant peptide SS31 prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis by down-regulating p66Shc in renal tubular epithelial cells. Cell Physiol Biochem. 2013;32(3):591-600. doi: 10.1159/000354463. Epub 2013 Sep 6. PubMed PMID: 24021885.

10: Dai DF, Hsieh EJ, Chen T, Menendez LG, Basisty NB, Tsai L, Beyer RP, Crispin DA, Shulman NJ, Szeto HH, Tian R, MacCoss MJ, Rabinovitch PS. Global proteomics and pathway analysis of pressure-overload-induced heart failure and its attenuation by mitochondrial-targeted peptides. Circ Heart Fail. 2013 Sep 1;6(5):1067-76. doi: 10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.113.000406. Epub 2013 Aug 9. PubMed PMID: 23935006; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3856238.

/////////////////////Elamipretide,  SS-31,  Bendavia, PEPTIDE

CC1=CC(=CC(=C1CC(C(=O)NC(CCCCN)C(=O)NC(CC2=CC=CC=C2)C(=O)N)NC(=O)C(CCCN=C(N)N)N)C)O

TOZADENANT


Image result for TOZADENANT

Tozadenant

RO-449351
SYN-115

  • Molecular Formula C19H26N4O4S
  • Average mass 406.499 Da

A2 (3); A2a-(3); RO4494351; RO4494351-000; RO4494351-002; SYN-115

Phase III clinical trials at Biotie Therapies for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease as an adjunctive therapy with levodopa

1-Piperidinecarboxamide, 4-hydroxy-N-[4-methoxy-7-(4-morpholinyl)-2-benzothiazolyl]-4-methyl-
4-Hydroxy-N-[4-methoxy-7-(4-morpholinyl)-1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl]-4-methyl-1-piperidinecarboxamide
4-Hydroxy-N-[4-methoxy-7-(4-morpholinyl)-2-benzothiazolyl]-4-methyl-1-piperidinecarboxamide
4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-piperidine-1-carboxylic acid(4-methoxy-7-morpholin-4-yl-benzothiazol-2-yl)-amide
CAS 870070-55-6
  • Originator Roche
  • Developer Acorda Therapeutics
  • Class Amides; Antiparkinsonians; Benzothiazoles; Carboxylic acids; Morpholines; Piperidines; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase III Parkinson’s disease
  • Phase I Liver disorders

Most Recent Events

  • 30 Jun 2017 Biotie Therapies plans a phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in Canada (NCT03200080)
  • 30 Jun 2017 Phase-I clinical trials in Liver disorders (In volunteers) in USA (PO) (NCT03212313)
  • 27 Apr 2017 Acorda Therapeutics initiates enrolment in a phase III trial for Parkinson’s disease in Germany (EudraCT2016-003961-25)(NCT03051607)

Biotie Therapies Holding , under license from Roche , is developing tozadenant (phase 3, as of August 2017) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

SYN-115, a potent and selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, is in phase III clinical trials at Biotie Therapeutics for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, as an adjunjunctive therapy with levodopa. Phase 0 trials were are underway at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for the treatment of cocaine dependency, but no recent development has been reported.

The A2A receptor modulates the production of dopamine, glutamine and serotonin in several brain regions. In preclinical studies, antagonism of the A2A receptor resulted in increases in dopamine levels, which gave rise to the reversal of motor deficits.

Originally developed at Roche, SYN-115 was acquired by Synosia in 2007, in addition to four other drug candidates with potential for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Under the terms of the agreement, Synosia was responsible for clinical development and in some cases commercialization, while Roche retained the right to opt-in to two preselected programs.

In 2010, the compound was licensed to UCB by Synosia Therapeutics for development and commercialization worldwide.

In February 2011, Synosia (previously Synosis Therapeutics) was acquired by Biotie Therapeutics, and in 2014, Biotie regained global rights from UCB.

Image result for TOZADENANT

TOZADENANT.png

Image result for TOZADENANT

Figure

Representative examples of A2AAdoR antagonists.

Tozadenant, also known as 4-hydroxy-N-(4-methoxy-7-(4-morpholinyl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-4-methylpiperidine-l-carboxamide or SYN115, is an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. The A2A receptor modulates the production of

dopamine, glutamine and serotonin in several brain regions. In preclinical studies, antagonism of the A2A receptor resulted in increases in dopamine levels, which gave rise to the reversal of motor deficits.

Tozadenant is currently phase III clinical trials for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease as an adjunctive therapy with levodopa. It has also been explored for the treatment of cocaine dependency.

Inventors Alexander FlohrJean-Luc MoreauSonia PoliClaus RiemerLucinda Steward
Original Assignee Alexander FlohrJean-Luc MoreauPoli Sonia MClaus RiemerLucinda Steward

(F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG)

Image result

Claus Riemer

Claus Riemer

Expert Scientist
Roche , Basel · Department of Medicinal Chemistry

Sonia Poli

Sonia Poli

PhD
Chief Scientific Officer – CSO
Addex Therapeutics , Genève · R&D
PhD
Principal Scientist

PAPER

Fredriksson, KaiLottmann, PhilipHinz, SonjaOnila, IounutShymanets, AliakseiHarteneck, ChristianMüller, Christa E.Griesinger, ChristianExner, Thomas E. – Angewandte Chemie – International Edition, 2017, vol. 56, 21, pg. 5750 – 5754, Angew. Chem., 2017, vol. 129, pg. 5844 – 5848,5

PAPER

Mancel, ValérieMathy, François-XavierBoulanger, PierreEnglish, StephenCroft, MarieKenney, ChristopherKnott, TarraStockis, ArmelBani, Massimo – Xenobiotica, 2017, vol. 47,  8, pg. 705 – 718

Paper

Design, Synthesis of Novel, Potent, Selective, Orally Bioavailable Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists and Their Biological Evaluation

Drug Discovery Facility, Advinus Therapeutics Ltd., Quantum Towers, Plot-9, Phase-I, Rajiv Gandhi Infotech Park, Hinjawadi, Pune 411 057, India
J. Med. Chem.201760 (2), pp 681–694
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b01584
* Phone: +91 20 66539600. Fax: +91 20 66539620. E-mail: sujay.basu@advinus.com.
Abstract Image

Patent

https://www.google.com/patents/US20050261289

  • Adenosine modulates a wide range of physiological functions by interacting with specific cell surface receptors. The potential of adenosine receptors as drug targets was first reviewed in 1982. Adenosine is related both structurally and metabolically to the bioactive nucleotides adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP); to the biochemical methylating agent S-adenosyl-L-methione (SAM); and structurally to the coenzymes NAD, FAD and coenzyme A; and to RNA. Together adenosine and these related compounds are important in the regulation of many aspects of cellular metabolism and in the modulation of different central nervous system activities.
  • [0003]
    The adenosine receptors have been classified as A1, A2A, A2B and A3receptors, belonging to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. Activation of aderosine receptors by adenosine initiates signal transduction mechanisms. These mechanisms are dependent on the receptor associated G protein. Each of the adenosine receptor subtypes has been classically characterized by the adenylate cyclase effector system, which utilises cAMP as a second messenger. The A1and Areceptors, coupled with Gproteins inhibit adenylate cyclase, leading to a decrease in cellular cAMP levels, while A2A and A2Breceptors couple to Gproteins and activate adenylate cyclase, leading to an increase in cellular cAMP levels. It is known that the A1receptor system activates phospholipase C and modulates both potassium and calcium ion channels. The Asubtype, in addition to its association with adenylate cyclase, also stimulates phospholipase C and activates calcium ion channels.
  • [0004]
    The Areceptor (326-328 amino acids) was cloned from various species (canine, human, rat, dog, chick, bovine, guinea-pig) with 90-95% sequence identify among the mammalian species. The A2Areceptor (409-412 amino acids) was cloned from canine, rat, human, guinea pig and mouse. The A2B receptor (332 amino acids) was cloned from human and mouse and shows 45% homology with the human Aand A2A receptors. The Areceptor (317-320 amino acids) was cloned from human, rat, dog, rabbit and sheep.
  • [0005]
    The Aand A2A receptor subtypes are proposed to play complementary roles in adenosine’s regulation of the energy supply. Adenosine, which is a metabolic product of ATP, diffuses from the cell and acts locally to activate adenosine receptors to decrease the oxygen demand (A1) or increase the oxygen supply (A2A) and so reinstate the balance of energy supply: demand within the tissue. The actions of both subtypes is to increase the amount of available oxygen to tissue and to protect cells against damage caused by a short term imbalance of oxygen. One of the important functions of endogenous adenosine is preventing damage during traumas such as hypoxia, ischemia, hypotension and seizure activity.
  • [0006]
    Furthermore, it is known that the binding of the adenosine receptor agonist to mast cells expressing the rat Areceptor resulted in increased inositol triphosphate and intracellular calcium concentrations, which potentiated antigen induced secretion of inflammatory mediators. Therefore, the Areceptor plays a role in mediating asthmatic attacks and other allergic responses.
  • [0007]
    Adenosine is a neurotransmitter able to modulate many aspects of physiological brain function. Endogenous adenosine, a central link between energy metabolism and neuronal activity, varies according to behavioral state and (patho)physiological conditions. Under conditions of increased demand and decreased availability of energy (such as hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and/or excessive neuronal activity), adenosine provides a powerful protective feedback mechanism. Interacting with adenosine receptors represents a promising target for therapeutic intervention in a number of neurological and psychiatric diseases such as epilepsy, sleep, movement disorders (Parkinson or Huntington’s disease), Alzheimer’s disease, depression, schizophrenia, or addiction. An increase in neurotransmitter release follows traumas such as hypoxia, ischemia and seizures. These neurotransmitters are ultimately responsible for neural degeneration and neural death, which causes brain damage or death of the individual. The adenosine A1agonists mimic the central inhibitory effects of adenosine and may therefore be useful as neuroprotective agents. Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous anticonvulsant agent, inhibiting glutamate release from excitatory neurons and inhibiting neuronal firing. Adenosine agonists therefore may be used as antiepileptic agents. Furthermore, adenosine antagonists have proven to be effective as cognition enhancers. Selective A2A antagonists have therapeutic potential in the treatment of various forms of dementia, for example in Alzheimer’s disease, and of neurodegenerative disorders, e.g. stroke. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists modulate the activity of striatal GABAergic neurons and regulate smooth and well-coordinated movements, thus offering a potential therapy for Parkinsonian symptoms. Adenosine is also implicated in a number of physiological processes involved in sedation, hypnosis, schizophrenia, anxiety, pain, respiration, depression, and drug addiction (amphetamine, cocaine, opioids, ethanol, nicotine, and cannabinoids). Drugs acting at adenosine receptors therefore have therapeutic potential as sedatives, muscle relaxants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, analgesics, respiratory stimulants, antidepressants, and to treat drug abuse. They may also be used in the treatment of ADHD (attention deficit hyper-activity disorder).
  • [0008]
    An important role for adenosine in the cardiovascular system is as a cardioprotective agent. Levels of endogenous adenosine increase in response to ischemia and hypoxia, and protect cardiac tissue during and after trauma (preconditioning). By acting at the Areceptor, adenosine Aagonists may protect against the injury caused by myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. The modulating influence of A2Areceptors on adrenergic function may have implications for a variety of disorders such as coronary artery disease and heart failure. A2Aantagonists may be of therapeutic benefit in situations in which an enhanced anti-adrenergic response is desirable, such as during acute myocardial ischemia. Selective antagonists at A2A Areceptors may also enhance the effectiveness of adenosine in terminating supraventricula arrhytmias.
  • [0009]
    Adenosine modulates many aspects of renal function, including renin release, glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow. Compounds which antagonize the renal affects of adenosine have potential as renal protective agents. Furthermore, adenosine Aand/or A2Bantagonists may be useful in the treatment of asthma and other allergic responses or and in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and obesity.
  • [0010]

    Numerous documents describe the current knowledge on adenosine receptors, for example the following publications:

      • Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 6, (1998), 619-641,
      • Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 6, (1998), 707-719,
      • J. Med. Chem., (1998), 41, 2835-2845,
      • J. Med. Chem., (1998), 41, 3186-3201,
      • J. Med. Chem., (1998), 41, 2126-2133,
      • J. Med. Chem., (1999), 42, 706-721,
      • J. Med. Chem., (1996), 39, 1164-1171,
      • Arch. Pharm. Med. Chem., 332, 39-41, (1999),
      • Am. J. Physiol., 276, H1113-1116, (1999) or
      • Naunyn Schmied, Arch. Pharmacol. 362,375-381, (2000)
    EXAMPLE 14-Hydroxy-4-methyl-piperidine-1-carboxylic acid(4-methoxy-7-morpholin-4-yl-benzothiazol-2-yl)-amide (I)

  • [0065]
    To a solution of (4-methoxy-7-morpholin-4-yl-benzothiazol-2-yl)-carbamic acid phenyl ester (3.2 g, 8.3 mmol) and N-ethyl-diisopropyl-amine (4.4 ml, 25 mmol) in trichloromethane (50 ml) is added a solution of 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-piperidine in trichloromethane (3 ml) and tetrahydrofurane (3 ml) and the resulting mixture heated to reflux for 1 h. The reaction mixture is then cooled to ambient temperature and extracted with saturated aqueous sodium carbonate (15 ml) and water (2×5 ml). Final drying with magnesium sulphate and evaporation of the solvent and recrystallization from ethanol afforded the title compound as white crystals (78% yield), mp 236° C. MS: m/e=407(M+H+).

Figure US20050261289A1-20051124-C00013

Figure US20050261289A1-20051124-C00012Figure US20050261289A1-20051124-C00011

PATENT

WO-2017136375

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017136375&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Novel deuterated forms of tozadenant are claimed. Also claimed are compositions comprising them and method of modulating the activity of adenosine A2A receptor (ADORA2A), useful for treating Parkinson’s diseases. Represents new area of patenting to be seen from CoNCERT Pharmaceuticals on tozadenant. ISR draws attention towards WO2016204939 , claiming controlled-release tozadenant formulations.

This invention relates to deuterated forms of morpholinobenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-4-methylpiperidine-1-carboxamide compounds, and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof. This invention also provides compositions comprising a compound of this invention and the use of such compositions in methods of treating diseases and conditions that are beneficially treated by administering an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist.

Many current medicines suffer from poor absorption, distribution, metabolism and/or excretion (ADME) properties that prevent their wider use or limit their use in certain indications. Poor ADME properties are also a major reason for the failure of drug candidates in clinical trials. While formulation technologies and prodrug strategies can be employed in some cases to improve certain ADME properties, these approaches often fail to address the underlying ADME problems that exist for many drugs and drug candidates. One such problem is rapid metabolism that causes a number of drugs, which otherwise would be highly effective in treating a disease, to be cleared too rapidly from the body. A possible solution to rapid drug clearance is frequent or high dosing to attain a sufficiently high plasma level of drug. This, however, introduces a number of potential treatment problems such as poor patient compliance with the dosing regimen, side effects that become more acute with higher doses, and increased cost of treatment. A rapidly metabolized drug may also expose patients to undesirable toxic or reactive metabolites.

[3] Another ADME limitation that affects many medicines is the formation of toxic or biologically reactive metabolites. As a result, some patients receiving the drug may experience toxicities, or the safe dosing of such drugs may be limited such that patients receive a suboptimal amount of the active agent. In certain cases, modifying dosing intervals or formulation approaches can help to reduce clinical adverse effects, but often the formation of such undesirable metabolites is intrinsic to the metabolism of the compound.

[4] In some select cases, a metabolic inhibitor will be co- administered with a drug that is cleared too rapidly. Such is the case with the protease inhibitor class of drugs that are used to treat HIV infection. The FDA recommends that these drugs be co-dosed with ritonavir, an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4), the enzyme typically responsible for their metabolism (see Kempf, D.J. et al., Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, 1997, 41(3): 654-60). Ritonavir, however, causes adverse effects and adds to the pill burden for HIV patients who must already take a combination of different drugs. Similarly, the

CYP2D6 inhibitor quinidine has been added to dextromethorphan for the purpose of reducing rapid CYP2D6 metabolism of dextromethorphan in a treatment of pseudobulbar affect.

Quinidine, however, has unwanted side effects that greatly limit its use in potential combination therapy (see Wang, L et al., Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1994, 56(6 Pt 1): 659-67; and FDA label for quinidine at http://www.accessdata.fda.gov).

[5] In general, combining drugs with cytochrome P450 inhibitors is not a satisfactory strategy for decreasing drug clearance. The inhibition of a CYP enzyme’s activity can affect the metabolism and clearance of other drugs metabolized by that same enzyme. CYP inhibition can cause other drugs to accumulate in the body to toxic levels.

[6] A potentially attractive strategy for improving a drug’s metabolic properties is deuterium modification. In this approach, one attempts to slow the CYP-mediated metabolism of a drug or to reduce the formation of undesirable metabolites by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms with deuterium atoms. Deuterium is a safe, stable, non-radioactive isotope of hydrogen. Compared to hydrogen, deuterium forms stronger bonds with carbon. In select cases, the increased bond strength imparted by deuterium can positively impact the ADME properties of a drug, creating the potential for improved drug efficacy, safety, and/or tolerability. At the same time, because the size and shape of deuterium are essentially identical to those of hydrogen, replacement of hydrogen by deuterium would not be expected to affect the biochemical potency and selectivity of the drug as compared to the original chemical entity that contains only hydrogen.

[7] Over the past 35 years, the effects of deuterium substitution on the rate of metabolism have been reported for a very small percentage of approved drugs (see, e.g., Blake, MI et al, J Pharm Sci, 1975, 64:367-91; Foster, AB, Adv Drug Res 1985, 14: 1-40 (“Foster”); Kushner, DJ et al, Can J Physiol Pharmacol 1999, 79-88; Fisher, MB et al, Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel, 2006, 9: 101-09 (“Fisher”)). The results have been variable and unpredictable. For some compounds deuteration caused decreased metabolic clearance in vivo. For others, there was no change in metabolism. Still others demonstrated increased metabolic clearance. The variability in deuterium effects has also led experts to question or dismiss deuterium modification as a viable drug design strategy for inhibiting adverse metabolism (see Foster at p. 35 and Fisher at p. 101).

[8] The effects of deuterium modification on a drug’s metabolic properties are not predictable even when deuterium atoms are incorporated at known sites of metabolism. Only by actually preparing and testing a deuterated drug can one determine if and how the rate of metabolism will differ from that of its non-deuterated counterpart. See, for example, Fukuto et al. (J. Med. Chem. 1991, 34, 2871-76). Many drugs have multiple sites where metabolism is possible. The site(s) where deuterium substitution is required and the extent of deuteration necessary to see an effect on metabolism, if any, will be different for each drug.

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016367560 Methods for Treating Parkinson’s Disease 2016-06-17
US9534052 Reducing systemic regulatory T cell levels or activity for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease 2016-07-16 2017-01-03
US9512225 Reducing systemic regulatory T cell levels or activity for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease 2016-06-22 2016-12-06
US9512227 Reducing systemic regulatory T cell levels or activity for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease 2016-07-05 2016-12-06
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016000909 REDUCING SYSTEMIC REGULATORY T CELL LEVELS OR ACTIVITY FOR TREATMENT OF DISEASE AND INJURY OF THE CNS 2015-07-13 2016-01-07
US2016008463 REDUCING SYSTEMIC REGULATORY T CELL LEVELS OR ACTIVITY FOR TREATMENT OF DISEASE AND INJURY OF THE CNS 2015-09-10 2016-01-14
US2016108123 ANTIBODY MOLECULES TO PD-L1 AND USES THEREOF 2015-10-13 2016-04-21
US9394365 Reducing systemic regulatory T cell levels or activity for treatment of alzheimer’s disease 2015-12-02 2016-07-19
US2017029508 Reducing Systemic Regulatory T Cell Levels or Activity for Treatment of Disease and Injury of the CNS 2016-09-10
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US7368446 4-Hydroxy-4-methyl-piperidine-1-carboxylic acid (4-methoxy-7-morpholin-4-yl-benzothiazol-2-yl)-amide 2005-11-24 2008-05-06
US8168785 BENZOTHIAZOLE DERIVATIVES 2010-12-23 2012-05-01
US2009082341 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-piperidine-1-carboxylic acid (4-methoxy-7-morpholin-4-yl-benzothiazol-2-yl)-amide FOR THE TREATMENT OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER 2008-07-23 2009-03-26
US2013317019 A2A Antagonists as Cognition and Motor Function Enhancers 2011-11-04 2013-11-28
US9387212 Methods for Treating Parkinson’s Disease 2013-04-19 2015-06-11

///////////////TOZADENANT, phase III,  clinical trials,  Parkinson’s disease ,  adjunctive therapy,  levodopa, RO-449351, SYN-115

CC1(CCN(CC1)C(=O)NC2=NC3=C(C=CC(=C3S2)N4CCOCC4)OC)O

Peptide Drugs: RAPASTINEL рапастинел , راباستينيل , 雷帕替奈


File:Rapastinel.svg

Rapastinel.png

RAPASTINEL

  • Molecular Formula C18H31N5O6
  • Average mass 413.469 Da

L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-prolyl-L-threoninamide

(2S)-1-[(2S)-1-[(2S,3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carbonyl]-N-[(2S,3R)-1-amino-3-hydroxy-1-oxobutan-2-yl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide

117928-94-6 [RN]
L-Threoninamide, L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-prolyl-
рапастинел [Russian]
راباستينيل [Arabic]
雷帕替奈 [Chinese]
(S)-N-((2S,3R)-1-amino-3-hydroxy-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-((S)-1-((2S,3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutanoyl)pyrrolidine-2-carbonyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide

UNII-6A1X56B95E; 117928-94-6; 6A1X56B95E

(S)-N-((2S,3R)-1-amino-3-hydroxy-1-oxobutan-2-yl)-1-((S)-1-((2S,3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutanoyl)pyrrolidine-2-carbonyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide
[117928-94-6]
GLYX-13 trifluoroacetate
GLYX-13;GLYX13;GLYX 13;Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr-NH2
L-Threonyl-L-prolyl-L-prolyl-L-threoninamide trifluoroacetate
MFCD20527320
Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr-NH2 trifluoroacetate
TPPT-amide trifluoroacetate
UNII:6A1X56B95E

BV-102; GLYX13, GLYX-13, in phase 3 clinical trials


Originator 
Northwestern University

  • Developer Allergan; Naurex
  • Class Amides; Antidepressants; Neuropsychotherapeutics; Oligopeptides; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action NR2B N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor agonists

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase III Major depressive disorder
  • Discontinued Bipolar depression; Neuropathic pain

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Jan 2017 Allergan initiates enrolment in a phase III trial for Major depressive disorder (Adjunctive treatment) in USA (IV, Injection) (NCT03002077)
  • 21 Dec 2016 Allergan plans a phase III trial for Major depressive disorder (Adjunctive treatment) in USA (IV, Injection) (NCT03002077)
  • 01 Nov 2016 Phase-III clinical trials in Major depressive disorder (Adjunctive treatment, Prevention of relapse) in USA (IV) (NCT02951988)Image result for RAPASTINELImage result for RAPASTINEL

It is disclosed that GLYX-13 (Rapastinel) acts as NMDA receptor partial agonist, useful for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as stroke-related brain cell death, convulsive disorders, and learning and memory. See WO2015065891 , claiming peptidyl compound. Naurex , a subsidiary of Allergan is developing rapastinel (GLYX-13) (in phase3 clinical trials), a rapid-acting monoclonal antibody-derived tetrapeptide and NMDA receptor glycine site functional partial agonist as well as an amidated form of NT-13, for treating depression.

Rapastinel (INN) (former developmental code names GLYX-13BV-102) is a novel antidepressant that is under development by Allergan (previously Naurex) as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.[1][2] It is a centrally activeintravenously administered (non-orally activeamidated tetrapeptide (Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr-NH2) that acts as a selective, weak partial agonist (mixed antagonist/agonist) of an allosteric site of the glycine site of the NMDA receptor complex (Emax ≈ 25%).[1][2]The drug is a rapid-acting and long-lasting antidepressant as well as robust cognitive enhancer by virtue of its ability to both inhibit and enhance NMDA receptor-mediated signal transduction.[1][2]

On March 3, 2014, the U.S. FDA granted Fast Track designation to the development of rapastinel as an adjunctive therapy in treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.[3] As of 2015, the drug had completed phase II clinical development for this indication.[4] On January 29, 2016, Allergan (who acquired Naurex in July 2015) announced that rapastinel had received Breakthrough Therapydesignation from the U.S. FDA for adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder.

Rapastinel belongs to a group of compounds, referred to as glyxins (hence the original developmental code name of rapastinel, GLYX-13),[5] that were derived via structural modification of B6B21, a monoclonal antibody that similarly binds to and modulates the NMDA receptor.[2][6][7] The glyxins were invented by Joseph Moskal, the co-founder of Naurex.[5] Glyxins and B6B21 do not bind to the glycine site of the NMDA receptor but rather to a different regulatory site on the NMDA receptor complex that serves to allosterically modulate the glycine site.[8] As such, rapastinel is technically an allosteric modulator of the glycine site of the NMDA receptor, and hence is more accurately described as a functional glycine site weak partial agonist.[8]

In addition to its antidepressant effects, rapastinel has been shown to enhance memory and learning in both young adult and learning-impaired, aging rat models.[9] It has been shown to increase Schaffer collateralCA1 long-term potentiation in vitro. In concert with a learning task, rapastinel has also been shown to elevate gene expression of hippocampal NR1, a subunit of the NMDA receptor, in three-month-old rats.[10] Neuroprotective effects have also been demonstrated in Mongolian Gerbils by delaying the death of CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus pyramidal neurons under glucose and oxygen-deprived conditions.[11] Additionally, rapastinel has demonstrated antinociceptive activity, which is of particular interest, as both competitive and noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists are ataxic at analgesic doses, while rapastinel and other glycine subunit ligands are able to elicit analgesia at non-ataxic doses.[12]

Apimostinel (NRX-1074), an analogue of rapastinel with the same mechanism of action but dramatically improved potency, is being developed by the same company as a follow-on compound to rapastinel.

CN 104109189,

PAPER

Tetrahedron Letters (2017), 58(16), 1568-1571

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040403917303015

Novel silaproline (Sip)-incorporated close structural mimics of potent antidepressant peptide drug rapastinel (GLYX-13)

Highlights

Structural mimics of rapastinel comprising silaproline is reported.

Sip introduction is expected to improve its pharmacokinetic profiles.

Standard peptide coupling strategy in the solution-phase is utilized for synthesis.

Abstract

Rapastinel (GLYX-13) is a C-amidated tetrapeptide drug under clinical development for adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Rapastinel features two consecutive proline residues centered at the peptide sequence (Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr-NH2), which are detrimental to its biological activity. In this communication, we report the synthesis of very close structural analogues of rapastinel comprising silaproline (Sip) as proline surrogate. By virtue of its enhanced lipophilicity and metabolic stability, Sip introduction in the native rapastinel sequence is expected to improve its pharmacokinetic profiles.

Graphical abstract

This paper reports the synthesis of silaproline (Sip)-incorporated close structural mimics of potent antidepressant peptide drug rapastinel (GLYX-13).

Unlabelled figure

PATENT

CN 104109189

Depression is the most common neuropsychiatric diseases, seriously affecting people’s health. In China With accelerated pace of life, increasing the incidence of depression was significantly higher social pressure.

[0003] Drug therapy is the primary means of treatment of depression. The main treatment drugs, including tricyclic antidepressants such as imipramine, amitriptyline and the like; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine, sertraline and the like; serotonin / norepinephrine dual uptake inhibitors such as venlafaxine, duloxetine. However, commonly used drugs slow onset, usually takes several weeks to months, and there is not efficient and toxicity obvious shortcomings.

[0004] GLYX-13 is a new antidepressant, Phase II clinical study is currently underway. It does this by regulating the brain NMDA (N_ methyl -D- aspartate) receptors play a role, and none of them have serious side effects such as ketamine and R-rated, such as hallucinations and schizophrenia and so on.GLYX-13 can play a strong, fast and sustained antidepressant effects, the onset time of less than 24 hours, and the sustainable average of 7 days. As a peptide drug, GLYX-13 was well tolerated and safe to use.

[0005] GLYX-13 is a tetrapeptide having the sequence structure Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr, which is a free N-terminal amino group, C terminal amide structure. GLYX-13 synthesis methods include traditional methods of two solid-phase peptide synthesis and liquid phase peptide synthesis, because of its short sequence, the amount of solid phase synthesis of amino acids, high cost, and difficult to achieve a lot of preparation. A small amount of liquid phase amino acids, high yield can be prepared in large quantities.

The present invention can be further described by the following examples.

Preparation of r-NH2; [0013] Example 1 Four peptide H-Thr-Pr〇-P; r〇-Th

[0014] 1.1 threonine carboxyl amidation (H-Thr-NH2)

[0015] 500ml three flask was added Boc-Thr (tBu) -0H20g (0.073mol), anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (THF) 150ml, stirring to dissolve the solid. Ice-salt bath cooled to -10 ° C~_15 ° C, was added N- methylmorpholine 8ml, then l〇ml isobutyl chloroformate, keeping the temperature not higher than -10 ° C, after the addition was complete retention low temperature reaction 10min, then adding ammonia 20ml, ice bath reaction 30min, then at room temperature the reaction 8h. The reaction was stopped, water 300ml, 200ml ethyl acetate was added to extract the precipitate, washed with water 3 times.Dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate 6h. Filtered, and then the solvent was distilled off under reduced pressure to give a white solid 16. 6g, 83% yield.

[0016] The above product was dissolved in 50ml of trifluoroacetic acid or 2N hydrochloric acid / ethyl acetate solution was reacted at room temperature lh, the solvent was distilled off to give a white solid, i.e. amidated carboxyl threonine trifluoroacetic acid / hydrochloric acid salt H- Thr-NH 2. HC1.

[0017] 1.2 Pro – Preparation of threonine dipeptide fragment H-Pr〇-Thr-NH2 of

[0018] 500ml flask was added Boc-Pr〇 three-0H20g (0. 093mol), in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (TH F) 200ml, stirring to dissolve solids, cooled to ice-salt bath -l〇 ° C~-15 ° C, added N- methylmorpholine 11ml, then dropwise isobutyl 13ml, keeping the temperature not higher than -10 ° C, keep it cool after the addition was complete the reaction 10min. H-Thr-NH2. HC114. 5g dissolved in 50ml of tetrahydrofuran, was added N- methyl morpholine 11ml. The above solution was added to the reaction mixture, the low temperature reaction 30min, then at room temperature the reaction 8h. The reaction was stopped, water 300ml, 200ml ethyl acetate was added to extract the precipitate, washed with water 3 times. Dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate 6h. Filtered and then evaporated under reduced pressure to give a white solid 25.7g, 82% yield.

[0019] The above product was dissolved in 100ml of 2N trifluoroacetic acid or hydrochloric acid / ethyl acetate solution was reacted at room temperature lh, the solvent was distilled off to give a white solid, i.e., proline – threonine dipeptide hydrochloride salt of H-Pr〇 -Thr-NH 2. HC1.

[0020] The above product was dissolved in 100ml of pure water, sodium carbonate solution was added to adjust the PH value, the precipitated white solid was filtered and dried in vacuo to give the desired product proline – threonine dipeptide fragment H-Pr square-Thr- NH223g.

Protected threonine [0021] 1.3 – Preparation of dipeptide fragment Boc-Thr (tBu) -Pr〇-0H of

[0022] Boc-Thr (tBu) -0H20g (0 · 073mol) was dissolved in dry tetrahydrofuran (THF) 150ml, stirring to dissolve the solid.Ice-salt bath cooled to -10 G~-15 ° C, was added N- methylmorpholine 8ml, then dropwise isobutyl 10ml, maintained at a temperature no higher than -10 ° C, kept cold reaction After dropping 10min. Proline methyl ester hydrochloride

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (1989), 32(10), 2407-11.

Threonylprolylprolylthreoninamide (HRP-7). The synthesis of HRP-7 was begun with 3 g of p-methylbenzhydrylamine-resin containing 1.41 mmol of attachment sites. The protected tetrapeptidyl-resin (1.63 g) was subjected to HF cleavage. Radioactivity was found in the 1% acetic acid extract (77%) and in the 5% extract (24%). These solutions were combined and lyophilized. Crude peptide (309 mg, 97%) was gel filtered on Sephadex G-15 (1.1 X 100 cm). Peptide eluting between 34 and 46 mL was pooled and lyophilized to yield 294 mg (95%, overall yield 92%) of homogeneous HRP-7.

PATENT

WO 2010033757

PATENT

WO 2017136348

Process for synthesizing dipyrrolidine peptide compounds (eg GLYX-13) is claimed.

An N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a postsynaptic, ionotropic receptor that is responsive to, inter alia, the excitatory amino acids glutamate and glycine and the synthetic compound NMDA. The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) appears to controls the flow of both divalent and monovalent ions into the postsynaptic neural cell through a receptor associated channel and has drawn particular interest since it appears to be involved in a broad spectrum of CNS disorders. The NMDAR has been implicated, for example, in neurodegenerative disorders including stroke-related brain cell death, convulsive disorders, and learning and memory.

NMDAR also plays a central role in modulating normal synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity, and excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. The NMDAR is further involved in Long-Term Potentiation (LTP), which is the persistent strengthening of neuronal connections that underlie learning and memory The NMDAR has been associated with other disorders ranging from hypoglycemia and cardiac arrest to epilepsy. In addition, there are preliminary reports indicating involvement of NMDA receptors in the chronic neurodegeneration of Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s diseases. Activation of the NMDA receptor has been shown to be responsible for post-stroke convulsions, and, in certain models of epilepsy, activation of the NMDA receptor has been shown to be necessary for the generation of seizures. In addition, certain properties of NMDA receptors suggest that they may be involved in the information-processing in the brain that underlies consciousness itself. Further, NMDA receptors have also been implicated in certain types of spatial learning.

[0003] In view of the association of NMDAR with various disorders and diseases, NMDA-modulating small molecule agonist and antagonist compounds have been developed for therapeutic use. NMDA receptor compounds may exert dual (agonist/antagonist) effect on the NMDA receptor through the allosteric sites. These compounds are typically termed “partial agonists”. In the presence of the principal site ligand, a partial agonist will displace some of the ligand and thus decrease Ca flow through the receptor. In the absence of the principal site ligand or in the presence of a lowered level of the principal site ligand, the partial agonist acts to increase Ca++ flow through the receptor channel.

Example 2: Synthesis of GLYX-13

[00119] GLYX-13 was prepared as follows, using intermediates KSM-1 and KSM-2 produced in Example 1. The synthetic route for the same is provided in Figure 2.

Stage A – Preparation of (S)-N-((2S, 3R)-l-amino-3-hydroxy-l-oxobutan-2-yl)-l-((S)-pyrrolidine-2-carbonyl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide (Compound XI)

[00120] In this stage, KSM -1 was reacted with 10%Pd/C in presence of methanol to produce a compound represented by Formula XI. The reaction was optimized and performed up to 4.0 kg scale in the production plant and observed consistent quality (>80% by HPLC%PA) and yields (80% to 85%).

[00121] The reaction scheme involved in this method is as follows:

[00122] Raw materials used for this method are illustrated in Table 7 as follows:

Table 7.

[00123] In stage A, 10% Palladium on Carbon (w/w, 50% wet) was charged into the pressure reactor at ambient temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. KSM-1 was dissolved in methanol in another container and sucked into above reactor under vacuum. Hydrogen pressure was maintained at 45-60 psi at ambient temperature for over a period of 5-6 hrs. Progress of the reaction mixture was monitored by HPLC for KSM-1 content; limit is not more than 5%.

Hyflow bed was prepared with methanol (Lot-II). The reaction mass was filtered through nutsche filter under nitrogen atmosphere and bed was washed with Methanol Lot-Ill. Filtrate was transferred into the reactor and distilled completely under reduced pressure at below 50 °C (Bath temperature) to get the syrup and syrup material was unloaded into clean and dry container and samples were sent to QC for analysis.

[00124] From the above reaction(s), 1.31 kg of compound represented by Formula XI was obtained with a yield of 89.31% and with a purity of 93.63%).

Stage B – Preparation of Benzyl (2S, 3R)-l-((S)-2-((S)-2-((2S, 3R)-I-amino-3-hydroxy-I- oxobutan-2-ylcarbamoyl) pyrrolidine-! -carbonyl) pyrrolidin-1 -yl)-3-hydroxy-l -oxobutan-2- ylcarbamate (Compound XII)

[00125] In this stage the compound represented by Formula XI obtained above was reacted with KSM-2 to produce a compound represented by Formula XII. This reaction was optimized and scaled up to 3.0 kg scale in the production plant and obtained 25% to 28% yields with UPLC purity (>95%).

[00126] The reaction scheme is as follows:

[00127] Raw materials used for this method are illustrated in Table 8 as follows:

Table 8.

[00128] Stage B: ethanol was charged into the reactor at 20 to 35 °C. Compound represented by Formula XI was charged into the reactor under stirring at 20 to 35 °C and reaction mass was cooled to -5 to 0°C. EDC.HC1 was charged into the reaction mass at -5 to 0 °C and reaction mass, was maintained at -5 to 0 °C for 10-15 minutes. N-Methyl morpholine was added drop wise to the above reaction mass at -5 to 0 °C and reaction mass was maintained at -5 to 0 °C for 10-15 minutes.

[00129] KSM-2 was charged into the reactor under stirring at -5 to 0 °C and reaction mass was maintained at -5 to 0 °C for 3.00 to 4.00 hours. The temperature of the reaction mass was raised to 20 to 35 °C and was maintained at 20 to 35 °C for 12 – 15 hours under stirring. (Note:

Monitor the reaction mass by HPLC for Stage A content after 12.0 hours and thereafter every 2.0 hours. The content of stage A should not be more than 2.0%). Ethanol was distilled out completely under vacuum at below 50 °C (Hot water temperature) and reaction mass was cooled to 20 to 35 °C. Water Lot-1 was charged into the residue obtained followed by 10% DCM-Isopropyl alcohol (Mixture of Dichloromethane Lot-1 & Isopropyl alcohol Lot-1 prepared in a cleaned HDPE container) into the reaction mass at 20 – 35 °C.

[00130] Both the layers were separated and the aqueous layer was charged into the reactor. 10%) DCM-Isopropyl alcohol (Mixture of Dichloromethane Lot-2 & Isopropyl alcohol Lot-2 prepared in a cleaned HDPE container) was charged into the reaction mass at 20 to 35 °C. Both the layers were separated and the aqueous layer was charged back into the reactor. 10%> IDCM-isopropyl alcohol (Mixture of Dichloromethane Lot-3 & Isopropyl alcohol Lot-3 prepared in a cleaned HDPE container) was charged into the reaction mass at 20 to 35 °C. Both the layers were separated and the aqueous layer was charged back into the reactor. 10%> DCM-Isopropyl alcohol (Mixture of Dichloromethane Lot-4 & Isopropyl alcohol Lot-4 prepared in a cleaned HDPE container) was charged into the reaction mass at 20 to 35 °C and separated both the layers. The above organic layers were combined and potassium hydrogen sulfate solution (Prepare a solution in a HDPE container by dissolving Potassium hydrogen sulfate Lot-1 in water Lot-2) was charged into the reaction mass at 20 to 35 °C. Separated both the layers and charged back organic layer into the reactor. Potassium hydrogen sulfate solution (Prepared a solution in a HDPE container by dissolving Potassium hydrogen sulfate Lot-2 in water Lot-3) was charged into the reaction mass at 20 to 35 °C. Separated both the layers and the organic layer was dried over Sodium sulfate and distilled out the solvent completely under vacuum at below 45 °C (Hot water temperature).

[00131] The above crude was absorbed with silica gel (100-200mesh) Lot-1 in

dichloromethane. Prepared the column with silica gel (100-200 mesh) Lot-2, and washed the silica gel bed with from Dichloromethane Lot-5 and charged the adsorbed compound into the column. Eluted the column with 0-10% Methanol Lot-1 in Dichloromethane Lot-5 and analyzed fractions by HPLC. Solvent was distilled out completely under vacuum at below 45 °C (Hot water temperature). Methyl tert-butyl ether Lot-1 was charged and stirred for 30 min. The solid was filtered through the Nutsche filter and washed with Methyl tert-butyl ether Lot-2 and

samples were sent to QC for complete analysis. (Note: If product quality was found to be less than 95%, column purification should be repeated).

[00132] From the above reaction(s), 0.575 kg of compound represented by Formula XII was obtained with a yield of 17% and with a purity of 96.28%).

Stage C – Preparation of Benzyl (S)-N-((2S, 3R)-l-amino-3-hydroxy-l-oxobutan-2-yl)-l-((S)-l- ((2R, 3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutanoyl) pyrrolidine-2 carbonyl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide (GLYX-13)

[00133] In this reaction step the compound of Formula XII obtained above was reacted with 10%oPd in presence of methanol to produce GLYX-13. This reaction was optimized and performed up to 2.8 kg scale in the production plant and got 40% to 45% of yields with UPLC purity >98%.

[00134] The reaction scheme involved in this method is as follows:

i

[00135] Raw materials used for this method are illustrated in Table 9 as follows:

Table 9.

30 Nitrogen cylinder – – – – – 31 Hydrogen cylinder – – – – –

[00136] In an exemplary embodiment of stage C, 10% Palladium Carbon (50% wet) was charged into the pressure reactor at ambient temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. Compound of Formula XII was dissolved in methanol in a separate container and sucked into the reactor under vacuum. Hydrogen pressure was maintained 45-60 psi at ambient temperature over a period of 6-8 hrs. Progress of the reaction was monitored by HPLC for stage-B (compound represented by Formula XII) content (limit is not more than 2%). If HPLC does not comply continue the stirring until it complies. Prepared the hyflow bed with methanol (Lot-II) and the reaction mass was filtered through hyflow bed under nitrogen atmosphere, and the filtrate was collected into a clean HDPE container. The bed was washed with Methanol Lot-Ill and the filtrate was transferred into the Rota Flask and distilled out the solvent completely under reduced pressure at below 50°C (Bath temperature) to get the crude product. The material was unloaded into clean HDPE container under Nitrogen atmosphere.

[00137] Neutral Alumina Lot-1 was charged into the above HDPE container till uniform mixture was formed. The neutral Alumina bed was prepared with neutral alumina Lot-2 and dichloromethane Lot-1 in a glass column. The neutral Alumina Lot-3 was charged and

Dichloromethane Lot-2 into the above prepared neutral Alumina bed. The adsorbed compound was charged into the column from op.no.11. The column was eluted with Dichloromethane Lot-2 and collect 10 L fractions. The column was eluted with Dichloromethane Lot-3 and collected 10 L fractions. The column was eluted with Dichloromethane Lot-4 and Methanol Lot-4 (1%) and collected 10 L fractions. The column was eluted with Dichloromethane Lot-5 and Methanol Lot-5 (2%) and collected 10 L fractions. The column was eluted with Dichloromethane Lot-6 and Methanol Lot-6 (3%) and collected 10 L fractions. The column was eluted with

Dichloromethane Lot-7 and Methanol Lot-7 (5%). and collected 10 L fractions. The column was eluted with Dichloromethane Lot-8 and Methanol Lot-8 (8%). and collected 10 L fractions. The column was eluted with Dichloromethane Lot-9 and Methanol Lot-9 (10%) and collected 10 L fractions. Fractions were analyzed by HPLC (above 97% purity and single max impurity >0.5% fractions are pooled together)

[00138] Ensured the reactor is clean and dry. The pure fractions were transferred into the reactor.

[00139] The solvent was distilled off completely under vacuum at below 45 °C (Hot water temperature). The material was cooled to 20 to 35°C. Charged Dichloromethane Lot- 10 and Methanol Lot- 10 into the material and stirred till dissolution. Activated carbon was charged into the above mixture at 20 to 35°C and temperature was raised to 45 to 50 °C.

[00140] Prepared the Hyflow bed with Hyflow Lot-2 and Methanol Lot-11 Filtered the reaction mass through the Hy-flow bed under nitrogen atmosphere and collect the filtrate into a clean FIDPE container. Prepared solvent mixture with Dichloromethane Lot-11 and Methanol Lot- 12 in a clean FIDPE container and washed Nutsche filter with same solvent. Charged filtrate in to Rota evaporator and distilled out solvent under vacuum at below 50°C. Dry the compound in Rota evaporator for 5 to 6 hours at 50°C, send sample to QC for Methanol content (residual solvent) which should not be more than 3000 ppm. The material was cooled to 20 to 35 °C and the solid material was unloaded into clean and dry glass bottle. Samples were sent to QC for complete analysis.

[00141] From the above reaction(s), 0.92 kg of Glyx-13 was obtained with a yield of 43.5% and with a purity of 99.73%.

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9593145 SECONDARY STRUCTURE STABILIZED NMDA RECEPTOR MODULATORS AND USES THEREOF 2015-05-14 2016-04-28
US2017049844 STABLE COMPOSITIONS OF NEUROACTIVE PEPTIDES 2015-04-27
US2017049845 METHODS OF TREATING ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE, HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE, AUTISM, OR OTHER DISORDERS 2016-04-14
US2017072005 COMBINATIONS OF NMDAR MODULATING COMPOUNDS 2015-05-06
US2016345855 METHODS OF TREATING BRAIN DISORDERS OR IDENTIFYING BIOMARKERS RELATED THERETO 2014-12-15
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2015182582 Methods of Treating Depression and Other Related Diseases 2014-08-05 2015-07-02
US2015253305 METHODS OF IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS FOR TREATING DEPRESSION AND OTHER RELATED DISEASES 2013-10-11 2015-09-10
US2015343013 METHODS OF TREATING NEUROPATHIC PAIN 2014-12-16 2015-12-03
US2016002292 METHODS OF TREATING DEPRESSION AND OTHER RELATED DISEASES 2015-02-06 2016-01-07
US2016244485 NMDA RECEPTOR MODULATORS AND PRODRUGS, SALTS, AND USES THEREOF 2014-10-27 2016-08-25
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2013296248 Methods of Treating Depression and Other Related Diseases 2013-07-09 2013-11-07
US9101612 Secondary Structure Stabilized NMDA Receptor Modulators and Uses Thereof 2011-02-11 2013-02-28
US2012178695 METHODS OF TREATING NEUROPATHIC PAIN 2010-07-02 2012-07-12
US8951968 Methods of treating depression and other related diseases 2012-04-05 2015-02-10
US8492340 Methods of treating depression and other related diseases 2012-09-10 2013-07-23
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Patent Title

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US8673843 NMDA receptors modulators and uses thereof 2012-06-18 2014-03-18
US2014249088 METHODS OF TREATING NEUROPATHIC PAIN 2013-09-27 2014-09-04
US9198948 Methods of Treating Depression and Other Related Diseases 2013-07-09 2013-11-21
US9149501 Methods of Treating Depression and Other Related Diseases 2013-07-09 2013-11-28
US9340576 Methods of Treating Depression and Other Related Diseases 2013-06-04 2013-10-31

See also

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c Hashimoto K, Malchow B, Falkai P, Schmitt A (August 2013). “Glutamate modulators as potential therapeutic drugs in schizophrenia and affective disorders”. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci263 (5): 367–77. PMID 23455590doi:10.1007/s00406-013-0399-y.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d Moskal JR, Burgdorf JS, Stanton PK, Kroes RA, Disterhoft JF, Burch RM, Amin Khan M (2016). “The Development of Rapastinel (Formerly GLYX-13); a rapid acting and long lasting antidepressant”. Curr NeuropharmacolPMID 26997507.
  3. Jump up^ FDA Grants Fast Track Designation to Naurex’s Rapid-Acting Novel Antidepressant GLYX-13 http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fda-grants-fast-track-designation-to-naurexs-rapid-acting-novel-antidepressant-glyx-13-248174561.html
  4. Jump up^ http://naurex.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Naurex_P2b_Data_Press_Release_FINAL_Approved.pdf
  5. Jump up to:a b Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Weiss, Craig; Matthews, Elizabeth; Disterhoft, John F.; Stanton, Patric K.; Moskal, Joseph R. (2011). “The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor modulator GLYX-13 enhances learning and memory, in young adult and learning impaired aging rats”Neurobiology of Aging32 (4): 698–706. ISSN 0197-4580PMC 3035742Freely accessiblePMID 19446371doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2009.04.012.
  6. Jump up^ Haring R, Stanton PK, Scheideler MA, Moskal JR (1991). “Glycine-like modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors by a monoclonal antibody that enhances long-term potentiation”. J. Neurochem57 (1): 323–32. PMID 1828831doi:10.1111/j.1471-4159.1991.tb02131.x.
  7. Jump up^ Moskal JR, Kuo AG, Weiss C, Wood PL, O’Connor Hanson A, Kelso S, Harris RB, Disterhoft JF (2005). “GLYX-13: a monoclonal antibody-derived peptide that acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor modulator”. Neuropharmacology49 (7): 1077–87. PMID 16051282doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2005.06.006.
  8. Jump up to:a b Burch RM, Amin Khan M, Houck D, Yu W, Burgdorf J, Moskal JR (2016). “NMDA Receptor Glycine Site Modulators as Therapeutics for Depression: Rapastinel has Antidepressant Activity without Causing Psychotomimetic Side Effects”. Curr NeuropharmacolPMID 26830963.
  9. Jump up^ Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Weiss, Craig; Matthews, Elizabeth; Disterhoft, John F.; Stanton, Patric K.; Moskal, Joseph R. (2011). “The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor modulator GLYX-13 enhances learning and memory, in young adult and learning impaired aging rats”Neurobiology of Aging32 (4): 698–706. PMC 3035742Freely accessiblePMID 19446371doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2009.04.012.
  10. Jump up^ Moskal, Joseph R.; Kuo, Amy G.; Weiss, Craig; Wood, Paul L.; O’Connor Hanson, Amy; Kelso, Stephen; Harris, Robert B.; Disterhoft, John F. (2005). “GLYX-13: A monoclonal antibody-derived peptide that acts as an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor modulator”. Neuropharmacology49 (7): 1077–87. PMID 16051282doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2005.06.006.
  11. Jump up^ Stanton, Patric K.; Potter, Pamela E.; Aguilar, Jennifer; Decandia, Maria; Moskal, Joseph R. (2009). “Neuroprotection by a novel NMDAR functional glycine site partial agonist, GLYX-13”. NeuroReport20 (13): 1193–7. PMID 19623090doi:10.1097/WNR.0b013e32832f5130.
  12. Jump up^ Wood, Paul L.; Mahmood, Siddique A.; Moskal, Joseph R. (2008). “Antinociceptive action of GLYX-13: An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor glycine site partial agonist”. NeuroReport19(10): 1059–61. PMID 18580579doi:10.1097/WNR.0b013e32830435c9.

External links

rapastinel
Rapastinel.svg
GLYX-133DanFrame1.svg
Clinical data
Pregnancy
category
  • US: N (Not classified yet)
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
Chemical and physical data
Formula C18H31N5O6
Molar mass 413.47 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

/////////////RAPASTINEL, BV-102, GLYX-13, PEPTIDE, phase 3, рапастинел , راباستينيل , 雷帕替奈

CC(C(C(=O)N1CCCC1C(=O)N2CCCC2C(=O)NC(C(C)O)C(=O)N)N)O

Rosiptor acetate


imgThumbUNII-F6X6NZ9D95.png2D chemical structure of 782487-29-0

Rosiptor acetate

CAS: 782487-29-0 (acetate)  782487-28-9 (free base)
Chemical Formula: C22H39NO4
Molecular Weight: 381.557

AQX-1125; AQX 1125; AQX1125; AQX-1125 acetate; Rosiptor acetate

PHASE 3 …..a SH2-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) modulator for treating cancer, inflammatory disorders and immune disorders.

(1S,3S,4R)-4-((3aS,4R,5S,7aS)-4-(Aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1- methyleneoctahydro -1H – inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexanol, acetate

IUPAC/Chemical Name: (1S,3S,4R)-4-((3aS,4R,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1H-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexan-1-ol acetate

  • Originator Aquinox Pharmaceuticals
  • Class Anti-inflammatories; Immunotherapies; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase stimulants

Image result

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase III Interstitial cystitis
  • Phase II Allergic asthma
  • Discontinued Atopic dermatitis; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Haematological disorders; Hypersensitivity; Immunological disorders; Inflammation; Irritable bowel syndrome; Pulmonary fibrosis

Most Recent Events

  • 09 Mar 2017 Phase-III clinical trials in Interstitial cystitis in United Kingdom, Poland, Latvia and Canada before March 2017 (PO) (EudraCT2016-000906-12) (NCT02858453)
  • 04 Jan 2017 Aquinox Pharmaceuticals completes a phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in United Kingdom (NCT03185195)
  • 07 Sep 2016 Phase-III clinical trials in Interstitial cystitis in Czech Republic, Hungary, Denmark (PO) (EudraCT2016-000906-12)

Rosiptor, also known as AQX-1125 is a potent and selective SHIP1 activator currently in clinical development.

AQX-1125 inhibited Akt phosphorylation in SHIP1-proficient but not in SHIP1-deficient cells, reduced cytokine production in splenocytes, inhibited the activation of mast cells and inhibited human leukocyte chemotaxis.

AQX-1125 suppresses leukocyte accumulation and inflammatory mediator release in rodent models of pulmonary inflammation and allergy. As shown in the mouse model of LPS-induced lung inflammation, the efficacy of the compound is dependent on the presence of SHIP1. Pharmacological SHIP1 activation may have clinical potential for the treatment of pulmonary inflammatory diseases.

Dysregulated activation of the PI3K pathway contributes to inflammatory/immune disorders and cancer. Efforts have been made to develop modulators of PI3K as well as downstream kinases (Workman et al., Nat. Biotechnol. 24, 794-796, 2006; Simon, Cell 125, 647-649, 2006; Hennessy et al., Nat. Rev. Drug. Discov. 4, 988-1004, 2005; Knight et al., Cell 125, 733-747, 2006; Ong et al., Blood (2007), Vol. 110, No. 6, pp 1942-1949). A number of promising new PI3K isoform specific inhibitors with minimal toxicities have recently been developed and used mouse models of inflammatory disease (Camps et al., Nat. Med. 11, 936-943, 2005; Barber et al., Nat. Med. 11, 933-935, 2005) and glioma (Fan et al., Cancer Cell 9, 341-349, 2006). However, because of the dynamic interplay between phosphatases and kinases in regulating biological processes, inositol phosphatase activators represent a complementary, alternative approach to reduce PIPlevels. Of the phosphoinositol phosphatases that degrade PIP3, SHIP1 is a particularly ideal target for development of therapeutics for treating immune and hemopoietic disorders because of its hematopietic-restricted expression (Hazen et al., Blood 113, 2924-2933, 2009; Rohrschneider et al., Genes Dev. 14, 505-520, 2000).
      Small molecule SHIP1 modulators have been disclosed, including sesquiterpene compounds such as pelorol. Pelorol is a natural product isolated from the tropical marine sponge Dactylospongia elegans (Kwak et al., J. Nat. Prod. 63, 1153-1156, 2000; Goclik et al., J. Nat. Prod. 63, 1150-1152, 2000). Other reported SHIP1 modulators include the compounds set forth in PCT Published Patent Applications Nos. WO 2003/033517, WO 2004/035601, WO 2004/092100, WO 2007/147251, WO 2007/147252, WO 2011/069118, WO 2014/143561 and WO 2014/158654 and in U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,601,874 and 7,999,010.
      One such molecule is AQX-1125, which is the acetate salt of (1S,3S,4R)-4-((3aS,4R,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1H-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexanol (AQX-1125). AQX-1125 is a compound with anti-inflammatory activity and is described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,601,874 and 7,999,010, the relevant disclosures of which are incorporated in full by reference in their entirety, particularly with respect to the preparation of AQX-1125, pharmaceutical compositions comprising AQX-1125 and methods of using AQX-1125.
      AQX-1125 has the molecular formula, C20H36NO2+.C2H3O2, a molecular weight of 381.5 g/mole and has the following structural formula:

AQX-1125 is useful in treating disorders and conditions that benefit from SHIP1 modulation, such as cancers, inflammatory disorders and conditions and immune disorders and conditions. AQX-1125 is also useful in the preparation of a medicament for the treatment of such disorders and conditions.

Synthetic methods for preparing AQX-1125 are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,601,874 and 7,999,010. There exists, therefore, a need for improved methods of preparing AQX-1125.

Inventors Jeffery R RaymondKang HanYuanlin ZhouYuehua HeBradley NorenJames Gee Ken Yee
Applicant Inflazyme Pharm LtdJeffery R RaymondKang HanYuanlin ZhouYuehua HeBradley NorenJames Gee Ken Yee

Image result for Inflazyme Pharm Ltd

PATENT

WO-2016210146 

Dysregulated activation of the PI3K pathway contributes to

inflammatory/immune disorders and cancer. Efforts have been made to develop modulators of PI3K as well as downstream kinases (Workman et al., Nat. Biotechnol 24, 794-796, 2006; Simon, Cell 125, 647-649, 2006; Hennessy et al., Nat Rev Drug Discov 4, 988-1004, 2005; Knight et al., Cell 125, 733-747, 2006; Ong et al., Blood (2007), Vol. 110, No. 6, pp 1942-1949). A number of promising new PI3K isoform specific inhibitors with minimal toxicities have recently been developed and used in mouse models of inflammatory disease (Camps et al., Nat Med 1 1 , 936-943, 2005; Barber et ai, Nat Med 1 1 , 933-935, 2005) and glioma (Fan et al., Cancer Cell 9, 341-349, 2006). However, because of the dynamic interplay between phosphatases and kinases in regulating biological processes, inositol phosphatase activators represent a complementary, alternative approach to reduce PIP3 levels. Of the phosphoinositol phosphatases that degrade PIP3i SHIP1 is a particularly ideal target for development of therapeutics for treating immune and hemopoietic disorders because of its

hematopietic-restricted expression (Hazen et al., Blood 1 13, 2924-2933, 2009;

Rohrschneider et ai, Genes Dev. 14, 505-520, 2000).

Small molecule SHIP1 modulators have been disclosed, including

sesquiterpene compounds such as pelorol. Pelorol is a natural product isolated from the tropical marine sponge Dactylospongia elegans (Kwak et al., J Nat Prod 63, 1 153-1 156, 2000; Goclik et al., J Nat Prod 63, 1150-1152, 2000). Other reported SHIP1 modulators include the compounds set forth in PCT Published Patent Applications Nos. WO 2003/033517, WO 2004/035601 , WO 2004/092100, WO 2007/147251 , WO 2007/147252, WO 2011/069118, WO 2014/143561 and WO 2014/158654 and in U.S. Patent Nos. 7,601 ,874 and 7,999,010.

While significant strides have been made in this field, there remains a need for effective small molecule SHIP1 modulators.

One such molecule is the acetate salt of (1 S,3S,4 )-4-((3aS,4 ,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1 /-/-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexanol (referred to herein as Compound 1). Compound 1 is a compound with anti-inflammatory activity and is described in U.S. Patent Nos. 7,601 ,874 and 7,999,010, the relevant disclosures of which are incorporated in full by reference in their entirety, particularly with respect to the preparation of Compound 1 ,

pharmaceutical compositions comprising Compound 1 and methods of using

Compound 1.

Compound 1 has the molecular formula, C2oH36N02+ · C2H302, a molecular weight of 381.5 g/mole

front page image

The application is directed to crystalline forms of the acetate salt of (1S,3S,4R)-4-(3aS,4R,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a- methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1H-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl) -4-methylcyclohexanol and processes for their preparation. The compound acts as a SHIP1 modulator and is thus useful in the treatment of cancer or inflammatory and immune disorders and conditions.

(EN)

PATENT

https://encrypted.google.com/patents/WO1998002450A2?cl=en

Inventors David L. BurgoyneYaping ShenJohn M. LanglandsChristine RogersJoseph H.-L. ChauEdward PiersHassan Salari
Applicant Inflazyme Pharmaceuticals Ltd.University Of British ColumbiaUniversity Of Alberta

SYNTHESIS

WO 199802450

WO 2004092100

PATENT

WO 2004092100

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2004092100

 

 

 

PATENT

US 20170204048

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=US200947106&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Process for the synthesis of substituted indene derivative (particularly AQX-1125 ) as a SH2-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) modulator for treating cancer, inflammatory disorders and immune disorders. Aquinox Pharmaceuticals is developing AQX-1125 (phase III clinical trial in July 2017), a SHIP1 agonist, for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. For a prior filing see WO2016210146 , claiming novel crystalline forms of rosiptor acetate. In July 2017, Seenisamy and Chetia were associated with Syngene

Synthetic Method 1

In one aspect of the invention, AQX-1125 was prepared by the method described below in Reaction Scheme 1 where Pgis an oxygen-protecting group, Pgis a carbonyl protecting group, Lgis a leaving group and X is bromo or chloro:



Reaction Scheme 1A:



Synthetic Example 77

Step 11: Preparation of AQX-1125 from Compound 16

A. To a stirred solution of (1S,3S,4R)-4-((3aS,4R,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1H-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexan-1-ol (Compound 16, 58.0 g, 0.180 mol, 1.0 eq, from Synthetic Example 76) in methanol (174 mL, 3 V) was added acetic acid (23.5 mL, 0.4 V) dropwise at 10° C. under a nitrogen atmosphere over 20 min. The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 h. The solution was filtered to remove undissolved particles and washed with methanol (58 mL, 1 V). The filtrate was collected and evaporated at 35° C. to half the volume (˜125 mL). MTBE (348 mL, 6 V) was slowly added to the above concentrated mixture and the reaction stirred at 10° C. for 2 h. During the MTBE addition, slow precipitation of the product was observed. The solids were filtered and washed with MTBE (116 mL, 2V) to afford (1S,3S,4R)-4-((3aS,4R,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1H-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexan-1-ol, acetic acid salt, (AQX-1125) as a white solid (50 g, yield 72.6%). 1H NMR (400 MHz, pyridine-d5): δ 5.85 (br s, 5H), 4.70 (s, 2H), 4.08 (dd, J=10.4, 2 Hz, 1H), 3.95-3.85 (m, 1H), 3.60-3.50 (m, 1H), 3.18 (d, J=14 Hz, 1H), 2.92-2.86 (m, 1H), 2.80 (d, J=13.6 Hz, 1H), 2.50-2.40 (m, 1H), 2.25-1.97 (m, 3H), 2.15 (s, 3H), 1.90-1.65 (m, 4H), 1.56-1.40 (m, 4H), 1.39-1.20 (m, 2H), 1.25 (s, 3H), 0.78 (s, 3H). LCMS: (Method A) 322.4 (M+1), Retention time: 1.95 min, HPLC (Method H): 95.5 area %, Retention time: 16.66 min.

Synthetic Example 66

Preparation of Compound 16 and AQX-1125

      A. To a solution of 7a-methyl-5-((1S,2R,5S)-2-methyl-7-oxo-6-oxabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-2-yl)-1-methyleneoctahydro-1H-indene-4-carbaldehyde oxime (Compound 68, 100 mg, 0.30 mmol, from Synthetic Example 65) in 1,4-dioxane (5 mL) in a 25 mL RB flask fitted with reflux condenser was added a solution of lithium aluminum hydride (1 M in THF, 1.51 ml, 1.50 mmol) at RT under nitrogen and the reaction mass was stirred using a magnetic stirrer at 100° C. for 24 hours. Another lot of a solution of lithium aluminum hydride (1 M in THF, 1.51 ml, 1.50 mmol) was added and the reaction was further refluxed for 24 hours. Completion of the reaction was monitored by LCMS analysis.
      B. The reaction mass was quenched by the drop-wise addition of saturated aq. sodium sulfate solution, filtered through a CELITE™ bed on glass frit funnel and concentrated by rotary evaporation to get a crude mass which was further purified by preparative HPLC to afford (1S,3S,4R)-4-((4R,5S,7aS)-4-(aminomethyl)-7a-methyl-1-methyleneoctahydro-1H-inden-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-methylcyclohexan-1-ol (Compound 16, 35 mg, 36% yield) as an off-white solid. 1H-NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD): δ 4.69 (s, 2H), 3.73 (br d, J=10.0 Hz, 1H), 3.52-3.45 (m, 1H), 3.22-3.15 (m, 1H), 3.05-2.98 (m, 1H), 2.62-2.55 (m, 1H), 2.38-2.25 (m, 1H), 2.20-2.15 (m, 1H), 1.95-1.81 (m, 6H), 1.62-1.25 (m, 10H), 1.10 (s, 3H), 0.86 (s, 3H). LCMS (Method A) m/z: 322.5 (M+1), Retention time: 2.06 min, Purity: 98.9 area % (ELSD). HPLC (Method A): Retention time: 2.70 min, Purity: 99.3 area %.
      C. AQX-1125 was prepared from Compound 16 in the same manner as described above in Synthetic Example 16.

REFERENCES

1: Nickel JC, Egerdie B, Davis E, Evans R, Mackenzie L, Shrewsbury SB. A Phase II Study of the Efficacy and Safety of the Novel Oral SHIP1 Activator AQX-1125 in Subjects with Moderate to Severe Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome. J Urol. 2016 Sep;196(3):747-54. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2016.03.003. PubMed PMID: 26968644.

2: Chuang YC, Chermansky C, Kashyap M, Tyagi P. Investigational drugs for bladder pain syndrome (BPS) / interstitial cystitis (IC). Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2016;25(5):521-9. doi: 10.1517/13543784.2016.1162290. PubMed PMID: 26940379.

3: Leaker BR, Barnes PJ, O’Connor BJ, Ali FY, Tam P, Neville J, Mackenzie LF, MacRury T. The effects of the novel SHIP1 activator AQX-1125 on allergen-induced responses in mild-to-moderate asthma. Clin Exp Allergy. 2014 Sep;44(9):1146-53. doi: 10.1111/cea.12370. PubMed PMID: 25040039.

4: Stenton GR, Mackenzie LF, Tam P, Cross JL, Harwig C, Raymond J, Toews J, Wu J, Ogden N, MacRury T, Szabo C. Characterization of AQX-1125, a small-molecule SHIP1 activator: Part 1. Effects on inflammatory cell activation and chemotaxis in vitro and pharmacokinetic characterization in vivo. Br J Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;168(6):1506-18. doi: 10.1111/bph.12039. PubMed PMID: 23121445; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3596654.

5: Stenton GR, Mackenzie LF, Tam P, Cross JL, Harwig C, Raymond J, Toews J, Chernoff D, MacRury T, Szabo C. Characterization of AQX-1125, a small-molecule SHIP1 activator: Part 2. Efficacy studies in allergic and pulmonary inflammation models in vivo. Br J Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;168(6):1519-29. doi: 10.1111/bph.12038. PubMed PMID: 23121409; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3596655.

6: Croydon L. BioPartnering North America–Spotlight on Canada. IDrugs. 2010 Mar;13(3):159-61. PubMed PMID: 20191430.

Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2016083387 SHIP1 MODULATORS AND METHODS RELATED THERETO 2014-02-27 2016-03-24
US2016031899 SHIP1 MODULATORS AND METHODS RELATED THERETO 2014-02-27 2016-02-04

AQX-1125

In the PI3K pathway, the key messenger molecule is phosphatidylinositiol-3,4,5-trisphosphate, or PIP3, which initiates the signaling pathway. In cells derived from bone marrow tissues (e.g. predominantly immune cells), the key enzymes that control levels of PIP3 are the PI3 kinase (PI3K), and the phosphatases, PTEN and SHIP1 (SH2-containing inositol-5’-phosphatase 1). PI3K generates PIP3, thus initiating the signaling pathway. This signaling is reduced by degradation of PIP3 by PTEN and SHIP1. PTEN is generally considered to be constantly working in the pathway, whereas SHIP1 is dormant until the cell is stimulated. In preclinical models, PTEN has been shown to suppress cancer by controlling cell proliferation, whereas SHIP1, when functioning, has been demonstrated to control inflammation by reducing cell migration and activation.

The SHIP1 Pathway – Highlighting the Role of AQX-1125

AQX-1125 is our lead product candidate and has generated positive clinical data from three completed clinical trials, including two proof-of-concept trials, one in COPD and one in allergic asthma, demonstrating a favorable safety profile and anti-inflammatory activity. Overall, more than 100 subjects have received AQX-1125. Importantly, our clinical trial results were consistent with the drug-like properties and anti-inflammatory activities demonstrated in our preclinical studies. AQX-1125 is a once daily oral capsule with many desirable drug-like properties. We are currently investigating AQX-1125 in two Phase 2 clinical trials, one in COPD and one in BPS/IC.

Based on our three completed clinical trials, we have demonstrated that AQX-1125:

  • has desirable pharmacokinetic, absorption and excretion properties that make it suitable for once daily oral administration;
  • is generally well tolerated, exhibiting mild to moderate adverse events primarily related to gastrointestinal upset that resolve without treatment or long-term effects and are reduced by taking the drug candidate with food; and
  • has anti-inflammatory properties consistent with those exhibited in preclinical studies and exhibited activity in two trials using two distinct inflammatory challenges.

AQX-1125 is an activator of SHIP1, which controls the PI3K cellular signaling pathway. If the PI3K pathway is overactive, immune cells can produce an abundance of pro-inflammatory signaling molecules and migrate to and concentrate in tissues, resulting in excessive or chronic inflammation. SHIP1 is predominantly expressed in cells derived from bone marrow tissues, which are mainly immune cells. Therefore drugs that activate SHIP1 can reduce the function and migration of immune cells and have an anti-inflammatory effect. By controlling the PI3K pathway, AQX-1125 reduces immune cell function and migration by targeting a mechanism that has evolved in nature to maintain homeostasis of the immune system.

AQX-1125 has demonstrated compelling preclinical activity in a broad range of relevant inflammatory studies including preclinical models of COPD, asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, BPS/IC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In these studies we have seen a meaningful reduction in the relevant immune cells that are the cells that cause inflammation, such as neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, and a reduction in the symptoms of inflammation, such as pain and swelling. The activity, efficacy and potency seen with AQX-1125 in most preclinical studies compare favorably to published results with corticosteroids. In addition, AQX-1125 demonstrated compelling activity in the smoke airway inflammation and Bleomycin Fibrosis models, which are known to be steroid refractory, or in other words, do not respond to corticosteroids. We believe this broad anti-inflammatory profile is not typical amongst drugs in development and supports the therapeutic potential for AQX-1125.

In addition to demonstrating strong in vitro and in vivo activity, AQX-1125 was also selected as a lead candidate based on its many desirable drug-like properties. The drug candidate is highly water soluble and does not require complex formulation for oral administration. AQX-1125 has low plasma protein binding, is not metabolized and is excreted unmetabolized in both urine and feces. After oral or intravenous dosing, AQX-1125 reaches high concentrations in respiratory, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, all of which have mucosal surfaces of therapeutic interest. In humans, AQX-1125 has shown pharmacokinetic properties suitable for once-a-day dosing. In addition, the absorption of the drug candidate is equivalent whether taken with or without food.

///////////rosiptor, AQX-1125, AQX 1125, AQX1125; AQX-1125 acetate, Rosiptor acetate, PHASE 3,  SH2-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1, SHIP1,  cancer, inflammatory disorders, immune disorders, 782487-29-0, 782487-28-9, Aquinox

 CC(=O)O.C[C@@]1(CC[C@@H](C[C@@H]1CO)O)[C@H]2CC[C@]3([C@H]([C@@H]2CN)CCC3=C)C

CC(=O)O.C[C@@]1(CC[C@H](O)C[C@@H]1CO)[C@H]2CC[C@@]3(C)[C@@H](CCC3=C)[C@@H]2CN

Lanabecestat (formerly known as AZD3293 or LY3314814)


str1str1

Lanabecestat.svg

str1str1

Lanabecestat

  • Molecular FormulaC26H28N4O
  • Average mass412.527 Da

ChemSpider 2D Image | Lanabecestat | C26H28N4O

Dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-[2H]indene-1′(3′H),2”-[2H]imidazol]-4”-amine, 4-methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-[5-(1-propyn-1-yl)-3-pyridinyl]-, (1α,1′R,4β)-

(1r,1’R,4R)-4-Methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-[5-(1-propin-1-yl)-3-pyridinyl]-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-indene-1′,2”-imidazol]-4”-amin
(1r,1’R,4R)-4-Methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-[5-(1-propyn-1-yl)-3-pyridinyl]-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-indene-1′,2”-imidazol]-4”-amine
(lr,l’R,4R)- 4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-l-yn-l-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H- dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden-l’2′-imidazole]-4″-amine
(lr,4r)-4-Methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-(5-prop-l-yn-l-ylpyridin-3-yl)-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane- l,2′-indene-l’,2″-imidazol]- “-amine
CAS 1383982-64-6
AZD3293
Dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-[1H]indene-1′(3’H),2”-[2H]imidazol]-4”-amine, 4-methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-[5-(1-propyn-1-yl)-3-pyridinyl]-, (1’R)-
Lanabecestat
LY3314814
UNII:X8SPJ492VF, AZ-12304146
Beta amyloid antagonist; Beta secretase 1 inhibitor; Beta secretase 2 inhibitor
Fast Track
  • (1α,1’R,4β)-4-Methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-[5-(1-propyn-1-yl)-3-pyridinyl]dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-[2H]indene-1′(3’H),2”-[2H]imidazol]-4”-amine
  • (1,4-trans,1’R)-4-methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-1-yn-1-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-indene-1′,2”-imidazol]-4”-amine
  • (1r,1’R,4R)-4-methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-1-yn-1-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-indene-1′,2”-imidazol]-4”-amine

Lanabecestat (formerly known as AZD3293 or LY3314814) is an oral beta-secretase 1 cleaving enzyme (BACE) inhibitor. A BACE inhibitor in theory would prevent the buildup of beta-amyloid and may help slow or stop the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

In September 2014, AstraZeneca and Eli Lilly and Company announced an agreement to co-develop lanabecestat.[1] A pivotal Phase II/III clinical trial of lanabecestat started in late 2014 and is planned to recruit 2,200 patients and end in June 2019.[2] In April 2016 the company announced it would advance to phase 3 without modification.[3]

  • Originator Astex Pharmaceuticals; AstraZeneca
  • Developer AstraZeneca; Eli Lilly
  • Class Antidementias; Imidazoles; Pyridines; Small molecules; Spiro compounds
  • Mechanism of Action Amyloid precursor protein secretase inhibitors
  • Phase III Alzheimer’s disease

Most Recent Events

  • 15 Mar 2017 Eli Lilly and AstraZeneca initiates enrolment in an extension phase III trial for Alzheimer’s Disease (In adults, In the elderly) in USA (PO) (NCT02972658)
  • 25 Jan 2017 Chemical structure information added
  • 12 Jan 2017 Eli Lilly and AstraZeneca initiate enrolment in a phase I pharmacokinetics trial in Healthy volunteers in USA (PO) (NCT03019549
  • Astex Therapeutics Ltd

Image resultImage result for azd 3293

CHEMBL2152914.png

The prime neuropathological event distinguishing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is deposition of the 40-42 residue amyloid β-peptide (Αβ) in brain parenchyma and cerebral vessels. A large body of genetic, biochemical and in vivo data support a pivotal role for Αβ in the pathological cascade that eventually leads to AD. Patients usually present early symptoms (commonly memory loss) in their sixth or seventh decades of life. The disease progresses with increasing dementia and elevated deposition of Αβ. In parallel, a hyperphosphorylated form of the microtubule-associated protein tau accumulates within neurons, leading to a plethora of deleterious effects on neuronal function. The prevailing working hypothesis regarding the temporal relationship between Αβ and tau pathologies states that Αβ deposition precedes tau aggregation in humans and animal models of the disease. Within this context, it is worth noting that the exact molecular nature of Αβ, mediating this pathological function is presently an issue under intense study. Most likely, there is a continuum of toxic species ranging from lower order Αβ oligomers to supramolecular assemblies such as Αβ fibrils. The Αβ peptide is an integral fragment of the Type I protein APP (Αβ amyloid precursor protein), a protein ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Since soluble Αβ can be found in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and in the medium from cultured cells, APP has to undergo proteolysis. There are three main cleavages of APP that are relevant to the pathobiology of AD, the so-called α-, β-, and γ-cleavages. The a-cleavage, which occurs roughly in the middle of the Αβ domain in APP is executed by the metalloproteases AD AMI 0 or AD AMI 7 (the latter also known as TACE). The β-cleavage, occurring at the N terminus of Αβ, is generated by the transmembrane aspartyl protease Beta site APP Cleaving Enzymel (BACE1). The γ-cleavage, generating the Αβ C termini and subsequent release of the peptide, is effected by a multi-subunit aspartyl protease named γ-secretase. ADAM10/17 cleavage followed by γ-secretase cleavage results in the release of the soluble p3 peptide, an N- terminally truncated Αβ fragment that fails to form amyloid deposits in humans. This proteolytic route is commonly referred to as the non-amyloidogenic pathway. Consecutive cleavages by BACE1 and γ-secretase generates the intact Αβ peptide, hence this processing scheme has been termed the amyloidogenic pathway. With this knowledge at hand, it is possible to envision two possible avenues of lowering Αβ production: stimulating non- amyloidogenic processing, or inhibit or modulate amyloidogenic processing. This application focuses on the latter strategy, inhibition or modulation of amyloidogenic processing.

Amyloidogenic plaques and vascular amyloid angiopathy also characterize the brains of patients with Trisomy 21 (Down’s Syndrome), Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis of the Dutch-type (HCHWA-D), and other neurodegenerative disorders.

Neurofibrillary tangles also occur in other neurodegenerative disorders including dementia- inducing disorders (Varghese, J., et al, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 2003, 46, 4625-4630). β-amyloid deposits are predominately an aggregate of AB peptide, which in turn is a product of the proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP). More specifically, AB peptide results from the cleavage of APP at the C-terminus by one or more γ-secretases, and at the N- terminus by B-secretase enzyme (BACE), also known as aspartyl protease or Asp2 or Beta site APP Cleaving Enzyme (BACE), as part of the B-amyloidogenic pathway.

BACE activity is correlated directly to the generation of AB peptide from APP (Sinha, et al, Nature, 1999, 402, 537-540), and studies increasingly indicate that the inhibition of BACE inhibits the production of AB peptide (Roberds, S. L., et al, Human Molecular Genetics, 2001, 10, 1317-1324). BACE is a membrane bound type 1 protein that is

synthesized as a partially active proenzyme, and is abundantly expressed in brain tissue. It is thought to represent the major β-secretase activity, and is considered to be the rate-limiting step in the production of amyloid^-peptide (Αβ).

Drugs that reduce or block BACE activity should therefore reduce Αβ levels and levels of fragments of Αβ in the brain, or elsewhere where Αβ or fragments thereof deposit, and thus slow the formation of amyloid plaques and the progression of AD or other maladies involving deposition of Αβ or fragments thereof. BACE is therefore an important candidate for the development of drugs as a treatment and/or prophylaxis of Αβ-related pathologies such as Down’s syndrome, β-amyloid angiopathy such as but not limited to cerebral amyloid angiopathy or hereditary cerebral hemorrhage, disorders associated with cognitive impairment such as but not limited to MCI (“mild cognitive impairment”), Alzheimer’s Disease, memory loss, attention deficit symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease, neurodegeneration associated with diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease or dementia including dementia of mixed vascular and degenerative origin, pre-senile dementia, senile dementia and dementia associated with Parkinson’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy or cortical basal degeneration.

It would therefore be useful to inhibit the deposition of Αβ and portions thereof by inhibiting BACE through inhibitors such as the compounds provided herein.

The therapeutic potential of inhibiting the deposition of Αβ has motivated many groups to isolate and characterize secretase enzymes and to identify their potential inhibitors.

SYNTHESIS

As in WO 2013190302

PATENT

WO 2013190302

EXAMPLES

Example 1

6′-Bromospiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-indene]-l’,4(3’H)-dione

Figure imgf000016_0001

Potassium tert-butoxide (223 g, 1.99 mol) was charged to a 100 L reactor containing a stirred mixture of 6-bromo-l-indanone (8.38 kg, 39.7 mol) in THF (16.75 L) at 20-30 °C. Methyl acrylate (2.33 L, 25.8 mol) was then charged to the mixture during 15 minutes keeping the temperature between 20-30 °C. A solution of potassium tert-butoxide (89.1 g, 0.79 mol) dissolved in THF (400 mL) was added were after methyl acrylate (2.33 L, 25.8 mol) was added during 20 minutes at 20-30 °C. A third portion of potassium tert-butoxide (90 g, 0.80 mol) dissolved in THF (400 mL) was then added, followed by a third addition of methyl acrylate (2.33 L, 25.8 mol) during 20 minutes at 20-30 °C. Potassium tert-butoxide (4.86 kg, 43.3 mol) dissolved in THF (21.9 L) was charged to the reactor during 1 hour at 20-30 °C. The reaction was heated to approximately 65 °C and 23 L of solvent was distilled off. Reaction temperature was lowered to 60 °C and 50% aqueous potassium hydroxide (2.42 L, 31.7 mol) dissolved in water (51.1 L) was added to the mixture during 30 minutes at 55-60 °C were after the mixture was stirred for 6 hours at 60 °C, cooled to 20 °C during 2 hours. After stirring for 12 hours at 20 °C the solid material was filtered off, washed twice with a mixture of water (8.4 L) and THF (4.2 L) and then dried at 50 °C under vacuum to yield 6′- bromospiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-indene]-r,4(3’H)-dione (7.78 kg; 26.6 mol). 1H MR (500 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ ppm 1.78 – 1.84 (m, 2 H), 1.95 (td, 2 H), 2.32 – 2.38 (m, 2 H), 2.51 – 2.59 (m, 2 H), 3.27 (s, 2 H), 7.60 (d, 1 H), 7.81 (m, 1 H), 7.89 (m, 1 H).

Example 2

(lr,4r)-6′-Bromo-4-methoxyspiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden]-l'(3’H)-one

Figure imgf000016_0002

Borane tert-butylamine complex (845 g, 9.7 mol) dissolved in DCM (3.8 L) was charged to a slurry of 6′-Bromospiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-indene]- ,4(3’H)-dione (7.7 kg, 26.3 mol) in DCM (42.4 L) at approximately 0-5 °C over approximately 25 minutes. The reaction was left with stirring at 0-5°C for 1 hour were after analysis confirmed that the conversion was >98%. A solution prepared from sodium chloride (2.77 kg), water (13.3 L) and 37% hydrochloric acid (2.61 L, 32 mol) was charged. The mixture was warmed to approximately 15 °C and the phases separated after settling into layers. The organic phase was returned to the reactor, together with methyl methanesulfonate (2.68 L, 31.6 mol) and tetrabutylammonium chloride (131 g, 0.47 mol) and the mixture was vigorously agitated at 20 °C. 50% Sodium hydroxide (12.5 L, 236 mol) was then charged to the vigorously agitated reaction mixture over approximately 1 hour and the reaction was left with vigorously agitation overnight at 20 °C. Water (19 L) was added and the aqueous phase discarded after separation. The organic layer was heated to approximately 40 °C and 33 L of solvent were distilled off. Ethanol (21 L) was charged and the distillation resumed with increasing temperature (22 L distilled off at up to 79 °C). Ethanol (13.9 L) was charged at approximately 75 °C. Water (14.6 L) was charged over 30 minutes keeping the temperature between 72-75 °C. Approximately 400 mL of the solution is withdrawn to a 500 mL polythene bottle and the sample crystallised spontaneously. The batch was cooled to 50 °C were the crystallised slurry sample was added back to the solution. The mixture was cooled to 40 °C. The mixture was cooled to 20 °C during 4 hours were after it was stirred overnight. The solid was filtered off , washed with a mixture of ethanol (6.6 L) and water (5 L) and dried at 50 °C under vacuum to yield (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4- methoxyspiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden]-r(3’H)-one (5.83 kg, 18.9 mol) 1H MR (500 MHz,

DMSO-i¾) δ ppm 1.22-1.32 (m, 2 H), 1.41 – 1.48 (m, 2 H), 1.56 (td, 2 H), 1.99 – 2.07 (m, 2 H), 3.01 (s, 2 H), 3.16 – 3.23 (m, 1 H), 3.27 (s, 3 H), 7.56 (d, 1 H), 7.77 (d, 1 H), 7.86 (dd, 1

H).

Example 3

(lr,4r)-6′-Bromo-4-methoxyspiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden]-l'(3’H)-imine hydrochloride

Figure imgf000017_0001

(lr,4r)-6′-Bromo-4-methoxyspiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden]- (3’H)-one (5.82 kg; 17.7 mol) was charged to a 100 L reactor at ambient temperature followed by titanium (IV)ethoxide (7.4 L; 35.4 mol) and a solution of tert-butylsulfinamide (2.94 kg; 23.0 mol) in 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (13.7 L). The mixture was stirred and heated to 82 °C. After 30 minutes at 82 °C the temperature was increased further (up to 97 °C) and 8 L of solvent was distilled off. The reaction was cooled to 87 °C and 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (8.2 L) was added giving a reaction temperature of 82 °C. The reaction was left with stirring at 82 °C overnight. The reaction temperature was raised (to 97 °C) and 8.5 L of solvent was distilled off. The reaction was cooled down to 87 °C and 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (8.2 L) was added giving a reaction temperature of 82 °C. After 3.5 hours the reaction temperature was increased further (to 97 °C) and 8 L of solvent was distilled off. The reaction was cooled to 87 °C and 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (8.2 L) was added giving a reaction temperature of 82 °C. After 2 hours the reaction temperature was increased further (to 97 °C) and 8.2 L of solvent was distilled off. The reaction was cooled to 87 °C and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (8.2 L) was added giving a reaction temperature of 82 °C. The reaction was stirred overnight at 82 °C. The reaction temperature was increased further (to 97 °C) and 8 L of solvent was distilled off. The reaction was cooled down to 25 °C. Dichloromethane (16.4 L) was charged. To a separate reactor water (30 L) was added and agitated vigorously and sodium sulfate (7.54 kg) was added and the resulting solution was cooled to 10 °C. Sulfuric acid (2.3 L, 42.4 mol) was added to the water solution and the temperature was adjusted to 20 °C. 6 L of the acidic water solution was withdrawn and saved for later. The organic reaction mixture was charged to the acidic water solution over 5 minutes with good agitation. The organic reaction vessel was washed with dichloromethane (16.4 L), and the dichloromethane wash solution was also added to the acidic water. The mixture was stirred for 15 minutes and then allowed to settle for 20 minutes. The lower aqueous phase was run off, and the saved 6 L of acidic wash was added followed by water (5.5 L). The mixture was stirred for 15 minutes and then allowed to settle for 20 minutes. The lower organic layer was run off to carboys and the upper water layer was discarded. The organic layer was charged back to the vessel followed by sodium sulfate (2.74 kg), and the mixture was agitated for 30 minutes. The sodium sulfate was filtered off and washed with dichloromethane (5.5 L) and the combined organic phases were charged to a clean vessel. The batch was heated for distillation (collected 31 L max temperature 57 °C). The batch was cooled to 40 °C and dichloromethane (16.4 L) was added. The batch was heated for distillation (collected 17 L max temperature 54 °C). The batch was cooled to 20 °C and dichloromethane (5.5 L) and ethanol (2.7 L) were. 2 M hydrogen chloride in diethyl ether (10.6 L; 21.2 mol) was charged to the reaction over 45 minutes keeping the temperature between 16-23 °C. The resulting slurry was stirred at 20 °C for 1 hour whereafter the solid was filtered off and washed 3 times with a 1 : 1 mixture of dichloromethane and diethyl ether (3 x 5.5 L). The solid was dried at 50 °C under vacuum to yield (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4- methoxyspiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden]-l'(3’H)-imine hydrochloride (6.0 kg; 14.3 mol; assay 82% w/w by 1H MR) 1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ ppm 130 (m, 2 H), 1.70 (d, 2 H), 1.98 (m, 2 H), 2.10 (m, 2 H), 3.17 (s, 2 H), 3.23 (m, 1 H), 3.29 (s, 3 H), 7.61 (d, 1 H), 8.04 (dd, 1 H), 8.75 (d, 1 H), 12.90(br s,2H).

Example 4

(lr,4r)-6′-Bromo-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden-l’2′- imidazole]-4″ (3″H)-thione

Figure imgf000019_0001

Trimethylorthoformate (4.95 L; 45.2 mol) and diisopropylethylamine (3.5 L; 20.0 mol) was charged to a reactor containing (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4-methoxyspiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden]- l'(3’H)-imine hydrochloride (6.25 kg; 14.9 mol) in isopropanol (50.5 L). The reaction mixture was stirred and heated to 75 °C during 1 hour so that a clear solution was obtained. The temperature was set to 70 °C and a 2 M solution of 2-oxopropanethioamide in isopropanol (19.5 kg; 40.6 mol) was charged over 1 hour, were after the reaction was stirred overnight at 69 °C. The batch was seeded with (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H- dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- 2′-imidazole]-4″(3″H)-thione (3 g ; 7.6 mmol) and the temperature was lowered to 60 °C and stirred for 1 hour. The mixture was concentrated by distillation (distillation temperature approximately 60 °C; 31 L distilled off). Water (31 L) was added during 1 hour and 60 °C before the temperature was lowered to 25 °C during 90 minutes were after the mixture was stirred for 3 hours. The solid was filtered off , washed with isopropanol twice (2 x 5.2 L) and dried under vacuum at 40 °C to yield (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4- methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- 2′-imidazole]-4″(3″H)-thione (4.87 kg; 10.8 mol; assay of 87% w/w by 1H NMR). Example 5

(lr,l’R,4R)-6′-Bromo-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden-l’2′- imidazole]-4″-amine D(+)-10-Camphorsulfonic acid salt

Figure imgf000020_0001

7 M Ammonia in methanol (32 L; 224 mol) was charged to a reactor containing (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4-methoxy-5”-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- 2′-imidazole]- 4″(3″H)-thione (5.10 kg; 11.4 mol) and zinc acetate dihydrate (3.02 kg ; 13.8 mol). The reactor was sealed and the mixture was heated to 80 °C and stirred for 24 hours, were after it was cooled to 30 °C. 1-Butanol (51L) was charged and the reaction mixture was concentrated by vacuum distilling off approximately 50 L. 1-Butanol (25 L) was added and the mixture was concentrated by vacuum distilling of 27 L. The mixture was cooled to 30 °C and 1 M sodium hydroxide (30 L; 30 mol) was charged. The biphasic mixture was agitated for 15 minutes. The lower aqueous phase was separated off. Water (20 L) was charged and the mixture was agitated for 30 minutes. The lower aqueous phase was separated off. The organic phase was heated to 70 °C were after (l S)-(+)-10-camphorsulfonic acid (2.4 kg; 10.3 mol) was charged. The mixture was stirred for 1 hour at 70 °C and then ramped down to 20 °C over 3 hours. The solid was filtered off, washed with ethanol (20 L) and dried in vacuum at 50 °C to yield (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- 2′-imidazole]- 4″-amine (+)-10-Camphor sulfonic acid salt (3.12 kg; 5.13 mol; assay 102%w/w by 1H

MR).

Example 6

(lr,l’R,4R)- 4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-l-yn-l-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H- dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden-l’2′-imidazole]-4″-amine

Na2PdCl4 (1.4 g; 4.76 mmol) and 3-(di-tert-butylphosphonium)propane sulfonate (2.6 g; 9.69 mmol) dissolved in water (0.1 L) was charged to a vessel containing (lr,4r)-6′-bromo- 4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- 2′-imidazole]-4″-amine (+)-10- camphorsulfonic acid salt (1 kg; 1.58 mol), potassium carbonate (0.763 kg; 5.52 mol) in a mixture of 1-butanol (7.7 L) and water (2.6 L). The mixture is carefully inerted with nitrogen whereafter 5-(prop-l-ynyl)pyridine-3-yl boronic acid (0.29 kg; 1.62 mol) is charged and the mixture is again carefully inerted with nitrogen. The reaction mixture is heated to 75 °C and stirred for 2 hours were after analysis showed full conversion. Temperature was adjusted to 45 °C. Stirring was stopped and the lower aqueous phase was separated off. The organic layer was washed 3 times with water (3 x 4 L). The reaction temperature was adjusted to 22 °C and Phosphonics SPM32 scavenger (0.195 kg) was charged and the mixture was agitated overnight. The scavenger was filtered off and washed with 1-butanol (1 L). The reaction is concentrated by distillation under reduced pressure to 3 L. Butyl acetate (7.7 L) is charged and the mixture is again concentrated down to 3 L by distillation under reduced pressure. Butyl acetate (4.8 L) was charged and the mixture was heated to 60 °C. The mixture was stirred for 1 hour were after it was concentrated down to approximately 4 L by distillation under reduced pressure. The temperature was set to 60 °C and heptanes (3.8 L) was added over 20 minutes. The mixture was cooled down to 20 °C over 3 hours and then left with stirring overnight. The solid was filtered off and washed twice with a 1 : 1 mixture of butyl acetate: heptane (2 x 2 L). The product was dried under vacuum at 50 °C to yield (lr, R,4R)-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′- [5-(prop-l-yn-l-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- 2′-imidazole]-4”- amine (0.562 kg; 1.36 mol; assay 100% w/w by 1H MR). 1H MR (500 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ ppm 0.97 (d, 1 H), 1.12-1.30 (m, 2 H), 1.37-1.51 (m, 3 H), 1.83 (d, 2 H), 2.09 (s, 3 H), 2.17 (s, 2 H), 2.89-3.12 (m, 3 H), 3.20 (s, 3 H), 6.54 (s, 2 H), 6.83 (s, 1 H), 7.40 (d, 1 H), 7.54 (d, 1 H), 7.90(s,lH). 8.51(d,lH), 8.67(d, lH)

Example 7

Preparation of camsylate salt of (lr,l’R,4R)- 4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-l-yn-l- yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden-l’2′-imidazole]-4′ ‘-amine

1.105 kg (lr, l ‘R,4R)- 4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-l-yn-l-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H- dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- 2’-imidazole]-4″-amine was dissolved in 8.10 L 2-propanol and 475 mL water at 60 °C. Then 1.0 mole equivalent (622 gram) (l S)-(+)-10

camphorsulfonic acid was charged at 60 °C. The slurry was agitated until all (l S)-(+)-10 camphorsulfonic acid was dissolved. A second portion of 2-propanol was added (6.0 L) at 60 °C and then the contents were distilled until 4.3 L distillate was collected. Then 9.1 L Heptane was charged at 65 °C. After a delay of one hour the batch became opaque. Then an additional distillation was performed at about 75 °C and 8.2 L distillate was collected. The batch was then cooled to 20 °C over 2 hrs and held at that temperature overnight. Then the batch was filtered and washed with a mixture of 1.8 L 2-propanol and 2.7 L heptane. Finally the substance was dried at reduced pressure and 50 °C. The yield was 1.44 kg (83.6 % w/w). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 12.12 (1H, s), 9,70 (2H, d, J 40.2), 8.81 (1H, d, J2.1), 8.55 (1H, d, J 1.7), 8.05 (1H, dd, J2.1, 1.7), 7.77 (1H, dd, J7.8, 1.2), 7.50 (2H, m), 3.22 (3H, s), 3.19 (1H, d, J 16.1), 3.10 (1H, d, J 16.1), 3.02 (1H, m), 2.90 (1H, d, J 14.7), 2.60 (1H, m), 2.41 (1H, d, J 14.7), 2.40 (3H, s), 2.22 (1H, m), 2.10 (3H, s), 1.91 (3H, m), 1.81 (1H, m), 1.77 (1H, d, J 18.1), 1.50 (2H, m), 1.25 (6H, m), 0.98 (3H, s), 0.69 (3H, s).

Inventors Martin Hans Bohlin, Craig Robert Stewart
Applicant Astrazeneca Ab, Astrazeneca Uk Limited

str1

PATENT

WO 2012087237

Inventors Gabor Csjernyik, Sofia KARLSTRÖM, Annika Kers, Karin Kolmodin, Martin Nylöf, Liselotte ÖHBERG, Laszlo Rakos, Lars Sandberg, Fernando Sehgelmeble, Peter SÖDERMAN, Britt-Marie Swahn, Berg Stefan Von, Less «
Applicant Astrazeneca Ab

Example 20a (lr,4r)-4-Methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-(5-prop-l-yn-l-ylpyridin-3-yl)-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane- l,2′-indene-l’,2″-imidazol]- “-amine

Figure imgf000117_0001

Method A

5-(Prop-l-ynyl)pyridin-3-ylboronic acid (Intermediate 15, 0.044 g, 0.27 mmol), (lr,4r)-6′- bromo-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-indene- ,2″-imidazol]-4″-amine (Example 19 Method A Step 4, 0.085 g, 0.23 mmol), [l, l’-bis(diphenylphosphino)- ferrocene]palladium(II) chloride (9.29 mg, 0.01 mmol), K2C03 (2M aq., 1.355 mL, 0.68 mmol) and 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran (0.5 mL) were mixed and heated to 100 °C using MW for 2×30 min. 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran (5 mL) and H20 (5 mL) were added and the layers were separated. The organic layer was dried with MgS04 and then concentrated. The crude was dissolved in DCM and washed with H20. The organic phase was separated through a phase separator and dried in vacuo. The crude product was purified with preparative chromatography. The solvent was evaporated and the H20-phase was extracted with DCM. The organic phase was separated through a phase separator and dried to give the title compound (0.033 g, 36% yield), 1H MR (500 MHz, CD3CN) δ ppm 1.04 – 1.13 (m, 1 H), 1.23 – 1.35 (m, 2 H), 1.44 (td, 1 H), 1.50 – 1.58 (m, 2 H), 1.84 – 1.91 (m, 2 H), 2.07 (s, 3 H), 2.20 (s, 3 H), 3.00 (ddd, 1 H), 3.08 (d, 1 H), 3.16 (d, 1 H), 3.25 (s, 3 H), 5.25 (br. s., 2 H), 6.88 (d, 1 H), 7.39 (d, 1 H), 7.49 (dd, 1 H), 7.85 (t, 1 H), 8.48 (d, 1 H), 8.64 (d, 1 H), MS (MM-ES+APCI)+w/z 413 [M+H]+.

Separation of the isomers of (lr,4r)-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-(5-prop-l-yn-l-ylpyridin-3- yl)-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-indene-l’,2″-imidazol]-4″-amine

(lr,4r)-4-Methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-(5-prop-l-yn-l-ylpyridin-3-yl)-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′- indene-l’,2″-imidazol]-4″-amine (Example 20a, 0.144 g, 0.35 mmol) was purified using preparative chromatography (SFC Berger Multigram II, Column: Chiralcel OD-H; 20*250 mm; 5μιη, mobile phase: 30% MeOH (containing 0.1% DEA); 70% C02, Flow: 50 mL/min, total number of injections: 4). Fractions which contained the product were combined and the MeOH was evaporated to give: Isomer 1: (lr, R,4R)-4-methoxy-5”-methyl-6′-(5-prop-l-yn-l-ylpyridin-3-yl)-3’H-dispiro- [cyclohexane-l,2′-indene-l’,2″-imidazol]-4″-amine (49 mg, 34% yield) with retention time 2.5 min:

Figure imgf000118_0001

1H MR (500 MHz, CD3CN) δ ppm 1.07 – 1.17 (m, 1 H), 1.23 – 1.39 (m, 2 H), 1.47 (td, 1 H), 1.57 (ddq, 2 H), 1.86 – 1.94 (m, 2 H), 2.09 (s, 3 H), 2.23 (s, 3 H), 2.98 – 3.07 (m, 1 H), 3.11 (d, 1 H), 3.20 (d, 1 H), 3.28 (s, 3 H), 5.30 (br. s., 2 H), 6.91 (d, 1 H), 7.42 (d, 1 H), 7.52 (dd, 1 H), 7.88 (t, 1 H), 8.51 (d, 1 H), 8.67 (d, 1 H), MS (MM-ES+APCI)+ m/z 413.2 [M+H]+; and

Isomer 2: (lr,l’S,4S)-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-(5-prop-l-yn-l-ylpyridin-3-yl)-3’H- dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-indene-l’,2″-imidazol]-4″-amine (50 mg, 35% yield) with retention time 6.6 min:

Figure imgf000118_0002

1H MR (500 MHz, CD3CN) δ ppm 1.02 – 1.13 (m, 1 H), 1.20 – 1.35 (m, 2 H), 1.44 (d, 1 H), 1.54 (ddd, 2 H), 1.84 – 1.91 (m, 2 H), 2.06 (s, 3 H), 2.20 (s, 3 H), 3.00 (tt, 1 H), 3.08 (d, 1 H), 3.16 (d, 1 H), 3.25 (s, 3 H), 5.26 (br. s., 2 H), 6.88 (d, 1 H), 7.39 (d, 1 H), 7.49 (dd, 1 H), 7.84 (t, 1 H), 8.48 (d, 1 H), 8.63 (d, 1 H), MS (MM-ES+APCI)+ m/z 413.2 [M+H]+.

Method B

A vessel was charged with (lr,4r)-6′-bromo-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H-dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′- indene-l’,2″-imidazol]-4″-amine (Example 19 Method B Step 4, 7.5 g, 19.9 mmol), 5-(prop-l- ynyl)pyridin-3-ylboronic acid (Intermediate 15, 3.37 g, 20.9 mmol), 2.0 M aq. K2C03 (29.9 mL, 59.8 mmol), and 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran (40 mL). The vessel was purged under vacuum and the atmosphere was replaced with argon. Sodium tetrachloropalladate (II) (0.147 g, 0.50 mmol) and 3-(di-tert-butyl phosphonium) propane sulfonate (0.267 g, 1.00 mmol) were added and the contents were heated to reflux for a period of 16 h. The contents were cooled to 30 °C and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran (2 x 10 mL), then the organics were combined, washed with brine and treated with activated charcoal (2.0 g). The mixture was filtered over diatomaceous earth, and then washed with 2-methyl- tetrahydrofuran (20 mL). The filtrate was concentrated to a volume of approximately 50 mL, then water (300 μL) was added, and the contents were stirred vigorously as seed material was added to promote crystallization. The product began to crystallize and the mixture was stirred for 2 h at r.t., then 30 min. at 0-5 °C in an ice bath before being filtered. The filter cake was washed with 10 mL cold 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran and then dried in the vacuum oven at 45 °C to give the racemic title compound (5.2 g, 12.6 mmol, 63% yield): MS (ES+) m/z 413 [M+H]+.

(lr,l’R,4R)-4-Methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-l-yn-l-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3’H-dispiro- [cyclohexane-l,2′-indene-l’ “-imidazol]-4”-amine (isomer 1)

Figure imgf000119_0001

Method C

A solution of (lr,4r)-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-6′-(5-prop-l-yn-l-ylpyridin-3-yl)-3’H-dispiro- [cyclohexane-l,2′-indene-l’,2″-imidazol]-4″-amine (Example 20a method B, 4.85 g, 11.76 mmol) and EtOH (75 mL) was stirred at 55 °C. A solution of (+)-di-p-toluoyl-D-tartaric acid (2.271 g, 5.88 mmol) in EtOH (20 mL) was added and stirring continued. After 2 min. a precipitate began to form. The mixture was stirred for 2 h before being slowly cooled to 30 °C and then stirred for a further 16 h. The heat was removed and the mixture was stirred at r.t. for 30 min. The mixture was filtered and the filter cake washed with chilled EtOH (45 mL). The solid was dried in the vacuum oven at 45 °C for 5 h, then the material was charged to a vessel and DCM (50 mL) and 2.0 M aq. NaOH solution (20 mL) were added. The mixture was stirred at 25 °C for 15 min. The phases were separated and the aqueous layer was extracted with 10 mL DCM. The organic phase was concentrated in vacuo to a residue and 20 mL EtOH was added. The resulting solution was stirred at r.t. as water (15 mL) was slowly added to the vessel. A precipitate slowly began to form, and the resulting mixture was stirred for 10 min. before additional water (20 mL) was added. The mixture was stirred at r.t. for 1 h and then filtered. The filter cake was washed with water (15 mL) and dried in a vacuum oven at 45 °C for a period of 16 h to give the title compound (1.78 g, 36% yield): MS (ES+) m/z 413 [M+H]+. This material is equivalent to Example 20a Isomer 1 above. Method D

To a 500 mL round-bottomed flask was added (lr, R,4R)-6′-bromo-4-methoxy-5″-methyl-3’H- dispiro[cyclohexane-l,2′-inden- ,2′-imidazole]-4″-amine as the D(+)-10-camphor sulfonic acid salt (Example 19 Method B Step 5, 25.4 g, 41.7 mmol), 2 M aq. KOH (100 mL) and 2-methyl- tetrahydrofuran (150 mL). The mixture was stirred for 30 min at r.t. after which the mixture was transferred to a separatory funnel and allowed to settle. The phases were separated and the organic phase was washed with 2 M aq. K2C03 (100 mL). The organic phase was transferred to a 500 mL round-bottomed flask followed by addition of 5-(prop-l-ynyl)pyridin-3-ylboronic acid (Intermediate 15, 6.72 g, 41.74 mmol), K2C03 (2.0 M, 62.6 mL, 125.21 mmol). The mixture was degassed by means of bubbling Ar through the solution for 5 min. To the mixture was then added sodium tetrachloropalladate(II) (0.307 g, 1.04 mmol) and 3-(di-tert- butylphosphonium)propane sulfonate (0.560 g, 2.09 mmol) followed by heating the mixture at reflux (80 °C) overnight. The reaction mixture was allowed to cool down to r.t. and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with 2-Me-THF (2×100 mL). The organics were combined, washed with brine and treated with activated charcoal. The mixture was filtered over diatomaceous earth and the filter cake was washed with 2-Me-THF (2×20 mL), and the filtrate was concentrated to give 17.7 g that was combined with 2.8 g from other runs. The material was dissolved in 2-Me-THF under warming and put on silica (-500 g). Elution with 2- Me-THF/ Et3N (100:0-97.5:2.5) gave the product. The solvent was evaporated, then co- evaporated with EtOH (absolute, 250 mL) to give (9.1 g, 53% yield). The HCl-salt was prepared to purify the product further: The product was dissolved in CH2C12 (125 mL) under gentle warming, HC1 in Et20 (-15 mL) in Et20 (100 mL) was added, followed by addition of Et20 (-300 mL) to give a precipitate that was filtered off and washed with Et20 to give the HCl-salt. CH2C12 and 2 M aq. NaOH were added and the phases separated. The organic phase was concentrated and then co-evaporated with MeOH. The formed solid was dried in a vacuum cabinet at 45 °C overnight to give the title compound (7.4 g, 43% yield): 1H MR (500 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ ppm 0.97 (d, 1 H) 1.12 – 1.30 (m, 2 H) 1.37 – 1.51 (m, 3 H) 1.83 (d, 2 H) 2.09 (s, 3 H) 2.17 (s, 3 H) 2.89 – 3.12 (m, 3 H) 3.20 (s, 3 H) 6.54 (s, 2 H) 6.83 (s, 1 H) 7.40 (d, 1 H) 7.54 (d, 1 H) 7.90 (s, 1 H) 8.51 (d, 1 H) 8.67 (d, 1 H); HRMS-TOF (ES+) m/z 413.2338 [M+H]+ (calculated 413.2341); enantiomeric purity >99.5%; NMR Strength 97.8±0.6% (not including water).

References

  1. Jump up^ “AstraZeneca and Lilly announce alliance to develop and commercialise BACE inhibitor AZD3293 for Alzheimer’s disease”. http://www.astrazeneca.com. 16 Sep 2014. Retrieved 8 Oct 2014.
  2. Jump up^ “AstraZeneca and Lilly move Alzheimer’s drug into big trial”. December 2014.
  3. Jump up^ Lilly and AstraZeneca Alzheimer’s candidate advances; AstraZeneca earns $100M milestone. April 2016
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Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US8865911 Compounds and their use as BACE inhibitors 2013-03-15 2014-10-21
US8415483 Compounds and their use as BACE inhibitors 2011-12-20 2013-04-09
US2015133471 COMPOUNDS AND THEIR USE AS BACE INHIBITORS 2014-09-15 2015-05-14
US2016184303 COMPOUNDS AND THEIR USE AS BACE INHIBITORS 2015-12-22 2016-06-30
Lanabecestat
Lanabecestat.svg
Names
Systematic IUPAC name

4-Methoxy-5′′-methyl-6′-[5-(prop-1-yn-1-yl)pyridin-3-yl]-3′H-dispiro[cyclohexane-1,2′-indene-1′,2′′-imidazole]-4′′-amine
Other names

AZD3293; LY3314814
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
Properties
C26H28N4O
Molar mass 412.54 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

CC#CC1=CC(=CN=C1)C2=CC3=C(CC4(C35N=C(C(=N5)N)C)CCC(CC4)OC)C=C2

PAPER

Figure

Structure of Eli Lilly/AstraZeneca BACE1 inhibitor AZD3292 (+)-camsylate and of the 3-propynylpyridine fragment common to several BACE1 inhibitors.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease resulting in personality and behavioral disturbances, impaired memory loss, inability to perform daily tasks, and death.(1) AD affects an estimated 47 million patients and their families worldwide,(2) and this number is expected to rise to 115 million by 2050.(3) AD is caused through the accumulation of β-amyloid proteins into plaques outside neurons in the brain.(4) It is thought that soluble forms of this protein are neurotoxic and are the main cause of deterioration seen in Alzheimer patients. The soluble protein fragments are made through the cutting of larger proteins, namely, amyloid precursor protein (APP), by two enzymes: β-site amyloid cleaving enzyme (BACE) and γ-secretase. Notably, BACE1 inhibitors have shown promise as potentially disease-modifying treatments for AD.(5) The novel, potent BACE-1 inhibitor AZD3293 (LY3314814) is a brain-permeable, orally active compound with a slow off-rate from its target enzyme, BACE1, which robustly reduced plasma, CSF, and brain Aβ40, Aβ42, and sAβPPβ concentrations in multiple nonclinical species, in elderly subjects, and patients with AD. Eli Lilly and Co. and AstraZeneca are currently studying AZD3293 in phase 3 clinical trials.

Development of a Continuous-Flow Sonogashira Cross-Coupling Protocol using Propyne Gas under Process Intensified Conditions

Institute of Chemistry, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Heinrichstrasse 28, 8010 Graz, Austria
Research Center Pharmaceutical Engineering GmbH (RCPE), Inffeldgasse 13, 8010 Graz, Austria
§ AstraZeneca, Silk Road Business Park, Macclesfield SK10 2NA, United Kingdom
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00160

Abstract

Abstract Image

The development of a continuous-flow Sonogashira cross-coupling protocol using propyne gas for the synthesis of a key intermediate in the manufacturing of a β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitor, currently undergoing late stage clinical trials for a disease-modifying therapy of Alzheimer’s disease, is described. Instead of the currently used batch manufacturing process for this intermediate that utilizes TMS-propyne as reagent, we herein demonstrate the safe utilization of propyne gas, as a cheaper and more atom efficient reagent, using an intensified continuous-flow protocol under homogeneous conditions. The flow process afforded the target intermediate with a desired product selectivity of ∼91% (vs the bis adduct) after a residence time of 10 min at 160 °C. The continuous-flow process compares favorably with the batch process, which uses TMS-propyne and requires overnight processing, TBAF as an additive, and a significantly higher loading of Cu co-catalyst.

Product 3:

1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 8.48 (d, J = 1.2 Hz, 1H), 8.44 (d, J = 1.2 Hz, 1H), 7.74 (t, J = 2.0 Hz, 1H), 2.00 (s, 3H).

13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 150.2, 149.0, 140.7, 122.5, 119.9, 91.2, 75.2, 4.4.

Product 6: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 8.47 (d, J = 1.9, 2H), 7.63 (t, J = 2.0 Hz, 1H) 2.08 (s, 6H).

Product 4 was isolated for NMR analysis using the same purification procedure as described for product 3.

1 H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 8.54 (d, J = 2.2 Hz, 1H), 8.51 (d, J = 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.81 (t, J = 2.0 Hz, 1H), 2.42 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 2H), 1.65–1.40 (m, 4H), 0.95 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, 3H).

13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 150.5, 149.2, 140.9, 122.8, 120.1, 95.9, 76.2, 30.6, 22.1, 19.3, 13.7.

str1 str2 str3 str4 str5 str6

///////////////LanabecestatLY3314814, 1383982-64-6, AZD3293, PHASE 3, AZ-12304146, Fast Track, Nootropic agent, Neuroprotectant


Pridopidine.svg

Pridopidine

  • Molecular Formula C15H23NO2S
  • Average mass 281.414 Da
346688-38-8  CAS FREE FORM
882737-42-0 (hydrochloride)
1440284-30-9 HBr
4-[3-(Methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1-propylpiperidin
4- (3 -Methanesulfonyl-phenyl ) – 1-propyl -piperidine
ACR16
Huntexil
UNII-HD4TW8S2VK;
4-[3-(Methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1-propylpiperidine
ACR 16
  • ASP 2314
FR 310826

Huntingtons chorea

Dopamine D2 receptor antagonist; Opioid receptor sigma agonist 1

Neurosearch INNOVATORS, In 2012, the product was acquired by Teva

In January 2017, pridopidine was reported to be in phase 3 clinical development,  pridopidine for treating or improving cognitive functions and Alzheimer’s disease.

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, following an asset acquisition from NeuroSearch, is developing pridopidine, a fast-off dopamine D2 receptor antagonist that strengthens glutamate function, for treating HD.
The drug holds orphan drug designation in the U.S. and the E.U. for the treatment of Huntington’s disease

PRIDOPIDINE.png

About Huntington Disease

HD is a fatal neurodegenerative disease for which there is no known cure or prevention. People who suffer from HD will likely have a variety of steadily-worsening symptoms, including uncoordinated and uncontrolled movements, cognition and memory deterioration and a range of behavioral and psychological problems. HD symptoms typically start in middle age, but the disease may also manifest itself in childhood and in old age. Disease progression is characterized by a gradual decline in motor control, cognition and mental stability, and generally results in death within 15 to 25 years of clinical diagnosis. Current treatment is limited to managing the symptoms of HD, as there are no treatments that have been shown to alter the progression of HD. Studies estimate that HD affects about 13 to 15 people per 100,000 in Caucasians, and for every affected person there are approximately three to five people who may carry the mutation but are not yet ill.

Image result for Pridopidine

Pridopidine, also known as ACR16, is a dopamine stabilizer, which improves motor performance and shows neuroprotective effects in Huntington disease R6/2 mouse model. Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder for which new treatments are urgently needed. Pridopidine is a new dopaminergic stabilizer, recently developed for the treatment of motor symptoms associated with HD.

Figure

Dopamine D2 ligands. Dopamine D2 receptor agonists dopamine (1) and apomorphine (2), classical antagonists haloperidol (3) and olanzapine (4), partial agonists (−)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-Nn-propylpiperidine (5), bifeprunox (6), aripiprazole (7), and 3-(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)phenol (9a), and dopaminergic stabilizers S-(−)-OSU6162 (8) and pridopidine (12b).

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter in the brain. Since this discovery, made in the 1950s, the function of dopa-mine in the brain has been intensely explored. To date, it is well established that dopamine is essential in several aspects of brain function including motor, cognitive, sensory, emotional and autonomous (e.g. regulation of appetite, body temperature, sleep) functions. Thus, modulation of dopaminergic function may be beneficial in the treatment of a wide range of disorders affecting brain functions. In fact, both neurologic and psychiatric disorders are treated with medications based on interactions with dopamine systems and dopamine receptors in the brain.
Drugs that act, directly or indirectly, at central dopamine receptors are commonly used in the treatment of neurologic and psychiatric disorders, e.g. Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Currently available dopaminer-gic pharmaceuticals have severe side effects, such as ex-trapyramidal side effects and tardive dyskinesia in dopaminergic antagonists used as antipsychotic agents, and dyskinesias and psychoses in dopaminergic agonists used as anti -Parkinson ‘ s agents. Therapeutic effects are un-satisfactory in many respects. To improve efficacy and reduce side effects of dopaminergic pharmaceuticals, novel dopamine receptor ligands with selectivity at specific dopamine receptor subtypes or regional selectivity are sought for. In this context, also partial dopamine receptor agonists, i.e. dopamine receptor ligands with some but not full intrinsic activity at dopamine receptors, are being developed to achieve an optimal degree of stimulation at dopamine receptors, avoiding excessive do-pamine receptor blockade or excessive stimulation.
Compounds belonging to the class of substituted 4- (phenyl-N-alkyl) -piperazine and substituted 4-(phenyl-N-alkyl) -piperidines have been previously reported. Among these compounds, some are inactive in the CNS, some dis-play serotonergic or mixed serotonergic/dopaminergic pharmacological profiles while some are full or partial dopamine receptor agonists or antagonists with high affinity for dopamine receptors.
A number of 4-phenylpiperazines and 4 -phenyl -piperidine derivatives are known and described, for example Costall et al . European J. Pharm. 31, 94, (1975), Mewshaw et al . Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett., 8, 295, (1998). The reported compounds are substituted 4 -phenyl -piperazine ‘ s, most of them being 2-, 3- or 4 -OH phenyl substituted and displaying DA autoreceptor agonist properties .
Fuller R. W. et al , J. Pharmacol. Exp . Therapeut . 218, 636, (1981) disclose substituted piperazines (e.g. 1- (m-trifluoro-methylphenyl) piperazine) which reportedly act as serotonin agonists and inhibit serotonin uptake.

Fuller R. W. et al , Res. Commun. Chem. Pathol . Pharmacol. 17, 551, (1977) disclose the comparative effects on the 3 , 4-dihydroxy-phenylacetic acid and Res. Commun. Chem. Pathol. Pharmacol. 29, 201, (1980) disclose the compara-tive effects on the 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid concentration in rat brain by 1- (p-chlorophenol) -piperazine .
Boissier J. et al Chem Abstr. 61:10691c, disclose disubstituted piperazines. The compounds are reportedly adrenolytics, antihypertensives , potentiators of barbitu-rates, and depressants of the central nervous system.
A number of different substituted piperazines have been published as ligands at 5-HT1A receptors, for example Glennon R.A. et al J. Med. Chem., 31, 1968, (1988), van Steen B.J., J. Med. Chem., 36, 2751, (1993), Mokrosz, J. et al, Arch. Pharm. (Weinheim) 328, 143-148 (1995), and Dukat M.-L., J. Med. Chem., 39, 4017, (1996). Glennon R. A. discloses, in international patent applications WO93/00313 and WO 91/09594 various amines, among them substituted piperazines, as sigma receptor ligands. Clinical studies investigating the properties of sigma receptor ligands in schizophrenic patients have not generated evi-dence of antipsychotic activity, or activity in any other CNS disorder. Two of the most extensively studied selective sigma receptor antagonists, BW234U (rimcazole) and BMY14802, have both failed in clinical studies in schizophrenic patients (Borison et al , 1991, Psychopharmacol Bull 27(2): 103-106; Gewirtz et al , 1994, Neuropsycho-pharmacology 10:37-40) .
Further, WO 93/04684 and GB 2027703 also describe specific substituted piperazines useful in the treatment of CNS disorders

Pridopidine (Huntexil, formerly ACR16) is an experimental drug candidate belonging to a class of agents known as dopidines, which act as dopaminergic stabilizers in the central nervous system. These compounds may counteract the effects of excessive or insufficient dopaminergic transmission,[1][2] and are therefore under investigation for application in neurological and psychiatric disorders characterized by altered dopaminergic transmission, such as Huntington’s disease (HD).

Pridopidine is in late-stage development by Teva Pharmaceutical Industries who acquired the rights to the product from its original developer NeuroSearch in 2012. In April 2010, NeuroSearch announced results from the largest European phase 3 study in HD carried out to date (MermaiHD). The MermaiHD study examined the effects of pridopidine in patients with HD and the results showed after six months of treatment, pridopidine improved total motor symptoms, although the primary endpoint of the study was not met. Pridopidine was well tolerated and had an adverse event profile similar to placebo.[3]

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) have both indicated they will not issue approval for pridopidine to be used in human patients on the basis of the MermaiHD and HART trials, and a further, positive phase 3 trial is required for approval.[4][5]

Image result for Pridopidine

Dopidines

Dopidines, a new class of pharmaceutical compounds, act as dopaminergic stabilizers, enhancing or counteracting dopaminergic effects in the central nervous system.[1][2] They have a dual mechanism of action, displaying functional antagonism of subcortical dopamine type 2 (D2) receptors, as well as strengthening of cortical glutamate and dopamine transmission.[6] Dopidines are, therefore, able to regulate both hypoactive and hyperactive functioning in areas of the brain that receive dopaminergic input (i.e. cortical and subcortical regions). This potential ability to restore the cortical–subcortical circuitry to normal suggests dopidines may have the potential to improve symptoms associated with several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including HD.

SYNTHESIS

Figure

aReagents and conditions: (a) n-butyllithium, 1-Boc-4-piperidone, THF; (b) trifluoroacetic acid, CH2Cl2, Δ; (c) triethylamine, methyl chloroformate, CH2Cl2; (d) m-CPBA, CH2Cl2; (e) Pd/C, H2, MeOH, HCl; (f) HCl, EtOH, Δ; (g) RX, K2CO3, acetonitrile, Δ.

Pharmacology

In vitro studies demonstrate pridopidine exerts its effects by functional antagonism of D2 receptors. However, pridopidine possesses a number of characteristics[1][2][6][7] that differentiate it from traditional D2 receptor antagonists (agents that block receptor responses).

  • Lower affinity for D2 receptors than traditional D2 ligands[8]
  • Preferential binding to activated D2 (D2high) receptors (i.e. dopamine-bound D2 receptors)[8]
  • Rapid dissociation (fast ‘off-rate’) from D2 receptors
  • D2 receptor antagonism that is surmountable by dopamine
  • Rapid recovery of D2-receptor-mediated responses after washout[1][2][6][7]

Pridopidine is less likely to produce extrapyramidal symptoms, such as akinesia (inability to initiate movement) and akathisia (inability to remain motionless), than dopamine antagonists (such as antipsychotics).[9] Furthermore, pridopidine displays no detectable intrinsic activity,[9][10] differentiating it from D2 receptor agonists and partial agonists (agents that stimulate receptor responses). Pridopidine, therefore, differs from D2 receptor antagonists, agonists and partial agonists.[6]

As a dopaminergic stabilizer, pridopidine can be considered to be a dual-acting agent, displaying functional antagonism of subcortical dopaminergic transmission and strengthening of cortical glutamate transmission.

Clinical development

The MermaiHD study

In 2009, NeuroSearch completed the largest European HD trial to date, the Multinational EuRopean Multicentre ACR16 study In Huntington’s Disease (MermaiHD) study.

This six-month, phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial recruited patients from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain and the UK, and compared two different pridopidine dose regimens with placebo. Patients were randomly allocated to receive pridopidine (45 mg once daily or 45 mg twice daily) or placebo. During weeks 1–4, patients received once-daily treatment (as a morning dose). Thereafter, patients took two doses (one morning and one afternoon dose) until the end of the treatment period. The study had a target recruitment of 420 patients; recruitment was finalized in April 2009 with 437 patients enrolled.[14]

The purpose of the study was to assess the effects of pridopidine on a specific subset of HD motor symptoms defined in the modified motor score (mMS).[14] The mMS comprises 10 items relating to voluntary motor function from the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale Total Motor Score (UHDRS—TMS).[14] Other study endpoints included the UHDRS—TMS, submotor items, cognitive function, behaviour and symptoms of depression and anxiety.

After six months of treatment, patients who received pridopidine 45 mg twice daily showed significant improvements in motor function, as measured by the UHDRS-TMS, compared with placebo. For the mMS, which was the primary endpoint of the study, a strong trend in treatment effect was seen, although statistical significance was not reached. Pridopidine was also very well tolerated, had an adverse event profile similar to placebo and gave no indication of treatment-associated worsening of symptoms.[3]

The MermaiHD study – open-label extension

Patients who completed the six-month, randomized phase of the MermaiHD study could choose to enter the MermaiHD open-label extension study and receive pridopidine 45 mg twice daily for six months. In total, 357 patients were enrolled into the MermaiHD open-label extension study and of these, 305 patients completed the entire 12-month treatment period.[15]

The objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term safety and tolerability profile of pridopidine and to collect efficacy data after a 12-month treatment period to support the safety evaluation. Safety and tolerability assessments included the incidence and severity of adverse events, routine laboratory parameters, vital signs and electrocardiogram measurements.[15]

Results from the MermaiHD open-label extension study showed treatment with pridopidine for up to 12 months (up to 45 mg twice daily for the first six months; 45 mg twice daily for the last six months) was well tolerated and demonstrated a good safety profile.[3][15]

The HART study

In October 2010, NeuroSearch reported results from their three-month, phase 2b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study carried out in Canada and the USA – Huntington’s disease ACR16 Randomized Trial (HART). This study was conducted in 28 centres and enrolled a total of 227 patients, who were randomly allocated to receive pridopidine 10 mg, 22.5 mg or 45 mg twice daily) or placebo.[14][16] During weeks 1–4, patients received once-daily treatment (as a morning dose). Thereafter, patients took two treatment doses (one morning and one afternoon dose) until the end of the treatment period. Study endpoints were the same as those for the MermaiHD study.

Results from the HART study were consistent with findings from the larger MermaiHD study. After 12 weeks of treatment with pridopidine 45 mg twice daily, total motor function significantly improved, as measured by the UHDRS–TMS. The primary endpoint, improvement in the mMS, was not met.[16]

In both studies, the effects on the UHDRS–TMS and the mMS were driven by significant improvements in motor symptoms such as gait and balance, and hand movements, deemed by the authors to be “clinically relevant”. However, the magnitude of the improvements was small. Pridopdiine demonstrated a favourable tolerability and safety profile, including no observations of treatment-related disadvantages in terms of worsening of other disease signs or symptoms.[15][16]

Compassionate use programme and open-ended, open-label study

To meet requests from patients and healthcare professionals for continued treatment with pridopidine, NeuroSearch has established a compassionate use programme in Europe to ensure continued access to pridopidine for patients who have completed treatment in the MermaiHD open-label extension study. The programme is active in all of the eight European countries where the MermaiHD study was conducted.

NeuroSearch has initiated an open-ended, open-label clinical study in the USA and Canada, called the Open HART study. In this study, all patients who have completed treatment in the HART study are offered the chance to restart treatment with pridopidine until either marketing approval has been obtained in the countries in question, or the drug’s development is discontinued. The first patients were enrolled in March 2011.[3]

Regulatory agency advice

The results of the MermaiHD and HART trials were presented to the American and European regulatory agencies: the FDA in March 2011 and EMA in May, 2011. Both agencies indicated insufficient evidence had been produced to allow approval in human patients, and a further phase 3 trial would be required for approval.[4][5]

PATENT

WO 2001046145

Example 6: 4- (3 -Methanesulfonyl-phenyl ) – 1-propyl -piperidine
m.p. 200°C (HCl) MS m/z (relative intensity, 70 eV) 281 (M+, 5), 252 (bp) , 129 (20), 115 (20), 70 (25.

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2010), 53(6), 2510-2520.

Synthesis and Evaluation of a Set of 4-Phenylpiperidines and 4-Phenylpiperazines as D2 Receptor Ligands and the Discovery of the Dopaminergic Stabilizer 4-[3-(Methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1-propylpiperidine (Huntexil, Pridopidine, ACR16)

NeuroSearch Sweden AB, Arvid Wallgrens Backe 20, S-413 46 Göteborg, Sweden
J. Med. Chem., 2010, 53 (6), pp 2510–2520
DOI: 10.1021/jm901689v
*To whom correspondence should be addressed. Phone: +(46) 31 7727710. Fax: +(46) 31 7727701. E-mail: fredrik.pettersson@neurosearch.se.

Abstract

Abstract Image

Modification of the partial dopamine type 2 receptor (D2) agonist 3-(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)phenol (9a) generated a series of novel functional D2 antagonists with fast-off kinetic properties. A representative of this series, pridopidine (4-[3-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1-propylpiperidine; ACR16, 12b), bound competitively with low affinity to D2 in vitro, without displaying properties essential for interaction with D2 in the inactive state, thereby allowing receptors to rapidly regain responsiveness. In vivo, neurochemical effects of 12b were similar to those of D2 antagonists, and in a model of locomotor hyperactivity, 12b dose-dependently reduced activity. In contrast to classic D2 antagonists, 12b increased spontaneous locomotor activity in partly habituated animals. The “agonist-like” kinetic profile of 12b, combined with its lack of intrinsic activity, induces a functional state-dependent D2 antagonism that can vary with local, real-time dopamine concentration fluctuations around distinct receptor populations. These properties may contribute to its unique “dopaminergic stabilizer” characteristics, differentiating 12b from D2 antagonists and partial D2agonists.

4-[3-(Methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1-propylpiperidine (12b)

Purification with flash chromatography using CH2Cl2/MeOH [1:1 (v/v)] as eluent afforded pure 12b (3.28 g, 79%).
MS m/z (relative intensity, 70 eV) 281 (M+, 5), 252 (bp), 129 (20), 115 (20), 70 (25).
1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 0.96 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 3 H), 1.53−1.64 (m, 2 H), 1.89 (dd, J = 9.6, 3.54 Hz, 4 H), 2.03−2.14 (m, 2 H), 2.31−2.41 (m, 2 H), 2.64 (ddd, J = 15.4, 5.7, 5.5 Hz, 1 H), 3.06−3.15 (m, 5 H), 7.51−7.58 (m, 2 H), 7.78−7.86 (m, 2 H).
13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 11.98, 20.18, 33.29, 42.59, 44.43, 54.06, 60.93, 124.99, 125.74, 129.39, 132.04, 148.28.
The amine was converted to the HCl salt and recrystallized in EtOH/diethyl ether: mp 212−214 °C. Anal. (C15H24ClNO2S) C, H, N.

PATENT

WO-2017015609

Pridopidine (Huntexil®) is a unique compound developed for the treatment of patients with motor symptoms associated with Huntington’s disease. The chemical name of pridopidine is 4-(3-(Methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-l-propylpiperidine, and its Chemical Registry Number is CAS 346688-38-8 (CSED:7971505, 2016). The Chemical Registry number of pridopidine hydrochloride is 882737-42-0 (CSID:25948790 2016). Processes of synthesis of pridopidine and a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof are disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 7,923,459. U.S. Patent No. 6,903,120 claims pridopidine for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, dyskinesias, dystonias, Tourette’s disease, iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic psychoses and hallucinoses, mood and anxiety disorders, sleep disorder, autism spectrum disorder, ADHD, Huntington’s disease, age-related cognitive impairment, and disorders related to alcohol abuse and narcotic substance abuse.

US Patent Application Publication Nos. 20140378508 and 20150202302, describe methods of treatment with high doses of pridopidine and modified release formulations of pridopidine, respectively.

EXAMPLES

Example 1: Pridopidine-HCl synthesis

An initial process for synthesizing pridopidine HC1 shown in Scheme 1 and is a modification of the process disclosed in US Patent No. 7,923,459.

The synthesis of Compound 9 started with the halogen-lithium exchange of 3-bromothioanisole (3BTA) in THF employing n-hexyllithium (HexLi) in hexane as the lithium source. Li-thioanisole (3LTA) intermediate thus formed was coupled with 1 -propyl-4-piperidone (1P4P) forming a Li-Compound 9. These two reactions require low (cryogenic) temperature. The quenching of Li-Compound 9 was done in water HCl/MTBE resulting in precipitation of Compound 9-HCl salt. A cryogenic batch mode process for this step was developed and optimized. The 3BTA and THF were cooled to less than -70°C. A solution of HexLi in n-hexane (33%) was added at a temperature below -70°C and the reaction is stirred for more than 1 hour. An in-process control sample was taken and analyzed for completion of halogen exchange, l-propyl-4-piperidone (1P4P) was then added to the reaction at about -70°C letting the reaction mixture to reach -40°C and further stirred at this temperature for about 1 hour. An in-process sample was analyzed to monitor the conversion according to the acceptance criteria (Compound 9 not less than 83% purity). The reaction mixture was added to a mixture of 5N hydrochloric acid (HC1) and methyl teri-butyl ether (MTBE). The resulting precipitate was filtered and washed with MTBE to give the hydrochloric salt of Compound 9 (Compound 9-HCl) wet.

Batch mode technique for step 1 requires an expensive and high energy-consuming cryogenic system that cools the reactor with a methanol heat exchange, in which the methanol is circulated in counter current liquid nitrogen. This process also brings about additional problems originated from the workup procedure. The work-up starts when the reaction mixture is added into a mixture of MTBE and aqueous HC1. This gives three phases: (1) an organic phase that contains the organic solvents MTBE, THF and hexane along with other organic related materials such as thioanisole (TA), hexyl-bromide,

3-hexylthioanisole and other organic side reaction impurities (2) an aqueous phase containing inorganic salts (LiOH and LiBr), and (3) a solid phase which is mostly Compound 9-HCl but also remainders of 1P4P as an HC1 salt.

The isolation of Compound 9-HCl from the three phase work-up mixture is by filtration followed by MTBE washings. A major problem with this work-up is the difficulty of the filtration which resulted in a long filtration and washing operations. The time it takes to complete a centrifugation and washing cycle is by far beyond the normal duration of such a manufacturing operation. The second problem is the inevitable low and non-reproducible assay (purity of -90% on dry basis) of Compound 9-HCl due to the residues of the other two phases. It should be noted that a high assay is important in the next step in order to control the amount of reagents. The third problem is the existence of THF in the wet Compound 9-HCl salt which is responsible for the Compound 3 impurity that is discussed below.

Example 6.2: Pridopidine crude – work-up development

After the reduction, pridopidine HC1 is precipitated by adding HC1/IPA to the solution of pridopidine free base in ΓΡΑ in the process of Example 1. Prior to that, a solvent swap from toluene to ΓΡΑ is completed by 3 consecutive vacuum distillations. The amount of toluene in the ΓΡΑ solution affects the yield and it was set to be not more than 3% (IPC by GC method). The spontaneous precipitation produces fine crystals with wide PSD. In order to narrow the PSD, Example 1 accomplishes HC1/IPA addition in two cycles with cooling/warming profile.

The updated process is advantageous for crystallizing pridopidine free base over the procedure in Example 1 for two reasons.

First, it simplifies the work-up of the crude because the swap from toluene to PA is not required. The pridopidine free base is crystallized from toluene/n-heptanes system. Only one vacuum distillation of toluene is needed (compared to three in the work-up of Example 1) to remove water and to increase yield.

Second, in order to control pridopidine-HCl physical properties. Pridopidine free base is a much better starting material for the final crystallization step compared to the pridopidine HC1 salt because it is easily dissolved in ΓΡΑ which enables a mild absolute (0.2μ) filtration required in the final step of API manufacturing.

Crystallization of pridopidine free base in toluene/n-heptane system

First, crystallization of pridopidine free base in toluene/n-heptane mixture was tested in order to find the right ratio to maximize the yield. In order to obtain pridopidine free base, pridopidine-HCl in water/toluene system was basified with NaOH(aq) to pH>12. Two more water washes of the toluene phase brought the pH of the aqueous phase to <10. Addition of n-heptane into the toluene solution

resulted in pridopidine free base precipitation. Table 21 shows data from the toluene/n-heptane crystallization experiments.

Example 7: Development of the procedure for the purification of Compound 1 in pridopidine free base.

The present example describes lowering Compound 1 levels in pridopidine free base. This procedure involves dissolving pridopidine FB in 5 Vol of toluene at 20-30°C, 5 Vol of water are added and after the mixing phases are separated and the organic phase is washed three times with 5 Vol water. The toluene mixture is then distilled up to 2.5 Vol in the reactor and 4 Vol of heptane are added for crystallization. Experiment No. 2501 was completed using this procedure. Table 24 summarizes the results.

Example 8: Step 4 in Scheme 2: Pridopidine Hydrochloride process

This example discusses the step used to formulate pridopidine-HCl from pridopidine crude. The corresponding stage in Example 1 was part of the last (third) stage in which pridopidine-HCl was obtained directly from Compound 8 without isolation of pridopidine crude. In order to better control pridopidine-HCl physical properties, it is preferable to start with well-defined pridopidine free base which enables control on the exact amount of HC1 and IPA.

Pridopidine-HCl preparation – present procedure

Pridopidine-HCl was prepared according to the following procedure: Solid pridopidine crude was charged into the first reactor followed by 8 Vol of IPA (not more than (NMT) 0.8% water by KF) and the mixture is heated to Tr =40-45°C (dissolution at Tr = 25-28°C). The mixture was then filtered through a 0.2 μιη filter and transferred into the second (crystallizing) reactor. The first hot reactor was washed with 3.8 Vol of IPA. The wash was transferred through the filter to the second reactor. The temperature was raised to 65-67°C and 1.1 eq of IPA/HCl are added to the mixture (1.1 eq of HC1, from IPA/HCl 5N solution, 0.78 v/w). The addition of EPA HCl into the free base is exothermic; therefore, it was performed slowly, and the temperature maintained at Tr = 60-67°C. After the addition, the mixture was stirred for 15 min and pH is measured (pH<4). If pH adjustment is needed,

0.2 eq of HCl (from IPA/HC1 5 N solution) is optional. At the end of the addition, the mixture was stirred for 1 hour at Tr = 66°C to start sedimentation. If sedimentation does not start, seeding with 0.07% pridopidine hydrochloride crystals is optional at this temperature. Breeding of the crystals was performed by stirring for 2.5 h at Tr =64-67°C. The addition HCl line was washed with 0.4 Vol of ΓΡΑ to give~13 Vol solution. The mixture was cooled to Tr =0°C The solid is filtered and washed with cooled 4.6 Vol ΓΡΑ at LT 5°C. Drying as performed under vacuum (P< ) at 30-60°C to constant weight: Dried pridopidine-HCl was obtained as a white solid.

Purification of Compound 4 during pridopidine-HCl process

A relationship between high temperature in the reduction reaction and high levels of Compound 4 impurity have been observed. A reduction in 50°C leads to 0.25% of Compound 4. For that reason the process of Example 1 limits the reduction reaction temperature to 30±5°C since this is the final step and Compound 4 level should be not more than 0.15%. The present process has another crystallization stage by which Compound 4 can be purified.

PATENT

https://www.google.ch/patents/US20130150406

Pridopidine, i.e. 4-(3-methanesulfonyl-phenyl)-1-propyl-piperidine, is a drug substance currently in clinical development for the treatment of Huntington’s disease. The hydrochloride salt of 4-(3-methanesulfonyl-phenyl)-1-propyl-piperidine and a method for its synthesis is described in WO 01/46145. In WO 2006/040155 an alternative method for the synthesis of 4-(3-methanesulfonyl-phenyl)-1-propyl-piperidine is described. In WO 2008/127188 N-oxide and/or di-N-oxide derivatives of certain dopamine receptor stabilizers/modulators are reported, including the 4-(3-methanesulfonyl-phenyl)-1-propyl-piperidine-1-oxide.

1H NMR PREDICTIONS

ACTUAL VALUES

1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 0.96 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 3 H), 1.53−1.64 (m, 2 H), 1.89 (dd, J = 9.6, 3.54 Hz, 4 H), 2.03−2.14 (m, 2 H), 2.31−2.41 (m, 2 H), 2.64 (ddd, J = 15.4, 5.7, 5.5 Hz, 1 H), 3.06−3.15 (m, 5 H), 7.51−7.58 (m, 2 H), 7.78−7.86 (m, 2 H).
 
13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ ppm 11.98, 20.18, 33.29, 42.59, 44.43, 54.06, 60.93, 124.99, 125.74, 129.39, 132.04, 148.28.

13C NMR PREDICTIONS

References

  1.  Seeman P, Tokita K, Matsumoto M, Matsuo A, Sasamata M, Miyata K (October 2009). “The dopaminergic stabilizer ASP2314/ACR16 selectively interacts with D2(High) receptors”. Synapse. 63 (10): 930–4. doi:10.1002/syn.20663. PMID 19588469.
  2.  Rung JP, Rung E, Helgeson L, et al. (June 2008). “Effects of (-)-OSU6162 and ACR16 on motor activity in rats, indicating a unique mechanism of dopaminergic stabilization”. Journal of Neural Transmission. 115 (6): 899–908. doi:10.1007/s00702-008-0038-3. PMID 18351286.
  3. “NeuroSearch A/S announces the results of additional assessment and analysis of data from the Phase III MermaiHD study with Huntexil® in Huntington’s disease” (Press release). NeuroSearch. 28 April 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-28.
  4. “NeuroSearch press releases (dated 23.03.2011 and 24.05.2011)”. NeuroSearch “Huntexil update: EMA asks for further trial”. HDBuzz. Retrieved 11 December 2011.
  5.  Ponten, H.; Kullingsjö, J.; Lagerkvist, S.; Martin, P.; Pettersson, F.; Sonesson, C.; Waters, S.; Waters, N. (2003-11-19) [2000-12-22]. “In vivo pharmacology of the dopaminergic stabilizer pridopidine”. European Journal of Pharmacology. 644 (1-3) (1–3): 88–95. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2010.07.023. PMID 20667452.
  6. Dyhring T, Nielsen E, Sonesson C, et al. (February 2010). “The dopaminergic stabilizers pridopidine (ACR16) and (-)-OSU6162 display dopamine D(2) receptor antagonism and fast receptor dissociation properties”. European Journal of Pharmacology. 628 (1–3): 19–26. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2009.11.025. PMID 19919834.
  7.  Pettersson, F; Pontén, H; Waters N; Waters S; Sonesson C (March 2010). “Synthesis and Evaluation of a Set of 4-Phenylpiperidines and 4-Phenylpiperazines as D2 Receptor Ligands and the Discovery of the Dopaminergic Stabilizer 4-[3-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-1-propylpiperidine (Pridopidine; ACR16)”. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 53 (6): 2510–2520. doi:10.1021/jm901689v. PMID 20155917.
  8.  Natesan S, Svensson KA, Reckless GE, et al. (August 2006). “The dopamine stabilizers (S)-(-)-(3-methanesulfonyl-phenyl)-1-propyl-piperidine [(-)-OSU6162] and 4-(3-methanesulfonylphenyl)-1-propyl-piperidine (ACR16) show high in vivo D2 receptor occupancy, antipsychotic-like efficacy, and low potential for motor side effects in the rat”. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. 318 (2): 810–8. doi:10.1124/jpet.106.102905. PMID 16648369.
  9.  Tadori Y, Forbes RA, McQuade RD, Kikuchi T (November 2008). “Characterization of aripiprazole partial agonist activity at human dopamine D3 receptors”. European Journal of Pharmacology. 597 (1–3): 27–33. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.09.008. PMID 18831971.
  10.  Rung JP, Carlsson A, Markinhuhta KR, Carlsson ML (June 2005). “The dopaminergic stabilizers (-)-OSU6162 and ACR16 reverse (+)-MK-801-induced social withdrawal in rats”. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry. 29 (5): 833–9. doi:10.1016/j.pnpbp.2005.03.003. PMID 15913873.
  11.  Nilsson M, Carlsson A, Markinhuhta KR, et al. (July 2004). “The dopaminergic stabiliser ACR16 counteracts the behavioural primitivization induced by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 in mice: implications for cognition”. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry. 28 (4): 677–85. doi:10.1016/j.pnpbp.2004.05.004. PMID 15276693.
  12. Pettersson F, Waters N, Waters ES, Carlsson A, Sonesson C (November 7, 2002). The development of a new class of dopamine stabilizers. Society for Neuroscience Annual Conference. Orlando, FL.
  13.  Tedroff, J.; Krogh, P. Lindskov; Buusman, A.; Rembratt, Å. (2010). “Poster 20: Pridopidine (ACR16) in Huntington’s Disease: An Update on the MermaiHD and HART Studies”. Neurotherapeutics. 7: 144. doi:10.1016/j.nurt.2009.10.004.
  14.  “NeuroSearch announces results from an open-label safety extension to the Phase III MermaiHD study of Huntexil® in patients with Huntington’s disease” (Press release). NeuroSearch. 15 September 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-15.
  15.  “The HART study with Huntexil® shows significant effect on total motor function in patients with Huntington’s disease although it did not meet the primary endpoint after 12 weeks of treatment” (Press release). NeuroSearch. 14 October 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-14.

REFERENCES CITED:

U.S. Patent No. 6,903,120

U.S. Patent No. 7,923,459

U.S. Publication No. US-2013-0267552-A1

CSED:25948790, http://w .chemspider.com/Chernical-Stmcture.25948790.

CSID:7971505, http://ww.chemspider.com/Chermcal-Stmcture.7971505.html

Ebenezer et al, Tetrahedron Letters 55 (2014) 5323-5326.

REFERENCES

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2: Rabinovich-Guilatt L, Siegler KE, Schultz A, Halabi A, Rembratt A, Spiegelstein O. The effect of mild and moderate renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of pridopidine, a new drug for Huntington’s disease. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Feb;81(2):246-55. doi: 10.1111/bcp.12792. Epub 2015 Nov 25. PubMed PMID: 26407011.

3: Shannon KM, Fraint A. Therapeutic advances in Huntington’s Disease. Mov Disord. 2015 Sep 15;30(11):1539-46. doi: 10.1002/mds.26331. Epub 2015 Jul 30. Review. PubMed PMID: 26226924.

4: Sahlholm K, Sijbesma JW, Maas B, Kwizera C, Marcellino D, Ramakrishnan NK, Dierckx RA, Elsinga PH, van Waarde A. Pridopidine selectively occupies sigma-1 rather than dopamine D2 receptors at behaviorally active doses. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2015 Sep;232(18):3443-53. doi: 10.1007/s00213-015-3997-8. Epub 2015 Jul 11. PubMed PMID: 26159455; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4537502.

5: Squitieri F, Di Pardo A, Favellato M, Amico E, Maglione V, Frati L. Pridopidine, a dopamine stabilizer, improves motor performance and shows neuroprotective effects in Huntington disease R6/2 mouse model. J Cell Mol Med. 2015 Nov;19(11):2540-8. doi: 10.1111/jcmm.12604. Epub 2015 Jun 22. PubMed PMID: 26094900; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4627560.

6: Waters S, Ponten H, Klamer D, Waters N. Co-administration of the Dopaminergic Stabilizer Pridopidine and Tetrabenazine in Rats. J Huntingtons Dis. 2014;3(3):285-98. doi: 10.3233/JHD-140108. PubMed PMID: 25300332.

7: Waters S, Ponten H, Edling M, Svanberg B, Klamer D, Waters N. The dopaminergic stabilizers pridopidine and ordopidine enhance cortico-striatal Arc gene expression. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2014 Nov;121(11):1337-47. doi: 10.1007/s00702-014-1231-1. Epub 2014 May 11. PubMed PMID: 24817271.

8: Reilmann R. The pridopidine paradox in Huntington’s disease. Mov Disord. 2013 Sep;28(10):1321-4. doi: 10.1002/mds.25559. Epub 2013 Jul 11. PubMed PMID: 23847099.

9: Gronier B, Waters S, Ponten H. The dopaminergic stabilizer pridopidine increases neuronal activity of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex. J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2013 Sep;120(9):1281-94. doi: 10.1007/s00702-013-1002-4. Epub 2013 Mar 7. PubMed PMID: 23468085.

10: Huntington Study Group HART Investigators. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pridopidine in Huntington’s disease. Mov Disord. 2013 Sep;28(10):1407-15. doi: 10.1002/mds.25362. Epub 2013 Feb 28. PubMed PMID: 23450660.

11: Squitieri F, Landwehrmeyer B, Reilmann R, Rosser A, de Yebenes JG, Prang A, Ivkovic J, Bright J, Rembratt A. One-year safety and tolerability profile of pridopidine in patients with Huntington disease. Neurology. 2013 Mar 19;80(12):1086-94. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182886965. Epub 2013 Feb 27. PubMed PMID: 23446684.

12: Ponten H, Kullingsjö J, Sonesson C, Waters S, Waters N, Tedroff J. The dopaminergic stabilizer pridopidine decreases expression of L-DOPA-induced locomotor sensitisation in the rat unilateral 6-OHDA model. Eur J Pharmacol. 2013 Jan 5;698(1-3):278-85. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2012.10.039. Epub 2012 Nov 2. PubMed PMID: 23127496.

13: Lindskov Krog P, Osterberg O, Gundorf Drewes P, Rembratt Å, Schultz A, Timmer W. Pharmacokinetic and tolerability profile of pridopidine in healthy-volunteer poor and extensive CYP2D6 metabolizers, following single and multiple dosing. Eur J Drug Metab Pharmacokinet. 2013 Mar;38(1):43-51. doi: 10.1007/s13318-012-0100-2. Epub 2012 Sep 5. PubMed PMID: 22948856.

14: Ruiz C, Casarejos MJ, Rubio I, Gines S, Puigdellivol M, Alberch J, Mena MA, de Yebenes JG. The dopaminergic stabilizer, (-)-OSU6162, rescues striatal neurons with normal and expanded polyglutamine chains in huntingtin protein from exposure to free radicals and mitochondrial toxins. Brain Res. 2012 Jun 12;1459:100-12. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2012.04.021. Epub 2012 Apr 21. PubMed PMID: 22560595.

15: Helldén A, Panagiotidis G, Johansson P, Waters N, Waters S, Tedroff J, Bertilsson L. The dopaminergic stabilizer pridopidine is to a major extent N-depropylated by CYP2D6 in humans. Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2012 Sep;68(9):1281-6. doi: 10.1007/s00228-012-1248-z. Epub 2012 Mar 8. PubMed PMID: 22399238.

16: Sahlholm K, Århem P, Fuxe K, Marcellino D. The dopamine stabilizers ACR16 and (-)-OSU6162 display nanomolar affinities at the σ-1 receptor. Mol Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;18(1):12-4. doi: 10.1038/mp.2012.3. Epub 2012 Feb 21. PubMed PMID: 22349783.

17: Neurodegenerative disease: Pridopidine for Huntington disease falls short of primary efficacy end point in phase III trial. Nat Rev Neurol. 2011 Dec 26;8(1):4. doi: 10.1038/nrneurol.2011.208. PubMed PMID: 22198402.

18: de Yebenes JG, Landwehrmeyer B, Squitieri F, Reilmann R, Rosser A, Barker RA, Saft C, Magnet MK, Sword A, Rembratt A, Tedroff J; MermaiHD study investigators. Pridopidine for the treatment of motor function in patients with Huntington’s disease (MermaiHD): a phase 3, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Neurol. 2011 Dec;10(12):1049-57. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(11)70233-2. Epub 2011 Nov 7. PubMed PMID: 22071279.

19: Feigin A. Pridopidine in treatment of Huntington’s disease: beyond chorea? Lancet Neurol. 2011 Dec;10(12):1036-7. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(11)70247-2. Epub 2011 Nov 7. PubMed PMID: 22071278.

20: Esmaeilzadeh M, Kullingsjö J, Ullman H, Varrone A, Tedroff J. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism after pridopidine (ACR16) treatment in patients with Huntington disease. Clin Neuropharmacol. 2011 May-Jun;34(3):95-100. doi: 10.1097/WNF.0b013e31821c31d8. PubMed PMID: 21586914.

US6903120 Dec 22, 2000 Jun 7, 2005 A. Carlsson Research Ab Modulators of dopamine neurotransmission
US7417043 Dec 21, 2004 Aug 26, 2008 Neurosearch Sweden Ab Modulators of dopamine neurotransmission
US7923459 Apr 10, 2007 Apr 12, 2011 Nsab, Filial Af Neurosearch Sweden Ab, Sverige Process for the synthesis of 4-(3-methanesulfonylphenyl)-1-N-propyl-piperidine
US20070238879 * Apr 10, 2007 Oct 11, 2007 Gauthier Donald R Process for the synthesis of 4-(3-methanesulfonylphenyl)-1-n-propyl-piperidine
US20100105736 Apr 14, 2008 Apr 29, 2010 Nsab, Filial Af Neurosearch Sweden Ab, Sverige N-oxide and/or di-n-oxide derivatives of dopamine receptor stabilizers/modulators displaying improved cardiovascular side-effects profiles
US20130150406 Dec 7, 2012 Jun 13, 2013 IVAX International GmbH Hydrobromide salt of pridopidine
US20130197031 Aug 31, 2011 Aug 1, 2013 IVAX International GmbH Deuterated analogs of pridopidine useful as dopaminergic stabilizers
US20130267552 Apr 3, 2013 Oct 10, 2013 IVAX International GmbH Pharmaceutical compositions for combination therapy
US20140088140 Sep 27, 2013 Mar 27, 2014 Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd. Combination of laquinimod and pridopidine for treating neurodegenerative disorders, in particular huntington’s disease
US20140088145 Sep 27, 2013 Mar 27, 2014 Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd. Combination of rasagiline and pridopidine for treating neurodegenerative disorders, in particular huntington’s disease
CN101056854A Oct 13, 2005 Oct 17, 2007 神经研究瑞典公司 Process for the synthesis of 4-(3-methanesulfonylphenyl)-1-N-propyl-piperidine
WO2001046145A1 Dec 22, 2000 Jun 28, 2001 A. Carlsson Research Ab New modulators of dopamine neurotransmission
WO2006040155A1 Oct 13, 2005 Apr 20, 2006 Neurosearch Sweden Ab Process for the synthesis of 4-(3-methanesulfonylphenyl)-1-n-propyl-piperidine
US9006445 6. Sept. 2012 14. Apr. 2015 IVAX International GmbH Polymorphic form of pridopidine hydrochloride
US9139525 11. Apr. 2008 22. Sept. 2015 Teva Pharmaceuticals International Gmbh N-oxide and/or di-N-oxide derivatives of dopamine receptor stabilizers/modulators displaying improved cardiovascular side-effects profiles
US20100105736 * 14. Apr. 2008 29. Apr. 2010 Nsab, Filial Af Neurosearch Sweden Ab, Sverige N-oxide and/or di-n-oxide derivatives of dopamine receptor stabilizers/modulators displaying improved cardiovascular side-effects profiles
US20160176821 * 18. Dez. 2015 23. Juni 2016 Teva Pharmaceuticals International Gmbh L-tartrate salt of pridopidine
USRE46117 22. Dez. 2000 23. Aug. 2016 Teva Pharmaceuticals International Gmbh Modulators of dopamine neurotransmission
WO2014205229A1 * 19. Juni 2014 24. Dez. 2014 IVAX International GmbH Use of high dose pridopidine for treating huntington’s disease
WO2015112601A1 * 21. Jan. 2015 30. Juli 2015 IVAX International GmbH Modified release formulations of pridopidine
WO2016106142A1 * 18. Dez. 2015 30. Juni 2016 Teva Pharmaceuticals International Gmbh L-tartrate salt of pridopidine
Pridopidine
Pridopidine.svg
Names
IUPAC name

4-(3-(Methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-1-propylpiperidine
Identifiers
346688-38-8 Yes
3D model (Jmol) Interactive image
ChemSpider 7971505 
KEGG D09953 
PubChem 9795739
UNII HD4TW8S2VK Yes
Properties
C15H23NO2S
Molar mass 281.41 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

/////////pridopidine, PHASE 3, TEVA, 346688-38-8, orphan drug designation, Neurosearch, ACR16, Huntexil, ASP 2314, FR 310826, UNII-HD4TW8S2VK

CCCN1CCC(CC1)c2cccc(c2)S(C)(=O)=O

OXIDE

Example 5 – Preparation Of Compound 5 (4-(3-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-l-propylpiperidine 1-oxide)

Pridopidine (50.0g, 178mmol, leq) was dissolved in methanol (250mL) and 33% hydrogen peroxide (20mL, 213mmol, 1.2eq). The reaction mixture was heated and kept at 40°C for 20h. The reaction mixture was then concentrated in a rotavapor to give 71g light-yellow oil. Water (400mL) was added and the suspension was extracted with isopropyl acetate (150mL) which after separation contains unreacted pridopidine while water phase contains 91% area of Compound 5 (HPLC). The product was then washed with dichloromethane (400mL) after adjusting the water phase pH to 9 by sodium hydroxide. After phase separation the water phase was washed again with dichloromethane (200mL) to give 100% area of Compound 5 in the water phase (HPLC). The product was then extracted from the water phase into butanol (lx400mL, 3x200ml) and the butanol phases were combined and concentrated in a rotavapor to give 80g yellow oil (HPLC: 100% area of Compound 5). The oil was washed with water (150mL) to remove salts and the water was extracted with butanol. The organic phases were combined and concentrated in a rotavapor to give 43g of white solid which was suspended in MTBE for lhr, filtered and dried to give 33g solid that was melted when standing on air. After high vacuum drying (2mbar, 60°C, 2.5h) 32.23g pure Compound 5 were obtained (HPLC: 99.5% area, 1H-NMR assay: 97.4%).

NMR Identity Analysis of Compound 5

Compound 5:

The following data in Tables 10 and 11 was determined using a sample of 63.06 mg Compound 5, a solvent of 1.2 ml DMSO-D6, 99.9 atom%D, and the instrument was a Bruker Avance ΙΠ 400 MHz.

Table 10: Assignment of ¾ NMRa,c

a The assignment is based on the coupling pattern of the signals, coupling constants and chemical shifts.

b Weak signal.

c Spectra is calibrated by the solvent residual peak (2.5 ppm).

Table 11: Assignment of 13C NMRa,b

a The assignment is based on the chemical shifts and 1H-13C couplings extracted from HSQC and HMBC experiments.

b Spectra is calibrated by a solvent peak (39.54 ppm)

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016003919&recNum=5&docAn=US2015038349&queryString=EN_ALL:nmr%20AND%20PA:(teva%20pharmaceutical)&maxRec=677#H3

PATENT

http://www.google.bg/patents/WO2013086425A1?cl=en&hl=bg

Preparation of pridopidine HBr

In order to prepare 33 g of pridopidine HBr, 28.5 g of free base was dissolved in 150 ml 99% ethanol at room temperature. 1 .5 equivalents of hydrobromic acid 48% were added. Precipitation occurred spontaneously, and the suspension was left in refrigerator for 2.5 hours. Then the crystals were filtered, followed by washing with 99% ethanol and ether. The crystals were dried over night under vacuum at 40°C: m.p. 196°C. The results of a CHN analysis are presented in Table 2, below.

NMR 1 H NMR (DMSO-d6): 0.93 ( 3H, t), 1 .68-1 .80 ( 2H, m), 1 .99-2.10 ( 4H, m) 2.97-3.14 (5H, m), 3.24 ( 3H, s), 3.57-3.65 ( 2H, d), 7.60-7.68 (2H, m), 7.78-7.86 ( 2H, m) and 9.41 ppm (1 H, bs).

Plinabulin


Plinabulin.svg

Plinabulin

  • Molecular FormulaC19H20N4O2
  • Average mass336.388 Da
(3Z,6Z)-3-Benzylidène-6-{[4-(2-méthyl-2-propanyl)-1H-imidazol-5-yl]méthylène}-2,5-pipérazinedione
2,5-Piperazinedione, 3-[[5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-imidazol-4-yl]methylene]-6-(phenylmethylene)-, (3Z,6Z)-
CAS 714272-27-2
NPI 2358
NPI-2358; NPI 2358
UNII:986FY7F8XR
Phase 3 Clinical

Tubulin antagonist

Cancer; Febrile neutropenia; Non-small-cell lung cancer

Plinabulin (chemical structure, BPI-2358, formerly NPI-2358) is a small molecule under development by BeyondSpring Pharmaceuticals, and is in a world-wide Phase 3 clinical trial for non-small cell lung cancer. [1] Plinabulin blocks the polymerization of tubulin in a unique manner, resulting in multi-factorial effects including an enhanced immune-oncology response, [2] activation of the JNK pathway [3] and disruption of the tumor blood supply. Plinabulin is being investigated for the reduction of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia [4] and for anti-cancer effects in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors [5] [6] and in KRAS mutated tumors. [7]

ChemSpider 2D Image | Plinabulin | C19H20N4O2

Plinabulin is a synthetic analog of diketopiperazine phenylahistin (halimide) discovered from marine and terrestrial Aspergillus sp. Plinabulin is structurally different from colchicine and its combretastatin-like analogs (eg, fosbretabulin) and binds at or near the colchicine binding site on tubulin monomers. Previous studies showed that plinabulin induced vascular endothelial cell tubulin depolymerization and monolayer permeability at low concentrations compared with colchicine and that it induced apoptosis in Jurkat leukemia cells. Studies of plinabulin as a single agent in patients with advanced malignancies (lung, prostate, and colon cancers) showed a favorable pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamics, and safety profile.

Beyondspring, under license from Nereus (now Triphase, which licensed the program from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography of the University of California San Diego), is developing plinabulin, the lead in the NPI-2350 halimide series of marine Aspergillus-derived, vascular-targeting antimicrotubule agents, for treating cancer, primarily non-small cell lung cancer.

Image result for BeyondSpring Pharmaceuticals

It is thought that a single, universal cellular mechanism controls the regulation of the eukaryotic cell cycle process. See, e.g., Hartwpll, L.H. et al., Science (1989), 246: 629-34. It is also known that when an abnormality arises in the control mechanism of the cell cycle, cancer or an immune disorder may occur. Accordingly, as is also known, antitumor agents and immune suppressors may be among the substances that regulate the cell cycle. Thus, new methods for producing eukaryotic cell cycle inhibitors are needed as antitumor and immune-enhancing compounds, and should be useful in the treatment of human cancer as chemotherapeutic, anti-tumor agents. See, e.g., Roberge, M. et al., Cancer Res. (1994), 54, 6115-21.

Fungi, especially pathogenic fungi and related infections, represent an increasing clinical challenge. Existing antifungal agents are of limited efficacy and toxicity, and the development and/or discovery of strains of pathogenic fungi that are resistant to drags currently available or under development. By way of example, fungi that are pathogenic in humans include among others Candida spp. including C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. keƒyr, C. krusei and C. galbrata; Aspergillus spp. including A. fumigatus and A. flavus; Cryptococcus neoƒormans; Blastomyces spp. including Blastomyces dermatitidis; Pneumocystis carinii; Coccidioides immitis; Basidiobolus ranarum; Conidiobolus spp.; Histoplasma capsulatum; Rhizopus spp. including R. oryzae and R. microsporus; Cunninghamella spp.; Rhizomucor spp.; Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; Pseudallescheria boydii; Rhinosporidium seeberi; and Sporothrix schenckii (Kwon-Chung, K.J. & Bennett, J.E. 1992 Medical Mycology, Lea and Febiger, Malvern, PA).

Recently, it has been reported that tryprostatins A and B (which are diketopiperazines consisting of proline and isoprenylated tryptophan residues), and five other structurally-related diketopiperazines, inhibited cell cycle progression in the M phase, see Cui, C. et al., 1996 J Antibiotics 49:527-33; Cui, C. et al. 1996 J Antibiotics 49:534-40, and that these compounds also affect the microtubule assembly, see Usui, T. et al. 1998 Biochem J 333:543-48; Kondon, M. et al. 1998 J Antibiotics 51:801-04. Furthermore, natural and synthetic compounds have been reported to inhibit mitosis, thus inhibit the eukaryotic cell cycle, by binding to the colchicine binding-site (CLC-site) on tubulin, which is a macromolecule that consists of two 50 kDa subunits (α- and β-tubulin) and is the major constituent of microtubules. See, e.g., Iwasaki, S., 1993 Med Res Rev 13:183-198; Hamel, E. 1996 Med Res Rev 16:207-31; Weisenberg, R.C. et al., 1969 Biochemistry 7:4466-79. Microtubules are thought to be involved in several essential cell functions, such as axonal transport, cell motility and determination of cell morphology. Therefore, inhibitors of microtubule function may have broad biological activity, and be applicable to medicinal and agrochemical purposes. It is also possible that colchicine (CLC)-site ligands such as CLC, steganacin, see Kupchan, S.M. et al., 1973 J Am Chem Soc 95:1335-36, podophyllotoxin, see Sackett, D.L., 1993 Pharmacol Ther 59:163-228, and combretastatins, see Pettit, G.R. et al., 1995 J Med Chem 38:166-67, may prove to be valuable as eukaryotic cell cycle inhibitors and, thus, may be useful as chemotherapeutic agents.

Although diketopiperazine-type metabolites have been isolated from various fungi as mycotoxins, see Horak R.M. et al., 1981 JCS Chem Comm 1265-67; Ali M. et al., 1898 Toxicology Letters 48:235-41, or as secondary metabolites, see Smedsgaard J. et al., 1996 J Microbiol Meth 25:5-17, little is known about the specific structure of the diketopiperazine-type metabolites or their derivatives and their antitumor activity, particularly in vivo. Not only have these compounds been isolated as mycotoxins, the chemical synthesis of one type of diketopiperazine-type metabolite, phenylahistin, has been described by Hayashi et al. in J. Org. Chem. (2000) 65, page 8402. In the art, one such diketopiperazine-type metabolite derivative, dehydrophenylahistin, has been prepared by enzymatic dehydrogenation of its parent phenylahistin. With the incidences of cancer on the rise, there exists a particular need for chemically producing a class of substantially purified diketopiperazine-type metabolite-derivatives having animal cell-specific proliferation-inhibiting activity and high antitumor activity and selectivity. There is therefore a particular need for an efficient method of synthetically producing substantially purified, and structurally and biologically characterized, diketopiperazine-type metabolite-derivatives.

Also, PCT Publication WO/0153290 (July 26, 2001) describes a non-synthetic method of producing dehydrophenylahistin by exposing phenylahistin or a particular phenylahistin analog to a dehydrogenase obtained from Streptomyces albulus.

Synthesis

Image result for Plinabulin

Image result for (S)-(-)-phenylahistin

PATENT

WO2001053290,

WO 2004054498

PATENT

WO 2005077940

The imidazolecarboxaldehyde may be prepared, for example, according the procedure disclosed in Hayashi et al., 2000 J Organic Chem 65: 8402 as depicted below:

EXAMPLE 2

Synthesis and Physical Characterization of tBu-dehydrophenylahistin Derivatives

[0207] Structural derivatives of dehydrophenylahistin were synthesized according to the following reaction schemes to produce tBu-dehydrophenylahistin. Synthesis by Route

A (see Figure 1) is similar in certain respects to the synthesis of the dehydrophenylahistin synthesized as in Example 1.

Route A:

[0208] N,N’-diacethyl-2,5-piperazinedione 1 was prepared as in Example 1.

1) 1-Acetyl-3-{(Z)-1-[5-tert-butyl-1H-4-imidazolyl]methylidene}]-2,5-piperazinedione (16)

. [0209] To a solution of 5-tert-butylimidazole-4-carboxaldehyde 15 (3.02 g, 19.8. mmol) in DMF (30 mL) was added compound 1 (5.89 g, 29.72 mmol) and the solution was repeatedly evacuated in a short time to remove oxygen and flushed with Ar, followed by the addition of Cs2CO3 (9.7 g, 29.72 mmol) and the evacuation-flushing process was repeated again. The resultant mixture was stirred for 5 h at room temperature. After the solvent was removed by evaporation, the residue was dissolved in the mixture of EtOAc and 10% Na2CO3, and the organic phase was washed with 10% Na2CO3 again and saturated NaCl for three times, dried over Na2SO4 and concentrated in vacuo. The residual oil was purified by column chromatography on silica using CHCl3-MeOH (100:0 to 50:1) as an eluant to give 1.90 g (33 %) of a pale yellow solid 16. 1H NMR (270 MHz, CDCl3) δ 12.14 (d, br-s, 1H), 9.22 (br-s, 1H), 7.57 (s, 1H), 7.18, (s, 1H), 4.47 (s, 2H), 2.65 (s, 3H), 1.47 (s, 9H).

2) t-Bu-dehydrophenylahistin

[0210] To a solution of 1-Acetyl-3-{(Z)-1-[5-tert-butyl-1H-4-imidazolyl]methylidene}]-2,5-piperazinedione (16) (11 mg, 0.038 mmol) in DMF (1.0 mL) was added benzaldehyde (19 μL, 0.19 mmol, 5 eq) and the solution was repeatedly evacuated in a short time to remove oxygen and flushed with Ar, followed by the addition of Cs2CO3 (43 mg, 0.132 mmol, 3.5 eq) and the evacuation-flushing process was repeated again. The resultant mixture was heated for 2.5 h at 80°C. After the solvent was removed by

evaporation, the residue was dissolved in EtOAc, washed with water for two times and saturated NaCl for three times, dried over Na2SO4 and concentrated in vacuo. The resulting residue was dissolved in 90% MeOH aq and applied to reverse-phase HPLC column (YMC-Pack, ODS-AM, 20 × 250 mm) and eluted using a linear gradient from 70 to 74% MeOH in water over 16 min at a flow rate of 12 mL/min, and the desired fraction was collected and concentrated by evaporation to give a 6.4 mg (50%) of yellow colored tert-butyl-dehydrophenylahistin. 1H NMR (270 MHz, CDCl3) δ 12.34 br-s, 1H), 9.18 (br-s, 1H), 8.09 (s, 1H), 7.59 (s, 1H), 7.31 – 7.49 (m, 5H), 7.01 s, 2H), 1.46 (s, 9H).

[0211] The dehydrophenylahistin reaction to produce tBu-dehydrophenylahistin is identical to Example 1.

[0212] The total yield of the tBu-dehydrophenylahistin recovered was 16.5%. Route B:

[0213] N,N’-diacethyl-2,5-piperazinedione 1 was prepared as in Example 1.

1) 1-Acetyl-3-[(Z)-benzylidenel]-2,5-piperazinedione (17)

[0214] To a solution of benzaldehyde 4 (0.54 g, 5.05. mmol) in DMF (5 mL) was added compound 1 (2.0 g, 10.1 mmol) and the solution was repeatedly evacuated in a short time to remove oxygen and flushed with Ar, followed by the addition of Cs2CO3 (1.65 g, 5.05 mmol) and the evacuation-flushing process was repeated again. The resultant mixture was stirred for 3.5 h at room temperature. After the solvent was removed by evaporation, the residue was dissolved in the mixture of EtOAc and 10% Na2CO3, and the organic phase was washed with 10% Na2CO3 again and saturated NaCl for three times, dried over Na2SO4 and concentrated in vacuo. The residual solid was recrystalized from MeOH-ether to obtain a off-white solid of 17; yield 1.95 g (79%).

2) t-Bu-dehydrophenylahistin

[0215] To a solution of 1-Acetyl-3-[(Z)-benzylidenel]-2,5-piperazinedione (17) (48 mg, 0.197 mmol) in DMF (1.0 mL) was added 5-tert-butylimidazole-4-carboxaldehyde 15 (30 mg, 0.197 mmol) and the solution was repeatedly evacuated in a short time to remove oxygen and flushed with Ar, followed by the addition of Cs2CO3 (96 mg, 0.296 mmol) and the evacuation-flushing process was repeated again. The resultant mixture was heated for 14 h at 80°C. After the solvent was removed by evaporation, the residue was dissolved in EtOAc, washed with water for two times and saturated NaCl for three times, dried over Na2SO4 and concentrated in vacuo. The resulting residue was dissolved in 90% MeOH aq and applied to reverse-phase HPLC column (YMC-Pack, ODS-AM, 20 x 250 mm) and eluted using a linear gradient from 70 to 74% MeOH in water over 16 min at a flow rate of 12 mL/min, and the desired fraction was collected and concentrated by evaporation to give a 0.8 mg (1.2%) of yellow colored tert-butyl-dehydrophenylahistin.

[0216] The total yield of the tBu-dehydrophenylahistin recovered was 0.9%.

[0217] The HPLC profile of the crude synthetic tBu-dehyrophenylahistin from Route A and from Route B is depicted in Figure 4.

[0218] Two other tBu-dehydrophenylahistin derivatives were synthesized according to the method of Route A. In the synthesis of the additional tBu-dehydrophenylahistin derivatives, modifications to the benzaldehyde compound 4 were made.

[0219] Figure 4 illustrates the similarities of the HPLC profiles (Column: YMC-Pack ODS-AM (20 × 250mm); Gradient: 65% to 75% in a methanol-water system for 20 min, then 10 min in a 100% methanol system; Flow rate: 12mL/min; O.D. 230 nm) from the synthesized dehydrophenylahistin of Example 1 (Fig 2) and the above exemplified tBu-dehydrophenylahistin compound produced by Route A.

[0220] The sequence of introduction of the aldehydes is a relevant to the yield and is therefore aspect of the synthesis. An analogue of dehydrophenylahistin was synthesized, as a confrol or model, wherein the dimethylallyl group was changed to the tert-butyl group with a similar steric hindrance at the 5-position of the imidazole ring.

[0221] The synthesis of this “tert-butyl (tBu)-dehydrophenylahistin” using “Route A” was as shown above: Particularly, the sequence of infroduction of the aldehyde exactly follows the dehydrophenylahistin synthesis, and exhibited a total yield of 16.5% tBu-dehydrophenylahistin. This yield was similar to that of dehydrophenylahistin (20%). Using “Route B”, where the sequence of introduction of the aldehydes is opposite that of Route “A” for the dehydrophenylahistin synthesis, only a trace amount of the desired tBu-dehydroPLH was obtained with a total yield of 0.9%, although in the introduction of first benzaldehyde 4 gave a 76% yield of the intermediate compound 17. This result indicated that it may be difficult to introduce the highly bulky imidazole-4-carboxaldehydes 15 with a substituting group having a quaternary-carbon on the adjacent 5-position at the imidazole ring into the intermediate compound 17, suggesting that the sequence for introduction of aldehydes is an important aspect for obtaining a high yield of dehydrophenylahistin or an analog of dehydrophenylahistin employing the synthesis disclosed herein:

[0222] From the HPLC analysis of the final crude products, as shown in Figure 4, a very high content of tBu-dehydrophenylahistin and small amount of by-product formations were observed in the crude sample of Route A (left). However, a relatively smaller amount of the desired tBu-dehydrophenylahistin and several other by-products were observed in the sample obtained using Route B (right).

Synthesis oƒ 3-Z-Benzylidene-6-(5″-tert-butyl-1H-imidazol-4″-Z-ylmethylene)-piperazine-2,5-dione (2)

Reagents: g) SO2Cl2; h) H2NCHO, H2O; I)LiAlH4; j) MnO2; k) 1,4-diacetyl-piperazine-2,5-dione, Cs2CO3; 1) benzaldehyde, Cs2CO3

2-Chloro-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxo-pentanoic acid ethyl ester

[0280] Sulfuryl chloride (14.0 ml, 0.17 mol) was added to a cooled (0°) solution of ethyl pivaloylacetate (27.17 g, 0.16 mol) in chloroform (100 ml). The resulting mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature and was stirred for 30 min, after which it was heated under reflux for 2.5 h. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was diluted with chloroform, then washed with sodium bicarbonate, water then brine.

[0281] The organic phase was dried and evaporated to afford, as a clear oil, 2-chloro-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxo-pentanoic acid ethyl ester (33.1 g, 102%). (Durant et al., “Aminoalkylimidazoles and Process for their Production.” Patent No. GB1341375 (Great Britain, 1973)).

[0282] HPLC (214nm) tR = 8.80 (92.9%) min.

[0283] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 1.27 (s, 9H); 1.29 (t, J= 7.2 Hz, 3H); 4.27

(q, J= 7.2 Hz, 2H); 5.22 (s, 1H).

[0284] 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 13.8, 26.3, 45.1, 54.5, 62.9, 165.1, 203.6.

5-tert-Butyl-3H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester

[0285] A solution of 2-chloro-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxo-pentanoic acid ethyl ester (25.0 g, 0.12 mol) in formamide (47.5 ml) and water (2.5 ml) was shaken, then dispensed into 15 x 8 ml vials. All vials were sealed and then heated at 150° for 3.5 h. The vials were allowed to cool to room temperature, then water (20 ml) was added and the mixture was exhaustively extracted with chloroform. The chloroform was removed to give a concentrated formamide solution (22.2 g) which was added to a flash silica column (6 cm diameter, 12 cm height) packed in 1% MeOH/1% Et3N in chloroform. Elution of the column with 2.5 L of this mixture followed by 1 L of 2% MeOH/1% Et3N in chloroform gave, in the early fractions, a product suspected of being 5-tert-butyl-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (6.3 g, 26%).

[0286] HPLC (214nm) tR = 8.77 min.

[0287] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 1.41 (t, J= 7.2 Hz, 3H); 1.43 (s, 9H); 4.40

(q, J= 7.2 Hz, 2H); 7.81 (s, 1H).

[0288] 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 14.1, 28.8, 32.5, 61.3, 136.9, 149.9, 156.4,

158.3.

[0289] ESMS m/z 198.3 [M+H]+, 239.3 [M+CH4CN]+.

[0290] LC/MS tR = 7.97 (198.1 [M+H]+) min.

[0291] Recovered from later fractions was 5-tert-butyl-3H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (6.20 g, 26%). (Durant et al., “Aminoalkylimidazoles and Process for their Production.” Patent No. GB 1341375 (Great Britain, 1973)).

[0292] HPLC (214nm) tR = 5.41 (93.7%) min.

[0293] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 1.38 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 3H); 1.47 (s, 9H); 4.36

(q, J= 7.2 Hz, 2H); 7.54 (s, 1H).

[0294] 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 13 7, 28.8, 32.0, 59.8, 124.2, 133.3, 149.2,

162.6.

[0295] ESMS m/z 197.3 [M+H]+, 238.3 [M+CH4CN]+.

[0296] Further elution of the column with 1L of 5% MeOh/1% Et3N gave a compound suspected of being 5-tert-butyl-3H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid (0.50 g, 2%).

[0297] HPLC (245nm) tR = 4.68 (83.1%) min.

[0298] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 1.36 (s, 9H); 7.69 (s, 1H).

[0299] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 1.37 (s, 9H); 7.74 (s, 1H).

[0300] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3SO) δ 1.28 (s, 9H); 7.68 (s, 1H).

[0301] ESMS m/z 169.2 [M+H]+, 210.4 [M+CH4CN]+.

(5-tert-Butyl-3H-imidazol-4-yl)-methanol

[0302] A solution of 5-tert-butyl-3-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (3.30 g, 16.8 mmol) in THF (60 ml) was added dropwise to a suspension of lithium aluminium hydride (95% suspension, 0.89 g, 22.2 mmol) in THF (40 ml) and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 3 h. Water was added until the evolution of gas ceased, the mixture was stirred for 10 min, then was filtered through a sintered funnel. The precipitate was washed with THF, then with methanol, the filtrate and washings were combined and evaporated. The residue was freeze-dried overnight to afford, as a white solid (5-tert-butyl- 3H-imidazol-4-yl)-methanol (2.71 g, 105%). (Durant et al., “Aminoalkylimidazoles and Process for their Production.” Patent No. GB1341375 (Great Britain, 1973)).

[0303] HPLC (240nm) tR = 3.70 (67.4%) min.

[0304] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 1 36 (s, 9H). 4 62 (s, 2H); 7.43 (s, 1H).

[0305] 13C NMR (100 MHz, CD3OD) δ 31.1, 33.0, 57.9, 131.4, 133.9, 140.8.

[0306] LC/MS tR = 3.41 (155.2 [M+H]+) min.

[0307] This material was used without further purification.

5-tert-Butyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde

[0308] Manganese dioxide (30 g, 0.35 mol) was added to a heterogeneous solution of (5-tert-butyl-3H-imidazol-4-yl)-methanol (4.97 g, 0.03 mol) in acetone (700 ml) and the resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature for 4 h. The mixture was filtered through a pad of Celite and the pad was washed with acetone. The filfrate and washings were combined and evaporated. The residue was triturated with ether to afford, as a colorless solid, 5-tert-butyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde (2.50 g, 51%). (Hayashi, Personal Communication (2000)).

[0309] HPLC (240nm) tR = 3.71 (89.3%) min.

[0310] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 1.48 (s, 9H); 7.67 (s, 1H); 10.06 (s, 1H).

[0311] LC/MS tR = 3.38 (153.2 [M+H]+) min.

[0312] Evaporation of the filtrate from the trituration gave additional 5-tert-butyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde (1.88 g, 38%).

1-Acetyl-3-(5′-tert-butyl-1H-imdazol-4′-Z-ylmethylene)-piperazine-2,5-dione

[0313] To a solution of 5-tert-butyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde (2.50 g, 164.4 mmol) in DMF (50 ml) was added 1,4-diacetyl-piperazine-2,5-dione (6.50 g, 32.8 mmol) and the solution was evacuated, then flushed with argon. The evacuation-flushing process was repeated a further two times, then cesium carbonate (5.35 g, 16.4 mmol) was added. The evacuation-flushing process was repeated a further three times, then the resultant mixture was stirred at room temperature for 5 h. The reaction mixture was partially evaporated (heat and high vacuum) until a small volume remained and the resultant solution was added dropwise to water (100 ml). The yellow precipitate was collected, then freeze-dried to afford 1-acetyl-3-(5′-tert-butyl-1Η-imidazol-4′-Z-ylmethylene)-piperazine-2,5-dione (2.24 g, 47%). (Hayashi, Personal Communication (2000)).

[0314] HPLC (214nm) tR = 5.54 (94.4%) min.

[0315] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 1.47 (s, 9H); 2.65 (s, 3H), 4.47 (s, 2H);

7.19 (s, 1H); 7.57 (s, 1H), 9.26 (s, 1H), 12.14 (s, 1H).

[0316] 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCI3+CD3OD) δ 27.3, 30.8, 32.1, 46.5, 110.0,

123.2, 131.4, 133.2, 141.7, 160.7, 162.8, 173.0

[0317] LC/MS tR = 5.16 (291.2 [M+H]+, 581.6 [2M+H]+) min.

3-Z-Benzylidene-6-(5″-tert-butyl-lH-imidazol-4″-Z-ylmethylene)-piperazine-2,5-dione

[0318] To a solution of 1-acetyl-3-(5′-tert-butyl-1H-imidazol-4′-Z-ylmethylene)-piperazine-2,5-dione (2.43 g, 8.37 mmol) in DMF (55 ml) was added benzaldehyde (4.26 ml, 41.9 mmol) and the solution was evacuated, then flushed with nitrogen. The evacuation-

flushing process was repeated a further two times, then cesium carbonate (4.09 g, 12.6 mmol) was added. The evacuation-flushing process was repeated a further three times, then the resultant mixture was heated under the temperature gradient as shown below. After a total time of 5 h the reaction was allowed to cool to room temperature and the mixture was added to ice-cold water (400 ml). The precipitate was collected, washed with water, then freeze-dried to afford a yellow solid (2.57 g, HPLC (214nm) tR = 6.83 (83.1%) min.). This material was dissolved in chloroform (100 ml) and evaporated to azeofrope remaining water, resulting in a brown oil. This was dissolved in chloroform (20 ml) and cooled in ice. After 90 min the yellow precipitate was collected and air-dried to afford 3-Z-benzylidene-6-(5″-tert-butyl-1H-imidazol-4″-Z-ylmethylene)-piperazine-2,5-dione (1.59 g, 56%). (Hayashi, Personal Communication (2000)).

[0319] HPLC (214nm) tR = 6.38 (2.1%), 6.80 (95.2) min.

[0320] 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 1.46 (s, pH). 7 01 (s, 1H, -C-C=CH); 7.03

(s, 1H, -C-C=CH); 7.30-7.50 (m, 5H, Ar); 7.60 (s, 1H); 8.09 (bs, NH); 9.51 (bs, NH); 12.40 (bs, NH).

[0321] LC/MS tR = 5.84 (337.4 [M+H]+, E isomer), 6.25 (337.4 [M+H]+, 673.4 [2M+H]+, Z isomer) min.

[0322] ESMS m/z 337.3 [M+H]+, 378.1 [M+OLGNT.

[0323] Evaporation of the chloroform solution gave additional 3-Z-benzylidene-6-(5″-tert-butyl-1H-imidazol-4″-Z-ylmethylene)-piperazine-2,5-dione (0.82 g, 29%). ΗPLC (214nm) tR = 6.82 (70.6%) min.

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2012), 55(3), 1056-1071

Abstract Image

Plinabulin (11, NPI-2358) is a potent microtubule-targeting agent derived from the natural diketopiperazine “phenylahistin” (1) with a colchicine-like tubulin depolymerization activity. Compound 11 was recently developed as VDA and is now under phase II clinical trials as an anticancer drug. To develop more potent antimicrotubule and cytotoxic derivatives based on the didehydro-DKP skeleton, we performed further modification on the tert-butyl or phenyl groups of 11, and evaluated their cytotoxic and tubulin-binding activities. In the SAR study, we developed more potent derivatives 33 with 2,5-difluorophenyl and 50 with a benzophenone in place of the phenyl group. The anti-HuVEC activity of 33 and 50 exhibited a lowest effective concentration of 2 and 1 nM for microtubule depolymerization, respectively. The values of 33 and 50 were 5 and 10 times more potent than that of CA-4, respectively. These derivatives could be a valuable second-generation derivative with both vascular disrupting and cytotoxic activities.

Synthesis and Structure–Activity Relationship Study of Antimicrotubule Agents Phenylahistin Derivatives with a Didehydropiperazine-2,5-dione Structure

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392, Japan
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Center for Frontier Research in Medicinal Science, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto 607-8412, Japan
§Nereus Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, California 92121, United States
Department of Analytical and Bioinorganic Chemistry, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto 607-8414, Japan
Laboratory of Comparative Agricultural Science, Division of Environmental Science and Technology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
# Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572, Japan
Marine Biotechnology Institute Co., Ltd., Kamaishi, Iwate 026-0001, Japan
J. Med. Chem., 2012, 55 (3), pp 1056–1071
DOI: 10.1021/jm2009088
*Tel/fax: +81-42-676-3275. E-mail: yhayashi@toyaku.ac.jp.
3-{(Z)-1-[5-(tert-Butyl)-1H-4-imidazolyl]methylidene}-6-[(Z)-1-phenylmethylidene]-2,5-piperazinedione
Compound 11 as a yellow solid: yield 81%;
mp 160–162 °C (dec);
IR (KBr, cm–1) 3500, 3459, 3390, 3117, 3078, 2963, 2904, 1673, 1636, 1601, 1413, 1371, 1345;
1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 12.26 (s, 2H), 10.16 (br s, 1H), 7.86 (s, 1H), 7.53 (d, J = 7.4 Hz, 2H), 7.42 (t, J = 7.5 Hz 2H), 7.32 (t, J = 7.4 Hz, 1H), 6.86 (s, 1H), 6.75 (s, 1H), 1.38 (s, 9H);
13C NMR (150 MHz, DMSO-d6) 157.2, 156.4, 145.3, 137.4, 134.5, 133.1, 129.1, 128.6, 127.9, 126.4, 113.9, 112.0, 104.5, 37.4, 27.7;
HRMS (EI) m/z 336.1591 (M+) (calcd for C19H20N4O2 336.1586).
Anal. (C19H20N4O2·0.25H2O·CF3COOH) C, H, N. HPLC (method 1) 99.4% (tR = 18.87 min).
str1 str2

PAPER

Chemistry – A European Journal (2011), 17(45), 12587-12590, S12587/1-S12587/13

Abstract

original image

Click for improved solubility: A water-soluble prodrug of plinabulin was designed and synthesized efficiently by using click chemistry in three steps (see scheme). The product was highly water-soluble, and the parent compound could be regenerated by esterase hydrolysis.

PATENT

WO2017011399,  PLINABULIN COMPOSITIONS

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017011399&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

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  3.  Singh, A.V.; Bandi, M.; Raje, N.; Richardson, P.; Palladino, M.A.; Chauhan, D.; Anderson, K. (2011). “A Novel Vascular Disrupting Agent Plinabulin Triggers JNK-Mediated Apoptosis and Inhibits Angiogenesis in Multiple Myeloma Cells”. Blood. 117 (21): 5692–5700.
  4.  Heist, R.S.; Aren, O.R.; Mita, A.C.; Polikoff, J.; Bazhenova, L.; Lloyd, G.K.; Mikrut, W.; Reich, W.; Spear, M.A.; Huang, L. (2014), Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Plinabulin (NPI-2358) Plus Docetaxel in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Lung Cancer (NSCLC) (abstr 8054)
  5.  “Nivolumab and Plinabulin in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB-IV, Recurrent, or Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer”.
  6.  “Nivolumab in Combination With Plinabulin in Patients With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)”.
  7.  Lloyd, G.K.; Du, L.; Lee, G.; Dalsing-Hernandez, J.; Kotlarczyk, K.; Gonzalez, K.; Nawrocki, S.; Carew, J.; Huang, L. (October 5–9, 2015), Activity of Plinabulin in Tumor Models with Kras Mutations (Philadelphia (PA) AACR 2015 Abstract nr. 184), Boston MA
Plinabulin
Plinabulin.svg
Names
IUPAC name

(3Z,6Z)-3-Benzylidene-6-{[5-(2-methyl-2-propanyl)-1H-imidazol-4-yl]methylene}-2,5-piperazinedione
Identifiers
714272-27-2 Yes
3D model (Jmol) Interactive image
ChemSpider 8125252
PubChem 9949641
Properties
C19H20N4O2
Molar mass 336.40 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

////////////Plinabulin, Phase 3,  Clinical, 714272-27-2, NPI 2358, Nereus,  (S)-(-)-phenylahistin,  NPI-2350,  (-)-phenylahistin,  KPU-2, KPU-02, KPU-35

O=C3N\C(=C/c1ncnc1C(C)(C)C)C(=O)N/C3=C\c2ccccc2

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