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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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Reldesemtiv


Reldesemtiv.png

Image result for Reldesemtiv

Reldesemtiv

CK-2127107

CAS 1345410-31-2

UNII-4S0HBYW6QE, 4S0HBYW6QE

MW 384.4 g/mol, MF C19H18F2N6O

1-[2-({[trans-3-fluoro-1-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl]methyl}amino)pyrimidin-5-yl]-1H-pyrrole-3- carboxamide

1-[2-[[3-fluoro-1-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl]methylamino]pyrimidin-5-yl]pyrrole-3-carboxamide

Reldesemtiv, also known as CK-2127107, is a skeletal muscle troponin activator (FSTA) and is a potential treatment for people living with debilitating diseases and conditions associated with neuromuscular or non-neuromuscular dysfunction, muscular weakness, and/or muscle fatigue such as SMA, COPD, and ALS.

Cytokinetics , in collaboration with  Astellas , is developing reldesemtiv, the lead from a program of selective fast skeletal muscle troponin activators, in an oral suspension formulation, for the treatment of indications associated with neuromuscular dysfunction, including spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  • Originator Cytokinetics
  • Developer Astellas Pharma; Cytokinetics
  • Class Pyridines; Pyrimidines; Pyrroles; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Troponin stimulants
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Spinal muscular atrophy
  • Phase II Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Spinal muscular atrophy
  • Suspended Muscle fatigue
  • No development reported Muscular atrophy
  • 05 May 2019 Safety and efficacy data from the phase II FORTITUDE-ALS trial in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis presented at the American Academy of Neurology Annual Meeting (AAN-2019)
  • 07 Mar 2019 Cytokinetics completes the phase III FORTITUDE-ALS trial for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in USA, Australia, Canada, Spain, Ireland and Netherlands (PO) (NCT03160898)
  • 22 Jan 2019 Cytokinetics plans a phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in the first quarter of 2019

Reldesemtiv, a next-generation, orally-available, highly specific small-molecule is being developed by Cytokinetics, in collaboration with Astellas Pharma, for the improvement of skeletal muscle function associated with neuromuscular dysfunction, muscle weakness and/or muscle fatigue in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The drug candidate is a fast skeletal muscle troponin activator (FSTA) or troponin stimulant intended to slow the rate of calcium release from the regulatory troponin complex of fast skeletal muscle fibers. Clinical development for ALS, COPD and SMA is underway in the US, Australia, Canada, Ireland, Netherlands and Spain. No recent reports of development had been identified for phase I development for muscular atrophy in the US. Due to lack of of efficacy determined at interim analysis Cytokinetics suspended phase I trial in muscle fatigue in the elderly.

The cytoskeleton of skeletal and cardiac muscle cells is unique compared to that of all other cells. It consists of a nearly crystalline array of closely packed cytoskeletal proteins called the sarcomere. The sarcomere is elegantly organized as an interdigitating array of thin and thick filaments. The thick filaments are composed of myosin, the motor protein responsible for transducing the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into force and directed movement. The thin filaments are composed of actin monomers arranged in a helical array. There are four regulatory proteins bound to the actin filaments, which allows the contraction to be modulated by calcium ions. An influx of intracellular calcium initiates muscle contraction; thick and thin filaments slide past each other driven by repetitive interactions of the myosin motor domains with the thin actin filaments.

[0003] Of the thirteen distinct classes of myosin in human cells, the myosin-II class is responsible for contraction of skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle. This class of myosin is significantly different in amino acid composition and in overall structure from myosin in the other twelve distinct classes. Myosin-II forms homo-dimers resulting in two globular head domains linked together by a long alpha-helical coiled-coiled tail to form the core of the sarcomere’s thick filament. The globular heads have a catalytic domain where the actin binding and ATPase functions of myosin take place. Once bound to an actin filament, the release of phosphate (cf. ADP-Pi to ADP) signals a change in structural conformation of the catalytic domain that in turn alters the orientation of the light-chain binding lever arm domain that extends from the globular head; this movement is termed the powerstroke. This change in orientation of the myosin head in relationship to actin causes the thick filament of which it is a part to move with respect to the thin actin filament to which it is bound. Un-binding of the globular head from the actin filament (Ca2+ regulated) coupled with return of the catalytic domain and light chain to their starting conformation/orientation completes the catalytic cycle, responsible for intracellular movement and muscle contraction.

Tropomyosin and troponin mediate the calcium effect on the interaction on actin and myosin. The troponin complex is comprised of three polypeptide chains: troponin C, which binds calcium ions; troponin I, which binds to actin; and troponin T, which binds to tropomyosin. The skeletal troponin-tropomyosin complex regulates the myosin binding sites extending over several actin units at once.

Troponin, a complex of the three polypeptides described above, is an accessory protein that is closely associated with actin filaments in vertebrate muscle. The troponin complex acts in conjunction with the muscle form of tropomyosin to mediate the

Ca2+ dependency of myosin ATPase activity and thereby regulate muscle contraction. The troponin polypeptides T, I, and C, are named for their tropomyosin binding, inhibitory, and calcium binding activities, respectively. Troponin T binds to tropomyosin and is believed to be responsible for positioning the troponin complex on the muscle thin filament. Troponin I binds to actin, and the complex formed by troponins I and T, and tropomyosin inhibits the interaction of actin and myosin. Skeletal troponin C is capable of binding up to four calcium molecules. Studies suggest that when the level of calcium in the muscle is raised, troponin C exposes a binding site for troponin I, recruiting it away from actin. This causes the tropomyosin molecule to shift its position as well, thereby exposing the myosin binding sites on actin and stimulating myosin ATPase activity.

U.S. Patent No. 8962632 discloses l-(2-((((trans)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl)amino)pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrole-3-carboxamide, a next-generation fast skeletal muscle troponin activator (FSTA) as a potential treatment for people living with debilitating diseases and conditions associated with neuromuscular or non-neuromuscular dysfunction, muscular weakness, and/or muscle fatigue.

PATENT

WO 2011133888

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2011133888&recNum=202&docAn=US2011033614&queryString=&maxRec=57668

PATENT

WO2016039367 ,

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016039367&tab=FULLTEXT

claiming the use of a similar compound for treating stress urinary incontinence.

Compound A is 1- [2-({[trans-3-fluoro-1- (3-fluoropyridin-2-yl) cyclobutyl] methyl} amino) pyrimidin-5-yl] -1H Pyrrole-3-carboxamide, which is the compound described in Example 14 of the aforementioned US Pat. The chemical structure is as shown below.
[Chemical formula 1]

PATENT

WO-2019133605

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019133605&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&_cid=P11-JXY4C3-99085-1

Process for preparing reldesemtiv , a myosin, actin, tropomyosin, troponin C, troponin I, troponin T modulator, useful for treating neuromuscular disorders, muscle wasting, claudication and metabolic syndrome.

Scheme 1

[0091] Scheme 1 illustrates a scheme of synthesizing the compound of Formula (1C).

Scheme 2

[0092] Scheme 2 illustrates an alternative scheme of synthesizing the compound of Formula (1C).

M

TFAA DS, toluene

Et

to


HCI, H20

50°C

Scheme 3

[0093] Scheme 3 illustrates a scheme of converting the compound of Formula (1C) to the compound of Formula (II).

H2

Ni Raney

NH3

Scheme 4

[0094] Scheme 4 illustrates a scheme of converting the compound of Formula (II) to the compound of Formula (1).

Examples

[0095] To a flask was added N-methylpyrrolidone (30 mL), tert-butyl cyanoacetate (8.08 g) at room temperature. To a resulting solution was added potassium tert-butoxide (7.71 g), l,3-dibromo-2,2-dimethoxy propane (5.00 g) at 0 °C. To another flask, potassium iodide (158 mg), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol (42 mg), N-methylpyrrolidone (25 mL) were added at room temperature and then resulting solution was heated to 165 °C. To this solution, previously prepared mixture was added dropwise at 140-165 °C, then stirred for 2 hours at 165 °C. To the reaction mixture, water (65 mL) was added. A resulting solution was extracted with toluene (40 mL, three times) and then combined organic layer was washed with water (20 mL, three times) and 1N NaOH aq. (20 mL). A resulting organic layer was concentrated below 50 °C under reduced pressure to give 3, 3 -dimethoxy cyclobutane- l-carbonitrile (66% yield,

GC assay) as toluene solution. 1H MR (CDCl3, 400 MHz) d 3.17 (s, 3H), 3.15 (s, 3H), 2.93-2.84 (m, 1H), 2.63-2.57 (m, 2H), 2.52-2.45 (m, 2H).

Example 2 Synthesis of methyl 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carboxylate

[0096] A reactor was vacuumed to 0.02 MPa and less and then inerted with nitrogen to atmosphere for three times. MeOH (339.00 kg), 3-oxocyclobutanecarboxylic acid (85.19 kg, 746.6 mol, 1.0 eq.), Amberlyst-l5 ion exchange resin (8.90 kg, 10% w/w), and

trimethoxymethane (196.00 kg, 1847.3 mol, 2.5 eq.) were charged into the reactor and the resulting mixture was heated to 55±5°C and reacted for 6 hours to give methyl 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carboxylate solution in MeOH. 1H NMR (CDCl3, 400 MHz) d 3.70 (s, 3H), 3.17 (s, 3H), 3.15 (s, 3H), 2.94-2.85 (m, 1H), 2.47-2.36 (m, 4H).

Example 3 Synthesis of 3, 3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l -carboxamide

[0097] The methyl 3, 3 -dimethoxy cyclobutane- l-carboxylate solution in MeOH prepared as described in Example 2 was cooled to below 25°C and centrifuged. The filter cake was washed with MeOH(7.00 kg) and the filtrate was pumped to the reactor. The solution was concentrated under vacuum below 55°C until the system had no more than 2 volumes. MeOH

(139.40 kg) was charged to the reactor and the solution was concentrated under vacuum below 55°C until the system had no more than 2 volumes. MeOH (130.00 kg) was charged to the reactor and the solution was concentrated under vacuum below 55°C until the system had no more than 2 volumes. Half of the resulting solution was diluted with MeOH (435.00 kg) and cooled to below 30°C. NH3 gas (133.80 kg) was injected into the reactor below 35°C for

24 hours. The mixture was stirred at 40±5°C for 72 hours. The resulting solution was

concentrated under vacuum below 50°C until the system had no more than 2 volumes.

MTBE(l8l.OO kg) was charged into the reactor. The resulting solution was concentrated under vacuum below 50°C until the system had no more than 2 volumes. PE (318.00 kg) was charged into the reactor. The resulting mixture was cooled to 5±5°C, stirred for 4 hours at 5±5°C, and centrifuged. The filter cake was washed with PE (42.00 kg) and the wet filter cake was put into a vacuum oven. The filter cake was dried at 30±5°C for at least 8 hours to give 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carboxamide as off-white solid (112.63 kg, 94.7% yield). 1H NMR (CDCf, 400 MHz) d 5.76 (bs, 1H), 5.64 (bs, 1H), 3.18 (s, 3H), 3.17 (s, 3H), 2.84-2.76 (m, 1H), 2.45-2.38 (m, 4H).

[0098] A reactor was vacuumed to 0.02 MPa and less and then inerted with nitrogen to atmosphere for three times. Toluene (500.00 kg), 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carboxamide (112.54kg, 706.9 mol, 1.0 eq.), and TEA (158.00 kg, 1561.3 mol, 2.20 eq) were charged into the reactor and the resulting mixture was cooled to 0+ 5°C. TFAA (164.00 kg, 781 mol, 1.10 eq.) was added dropwise at 0±5°C. The resulting mixture was stirred for 10 hours at 20±5°C and cooled below 5±5°C. H20 (110.00 kg) was charged into the reactor at below 15 °C. The resulting mixture was stirred for 30 minutes and the water phase was separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with toluene (190.00 kg) twice. The organic phases were combined and washed with H20 (111.00 kg). H20 was removed by azeotrope until the water content was no more than 0.03%. The resulting solution was cooled to below 20°C to give 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carbonitrile solution in toluene (492.00 kg with 17.83% assay content, 87.9% yield).

Example 5 Synthesis of l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carbonitrile

[0099] A reactor was vacuumed to 0.02 MPa and less and then inerted with nitrogen to atmosphere for three times. The 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carbonitrile solution in toluene prepared as described in Example 4 (246.00 kg of a 17.8% solution of 3,3-dimethoxycyclobutane-l-carbonitrile in toluene, 1.05 eq.) and 2-chloro-3-fluoropyridine (39.17 kg, 297.9 mol, 1.00 eq.) were charged into the reactor. The reactor was vacuumed to 0.02 MPa and less and then inerted with nitrogen to atmosphere for three times. The mixture was slowly cooled to -20±5°C. NaHDMS (2M in THF) (165.71 kg, 1.20 eq) was added

dropwise at -20±5°C. The resulting mixture was stirred at -l5±5°C for 1 hour. The mixture was stirred until the content of 2-chloro-3-fluoropyridine is no more than 2% as measured by HPLC. Soft water (16.00 kg) was added dropwise at below 0°C while maintaining the reactor temperature. The resulting solution was transferred to another reactor. Aq. NH4Cl (10% w/w, 88.60 Kg) was added dropwise at below 0°C while maintaining the reactor temperature. Soft water (112.00 kg) was charged into the reactor and the aqueous phase was separated and collected. The aqueous phase was extracted with ethyl acetate (70.00 kg) and an organic phase was collected. The organic phase was washed with sat. NaCl (106.00 kg) and collected. The above steps were repeated to obtain another batch of organic phase. The two batches of organic phase were concentrated under vacuum below 70°C until the system had no more than 2 volumes. The resulting solution was cooled to below 30°C to give a l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3, 3 -dimethoxy cyclobutane- l-carbonitrile solution. 1H NMR (CDC13, 400 MHz) d 8.42-8.38 (m, 1H), 7.50-7.45 (m, 1H), 7.38-7.33 (m, 1H), 3.28 (s, 3 H), 3.13 (s, 3H), 3.09-3.05 (m, 4H).

Example 6 Synthesis of I-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3-oxocyclohutanecarhonitrile

[0100] A reactor was vacuumed to 0.02 MPa and less and then inerted with nitrogen to atmosphere for three times. Water (603.00 kg) was added to the reactor and was stirred.

Concentrated HC1 (157.30 kg) was charged into the reactor at below 35°C. The l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3, 3 -dimethoxy cyclobutane- l-carbonitrile solution prepared as described in Example 5 (206.00 kg) was charged into the reactor and the resulting mixture was heated to 50±5°C and reacted for 3 hours at 50±5°C. The mixture was reacted until the content of 1-(3 -fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3, 3 -dimethoxycyclobutane- l-carbonitrile was no more than 2.0% as measured by HPLC. The reaction mixture was cooled to below 30°C and extracted with ethyl acetate (771.00 kg). An aqueous phase was collected and extracted with ethyl acetate (770.00 kg). The organic phases were combined and the combined organic phase was washed with soft water (290.00 kg) and brine (385.30 kg). The organic phase was concentrated under vacuum at below 60°C until the system had no more than 2 volumes. Propan-2-ol (218.00 kg) was charged into the reactor. The organic phase was concentrated under vacuum at below

60°C until the system had no more than 1 volume. PE (191.00 kg) was charged into the reactor at 40±5 °C and the resulting mixture was heated to 60±5 °C and stirred for 1 hour at 60±5 °C. The mixture was then slowly cooled to 5±5 °C and stirred for 5 hours at 5±5 °C. The mixture was centrifuged and the filter cake was washed with PE (48.00 kg) and the wet filter cake was collected. Water (80.00 kg), concentrated HC1 (2.20 kg), propan-2-ol (65.00 kg), and the wet filter cake were charged in this order into a drum. The resulting mixture was stirred for 10 minutes at 20±5 °C. The mixture was centrifuged and the filter cake was washed with a mixture solution containing 18.00 kg of propan-2-ol, 22.50 kg of soft water, and 0.60 kg of concentrated HC1. The filter cake was put into a vacuum oven and dried at 30±5°C for at least 10 hours. The filter cake was dried until the weight did not change to give l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3-oxocyclobutanecarbonitrile as off-white solid (77.15 kg, 68.0% yield). 1H NMR (CDCl3, 400 MHz) d 8.45-8.42 (m, 1H), 7.60-7.54 (m, 1H), 7.47-7.41 (m, 1H), 4.18-4.09 (m, 2H), 4.02-3.94 (m, 2H).

Example 7 Synthesis of I-(3-fhtoropyridin-2-yl)-3-hydroxycyclobulanecarbonilrile

[0101] To a solution of l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3-oxocyclobutanecarbonitrile (231 g,

1.22 mol) in a mixture ofDCM (2 L) and MeOH (200 mL) was added NaBH4 portionwise at -78° C. The reaction mixture was stirred at -78°C. for 1 hour and quenched with a mixture of methanol and water (1 : 1). The organic layer was washed with water (500 mL><3), dried over Na2S04, and concentrated. The residue was purified on silica gel (50% EtO Ac/hexanes) to provide the title compound as an amber oil (185.8 g, 77.5%). Low Resolution Mass

Spectrometry (LRMS) (M+H) m/z 193.2.

Example 8 Synthesis of (ls,3s)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutane-l-carbonitrile

[0102] To a solution of 1 -(3 -fluoropyridin-2-yl)-3 -hydroxy cyclobutanecarbonitrile (185 g, 0.96 mol) in DCM (1 L) was added DAST portionwise at 0-10 °C. Upon the completion of addition, the reaction was refluxed for 6 hours. The reaction was cooled to rt and poured onto sat. NaHCCf solution. The mixture was separated and the organic layer was washed with water, dried over Na2S04, and concentrated. The residue was purified on silica gel (100% DCM) to provide the title compound as a brown oil (116g) in a 8: 1 transxis mixture. The above brown oil (107 g) was dissolved in toluene (110 mL) and hexanes (330mL) at 70 °C. The solution was cooled to 0 °C and stirred at 0 °C overnight. The precipitate was filtered and washed with hexanes to provide the trans isomer as a white solid (87.3 g). LRMS (M+H) m/z 195.1.

Example 9 Synthesis of ((lr,3r)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methanamine

[0103] A mixture of ( 1.v,3.v)-3-fluoro- 1 -(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutane- 1 -carbonitrile (71 g, 0.37 mol) and Raney nickel (~7 g) in 7N ammonia in methanol (700 mL) was charged with hydrogen (60 psi) for 2 days. The reaction was filtered through a celite pad and washed with methanol. The filtrate was concentrated under high vacuum to provide the title compound as a light green oil (70 g, 97.6%). LRMS (M+H) m/z 199.2.

Example 10 Synthesis of t-butyl 5-bromopyrimidin-2-yl((trans-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl) carbamate

[0104] A mixture of ((lr,3r)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methanamine (37.6 g, 190 mmol), 5-bromo-2-fluoropyrimidine (32.0 g, 181 mmol), DIPEA (71 mL, 407 mmol), and NMP (200 mL) was stirred at rt overnight. The reaction mixture was then diluted with EtOAc (1500 mL) and washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate (500 mL). The

organic layer was separated, dried over Na2S04, and concentrated. The resultant solid was dissolved in THF (600 mL), followed by the slow addition of DMAP (14 g, 90 mmol) and Boc20 (117.3 g, 542 mmol). The reaction was heated to 60° C. and stirred for 3 h. The reaction mixture was then concentrated and purified by silica gel chromatography

(EtO Ac/hex) to give 59.7 g oft-butyl 5-bromopyrimidin-2-yl((trans-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl)carbamate as a white solid.

Example 11 Synthesis of t-butyl 5-(3-cyano- 1 H -pyrrol- 1 -yl)pyrimidin-2-yl(((lrans)-3-fhtoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclohutyl)methyl)carhamate

[0105] To a solution oft-butyl 5-bromopyrimidin-2-yl((trans-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl) carbamate (1.0 g, 2.8 mmol) in 15 mL of toluene (degassed with nitrogen) was added copper iodide (100 mg, 0.6 mmol), potassium phosphate (1.31 g, 6.2 mmol), trans-N,N’-dimethylcyclohexane-l, 2-diamine (320 mg, 2.2 mmol), and 3-cyanopyrrole (310 mg, 3.6 mmol). The reaction was heated to 100 °C and stirred for 2 h. The reaction was then concentrated and purified by silica gel chromatography (EtOAc/hexanes) to afford 1.1 g of t-butyl 5-(3-cyano-lH-pyrrol-l-yl)pyrimidin-2-yl(((trans)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl)carbamate as a clear oil.

Example 12 Synthesis of l-(2-((((trans)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl)amino)pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrole-3-carboxamide

[0106] To a solution oft-butyl 5-(3-cyano-lH-pyrrol-l-yl)pyrimidin-2-yl(((trans)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl)carbamate (1.1 g, 3.1 mmol) in DMSO (10 mL) was added potassium carbonate (1.3 g, 9.3 mmol). The mixture was cooled to 0 °C and hydrogen peroxide (3 mL) was slowly added. The reaction was warmed to rt and stirred for 90 min. The reaction was diluted with EtO Ac (75 mL) and washed three times with brine (50 mL). The organic layer was then dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated to give a crude solid that was purified by silica gel chromatography (10% MeOH/CH2Cl2) to afford 1.07 g of a white solid compound. This compound was dissolved in 25% TFA/CH2CI2 and stirred for 1 hour. The reaction was then concentrated, dissolved in ethyl acetate (75 mL), and washed three times with saturated potassium carbonate solution. The organic layer was then dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated to give a crude solid that was triturated with 75% ethyl acetate/hexanes. The resultant slurry was sonicated and filtered to give 500 mg of l-(2-((((trans)-3-fluoro-l-(3-fluoropyridin-2-yl)cyclobutyl)methyl)amino)pyrimidin-5-yl)-lH-pyrrole-3 -carboxamide as a white solid. LRMS (M+H=385).

REFERENCES

1: Andrews JA, Miller TM, Vijayakumar V, Stoltz R, James JK, Meng L, Wolff AA, Malik FI. CK-2127107 amplifies skeletal muscle response to nerve activation in humans. Muscle Nerve. 2018 May;57(5):729-734. doi: 10.1002/mus.26017. Epub 2017 Dec 11. PubMed PMID: 29150952.

2: Gross N. The COPD Pipeline XXXII. Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis. 2016 Jul 14;3(3):688-692. doi: 10.15326/jcopdf.3.3.2016.0150. PubMed PMID: 28848893; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5556764.

//////////////CK-2127107, CK 2127107, CK2127107, Reldesemtiv, Cytokinetics,   Astellas, neuromuscular disorders, muscle wasting, claudication, metabolic syndrome, spinal muscular atrophy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Orphan Drug Status, Spinal muscular atrophy, Phase II

C1C(CC1(CNC2=NC=C(C=N2)N3C=CC(=C3)C(=O)N)C4=C(C=CC=N4)F)F

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SELPERCATINIB


img

Selpercatinib.png

SELPERCATINIB

LOXO 292

CAS: 2152628-33-4
Chemical Formula: C29H31N7O3
Molecular Weight: 525.613

CEGM9YBNGD

UNII-CEGM9YBNGD

 6-(2-hydroxy-2-methylpropoxy)-4-(6-{6-[(6-methoxypyridin- 3-yl)methyl]-3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptan-3-yl}pyridin-3- yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-3-carbonitrile

Selpercatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor with antineoplastic properties.

A phase I/II trial is also under way in pediatric patients and young adults with activating RET alterations and advanced solid or primary CNS tumors.

Loxo Oncology (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly ), under license from Array , is developing selpercatinib, a lead from a program of RET kinase inhibitors, for treating cancer, including non-small-cell lung cancer, medullary thyroid cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, papillary thyroid cancer, other solid tumors, infantile myofibromatosis, infantile fibrosarcoma and soft tissue sarcoma

In 2018, the compound was granted orphan drug designation in the U.S. for the treatment of pancreatic cancer and in the E.U. for the treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

Trk is a high affinity receptor tyrosine kinase activated by a group of soluble growth factors called neurotrophic factor (NT). The Trk receptor family has three members, namely TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Among the neurotrophic factors are (1) nerve growth factor (NGF) which activates TrkA, (2) brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and NT4/5 which activate TrkB, and (3) NT3 which activates TrkC. Trk is widely expressed in neuronal tissues and is involved in the maintenance, signaling and survival of neuronal cells.
The literature also shows that Trk overexpression, activation, amplification and/or mutations are associated with many cancers including neuroblastoma, ovarian cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer, multiple myeloma, astrocytoma. And medulloblastoma, glioma, melanoma, thyroid cancer, pancreatic cancer, large cell neuroendocrine tumor and colorectal cancer. In addition, inhibitors of the Trk/neurotrophin pathway have been shown to be effective in a variety of preclinical animal models for the treatment of pain and inflammatory diseases.
The neurotrophin/Trk pathway, particularly the BDNF/TrkB pathway, has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. The modulating neurotrophic factor/Trk pathway can be used to treat these and related diseases.
It is believed that the TrkA receptor is critical for the disease process in the parasitic infection of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) in human hosts. Therefore, TrkA inhibitors can be used to treat Chagas disease and related protozoal infections.
Trk inhibitors can also be used to treat diseases associated with imbalances in bone remodeling, such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and bone metastasis. Bone metastases are a common complication of cancer, up to 70% in patients with advanced breast or prostate cancer and about 15 in patients with lung, colon, stomach, bladder, uterine, rectal, thyroid or kidney cancer Up to 30%. Osteolytic metastases can cause severe pain, pathological fractures, life-threatening hypercalcemia, spinal cord compression, and other neurostress syndromes. For these reasons, bone metastases are a serious cancer complication that is costly. Therefore, an agent that can induce apoptosis of proliferating bone cells is very advantageous. Expression of the TrkA receptor and TrkC receptor has been observed in the osteogenic region of the fractured mouse model. In addition, almost all osteoblast apoptosis agents are very advantageous. Expression of the TrkA receptor and TrkC receptor has been observed in the osteogenic region of the fractured mouse model. In addition, localization of NGF was observed in almost all osteoblasts. Recently, it was demonstrated that pan-Trk inhibitors in human hFOB osteoblasts inhibit tyrosine signaling activated by neurotrophic factors that bind to all three Trk receptors. This data supports the theory of using Trk inhibitors to treat bone remodeling diseases, such as bone metastases in cancer patients.
Developed by Loxo Oncology, Larotrectinib (LOXO-101) is a broad-spectrum antineoplastic agent for all tumor patients expressing Trk, rather than tumors at an anatomical location. LOXO-101 chemical name is (S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidin-1-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a] Pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide, the structural formula is as follows. LOXO-101 began treatment of the first patient in March 2015; on July 13, 2016, the FDA granted a breakthrough drug qualification for the inoperable removal or metastatic solid tumor of adults and children with positive Trk fusion gene mutations; Key entry was completed in February 2017; in November 2018, the FDA approved the listing under the trade name Vitrakvi.
Poor absorption, distribution, metabolism, and/or excretion (ADME) properties are known to be the primary cause of clinical trial failure in many drug candidates. Many of the drugs currently on the market also limit their range of applications due to poor ADME properties. The rapid metabolism of drugs can lead to the inability of many drugs that could be effectively treated to treat diseases because they are too quickly removed from the body. Frequent or high-dose medications may solve the problem of rapid drug clearance, but this approach can lead to problems such as poor patient compliance, side effects caused by high-dose medications, and increased treatment costs. In addition, rapidly metabolizing drugs may also expose patients to undesirable toxic or reactive metabolites.
Although LOXO-101 is effective as a Trk inhibitor in the treatment of a variety of cancers and the like, it has been found that a novel compound having a good oral bioavailability and a drug-forming property for treating a cancer or the like is a challenging task. Thus, there remains a need in the art to develop compounds having selective inhibitory activity or better pharmacodynamics/pharmacokinetics for Trk kinase mediated diseases useful as therapeutic agents, and the present invention provides such compounds.
SYN
WO 2018071447

PATENT

WO2018071447

PATENT

US 20190106438

PATENT

WO 2019075108

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019075108&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION

Compounds of Formula I-IV, 4-(6-(4-((6-methoxypyridin-3-yl)methyl)piperazin-1-yl)pyridin-3-yl)-6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-3-carbonitrile (Formula I); 6-(2-hydroxy-2-methylpropoxy)-4-(6-(6-((6-methoxypyridin-3-yl)methyl)-3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptan-3-yl)pyridin-3-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-3-carbonitrile (Formula II); 6-(2-hydroxy-2-methylpropoxy)-4-(6-(6-(6-methoxynicotinoyl)-3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptan-3-yl)pyridin-3-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-3-carbonitrile (Formula III); and 6-(2-hydroxy-2-methylpropoxy)-4-(6-(4-hydroxy-4-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)piperidin-1-yl)pyridin-3-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-3-carbonitrile (Formula IV) are inhibitors of RET kinase, and are useful for treating diseases such as proliferative diseases, including cancers.

[0007] Accordingly, provided herein is a compound of Formula I-IV:

and pharmaceutically acceptable salts, amorphous, and polymorph forms thereof.

PATENT

WO 2019075114

PATENT

WO-2019120194

Novel deuterated analogs of pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine compounds, particularly selpercatinib , processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them are claimed. Also claims are their use for treating pain, inflammation, cancer and certain infectious diseases.

Example 2(S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl-2,3,3-d 3)-pyrazolo[ 1,5-a] pyrimidin-3-yl) -3-hydroxypyrazole prepared pyrrolidine-1-carboxamide (compound L-2) a.

[0163]

[0164]
Use the following route for synthesis:

[0165]
Patent ID Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US10137124 Substituted pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine compounds as RET kinase inhibitors 2018-01-03
US10172851 Substituted pyrazolo[1,5-A]pyridine compounds as RET kinase inhibitors 2018-01-03
US10112942 Substituted pyrazolo[1,5-A]pyridine compounds as RET kinase inhibitors 2017-12-29

/////////////SELPERCATINIB, non-small-cell lung cancer, medullary thyroid cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, papillary thyroid cancer, other solid tumors, infantile myofibromatosis, infantile fibrosarcoma, soft tissue sarcoma, LOXO, ELI LILY,  ARRAY, LOXO 292, orphan drug designation

N#CC1=C2C(C3=CC=C(N4CC(C5)N(CC6=CC=C(OC)N=C6)C5C4)N=C3)=CC(OCC(C)(O)C)=CN2N=C1

Ceralasertib, AZD 6738


Image result for azd 6738

Image result for azd 6738

Image result for azd 6738

AZD-6738, Ceralasertib

  • Molecular Formula C20H24N6O2S
  • Average mass 412.509 Da
CAS 1352226-88-0 [RN]
1H-Pyrrolo[2,3-c]pyridine, 4-[4-[(3R)-3-methyl-4-morpholinyl]-6-[1-(S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]-2-pyrimidinyl]-
4-{4-[(3R)-3-Methyl-4-morpholinyl]-6-[1-(S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]-2-pyrimidinyl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-c]pyridine
1H-Pyrrolo(2,3-b)pyridine, 4-(4-(1-((S(R))-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl)-6-((3R)-3-methyl-4-morpholinyl)-2-pyrimidinyl)-
imino-methyl-[1-[6-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-2-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]cyclopropyl]-oxo-λ6-sulfane
85RE35306Z
AZD-6738
UNII:85RE35306Z
CAS : 1352226-88-0 (free base)   1352280-98-8 (formic acid)   1352226-97-1 (racemic)
  • 4-[4-[1-[[S(R)]-S-Methylsulfonimidoyl]cyclopropyl]-6-[(3R)-3-methyl-4-morpholinyl]-2-pyrimidinyl]-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine
  • AZD 6738
  • Ceralasertib
  • Originator AstraZeneca; University of Pennsylvania
  • Class Antineoplastics; Morpholines; Pyrimidines; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action ATR protein inhibitors
  • Phase II Breast cancer; Gastric cancer; Non-small cell lung cancer; Ovarian cancer
  • Phase I/II Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia; Solid tumours
  • Phase I Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
  • Preclinical Diffuse large B cell lymphoma
  • No development reported B-cell lymphoma; Lymphoid leukaemia
  • 26 Mar 2019 National Cancer Institute plans a phase II trial for Cholangiocarcinoma (Combination therapy, Second-line therapy or greater) and Solid tumours (Combination therapy, Second-line therapy or greater) in March 2019 (NCT03878095)
  • 18 Mar 2019 Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and AstraZeneca re-initiate the phase I PATRIOT trial in Solid tumours (Second-line therapy or greater) in United Kingdom (NCT02223923)
  • 25 Dec 2018 University of Michigan Cancer Center plans the phase II TRAP trial for Prostate cancer (Combination therapy; Metastatic disease; Second-line therapy or greater) in February 2019 (NCT03787680)

Inhibits ATR kinase.

Ceralasertib, also known as AZD6738, is an orally available morpholino-pyrimidine-based inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3 related (ATR) kinase, with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon oral administration, ATR kinase inhibitor Ceralasertib selectively inhibits ATR activity by blocking the downstream phosphorylation of the serine/threonine protein kinase CHK1. This prevents ATR-mediated signaling, and results in the inhibition of DNA damage checkpoint activation, disruption of DNA damage repair, and the induction of tumor cell apoptosis.

ATR (also known as FRAP-Related Protein 1; FRP1; MEC1; SCKL; SECKL1) protein kinase is a member of the PI3 -Kinase like kinase (PIKK) family of proteins that are involved in repair and maintenance of the genome and its stability (reviewed in Cimprich K.A. and Cortez D. 2008, Nature Rev. Mol. Cell Biol. 9:616-627). These proteins co-ordinate response to DNA damage, stress and cell-cycle perturbation. Indeed ATM and ATR, two members of the family of proteins, share a number of downstream substrates that are themselves recognised components of the cell cycle and DNA-repair machinery e.g. Chkl, BRCAl, p53 (Lakin ND et al,1999, Oncogene; Tibbets RS et al, 2000, Genes & Dev.). Whilst the substrates of ATM and ATR are to an extent shared, the trigger to activate the signalling cascade is not shared and ATR primarily responds to stalled replication forks (Nyberg K.A. et al., 2002, Ann. Rev.

Genet. 36:617-656; Shechter D. et al. 2004, DNA Repair 3:901-908) and bulky DNA damage lesions such as those formed by ultraviolet (UV) radiation (Wright J. A. et al, 1998, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 23:7445-7450) or the UV mimetic agent, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxi-e, 4NQO (Ikenaga M. et al. 1975, Basic Life Sci. 5b, 763-771). However, double strand breaks (DSB) detected by ATM can be processed into single strand breaks (SSB) recruiting ATR; similarly SSB, detected by ATR can generate DSB, activating ATM. There is therefore a significant interplay between ATM and ATR.

Mutations of the ATR gene that result in complete loss of expression of the ATR protein are rare and in general are not viable. Viability may only result under heterozygous or hypomorphic conditions. The only clear link between ATR gene mutations and disease exists in a few patients with Seckel syndrome which is characterized by growth retardation and microcephaly (O’Driscoll M et al, 2003 Nature Genet. Vol3, 497-501). Cells from patients with hypomorphic germline mutations of ATR (seckel syndrome) present a greater susceptibility to chromosome breakage at fragile sites in presence of replication stress compared to wild type cells (Casper 2004). Disruption of the ATR pathway leads to genomic instability. Patients with Seckel syndrome also present an increased incidence of cancer,suggestive of the role of ATR in this disease in the maintenance of genome stability .

Moreover, duplication of the ATR gene has been described as a risk factor in rhabdomyosarcomas (Smith L et al, 1998, Nature Genetics 19, 39-46). Oncogene-driven tumorigenesis may be associated with ATM loss-of- function and therefore increased reliance on ATR signalling (Gilad 2010). Evidence of replication stress has also been reported in several tumour types such as colon and ovarian cancer, and more recently in glioblastoma, bladder, prostate and breast (Gorgoulis et al, 2005; Bartkova et al. 2005a; Fan et al., 2006; Tort et al, 2006; Nuciforo et al, 2007; Bartkova et al., 2007a). Loss of Gl checkpoint is also frequently observed during tumourigenesis. Tumour cells that are deficient in Gl checkpoint controls, in particular p53 deficiency, are susceptible to inhibition of ATR activity and present with premature chromatin condensation (PCC) and cell death (Ngheim et al, PNAS, 98, 9092-9097).

ATR is essential to the viability of replicating cells and is activated during S-phase to regulate firing of replication origins and to repair damaged replication forks (Shechter D et al, 2004, Nature cell Biology Vol 6 (7) 648-655). Damage to replication forks may arise due to exposure of cells to clinically relevant cytotoxic agents such as hydroxyurea (HU) and platinums (O’Connell and Cimprich 2005; 118, 1-6). ATR is activated by most cancer chemotherapies (Wilsker D et al, 2007, Mol. Cancer Ther. 6(4) 1406-1413). Biological assessment of the ability of ATR inhibitors to sensitise to a wide range of chemotherapies have been evaluated. Sensitisation of tumour cells to chemotherapeutic agents in cell growth assays has been noted and used to assess how well weak ATR inhibitors (such as Caffeine) will sensitise tumour cell lines to cytotoxic agents. (Wilsker D .et al, 2007, Mol Cancer Ther. 6 (4)1406-1413; Sarkaria J.N. et al, 1999, Cancer Res. 59, 4375-4382). Moreover, a reduction of ATR activity by siRNA or ATR knock-in using a dominant negative form of ATR in cancer cells has resulted in the sensitisation of tumour cells to the effects of a number of therapeutic or experimental agents such as antimetabolites (5-FU, Gemcitabine, Hydroxyurea, Metotrexate, Tomudex), alkylating agents (Cisplatin, Mitomycin C, Cyclophosphamide, MMS) or double-strand break inducers (Doxorubicin, Ionizing radiation) (Cortez D. et al. 2001, Science, 294:1713-1716; Collis S.J. et al, 2003, Cancer Res. 63:1550-1554; Cliby W.A. et al, 1998, EMBO J. 2:159-169) suggesting that the combination of ATR inhibitors with some cytotoxic agents might be therapeutically beneficial.

An additional phenotypic assay has been described to define the activity of specific ATR inhibitory compounds is the cell cycle profile (PJ Hurley, D Wilsker and F Bunz, Oncogene, 2007, 26, 2535-2542). Cells deficient in ATR have been shown to have defective cell cycle regulation and distinct characteristic profiles, particularly following a cytotoxic cellular insult. Furthermore, there are proposed to be differential responses between tumour and normal tissues in response to modulation of the ATR axis and this provides further potential for therapeutic intervention by ATR inhibitor molecules (Rodnguez-Bravo V et al, Cancer Res., 2007, 67, 11648-11656).

Another compelling utility of ATR-specific phenotypes is aligned with the concept of synthetic lethality and the observation that tumour cells that are deficient in G1 checkpoint controls, in particular p53 deficiency, are susceptible to inhibition of ATR activity resulting in premature chromatin condensation (PCC) and cell death (Ngheim et al, PNAS, 98, 9092-9097). In this situation, S-phase replication of DNA occurs but is not completed prior to M-phase initiation due to failure in the intervening checkpoints resulting in cell death from a lack of ATR signalling. The G2/M checkpoint is a key regulatory control involving ATR (Brown E. J. and Baltimore D., 2003, Genes Dev. 17, 615-628) and it is the compromise of this checkpoint and the prevention of ATR signalling to its downstream partners which results in PCC. Consequently, the genome of the daughter cells is compromised and viability of the cells is lost (Ngheim et al, PNAS, 98, 9092-9097).

It has thus been proposed that inhibition of ATR may prove to be an efficacious approach to future cancer therapy (Collins I. and Garret M.D., 2005, Curr. Opin. Pharmacol., 5:366-373; Kaelin W.G. 2005, Nature Rev. Cancer, 5:689-698) in the appropriate genetic context such as tumours with defects in ATM function or other S-phase checkpoints. Until recently, There is currently no clinical precedent for agents targeting ATR, although agents targeting the downstream signalling axis i.e. Chk1 are currently undergoing clinical evaluation (reviewed in Janetka J.W. et al. Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel, 2007, 10:473-486). However, inhibitors targeting ATR kinase have recently been described (Reaper 2011, Charrier 2011).

In summary ATR inhibitors have the potential to sensitise tumour cells to ionising radiation or DNA-damage inducing chemotherapeutic agents, have the potential to induce selective tumour cell killing as well as to induce synthetic lethality in subsets of tumour cells with defects in DNA damage response.

PAPER

Discovery and Characterization of AZD6738, a Potent Inhibitor of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated and Rad3 Related (ATR) Kinase with Application as an Anticancer Agent

  • Kevin M. Foote
Cite This:J. Med. Chem.201861229889-9907
Publication Date:October 22, 2018
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.8b01187
The kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated and rad3 related (ATR) is a key regulator of the DNA-damage response and the apical kinase which orchestrates the cellular processes that repair stalled replication forks (replication stress) and associated DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of repair pathways mediated by ATR in a context where alternative pathways are less active is expected to aid clinical response by increasing replication stress. Here we describe the development of the clinical candidate 2(AZD6738), a potent and selective sulfoximine morpholinopyrimidine ATR inhibitor with excellent preclinical physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics. Compound 2 was developed improving aqueous solubility and eliminating CYP3A4 time-dependent inhibition starting from the earlier described inhibitor 1 (AZ20). The clinical candidate 2 has favorable human PK suitable for once or twice daily dosing and achieves biologically effective exposure at moderate doses. Compound 2 is currently being tested in multiple phase I/II trials as an anticancer agent.
 ATR Inhibitors
4-{4-[(3R)-3-Methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (2)
2 (139 g, 42%) as a white crystalline solid.
1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 1.19 (3H, d), 1.29–1.50 (3H, m), 1.61–1.72 (1H, m), 3.01 (3H, s), 3.22 (1H, d), 3.43 (1H, td), 3.58 (1H, dd), 3.68–3.76 (2H, m), 3.87–3.96 (1H, m), 4.17 (1H, d), 4.60 (1H, s), 6.98 (1H, s), 7.20 (1H, dd), 7.55–7.58 (1H, m), 7.92 (1H, d), 8.60 (1H, d), 11.67 (1H, s).
13C NMR (176 MHz, DMSO-d6) 11.29, 12.22, 13.39, 38.92, 41.14, 46.48, 47.81, 65.97, 70.19, 101.54, 102.82, 114.58, 117.71, 127.21, 136.70, 142.21, 150.12, 161.88, 162.63, 163.20.
HRMS-ESI m/z 413.17529 [MH+]; C20H24N6O2S requires 413.1760.
Chiral HPLC: (HP1100 system 4, 5 μm Chiralpak AS-H (250 mm × 4.6 mm) column, eluting with isohexane/EtOH/MeOH/TEA 50/25/25/0.1) Rf = 8.252, >99%. Anal. Found (% w/w): C, 58.36; H, 5.87; N, 20.20; S, 7.55; H2O, <0.14. C20H24N6O2S requires C, 58.23; H, 5.86; N, 20.37; S, 7.77.

Patent

WO 2011154737

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=CF8CA857FDD8BF59DA9F336056132BB7.wapp2nA?docId=WO2011154737&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION

Example 1.01

4-{4-[(3R)-3-Methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)methyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine

(R)-3-Methyl-4-(6-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoylmethyl)-2-(1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)morpholine (98 mg, 0.18 mmol) was dissolved in MeOH (10 ml) and DCM (10 ml) and heated to 50 °C. Sodium hydroxide, 2M aqueous solution (0.159 ml, 0.32 mmol) was then added and heating continued for 5 hours. The reaction mixture was evaporated and the residue dissolved in DME: water :MeCN 2: 1 : 1 (4 ml) and then purified by preparative HPLC using decreasingly polar mixtures of water (containing 1% NH3) and MeCN as eluents. Fractions containing the desired compound were evaporated and the residue trituated with Et2O

(1 ml) to afford the title compound (34.6 mg, 49%); 1HNMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.40 (3H, d), 3.17 (3H, s), 3.39 (1H, tt), 3.62 (1H, td), 3.77 (1H, dd), 3.85 (1H, d), 4.08 (1H, dd), 4.18 (1H, d), 4.37 – 4.48 (2H, q), 4.51 (1H, s), 6.59 (1H, s), 7.35 (1H, t), 7.46 (1H, d), 8.06 (1H, d), 8.42 (1H, d), 10.16 (1H, s); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 387.19.

The (R)-3-methyl-4-(6-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoylmethyl)-2-(1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)morpholine, used as starting material, can be prepared as follows:

a) (R)-3-methylmorpholine (7.18 g, 71.01 mmol) and triethylamine (12.87 ml, 92.31 mmol) were added to methyl 2,4-dichloropyrimidine-6-carboxylate (14.70 g, 71.01 mmol) in DCM (100 ml). The resulting mixture was stirred at RT for 18 hours. Water (100 ml) was added, the layers separated and extracted with DCM (3 × 75 ml). The combined organics were

dried over MgSO4, concentrated in vacuo and the residue triturated with Et2O to yield (R)-methyl 2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidine-4-carboxylate (14.77 g, 77%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.35 (3H, d), 3.34 (1H, td), 3.55 (1H, td), 3.70 (1H, dd), 3.81 (1H, d), 3.97 (3H, s), 4.03 (1H, dd), 4.12 (1H, br s), 4.37 (1H, br s), 7.15 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 272.43. The liquors were concentrated onto silica and purified by chromatography on silica eluting with a gradient of 20 to 40% EtOAc in isohexane. Fractions containing product were combined and evaporated to afford (R)-methyl 2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidine-4-carboxylate (1.659 g, 9%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.35 (3H, d), 3.33 (1H, td), 3.55 (1H, td), 3.69 (1H, dd), 3.80 (1H, d), 3.97 (3H, s), 4.03 (1H, dd), 4.12 (1H, br s), 4.36 (1H, br s), 7.15 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 272.43.

b) Lithium borohydride, 2M in THF (18 ml, 36.00 mmol) was added dropwise to (R)-methyl 2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidine-4-carboxylate (16.28 g, 59.92 mmol) in THF (200 ml) at 0°C over a period of 20 minutes under nitrogen. The resulting solution was stirred at 0 °C for 30 minutes and then allowed to warm to RT and stirred for a further 18 hours. Water (200 ml) was added and the THF evaporated. The aqueous layer was extracted with EtOAc (2 × 100 ml) and the organic phases combined, dried over MgSO4 and then evaporated to afford (R)-(2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanol (14.54 g, 100%) which was used in the next step without purification; 1HNMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.32 (3H, d), 2.65 (1H, br s), 3.25 – 3.32 (1H, m), 3.51 – 3.57 (1H, m), 3.67 – 3.70 (1H, m), 3.78 (1H, d), 3.98 – 4.09 (2H, m), 4.32 (1H, br s), 4.59 (2H, s), 6.44 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 244.40.

c) Methanesulfonyl chloride (4.62 ml, 59.67 mmol) was added dropwise to (R)-(2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanol (14.54 g, 59.67 mmol) and triethylamine (8.32 ml, 59.67 mmol) in DCM (250 ml) at 25 °C over a period of 5 minutes. The resulting solution was stirred at 25 °C for 90 minutes. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (100 ml) and extracted with DCM (2 × 100 ml). The organic phases were combined, dried over MgSO4, filtered and evaporated to afford (R)-(2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methyl methanesulfonate (20.14 g, 105%) which was used in the next step without further purification; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.33 (3H, d), 3.13 (3H, s), 3.27 – 3.34 (1H, m), 3.51 -3.57 (1H, m), 3.66 – 3.70 (1H, m), 3.79 (1H, d), 3.99 – 4.03 (2H, m), 4.34 (1H, br s), 5.09 (2H, d) , 6.52 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 322.83.

Alternatively, this step can be carried out as follows:

In a 3 L fixed reaction vessel with a Huber 360 heater / chiller attached, under a nitrogen atmosphere, triethylamine (0.120 L, 858.88 mmol) was added in one go to a stirred solution of (R)-(2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methanol (161 g, 660.68 mmol) in DCM (7.5vol) (1.2 L) at 20°C (3°C exotherm seen). The mixture was cooled to 5°C and then methanesulfonyl chloride (0.062 L, 792.81 mmol) was added dropwise over 15 minutes, not allowing the internal temperature to exceed 15°C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 15°C for 2 hours and then held (not stirring) overnight at RT under a nitrogen atmosphere. Water (1.6 L, 10 vol) was added and the aqueous layer was separated and then extracted with DCM (2 × 1.6 L, 2 × 10 vol). The organics were combined, washed with 50% brine / water (1.6 L, 10 vol), dried over magnesium sulphate, filtered and then evaporated to afford a mixture of

approximately two thirds (R)-(2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methyl methanesulfonate and one third (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(chloromethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (216 g) which was used in the next step without further purification, d) Lithium iodide (17.57 g, 131.27 mmol) was added to (R)-(2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methyl methanesulfonate (19.2 g, 59.67 mmol) in dioxane (300 ml) and heated to 100 °C for 2 hours under nitrogen. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (200 ml) and extracted with EtOAc (3 × 200 ml). The organic layers were combined and washed with 2M sodium bisulfite solution (400 ml), water (400 ml), brine (400 ml) dried over MgSO4 and then evaporated. The residue was triturated with Et2O to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(iodomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (13.89 g, 66%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.32 (3H, d), 3.28 (1H, td), 3.54 (1H, td), 3.69 (1H, dd), 3.78 (1H, d), 3.98 -4.02 (2H, m), 4.21 (2H, s), 4.29 (1H, br s), 6.41 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+ 354.31.

The mother liquors were concentrated down and triturated with Et2O to afford a further crop of (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(iodomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (2.46 g, 12%); 1HNMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) 1.32 (3H, d), 3.28 (1H, td), 3.54 (1H, td), 3.69 (1H, dd), 3.78 (1H, d), 3.98 – 4.02 (2H, m), 4.21 (2H, s), 4.30 (1H, s), 6.41 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 354.31.

Alternatively, this step can be carried out as follows:

(R)-(2-Chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methyl methanesulfonate (80 g, 248.62 mmol) and lithium iodide (83 g, 621.54 mmol) were dissolved in dioxane (300 ml) and then heated at 107 °C for 1 hour. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (250 ml), extracted with EtOAc (3 × 250 ml), the organic layer was dried over MgSO4, filtered and evaporated. The residue was dissolved in DCM and Et2O was added, the mixture was passed through silica (4 inches) and eluted with Et2O. Fractions containing product were evaporated and the residue was then triturated with Et2O to give a solid which was collected by filtration and dried under vacuum to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(iodomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (75 g, 86%) ; m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 354.27.

e) (R)-4-(2-Chloro-6-(iodomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (17.0 g, 48.08 mmol) was dissolved in DMF (150 ml), to this was added sodium methanethiolate (3.37 g, 48.08 mmol) and the reaction was stirred for 1 hour at 25 °C. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (50 ml) and then extracted with Et2O (3 × 50 ml). The organic layer was dried over MgSO4, filtered and then evaporated. The residue was purified by flash

chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 50 to 100% EtOAc in iso-hexane. Pure fractions were evaporated to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(methylthiomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (12.63 g, 96%); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 274.35.

Alternatively, (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(methylthiomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine, may be prepared as follows:

In a 3 L fixed vessel, sodium thiomethoxide (21% in water) (216 g, 646.69 mmol) was added dropwise over 5 minutes to a stirred solution of a mixture of approximately two thirds (R)-(2-chloro-6-(3-methylmorpholino)pyrimidin-4-yl)methyl methanesulfonate and one third (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(chloromethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (130.2 g, 431 mmol) and sodium iodide (1.762 ml, 43.11 mmol) in MeCN (1 L) at RT (temperature dropped from 20 °C to 18 °C over the addition and then in the next 5 minutes rose to 30 °C). The reaction mixture was stirred for 16 hours and then diluted with EtOAc (2 L), and washed sequentially with water (750 ml) and saturated brine (1 L). The organic layer was dried over MgSO4, filtered and then evaporated to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(methylthiomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (108 g, 91%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO- d6) 1.20 (3H, d), 2.07 (3H, s), 3.11 – 3.26 (1H, m), 3.44 (1H, td), 3.53 (2H, s), 3.59 (1H, dd), 3.71 (1H, d), 3.92 (1H, dd), 3.92 – 4.04 (1H, br s), 4.33 (1H, s), 6.77 (1H, s); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 274.36.

f) (R)-4-(2-Chloro-6-(methylthiomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (12.63 g, 46.13 mmol) was dissolved in DCM (100 ml), to this was added mCPBA (7.96 g, 46.13 mmol) in one portion and the reaction mixture was stirred for 10 minutes at 25 °C. An additional portion of mCPBA (0.180 g) was added. The reaction mixture was quenched with saturated Na2CO3 solution (50 ml) and extracted with DCM (3 × 50 ml). The organic layer was dried over MgSO4, filtered and then evaporated. The residue was dissolved in DCM (80 ml) in a 150

ml conical flask which was placed into a beaker containing Et2O (200 ml) and the system covered with laboratory film and then left for 3 days. The obtained crystals were filtered, crushed and sonicated with Et2O. The crystallisation procedure was repeated to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((R)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine as white needles (3.87 g, 29%); 1HNMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.33 (3H, d), 2.62 (3H, s), 3.30 (1H, td), 3.53 (1H, td), 3.68 (1H, dd), 3.76 (2H, dd), 3.95 (1H, d), 4.00 (1H, dd), 4.02 (1H, s), 4.32 (1H, s), 6.42 (1H, s).

The remaining liquour from the first vapour diffusion was purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 0 to 5% MeOH in DCM. Pure fractions were evaporated to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((S)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine as an orange gum (5.70 g, 43%); 1 HNMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.33 (3H, d), 2.62 (3H, d), 3.29 (1H, td), 3.54 (1H, td), 3.68 (1H, dd), 3.73 – 3.82 (2H, m), 3.94 (1H, dd), 4.00 (2H, dd), 4.33 (1H, s), 6.42 (1H, s).

Alternatively, this step can be carried out as follows:

Sodium meta-periodate (64.7 g, 302.69 mmol) was added in one portion to (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(methylthiomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (82.87 g, 302.69 mmol) in water (500 ml), EtOAc (1000 ml) and MeOH (500 ml). The resulting solution was stirred at 20 °C for 16 hours. Sodium metabisulfite (50 g) was added and the mixture stirred for 30 minutes. The reaction mixture was filtered and then partially evaporated to remove the MeOH. The organic layer was separated, dried over MgSO4, filtered and then evaporated. The aqueous layer was washed with DCM (3 x 500 ml). The organic layers were combined, dried over MgSO4, filtered and then evaporated. The residues were combined and dissolved in DCM (400 ml) and purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 0 to 5% MeOH in DCM. Fractions containing product were evaporated and the residue was dissolved in DCM (400 ml) and then divided into four 450 ml bottles. An aluminium foil cap was placed over the top of each bottle and a few holes made in each cap. The bottles were placed in pairs in a large dish containing Et2O (1000 ml), and then covered and sealed with a second glass dish and left for 11 days. The resultant white needles were collected by filtration and dried under vacuum. The crystals were dissolved in DCM (200 ml) and placed into a 450 ml bottle. An aluminium foil cap was placed over the top of the bottle and a few holes made in the cap. The bottle was placed in a large dish containing Et2O (1500 ml) and then covered and sealed with a second glass dish and left for 6 days. The resultant crystals were collected by filtration and dried under vacuum to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((R)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (16.53 g, 19%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.33 (3H, d), 2.61 (3H, s),

3.29 (1H, td), 3.53 (1H, td), 3.68 (1H, dd), 3.76 (2H, dd), 3.95 (1H, d), 3.99 (1H, dd), 4.02 (1H, s), 4.31 (1H, s), 6.41 (1H, s). Chiral HPLC: (HP1100 System 5, 20μm Chiralpak AD-H (250 mm × 4.6 mm) column eluting with Hexane/EtOH/TEA 50/50/0.1) Rf, 12.192 98.2%.

The filtrate from the first vapour diffusion was concentrated in vacuo to afford an approximate

5:2 mixture of (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((S)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine and (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((R)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (54.7 g, 62%).

Alternatively, this step can be carried out as follows:

Sodium meta-periodate (2.87 g, 13.44 mmol) was added in one portion to (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(methylthiomethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (3.68 g, 13.44 mmol) in water (10.00 ml), EtOAc (20 ml) and MeOH (10.00 ml). The resulting solution was stirred at 20 °C for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was diluted with DCM (60 ml) and then filtered. The DCM layer was separated and the aqueous layer washed with DCM (3 × 40 ml). The organics were combined, dried over MgSO4, filtered and then evaporated. The residue was purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 0 to 7% MeOH in DCM. Pure fractions were evaporated to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (2.72 g, 70%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 1.22 (3H, d), 2.64 (3H, d), 3.14 – 3.26 (1H, m), 3.45 (1H, td), 3.59 (1H, dd), 3.73 (1H, d), 3.88 – 3.96 (2H, m), 4.00 (1H, d), 4.07 (1H, dt), 4.33 (1H, s), 6.81 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 290.43.

The (3R)-4-(2-chloro-6-(methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (2.7 g, 9.32 mmol) was purified by preparative chiral chromatography on a Merck 100 mm 20 μm Chiralpak AD column, eluting isocratically with a 50:50:0.1 mixture of iso-Hexane:EtOH:TEA as eluent. The fractions containing product were evaporated to afford (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((S)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (1.38 g, 51%) as the first eluting compound; 1HNMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.29 (3H, dd), 2.56 (3H, s), 3.15 – 3.33 (1H, m), 3.46 (1H, tt), 3.55 – 3.83 (3H, m), 3.85 – 4.06 (3H, m), 4.31 (1H, s), 6.37 (1H, s). Chiral HPLC: (HP1100 System 6, 20μm Chiralpak AD (250 mm × 4.6 mm) column eluting with iso-Hexane/EtOH/TEA 50/50/0.1) Rf, 7.197 >99%.

and (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((R)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (1.27 g, 47 %) as the second eluting compound; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.28 (3H, d), 2.58 (3H, s),

3.26 (1H, td), 3.48 (1H, td), 3.62 (1H, dt), 3.77 (2H, dd), 3.88 – 4.13 (3H, m), 4.28 (1H, s), 6.37 (1H, s). Chiral HPLC: (HP1100 System 6, 20μm Chiralpak AD (250 mm × 4.6 mm) column eluting with iso-Hexane/EtOH/TEA 50/50/0.1) Rf, 16.897 >99%.

g) Iodobenzene diacetate (18.98 g, 58.94 mmol) was added to (R)-4-(2-chloro-6-((R)-methylsulfinylmethyl)pyrimidin-4-yl)-3-methylmorpholine (17.08 g, 58.94 mmol), 2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (13.33 g, 117.88 mmol), magnesium oxide (9.50 g, 235.76 mmol) and rhodium(II) acetate dimer (0.651 g, 1.47 mmol) in DCM (589 ml) under air. The resulting suspension was stirred at 20 °C for 24 hours. Further 2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (13.33 g, 117.88 mmol), magnesium oxide (9.50 g, 235.76 mmol), iodobenzene diacetate (18.98 g, 58.94 mmol) and rhodium(II) acetate dimer (0.651 g, 1.47 mmol) were added and the suspension was stirred at 20 °C for 3 days. The reaction mixture was filtered and then silica gel (100 g) added to the filtrate and the solvent removed in vacuo. The resulting powder was purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 20 to 50% EtOAc in isohexane. Pure fractions were evaporated to afford N-[({2-chloro-6-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]pyrimidin-4-yl}methyl)(methyl)oxido-λ6-(R)-sulfanylidene]-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (19.39 g, 82%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 1.22 (3H, d), 3.17 – 3.27 (1H, m), 3.44 (1H, td), 3.59 (1H, dd), 3.62 (3H, s), 3.74 (1H, d), 3.95 (1H, dd), 4.04 (1H, br s), 4.28 (1H, s), 5.08 (2H, q), 6.96 (1H, s); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 401.12 and 403.13.

h) Dichlorobis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(II) (8.10 mg, 0.01 mmol) was added in one portion to N-[({2-chloro-6-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]pyrimidin-4-yl}methyl)(methyl)oxido-λ6-(R)-sulfanylidene]-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamide (185 mg, 0.46 mmol), 2M aqueous Na2CO3 solution (0.277 ml, 0.55 mmol) and 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (193 mg, 0.48 mmol) in DME:water 4: 1 (5 ml) at RT. The reaction mixture was stirred at 90 °C for 1 hour, filtered and then purified by preparative HPLC using decreasingly polar mixtures of water (containing 1% NH3) and MeCN as eluents. Fractions containing the desired compound were evaporated to afford (R)-3-methyl-4-(6-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoylmethyl)-2-(1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)morpholine (102 mg, 41%); 1HNMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.33 (3H, d), 3.21 – 3.38 (1H, m), 3.42 (3H, d), 3.45 – 3.57 (1H, m), 3.61 – 3.70 (1H, m), 3.78 (1H, d), 4.01 (1H, dd), 3.90 -4.15 (1H, br s), 4.30 (1H, s), 4.64 (1H, dd), 4.84 (1H, dd), 6.49 (1H, d); m/z: (ESI+) MH+, 541.35

The 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine, used as starting material, can be prepared as follows:

a) To a 3L fixed vessel was charged 3-chlorobenzoperoxoic acid (324 g, 1444.67 mmol) portionwise to 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (150 g, 1244.33 mmol) in DME (750 ml) and heptane (1500 ml) at 20°C over a period of 1 hour under nitrogen. The resulting slurry was stirred at 20 °C for 18 hours. The precipitate was collected by filtration, washed with DME / heptane (1/2 5 vol) (750 ml) and dried under vacuum at 40°C to afford 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b] pyridine 7-oxide 3-chlorobenzoate (353 g, 97%) as a cream solid, which was used without further purification; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 6.59 (1H, d), 7.07 (1H, dd), 7.45 (1H, d), 7.55 (1H, t), 7.65 (1H, dd), 7.70 (1H, ddd), 7.87 – 7.93 (2H, m), 8.13 (1H, d), 12.42 (1H, s), 13.32 (1H, s).

b) A 2M solution of potassium carbonate (910 ml, 1819.39 mmol) was added dropwise to a stirred slurry of 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine 7-oxide 3-chlorobenzoate (352.6 g, 1212.93 mmol) in water (4.2 vol) (1481 ml) at 20°C, over a period of 1 hour adjusting the pH to 10. To the resulting slurry was charged water (2 vol) (705 ml) stirred at 20 °C for 1 hour. The slurry was cooled to 0°C for 1 hour and the slurry filtered, the solid was washed with water (3 vol 1050ml) and dried in a vacuum oven at 40°C over P2O5 overnight to afford 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b] pyridine 7-oxide (118 g, 73%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 6.58 (1H, d), 7.06 (1H, dd), 7.45 (1H, d), 7.64 (1H, d), 8.13 (1H, d), 12.44 (1H, s); m/z: (ES+) (MH+MeCN)+, 176.03. c) To a 3L fixed vessel under an atmosphere of nitrogen was charged methanesulfonic anhydride (363 g, 2042.71 mmol) portionwise to 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine 7-oxide (137 g, 1021.36 mmol), and tetramethylammonium bromide (236 g, 1532.03 mmol) in DMF (10 vol) (1370 ml) cooled to 0°C over a period of 30 minutes under nitrogen. The resulting suspension was stirred at 20 °C for 24 hours. The reaction mixture was quenched with water (20 vol, 2740 ml) and the reaction mixture was adjusted to pH 7 with 50% sodium hydroxide (approx 200 ml). Water (40 vol, 5480 ml) was charged and the mixture cooled to 10°C for 30 minutes. The solid was filtered, washed with water (20 vol, 2740 ml) and the solid disssolved into

DCM/methanol (4: 1, 2000 ml), dried over MgSO4 and evaporated to provide a light brown solid. The solid was taken up in hot methanol (2000 ml) and water added dropwise until the solution went turbid and left overnight. The solid was filtered off and discarded, the solution was evaporated and the solid recrystallised from MeCN (4000 ml). The solid was filtered and washed with MeCN to afford 4-bromo-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (68.4 g, 34%) as a pink

solid; 1H NMR (400 MHz, OMSO-d6) 6.40 – 6.45 (1H, m), 7.33 (1H, d), 7.57 – 7.63 (1H, m), 8.09 (1H, t), 12.02 (1H, s); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 198.92. The crude mother liquors were purified by Companion RF (reverse phase CI 8, 415g column), using decreasingly polar mixtures of water (containing 1% NH3) and MeCN as eluents (starting at 26% upto 46% MeCN). Fractions containing the desired compound were evaporated to afford 4-bromo-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (5.4 g, 3%) as a pink solid; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 6.43 (1H, dd), 7.33 (1H, d), 7.55 – 7.66 (1H, m), 8.09 (1H, d), 12.03 (1H, s); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 199.22.

d) Sodium hydroxide (31.4 ml, 188.35 mmol) was added to 4-bromo-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (10.03 g, 50.91 mmol), tosyl chloride (19.41 g, 101.81 mmol) and

tetrabutylammonium hydrogensulfate (0.519 g, 1.53 mmol) in DCM (250 ml) at RT. The resulting mixture was stirred at RT for 1 hour. The reaction was quenched through the addition of saturated aqueous NH4Cl, the organic layer removed and the aqueous layer further extracted with DCM (3 × 25 ml). The combinbed organics were washed with brine (100 ml), dried over Na2SO4 and then concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 0 to 20% EtOAc in isohexane. Pure fractions were evaporated to afford 4-bromo-1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (14.50 g, 81%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 2.38 (3H, s), 6.64 (1H, d), 7.28 (2H, d), 7.36 (1H, d), 7.78 (1H, d), 8.06 (2H, d), 8.22 (1H, d); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 353.23.

e) 1,1′-Bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocenedichloropalladium(II) (3.37 g, 4.13 mmol) was added in one portion to 4-bromo-1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (14.5 g, 41.28 mmol), bis(pinacolato)diboron (20.97 g, 82.57 mmol) and potassium acetate (12.16 g, 123.85 mmol) in anhydrous DMF (300 ml) at RT. The resulting mixture was stirred under nitrogen at 90 °C for 24 hours. After cooling to RT, 1N aqueous NaOH was added untill the aqueous layer was taken to pH 10. The aqueous layer was washed with DCM (1L), carefully acidified to pH 4 with 1 N aqueous HCl, and then extracted with DCM (3 × 300 ml). The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure to afford a dark brown solid. The solid was triturated with diethyl ether, filtered and dried to afford 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (7.058 g, 43%); 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.36 (12H, s), 2.35 (3H, s), 7.01 (1H, d), 7.22 (2H, d), 7.52 (1H, d), 7.74 (1H, d), 8.03 (2H, m), 8.42 (1H, d); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 399.40. The mother liquors were concentrated in vacuo and the residue triturated in isohexane, filtered and dried to afford a further sample of 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (3.173 g, 19%); 1H NMR (400 MHz,

CDCI3) 1.36 (12H, s), 2.35 (3H, s), 7.01 (1H, d), 7.23 (2H, d), 7.52 (1H, d), 7.74 (1H, d), 8.03 (2H, d), 8.42 (1H, d); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 399.40.

Example 2.01 and example 2.02

4-{4-[(3R)-3-Methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((S)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-blpyridine, and

4-{4-[(3R)-3-Methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-blpyridine


(3R)-3-Methyl-4-(6-(1-(S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl)-2-(1-tosyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)morpholine (1.67 g, 2.95 mmol) was dissolved in DME:water 4: 1 (60 ml) and heated to 50 °C. Sodium hydroxide, 2M aqueous solution (2.58 ml, 5.16 mmol) was then added and heating continued for 18 hours. The reaction mixture was acidified with 2M H Cl (~2 ml) to pH5. The reaction mixture was evaporated to dryness and the residue dissolved in EtOAc (250 ml), and washed with water (200 ml). The organic layer was dried over MgSO4, filtered and evaporated onto silica gel (10 g). The resulting powder was purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 0 to 7% MeOH in DCM. Pure fractions were evaporated and the residue was purified by preparative chiral chromatography on a Merck 50mm, 20μm ChiralCel OJ column, eluting isocratically with 50% isohexane in EtOH/MeOH (1 : 1) (modified with TEA) as eluent. The fractions containing the desired compound were evaporated to dryness to afford the title compound: 4-{4-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (0.538g, 44%) as the first eluting compound; 1H NMR (400 MHz,

DMSO-d6) 1.29 (3H, d), 1.51 (3H, m), 1.70 – 1.82 (1H, m), 3.11 (3H, s), 3.28 (1H, m, obscured by water peak), 3.48 – 3.60 (1H, m), 3.68 (1H, dd), 3.75 – 3.87 (2H, m), 4.02 (1H, dd), 4.19 (1H, d), 4.60 (1H, s), 7.01 (1H, s), 7.23 (1H, dd), 7.51 – 7.67 (1H, m), 7.95 (1H, d), 8.34 (1H, d), 11.76 (1H, s); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 413.12. Chiral HPLC: (HP1100 System 4, 5μm Chiralcel OJ-H (250 mm × 4.6 mm) column eluting with iso-Hexane/EtOH/MeOH/TEA 50/25/25/0.1) Rf, 9.013 >99%. Crystals were grown and isolated by slow evaporation to dryness in air from EtOAc. These crystals were used to obtain the structure shown in Fig 1 by X-Ray diffraction (see below). Example 2.02: 4-{4-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (326 mg, 0.79 mmol) was dissolved in DCM (3 ml). Silica gel (0.5 g) was added and the mixture concentrated in vacuo. The resulting powder was purified by flash chromatography on silica, eluting with a gradient of 0 to 5% MeOH in DCM. Pure fractions were evaporated to dryness and the residue was crystallized from EtOAc/n-heptane to afford 4-{4-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((R)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (256 mg, 79%) as a white crystalline solid; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 1.29 (3H, d), 1.39 – 1.60 (3H, m), 1.71 – 1.81 (1H, m), 3.10 (3H, d), 3.21 – 3.29 (1H, m), 3.52 (1H, td), 3.67 (1H, dd), 3.80 (2H, t), 4.01 (1H, dd), 4.19 (1H, d), 4.59 (1H, s), 7.01 (1H, s), 7.23 (1H, dd), 7.54 – 7.62 (1H, m), 7.95 (1H, d), 8.34 (1H, d), 11.75 (1H, s). DSC (Mettler-Toledo DSC 820, sample run at a heating rate of 10°C per minute from 30°C to 350°C in a pierced aluminium pan) peak, 224.1 FC.

and the title compound: 4-{4-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((S)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (0.441 g, 36%) as the second eluting compound; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 1.28 (3H, d), 1.40 – 1.58 (3H, m), 1.70 – 1.80 (1H, m), 3.10 (3H, d), 3.23 – 3.27 (1H, m), 3.51 (1H, dt), 3.66 (1H, dd), 3.80 (2H, d), 4.01 (1H, dd), 4.21 (1H, d), 4.56 (1H, s), 6.99 (1H, s), 7.22 (1H, dd), 7.54 – 7.61 (1H, m), 7.94 (1H, d), 8.33 (1H, d), 11.75 (1H, s); m/z: (ES+) MH+, 413.12. Chiral HPLC: (HP1100 System 4, 5μm Chiralcel OJ-H (250 mm × 4.6 mm) column eluting with iso-Hexane/EtOH/MeOH/TEA 50/25/25/0.1) Rf, 15.685 >99%. Example 2.01 : 4-{4-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((S)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (66.5 mg) was purified by crystallisation from EtOH/water to afford 4-{4-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-6-[1-((S)-S-methylsulfonimidoyl)cyclopropyl]pyrimidin-2-yl}-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine (0.050 g); 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 1.40 (3H, d), 1.59 (2H, s), 1.81 (2H, s), 2.41 (1H, s), 3.16 (3H, s), 3.39 (1H, td), 3.59 – 3.67 (1H, m), 3.77 (1H, dd), 3.86 (1H, d), 4.07 (1H, dd), 4.17 (1H, d), 4.54 (1H, s), 6.91 (1H, s), 7.34 (1H, t), 7.43 (1H, t), 8.05 (1H, d), 8.41 (1H, d), 9.14 (1H, s).

Scheme 1. Medicinal Chemistry Route to AZD6738

Reagent and conditions:

(a) (3R)-3-methylmorpholine, TEA, DCM, 77%;

(b) LiBH4, THF, 100%;

(c) MsCl, TEA, DCM, 100%;

(d) LiI, dioxane, 78%;

(e) NaSMe, DMF, 96%;

(f) m-CPBA, DCM;

(g) crystallization or chromatography, 40% (two steps);

(h) IBDA, trifluoroacetamide, MgO, DCM, Rh2(OAc)4 82%;

(i) 1,2-dibromoethane, sodium hydroxide, TOAB, 2-MeTHF, 47%;

(j) TsCl, tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulfate, sodium hydroxide, DCM, 92%;

(k) bis(pinacolato)diboron, potassium acetate, 1,1′-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene dichloro palladium(II), DMF, 62%;

(l) Pd(II)Cl2(PPh3)2, Na2CO3, DME, water, 80%;

(m) 2 N NaOH, DME, water, 92%.

Foote, K. M. N.Johannes, W. M.Turner, P.Morpholino Pyrimidines and their use in therapyWO 2011/154737 A1, 15 December 2011.

PAPER

Development and Scale-up of a Route to ATR Inhibitor AZD6738

  • William R. F. Goundry et al
Cite This:Org. Process Res. Dev.2019XXXXXXXXXX-XXX
Publication Date:June 21, 2019
https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.oprd.9b00075
AZD6738 is currently being tested in multiple phase I/II trials for the treatment of cancer. Its structure, comprising a pyrimidine core decorated with a chiral morpholine, a cyclopropyl sulfoximine, and an azaindole, make it a challenging molecule to synthesize on a large scale. We describe the evolution of the chemical processes, following the manufacture of AZD6738 from the initial scale-up through to multikilos on plant scale. During this evolution, we developed a biocatalytic process to install the sulfoxide with high enantioselectivity, followed by introduction of the cyclopropyl group first in batch, then in a continuous flow plate reactor, and finally through a series of continuous stirred tank reactors. The final plant scale process to form AZD6738 was operated on 46 kg scale with an overall yield of 18%. We discuss the impurities formed throughout the process and highlight the limitations of this route for further scale-up.
Abstract Image
imino-methyl-[1-[6-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-2-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]cyclopropyl]-oxo-λ6-sulfane (1) (30.0 g) were added at 75 °C, and the reaction mixture was held for 2 h. The mixture was cooled to 20 °C, and n-heptane (141.9 kg) was added at the rate of 40 kg/h. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with a mixture of 1-butanol and n-heptane (9.3 and 22.4 kg respectively), and then given a further wash with n-heptane (32.2 kg). The solid was dried at 40 °C to give imino-methyl-[1-[6-[(3R)-3-methylmorpholin-4-yl]-2-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]cyclopropyl]-oxo-λ6-sulfane (1) as a whit  solid (41.4 kg, 92% yield): Assay (HPLC) 99.9%; Assay (NMR) 99% wt/wt.

REFERENCES

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2: Wallez Y, Dunlop CR, Johnson TI, Koh SB, Fornari C, Yates JWT, Bernaldo de Quirós Fernández S, Lau A, Richards FM, Jodrell DI. The ATR Inhibitor AZD6738 Synergizes with Gemcitabine In Vitro and In Vivo to Induce Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Regression. Mol Cancer Ther. 2018 Jun 11. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-18-0010. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29891488.

3: Fròsina G, Profumo A, Marubbi D, Marcello D, Ravetti JL, Daga A. ATR kinase inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and AZD6738 effectively penetrate the brain after systemic administration. Radiat Oncol. 2018 Apr 23;13(1):76. doi: 10.1186/s13014-018-1020-3. PubMed PMID: 29685176; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5914052.

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5: Jin J, Fang H, Yang F, Ji W, Guan N, Sun Z, Shi Y, Zhou G, Guan X. Combined Inhibition of ATR and WEE1 as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer. Neoplasia. 2018 May;20(5):478-488. doi: 10.1016/j.neo.2018.03.003. Epub 2018 Mar 30. PubMed PMID: 29605721; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5915994.

6: Henssen AG, Reed C, Jiang E, Garcia HD, von Stebut J, MacArthur IC, Hundsdoerfer P, Kim JH, de Stanchina E, Kuwahara Y, Hosoi H, Ganem NJ, Dela Cruz F, Kung AL, Schulte JH, Petrini JH, Kentsis A. Therapeutic targeting of PGBD5-induced DNA repair dependency in pediatric solid tumors. Sci Transl Med. 2017 Nov 1;9(414). pii: eaam9078. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aam9078. PubMed PMID: 29093183; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5683417.

7: Jones BC, Markandu R, Gu C, Scarfe G. CYP-Mediated Sulfoximine Deimination of AZD6738. Drug Metab Dispos. 2017 Nov;45(11):1133-1138. doi: 10.1124/dmd.117.077776. Epub 2017 Aug 23. PubMed PMID: 28835442.

8: Dunne V, Ghita M, Small DM, Coffey CBM, Weldon S, Taggart CC, Osman SO, McGarry CK, Prise KM, Hanna GG, Butterworth KT. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia related-3 (ATR) improves therapeutic index in preclinical models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) radiotherapy. Radiother Oncol. 2017 Sep;124(3):475-481. doi: 10.1016/j.radonc.2017.06.025. Epub 2017 Jul 8. PubMed PMID: 28697853.

9: Kiesel BF, Shogan JC, Rachid M, Parise RA, Vendetti FP, Bakkenist CJ, Beumer JH. LC-MS/MS assay for the simultaneous quantitation of the ATM inhibitor AZ31 and the ATR inhibitor AZD6738 in mouse plasma. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2017 May 10;138:158-165. doi: 10.1016/j.jpba.2017.01.055. Epub 2017 Feb 4. PubMed PMID: 28213176; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5357441.

10: Ma J, Li X, Su Y, Zhao J, Luedtke DA, Epshteyn V, Edwards H, Wang G, Wang Z, Chu R, Taub JW, Lin H, Wang Y, Ge Y. Mechanisms responsible for the synergistic antileukemic interactions between ATR inhibition and cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia cells. Sci Rep. 2017 Feb 8;7:41950. doi: 10.1038/srep41950. PubMed PMID: 28176818; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5296912.

11: Vendetti FP, Leibowitz BJ, Barnes J, Schamus S, Kiesel BF, Abberbock S, Conrads T, Clump DA, Cadogan E, O’Connor MJ, Yu J, Beumer JH, Bakkenist CJ. Pharmacologic ATM but not ATR kinase inhibition abrogates p21-dependent G1 arrest and promotes gastrointestinal syndrome after total body irradiation. Sci Rep. 2017 Feb 1;7:41892. doi: 10.1038/srep41892. PubMed PMID: 28145510; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5286430.

12: Min A, Im SA, Jang H, Kim S, Lee M, Kim DK, Yang Y, Kim HJ, Lee KH, Kim JW, Kim TY, Oh DY, Brown J, Lau A, O’Connor MJ, Bang YJ. AZD6738, A Novel Oral Inhibitor of ATR, Induces Synthetic Lethality with ATM Deficiency in Gastric Cancer Cells. Mol Cancer Ther. 2017 Apr;16(4):566-577. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0378. Epub 2017 Jan 30. PubMed PMID: 28138034.

13: Dillon MT, Barker HE, Pedersen M, Hafsi H, Bhide SA, Newbold KL, Nutting CM, McLaughlin M, Harrington KJ. Radiosensitization by the ATR Inhibitor AZD6738 through Generation of Acentric Micronuclei. Mol Cancer Ther. 2017 Jan;16(1):25-34. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0239. Epub 2016 Nov 9. PubMed PMID: 28062704; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5302142.

14: Kim H, George E, Ragland R, Rafial S, Zhang R, Krepler C, Morgan M, Herlyn M, Brown E, Simpkins F. Targeting the ATR/CHK1 Axis with PARP Inhibition Results in Tumor Regression in BRCA-Mutant Ovarian Cancer Models. Clin Cancer Res. 2017 Jun 15;23(12):3097-3108. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-16-2273. Epub 2016 Dec 19. PubMed PMID: 27993965; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5474193.

15: Kim HJ, Min A, Im SA, Jang H, Lee KH, Lau A, Lee M, Kim S, Yang Y, Kim J, Kim TY, Oh DY, Brown J, O’Connor MJ, Bang YJ. Anti-tumor activity of the ATR inhibitor AZD6738 in HER2 positive breast cancer cells. Int J Cancer. 2017 Jan 1;140(1):109-119. doi: 10.1002/ijc.30373. Epub 2016 Oct 21. PubMed PMID: 27501113.

16: Biskup E, Naym DG, Gniadecki R. Small-molecule inhibitors of Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3 related kinase (ATR) sensitize lymphoma cells to UVA radiation. J Dermatol Sci. 2016 Dec;84(3):239-247. doi: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2016.09.010. Epub 2016 Sep 16. PubMed PMID: 27743911.

17: Checkley S, MacCallum L, Yates J, Jasper P, Luo H, Tolsma J, Bendtsen C. Corrigendum: Bridging the gap between in vitro and in vivo: Dose and schedule predictions for the ATR inhibitor AZD6738. Sci Rep. 2016 Feb 9;6:16545. doi: 10.1038/srep16545. PubMed PMID: 26859465; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4747154.

18: Kwok M, Davies N, Agathanggelou A, Smith E, Oldreive C, Petermann E, Stewart G, Brown J, Lau A, Pratt G, Parry H, Taylor M, Moss P, Hillmen P, Stankovic T. ATR inhibition induces synthetic lethality and overcomes chemoresistance in TP53- or ATM-defective chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Blood. 2016 Feb 4;127(5):582-95. doi: 10.1182/blood-2015-05-644872. Epub 2015 Nov 12. PubMed PMID: 26563132.

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//////AZD6738AZD-6738AZD 6738, AstraZeneca,  University of Pennsylvania, Phase II,  Breast cancer, Gastric cancer, Non-small cell lung cancer, Ovarian cancer, Ceralasertib
C[C@@H]1COCCN1c2cc(nc(n2)c3cncc4[nH]ccc34)C5(CC5)[S@](=N)(=O)C

SEVITERONEL, севитеронел , سيفيتيرونيل , 赛维罗奈 ,


VT-464.svg

SEVITERONEL

CAS Registry Number 1610537-15-9

Molecular formulaC18 H17 F4 N3 O3, MW 399.34

1H-1,2,3-Triazole-5-methanol, α-[6,7-bis(difluoromethoxy)-2-naphthalenyl]-α-(1-methylethyl)-, (αS)-

(αS)-α-[6,7-Bis(difluoromethoxy)-2-naphthalenyl]-α-(1-methylethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole-5-methanol

8S5OIN36X4

севитеронел [Russian] [INN]
سيفيتيرونيل [Arabic] [INN]
赛维罗奈 [Chinese] [INN]
  • Mechanism of ActionAndrogen receptor antagonists; Estrogen receptor antagonists; Steroid 17-alpha-hydroxylase inhibitors; Steroid 17-alpha-hydroxylase modulators
  • WHO ATC codeL01 (Antineoplastic Agents)L01X-X (Other antineoplastic agents)
  • EPhMRA codeL1 (Antineoplastics)L1X9 (All other antineoplastics)

1H-1,2,3-Triazole-5-methanol, alpha-(6,7-bis(difluoromethoxy)-2-naphthalenyl)-alpha-(1-methylethyl)-, (alphaS)-

Seviteronel (developmental codes VT-464 and, formerly, INO-464) is an experimental cancer medication which is under development by Viamet Pharmaceuticals and Innocrin Pharmaceuticals for the treatment of prostate cancer and breast cancer.[1] It is a nonsteroidalCYP17A1 inhibitor and works by inhibiting the production of androgens and estrogens in the body.[1] As of July 2017, seviteronel is in phase II clinical trials for both prostate cancer and breast cancer.[1] In January 2016, it was designated fast-track status by the United States Food and Drug Administration for prostate cancer.[1][2] In April 2017, seviteronel received fast-track designation for breast cancer as well.[1]

  • Originator Viamet Pharmaceuticals
  • Developer Innocrin Pharmaceuticals
  • Clas sAntiandrogens; Antineoplastics; Fluorine compounds; Naphthalenes; Propanols; Small molecules; Triazoles
  • Mechanism of Action Androgen receptor antagonists; Estrogen receptor antagonists; Steroid 17-alpha-hydroxylase inhibitors; Steroid 17-alpha-hydroxylase modulators
  • Phase II Breast cancer; Prostate cancer; Solid tumours
  • 31 Jan 2019 Innocrin Pharmaceutical completes a phase II trial in Prostate Cancer (Second-line therapy or greater, Hormone refractory) in the US (NCT02445976)
  • 31 Jan 2019 Innocrin Pharmaceutical completes a phase II trial for Prostate Cancer (Hormone refractory) in the US, UK, Switzerland and Greece (NCT02012920)
  • 31 Jan 2019 Innocrin Pharmaceuticals completes the phase I/II CLARITY-01 trial for Breast cancer (Late stage disease) in USA (NCT02580448)
  • CYP-17 useful for treating fungal infections, prostate cancer, and polycystic ovary syndrome, assigned to Viamet Pharmaceuticals Inc , naming Hoekstra and Rafferty. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals , a spin-out of Viamet is developing oral seviteronel, the lead dual selective inhibitors of the 17,20-lyase activity of P450c17 (CYP17) and androgen receptor antagonist, which also includes VT-478 and VT-489, developed using the company’s Metallophile technology, for treating castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in men, breast cancer and androgen (AR) related cancers.

Pharmacology

Pharmacodynamics

Seviteronel is a nonsteroidal antiandrogen, acting specifically as an androgen synthesis inhibitor via inhibition of the enzyme CYP17A1, for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer.[3][4][5][6][7][8] It has approximately 10-fold selectivity for the inhibition of 17,20-lyase (IC50 = 69 nM) over 17α-hydroxylase (IC50 = 670 nM), which results in less interference with corticosteroid production relative to the approved CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone acetate (which must be administered in combination with prednisone to avoid glucocorticoid deficiency and mineralocorticoid excess due to 17α-hydroxylase inhibition) and hence may be administerable without a concomitant exogenous glucocorticoid.[4][5][6][7][8] Seviteronel is 58-fold more selective for inhibition of 17,20-lyase than abiraterone (the active metabolite of abiraterone acetate), which has IC50 values for inhibition of 17,20-lyase and 17α-hydroxylase of 15 nM and 2.5 nM, respectively.[7] In addition, in in vitro models, seviteronel appears to possess greater efficacy as an antiandrogen relative to abiraterone.[6] Similarly to abiraterone acetate, seviteronel has also been found to act to some extent as an antagonist of the androgen receptor.[6]

Society and culture

Generic names

Seviteronel is the generic name of the drug and its INN.[9]

PATENT

WO2012064943

PATENT

WO-2019113312

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019113312&redirectedID=true

The present invention relates to a process for preparing compound 1 that is useful as an anticancer agent. In particular, the invention seeks to provide a new methodology for preparing compound 1 and substituted derivatives thereof.

Living organisms have developed tightly regulated processes that specifically import metals, transport them to intracellular storage sites and ultimately transport them to sites of use. One of the most important functions of metals such as zinc and iron in biological systems is to enable the activity of metalloenzymes. Metalloenzymes are enzymes that incorporate metal ions into the enzyme active site and utilize the metal as a part of the catalytic process. More than one-third of all characterized enzymes are metalloenzymes.

The function of metalloenzymes is highly dependent on the presence of the metal ion in the active site of the enzyme. It is well recognized that agents which bind to and inactivate the active site metal ion dramatically decrease the activity of the enzyme. Nature employs this same strategy to decrease the activity of certain metalloenzymes during periods in which the enzymatic activity is undesirable. For example, the protein TIMP (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases) binds to the zinc ion in the active site of various matrix metalloprotease enzymes and thereby arrests the enzymatic activity. The pharmaceutical industry has used the same strategy in the design of therapeutic agents. For example, the azole antifungal agents fluconazole and voriconazole contain a l-( 1,2, 4-triazole) group that binds to the heme iron present in the active site of the target enzyme lanosterol demethylase and thereby inactivates the enzyme.

In the design of clinically safe and effective metalloenzyme inhibitors, use of the most appropriate metal-binding group for the particular target and clinical indication is critical. If a weakly binding metal-binding group is utilized, potency may be suboptimal. On the other hand, if a very tightly binding metal-binding group is utilized, selectivity for the target enzyme versus related metalloenzymes may be suboptimal. The lack of optimal selectivity can be a cause for clinical toxicity due to unintended inhibition of these off-target metalloenzymes.

One example of such clinical toxicity is the unintended inhibition of human drug metabolizing enzymes such as CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 by the currently-available azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole and voriconazole. It is believed that this off-target inhibition is caused primarily by the indiscriminate binding of the currently utilized l-(l,2,4-triazole) to iron in the active site of CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4. Another example of this is the joint pain that has been observed in many clinical trials of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. This toxicity is considered to be related to inhibition of off-target metalloenzymes due to indiscriminate binding of the hydroxamic acid group to zinc in the off-target active sites.

Therefore, the search for metal-binding groups that can achieve a better balance of potency and selectivity remains an important goal and would be significant in the realization of therapeutic agents and methods to address currently unmet needs in treating and preventing diseases, disorders and symptoms thereof. Similarly, methods of synthesizing such therapeutic agents on the laboratory and, ultimately, commercial scale is needed. Addition of metal-based nucleophiles (Zn, Zr, Ce, Ti, Mg, Mn, Li) to azole-methyl substituted ketones have been effected in the synthesis of voriconazole (M. Butters, Org. Process Res. Dev. 2001, 5, 28-36). The nucleophile in these examples was an ethyl-pyrimidine substrate. Similarly, optically active azole-methyl epoxide has been prepared as precursor electrophile toward the synthesis of ravuconazole (A. Tsuruoka, Chem. Pharm. Bull. 1998, 46, 623-630). Despite this, the development of methodology with improved efficiency and selectivity is desirable

Preparation of Compound 4:

de 

Acetone (850 L), 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (85.00 kg, 530.7 moles), and potassium carbonate (219.3 kg, 1,586.7 moles) were charged to a clean, fixed reactor with stirring and with the temperature maintained at 20 – 35 °C. Dimethyl sulfate (200.6 kg, 2131.09) was added to the stirred reaction at a rate that maintains the internal temperature of the exothermic reaction below 60 °C. This addition typically requires about 3 hours. At the end of the dimethyl sulfate addition, the reaction is continued to allow to stir while maintaining the internal temperature at 50 – 60 °C. After about 3 hours, the reaction was analyzed by HPLC. The reaction was concentrated by atmospheric pressure distillation of acetone. The distillation was continued until 340 – 425 L of distillate was collected. This represents 40 – 50 % of the initial charge of acetone. At the end of the distillation, the reaction mass is present as a thick suspension. While maintaining the internal temperature below 60 °C, the reactor contents were slowly diluted with water (850 L). When the addition is complete, the reaction was cooled to an internal temperature of 25 – 35 °C and stirring was continued for 1 – 2 hours after the designated internal temperature was reached. Compound 2 was isolated by filtration and the cake was washed with water (at least 3 X 85 L). Compound 2 was dried at 40 – 45 °C and full vacuum until the water content by Karl Fisher titration is found to be NMT 2.0 %. Typically, greater than 90 kg of dry product is obtained with an assay of >99.5% AUC by HPLC.

Dichloromethane (with a water content by Karl Fisher Titration of NMT 0.50%) (928 L) and 2,3-dimethoxynaphthalene (2, 116.00 kg, 616.3 moles) were charged to a clean, fixed reactor with stirring and with the temperature maintained at 20 – 35 °C. The reactor contents were cooled to an internal temperature of -5 to 0 °C. Aluminum chloride (164.72 kg, 1235.3 moles, 2.00 molar equivalents) was carefully added in portions to the reaction, while maintaining the internal temperature at -5 to +5 °C. This addition typically requires 5 – 6 hours. At the end of the addition, the reactor contents were cooled to an internal temperature of -15 to -5 °C. Isobutyryl chloride (102.08 kg, 958.05 moles, 1.55 molar equivalents) was slowly added to the reaction while maintaining the internal temperature at -15 to -5 °C. The addition typically requires about 3 hours. At the end of the isobutyryl chloride addition, the reaction was warmed to an internal temperature of 20 – 35 °C. When the temperature was reached, these conditions were maintained for 2 – 3 hours until the IPC indicated a level of residual starting material of NMT 2.0 % AUC by HPLC. The reactor contents were then cooled to 0 – 5 °C. The reaction was quenched by adding the reaction to a precooled (0 – 5 °C) 3M aqueous solution of hydrochloric hcid (Water, 754 L: cone. HC1, 406 L). The mixture was vigorously stirred for 15 – 20 minutes then the layers were allowed to settle. The lower, dichloromethane, product-containing layer was washed sequentially with 10 % aqueous sodium bicarbonate (1044 L), water (1160 L), then 10 % aqueous sodium chloride (1044 L). The reaction was concentrated by distillation under full vacuum and at an internal temperature of NMT 40 °C. The reaction concentrate was cooled to 20 – 35 °C and diluted with hexanes (812 L). The resultant slurry was warmed to 45 – 50 °C and these conditions were maintained for 1 – 2 hours. The reactor contents were cooled to 20 – 35 °C for 1 – 2 hours. Compound 3 was isolated by filtration. The cake was washed with fresh hexanes (232 L) twice, the filter was cooled, and the cake was washed an additional two times with hexanes. Compound 3 was dried under full vacuum at a jacket temperature of 45 °C. Typically, about 95 kg of dry product was isolated with a product purity of >90% by HPLC.

Acetic acid (212.5 L L) and l-(6,7-dimethoxynaphthalene-2-yl)-2-methylpropane-l- one (42.5 kg, 164.5 moles) were charged to a clean, fixed reactor with stirring and with the temperature maintained at 25 – 45 °C. Concentrated hydrochloric acid (425.0 L) was added carefully to the stirring reactor contents while maintaining reactor contents at an internal temperature of 25 – 45 °C. When the addition was complete, the internal temperature of the reaction was raised to 100 – 105 °C. Note that the reaction is a heterogeneous mixture. The reaction was stirred under these conditions for 6 – 8 hours. The reaction was cooled to 85 – 90 °C to which was carefully added a fresh portion of hydrochloric acid (127.5 L). The reaction was warmed to 100 – 105 °C and stirred for another 6 – 8 hours. The reaction was cooled to 85 – 90 °C. The reaction was cooled further to 70 – 80 °C. Water (212.5 L) was added to the well stirred reaction and the reactor contents were cooled to an internal temperature of 35 – 45 °C and stirred for 3 – 4 hours. Compound 4 was collected by filtration. The wet cake was washed with water (212.5 L). The wet cake was added to a clean reactor with a 5% aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution and stirred at an internal temperature of 35 – 45 °C for 1 – 2 hours.

Compound 4 was collected by filtration and washed with water (212.5 L). Compound 4 was dried under full vacuum and a temperature of < 50 °C until the water content of the dried material was found to be NMT 5.0% by Karl Fisher Titration. The yield is typically >31 kg with a purity >99.5 %.

Preparation of Compound 5:

The following difluoromethylation conditions listed in Table 1 were investigated:

Preparation 1:

The reaction flask was dried under an argon flow at 120 °C. (lS,2R)-l-Phenyl-2-(l- pyrrolidinyl)propan-l-ol (ligand 45) (196.6 g, 0.96 mol, 2.2 eq.) was added into the flask and then toluene (195 mL) was added. The solution was cooled to <12 °C. A solution of diethyl zinc (716.4 g, 0.87 mol, 15 wt%, 2 eq.) in toluene was added through a septum over 30 min at 0-10 °C. Further, a solution of ((Trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)-magnesium bromide in THF (1.81 kg; 0.87 mol, 9.7 wt%, 2 eq.) was added over 30 min at 0-10 °C. Finally, trifluoroethanol (87.0 g; 0.87 mol; 2 eq.) was added over 10 min at 0-10 °C. The reaction solution was stirred at 10-12 °C for 3 h. Compound 5 (143.4 g; 0.434 mol; 1 eq.) was added (as a solid) at room

temperature. The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 h and at 55 °C for 17 h. The reaction solution was cooled to room temperature and dosed with aqueous HC1 (3600 mL; 7.5 wt%) within 20 min. The temperature of the mixture was kept below 25 °C. Toluene (1250 mL) was added and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 5 min. The aqueous phase was separated and stored for the recycling of ligand 45. The organic phases were washed with water (638 mL) and concentrated via distillation under reduced pressure (50 mbar). The residue (approx. 184 g) was treated with heptane (200 mL), which was removed

via distillation. The residue was dissolved in heptane (2050 mL) at 50 °C. The mixture was cooled to room temperature and subsequently to -8 °C within 2 hours. The obtained suspension was stirred at -8 °C for 1 h. Crystallized compound 5 (20.0 g; 14%) was isolated via filtration, washed twice with cold (0 °C) heptane (2×20 mL) and dried under vacuum at 50 °C for 12 hours. The combined heptane phases were concentrated under reduced pressure to obtain a 48 wt% solution of compound 18b in heptane (yield: 83.0%). The solution was directly used for the next step.

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, DMSO-D6) d: 0.23 (s, 9H), 0.77 (d, J = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 0.93 (d, 7 = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.04 (sept., 7 = 6.7 Hz, 1H), 6.11 (s, 1H), 7.32 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.35 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.68 (dd, 7 = 8.6, 1.5 Hz, 1H), 7.84 (s, 1H), 7.87 (s, 1H), 7.93 (d, 7 = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 8.03 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 94%;

chiral HPLC: e.r. = 18:82.

Preparation 2:

(7S,2R)-l-Phenyl-2-(l-pyrrolidinyl)propan-l-ol (ligand 45) (13.0 kg, 63.3 mol, 2.2 eq.) was charged into the reactor and toluene (60 L) was added. The solution was cooled to < 12 °C. A solution of diethyl zinc (35.6 kg, 57.3 mol, 20 wt%, 2 eq.) in toluene was added via mass flow controller at 8-16 °C. Further, a solution of ((trimethylsilyl)ethynyl)-magnesium bromide in THF (11.5 kg; 57.3 mol, 9.7 wt%, 2 eq.) was added at 8-16 °C. Finally, trifluoroethanol (5.7 kg; 57.3 mol; 2 eq.) was added over 10 min at 8-16 °C.The reaction solution was stirred at 22-25 °C for 3 h. A solution of compound 5 (9.5 kg; 28.7 mol; 1 eq.) in toluene (20 L) was added at room temperature. The reaction mixture was stirred at 25 °C for 1 h and at 55 °C for 17 h. The reaction solution was cooled to room temperature and dosed in aqueous HC1 (225L; 7.5 wt%) within 20 min. The temperature of the mixture should be kept below 25 °C. Toluene (80 L) was added and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 5 min. The organic phases was washed with water (50 L) and concentrated via distillation under reduced pressure (50 mbar). The residue was treated with heptane (100 L), which was removed via distillation. The residue was dissolved in heptane (100 L) at 50°C, which was removed via distillation. The residue was dissolved in heptane (25 L). Heptane (110 L) was added, the mixture was cooled to room temperature and subsequently to 0-5 °C and seeded with compound 5 (0.15 kg). The obtained suspension was cooled to -8 °C within 1 h and stirred at this temperature for 2 h. Crystallized compound 5 was removed via filtration. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure to obtain a 48 wt% solution of compound 18b in heptane (calculated 8.8 kg, 71.6%). This solution was directly used for the next step.

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, DMSO-D6) d: 0.23 (s, 9H), 0.77 (d, J = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 0.93 (d, 7 = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.04 (sept., 7 = 6.7 Hz, 1H), 6.11 (s, 1H), 7.32 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.35 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.68 (dd, 7 = 8.6, 1.5 Hz, 1H), 7.84 (s, 1H), 7.87 (s, 1H), 7.93 (d, 7 = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 8.03 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 94%;

chiral HPLC: e.r. = 18:82.

Recovery of the chiral ligand ( lS,2R)-l-Phenvl-2- 
-l-ol from the

Preparation 1:

The above acidic aqueous phase was diluted with toluene (1000 mL) and the mixture was treated with sodium hydroxide (50 wt% solution) to adjust the pH to 12. The mixture was warmed to 50 °C and sodium chloride (100 g) was added. The aqueous phase was separated and washed with toluene (1000 mL). The combined organic phases were washed with water (200 mL). The combined toluene phases were treated with water (1000 mL) and the pH was adjusted to 2 by the addition of a cone. HC1 solution. The aqueous phase was separated and the mixture was treated with sodium hydroxide (50 wt% solution) at 5 °C to adjust the pH to 12. After seeding, the suspension was stirred at 5 °C for 30 min. The solids were isolated, washed with cold (0 °C) water (4×100 mL) and dried under vacuum at 30 °C for 24 hours. Ligand 45 (178.9g; 91%) was obtained as slightly yellow crystalline solid.

HPLC (purity): 99%.

Preparation 2:

The acidic aqueous phase containing ligand 45 (500 L) was diluted with toluene (125 L) and treated with“Kieselgur” (20 L). The mixture was treated with sodium hydroxide (40 L; 50 wt% solution) to adjust the pH to 12 whereas the temperature was kept <55 °C. The suspension was stirred for 15-20 min and filtered to remove all solids. Toluene (80 L) was added and the aqueous phase was separated. The organic phase was treated with water (150 mL) and the pH was adjusted to 1.5-2 by the addition of an aqueous HC1 solution (10 L; 32 wt%). The aqueous phase was separated, toluene (150 L) was added, and the mixture was treated with sodium hydroxide (5 L; 50 wt% solution) at 5 °C to adjust the pH to 12-12.5. The organic phase was separated, washed with water (30 L), and concentrated under reduced

pressure at 50 °C. Approx. 100L of distillate was removed. A sample of the solution of ligand 45 in toluene was analyzed:

The NMR results indicated a 21.6 wt% solution of ligand 45 in toluene which corresponds to a calculated amount of 118.4 kg (83.6%) of ligand 45.

Preparation of Compound 18a

Preparation 1:

A solution of tertiary alcohol 18b (320 g; 48 wt%; 0.36 mol; 1 eq.) in heptane was dissolved in methanol (800 mL). Potassium carbonate (219 g; 1.58 mol; 4.4 eq.) was added (temperature was kept < 30 °C) and the suspension was stirred at room temperature for 3 h. Water (1250 mL) was added and the mixture was treated with a cone. HC1 solution (approx. 130 mL) to adjust the pH to 7.8. The reaction mixture was extracted twice with methyl- /-butyl ether (MTBE; 2×465 mL). The combined MTBE phases were washed with water (155 mL). Water (190 mL) was added to the MTBE phase and the organic solvent was distilled off under reduced pressure (50 mbar). The obtained emulsion of compound 18a (yield: 99%) was directly used for the next step.

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, CDC13) d: 0.87 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 1.09 (d, / = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 2.20 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 2.47 (s, 1H), 2.77 (s, 1H), 6.63 (t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 6.63 (t, 2/H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 7.65 (s, 1H), 7.69 (s, 1H), 7.74 (dd, 7 = 8.6, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.79 (d, / =

8.6 Hz, 1H), 8.06 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 95%.

Preparation 2:

The solution of tertiary alcohol 18b (48 wt%; 57.5 mol; 1 eq.) in heptane was dissolved in methanol (128 L). Potassium carbonate (35.0 kg; 253 mol; 4.4 eq.) was added (temperature was kept < 30 °C) and the suspension was stirred at 20-30 °C for 3 h. Water (200 L) was added and the mixture was treated with an aqueous HC1 solution (approx. 25 L; 32 wt%) to adjust the pH to 7.5 – 7.8. The reaction mixture was extracted twice with MTBE

(2×66.6 L). The combined MTBE phases were washed with water (25 L). Water (30 L) was added to the MTBE phase and the organic solvent was distilled off under reduced pressure (<80 mbar; 55°C). The residue was dissolved in tert-butanol (25 L). The resulting 18a was cooled to <30°C and used directly in the next step.

^-NMR (600.6 MHz, CDC13) d: 0.87 (d, / = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 1.09 (d, / = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 2.20 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 2.47 (s, 1H), 2.77 (s, 1H), 6.63 (t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 6.63 (t, 2/H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 7.65 (s, 1H), 7.69 (s, 1H), 7.74 (dd, 7 = 8.6, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.79 (d, / = 8.6 Hz, 1H), 8.06 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 95%.

Preparation of Compound 31

Preparation 1:

Benzyl bromide (39.4 g; 0.23 mol; 1 eq.) was dissolved in water (177 mL) and t-BuOH (200 mL). Diisopropylethylamine (DIPEA; 59.4 g; 0.46 mol; 2 eq.) and sodium azide (15.0 g; 0.23 mol; 1 eq.) were added. The suspension was stirred for 5 min at room temperature. A suspension of compound 18a (82 g; 0.23 mol; 1 eq.) in water (123 mL) was treated with t-BuOH (100 mL) and copper (I) iodide (8.8 g; 46 mmol; 0.2 eq.) was added and the temperature was kept below 30 °C. The yellow-brown suspension was stirred for 5 h at room temperature. Zinc powder (5.0 g; 76 mmol) and ammonium chloride (7.4 g; 0.14 mol) were added and the reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 3 hours. The mixture was diluted with MTBE (800 mL), water (280 mL), and an aqueous ammonia solution (120 g; 25 wt%). Solids were removed by filtration and additional MTBE (200 mL) and brine (200 mL) were added. The aqueous phase was separated and extracted with MTBE (400 mL). The combined organic phases were treated with water (150 mL) and MTBE was distilled off under reduced pressure (100 mbar). The obtained suspension of compound 31 (113 g; 50 wt%) in water (approx. 113 mL) was directly used for the next step.

Ή-NMEI (600.6 MHz, DMSO-D6) d: 0.66 (d, / = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 0.83 (d, / = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.78 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.68 (s, 1H), 7.29 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.32 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.36 – 7.26 (m, 5H), 7.79 (s, 1H), 7.82 (s, 1H), 7.82 (dd, 7 = 8.8, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.86 (d, / = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 7.94 (s, 1H), 8.10 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 87%.

Preparation 2:

Benzyl bromide (11.0 kg g; 64.4 mol; 1,12 eq.) was dissolved in water (40 L) and t-BuOH (60 L). DIPEA (16.4 kg; 126.5 mol; 2,2 eq.) and sodium azide (4.12 kg; 63.3 mol; 1 eq.) were added. The suspension was stirred 5 min at room temperature. A mixture of compound 18a (20.5 kg; 57.5 mol; 1 eq.) in ieri-butanol (see previous step) was added together with water (5 L) and copper (I) iodide (2.2 kg; 11.5 mol; 0.2 eq.) at a temperature < 30 °C. The yellow-brown suspension was stirred for 5 h at room temperature. Zinc powder (1.25 kg; 19 mol, 0.33 eq.) and an aqueous solution of ammonium chloride (2.14 kg; 20 wt%; 40 mol; 0.7 eq.) were added and the reaction mixture was stirred at 20-30 °C for 2 hours. The reaction mixture was concentrated under vacuum (<200 mbar, 55 °C). The residue was diluted with MTBE (200 L), water (30 L), and an aqueous ammonia solution (30 kg; 25 wt%). Solids were removed by filtration over a pad of“Kieselgur NF” (2 kg). Brine (50 L) was added for a better phase separation. The aqueous phase was separated and washed with MTBE (200 L). The combined organic phases were washed with an aqueous HC1 solution (1 N, 52 L) and water (50 L). MTBE was distilled off under reduced pressure (<400 mbar, 55°C; distillate min. 230L). The oily residue was dissolved in ethanol (150 L), which was distilled off under reduced pressure (<300 mbar; 55°C; distillate min. 150-155L) and the residue was dissolved in additional ethanol (60 L). To the resulting solution of compound 31 was added water (24 L) and the mixture was warmed to 50-55 °C. The mixture was cooled to 30 °C and crystallization started. The suspension was stirred at 30 °C for 1 h, cooled to <0 °C within 2 hours, and stirred at -5-0 °C for an additional 2 hours. The solids were isolated and washed with ethanol/water (1/1; v/v) (2 x 12 L). The wet product was dissolved in ethanol (115L) at 60 °C and water (24 L) was added. The mixture was cooled to 40 °C and the crystallization started. The suspension was stirred at 30 °C for 1 h, cooled to <0 °C within 2 hours, and stirred at -5-0 °C for additional 2 hours. The solids were isolated and washed (without stirring) with ethanol/water (1/1; v/v) (3 x 8 L). Pure, wet compound 31 was isolated as a white solid, which was used for the next step without drying. 14.0 kg of wet 31 were obtained with a 31 content of 81.6 wt%. Based on the determined content, the calculated amount of pure 31 was 11.4 kg with a yield of 41% over two steps (from 18b).

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, DMSO-D6) d: 0.66 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 0.83 (d, / = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.78 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.68 (s, 1H), 7.29 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.32 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 HZ, 1H), 7.36 – 7.26 (m, 5H), 7.79 (s, 1H), 7.82 (s, 1H), 7.82 (dd, 7 = 8.8, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.86 (d, / = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 7.94 (s, 1H), 8.10 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 87%.

Preparation 3: Synthesis of compound 31 directly from compound 18b

Benzyl bromide (1.64 g, 9.59 mmol, 1.12 eq) was dissolved in water (2.4 mL) and

MeOH (2.4 mL). K2CO3 (2.38 g, 17.2 mmol, 2.00 eq), sodium ascorbate (0.34 g, 1.72 mmol, 0.20 eq) and finally sodium azide (0.62 g, 9.40 mmol, 1.10 eq.) were added. The suspension was stirred for 5 min at room temperature. A suspension of 18b (3.08 g; 8.64 mmol, 1.00 eq) in water (2.5 mL) and MeOH (2.5 mL) and the resulting mixture was stirred for 10 min.

CuS04 (0.21 g, 1.30 mmol, 0.15 eq) were added (slightly exothermic reaction). The reaction mixture was stirred for 19 h and the conversion was determined by HPLC (conv. 100%, purity of compound 31 by HPLC: 83 area%). To the yellow-green suspension was added zinc powder (0.24 g, 4.13 mmol, 0.43 eq) and ammonium chloride (0.34 g, 6.36 mmol, 0.74 eq) were added and the reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. The reaction mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure (150 mbar, 50 °C). The mixture was diluted with MTBE (40 mL), water (15 mL), and an aqueous ammonia solution (6.5 mL). Solids were removed by filtration and brine (5.5 mL) was added. The aqueous phase was separated and extracted with MTBE (20 mL). The combined organic phases were treated with water (10 mL) and the pH was adjusted to a pH of 1 by addition of cone. HC1. After phase separation, the organic layer was washed with water (10 mL). MTBE was distilled off under reduced pressure (100 mbar, 50°C) to give the crude compound 31 as an oil. Water (2.5 mL) and EtOH (30 mL) were added and the mixture was warmed to 50 °C. After cooling to 30 °C, the mixture was seeded with compound 31 and compound 31 started to precipitate. The mixture was kept for 1 h at 30 °C, then cooled to 0 °C over 2 h and kept at 0 °C for 2 h. The resulting product, 31, was collected by filtration and the filter cake was washed with small portions of EtOH/water (1:1). After drying, the product (2.97 g) was obtained as a pale yellow, crystalline solid with an HPLC purity of 79 area% and a NMR content of ca. 70 wt%.

Recrystallization of 
31

Preparation 1:

To a suspension of compound 31 (96 g; 0.196 mol; 50 wt%) in water (96 mL) was added ethanol (480 mL) and the mixture was warmed to 50 °C. The mixture was cooled to 30 °C and crystallization started. The suspension was stirred at 30 °C for 1 h, cooled to 0 °C within 2 hours and stirred at 0 °C for additional 2 hours. The solids were isolated and washed with ethanol/water (1/1; v/v) (3 x 40 mL). The wet product was dissolved in ethanol (280 mL) at 60 °C and water (56 mL) was added. The mixture was cooled to 40 °C and crystallization started. The suspension was stirred at 30 °C for 1 h, cooled to 0 °C within 2 hours, and stirred at 0 °C for an additional 2 hours. The solids were isolated and washed with ethanol/water (1/1; v/v) (3 x 28 mL). Pure, wet compound 31 (46.8 g on dried basis; 49 % over 2 steps) was isolated as a white solid, which was used for the next step without drying.

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, DMSO-D6) d: 0.66 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 0.83 (d, / = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.78 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.68 (s, 1H), 7.29 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.32 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 HZ, 1H), 7.36 – 7.26 (m, 5H), 7.79 (s, 1H), 7.82 (s, 1H), 7.82 (dd, 7 = 8.8, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.86 (d, / = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 7.94 (s, 1H), 8.10 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 99.5%;

chiral HPLC: e.r.: 0.2:99.8%.

mp of dried product: 110 °C.

Preparation 2:

14 kg of ethanol-wet 31 (content 81.6 wt%, calculated 11.4 kg, 23.7 mol) were suspended in ethanol (46 L) and the mixture was warmed to 50-55 °C, forming a homogenous solution at this temperature. Water (9 L) was added at 50-55 °C and the mixture was cooled to 40-45 °C. After the crystallization had started, the suspension was stirred at 40-45 °C for 1 h, cooled to 0 °C within 2 hours, and stirred at 0 °C for additional 2 hours. The solids were isolated and washed with ethanol/water (1/1; v/v) (3 x 8 L). Pure, wet compound 31 (14.5 kg) was isolated as a white solid, which was used for the next step without drying.

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, DMSO-D6) d: 0.66 (d, / = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 0.83 (d, / = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.78 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.68 (s, 1H), 7.29 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.32 (t, 27H,F = 73.4 Hz, 1H), 7.36 – 7.26 (m, 5H), 7.79 (s, 1H), 7.82 (s, 1H), 7.82 (dd, 7 = 8.8, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.86 (d, / = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 7.94 (s, 1H), 8.10 (s (broad), 1H);

HPLC (purity): 99.8%;

chiral HPLC: e.r.: 0.2:99.8%.

mp of dried product: 110 °C.

Preparation of Azidomethyl Pivalate Protected Triazole (6) from Compound 18a

1

Azidomethyl pivalate (1.42 g, 9.00 mmol, 1.05 eq) was suspended in water (6.0 mL) and t-BuOH (7.2 mL) and the suspension was stirred for 5 min. Compound 18a (theor. 3.08 g, 8.64 mmol, 1.00 eq), sodium ascorbate (0.48 g, 2.4 mmol, 0.30 eq), and CuS04 (0.08 g, 0.40 mmol, 0.05 eq.) were added. The reaction mixture was stirred for 19 h and conversion was determined by HPLC (conv. 98%, purity of the product by HPLC: 81 area%). To the green suspension was added MTBE (20 mL), water (10 mL), and an aqueous ammonia solution (2 g). A biphasic turbid mixture was formed. To improve phase separation, additional MTBE (20 mL) and water (10 mL) were added. The aqueous phase was separated and extracted with MTBE (20 mL). The combined organic phases were concentrated under reduced pressure (100 mbar, 50 °C) to give the crude product as a brown oil that solidified upon standing. HPLC purity: ca. 65 area%; NMR content of ca. 73 wt%.

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, CDCL) d: 0.79 (d, 3H), 0.93 (d, 3H), 1.15 (s. 9H), 2.86 (sept, 1H), 3.12 (s, 1H), 6.20 (s, 2H), 6.59 (t/t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 2H), 7.61 (1, 1H), 7.64 (s, 1H), 7.70 – 7.82 (m, 3H), 8.04 (s, 1H).

Preparation of Azidomethyl Pivalate Protected Triazole (6) from 18b

In a reaction flask, sodium ascorbate (277 mg, 1.4 mmol, 1.20 eq) and CuS04 (37 mg, 0.23 mmol, 0.20 eq.) were suspended in MeOH (11 mL). Azidomethyl pivalate (183 mg, 1.16 mmol, 1.00 eq) and 18b (183 mg, 1.16 mmol, 1.00 eq) were added and the mixture was warmed to 60 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 19 h and worked up. To the green suspension was added an aq NH4Cl solution (2 mL) and zinc powder, and the mixture was stirred for 2 h. MTBE (2 mL) was added and the aqueous phase was separated and extracted with MTBE (2 mL). The combined organic phases were concentrated under reduced pressure (100 mbar, 50 °C) to give 6 as a brown oil that solidified upon standing. HPLC purity: ca. 81 area%; NMR content of ca. 57 wt%.

1H-NMR (600.6 MHz, CDCL) d: 0.79 (d, 3H), 0.93 (d, 3H), 1.15 (s. 9H), 2.86 (sept, 1H), 3.12 (s, 1H), 6.20 (s, 2H), 6.59 (t/t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 2H), 7.61 (1, 1H), 7.64 (s, 1H), 7.70 – 7.82 (m, 3H), 8.04 (s, 1H).

Preparation of Compound 1

Preparation 1:

Compound 31 (26 g; 53 mmol; 1 eq.) was dissolved in ethanol (260 mL) and Noblyst Pl 155 (2.2 g; 10 % Pd; 54 wt% water) was added. The autoclave was flushed with nitrogen and hydrogen (5 bar) was added. The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 32 hours. The reaction mixture was treated with charcoal (2 g), stirred for 15 min, and the charcoal was filtered off. The filtrate was concentrated via distillation and the residue (approximately 42 g) was diluted with heptane (200 mL). The mixture was heated to reflux to

obtain a clear solution. The solution was cooled to room temperature within 1 h and the resulting suspension was cooled to 0 °C and stirred for 2 hours at 0 °C. The solids were isolated via filtration and washed with heptane/ethanol (10:1; v/v; 3×10 mL). Compound 1 (18.0 g; 85 %) was dried under vacuum at 60 °C for 24 hours and obtained as a white, crystalline solid.

1H-NMR (600 MHz) d: 0.80 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 0.97 (d, / = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.83 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 6.60 (t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 6.61 (t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.65 (s, 1H), 7.68 (dd, / = 8.7, 1.6 Hz, 1H), 7.74 (s, 1H), 7.75 (d, / = 8.7 Hz, 1H), 8.02 (s (broad), 1H); HPLC (purity): 100%.

Preparation 2:

Compound 31 (26.5 kg; 53.5 mol; 1 eq.) was dissolved in ethanol (265 L) and Pd/C (2.0 kg; 10 % Pd; 54 wt% water) was added. The reactor was flushed with nitrogen, and hydrogen (4.5 bar) was added. The reaction mixture was stirred at 28-32 °C until the reaction was complete. The reaction mixture was treated with charcoal (1.3 kg) at a temperature of <

33 °C, stirred for 10 min, and the charcoal was filtered off, and the filter was washed with ethanol (10 L).The filtrates from two reactions were combined and concentrated via distillation under reduced pressure (max. 65 °C; distillate: min 480 L). The residue (approx. 50-60 L) was diluted with isopropylacetate (250 L). The mixture was again concentrated via distillation under reduced pressure (max. 65 °C; distillate: min 240-245 L). The residue (approx. 60-70 L) was cooled to 35-40 °C and isopropylacetate (125 L) and heptane (540 L) were added. The suspension was heated to reflux (approx. 88 °C) and stirred under reflux for 15-20 min. Subsequently, the mixture was cooled to 0-5 °C within 2 h and stirred at 0-5 °C for 2 hours. The solids were isolated via filtration and washed with heptane/isopropylacetate (5:1; v/v; 2×30 L; 0-5 °C). Wet 1 was dried under vacuum at 60 °C and was obtained as a white, crystalline solid (35.4 kg, 81.9%).

1H-NMR (600 MHz) d: 0.80 (d, / = 6.8 Hz, 3H), 0.97 (d, / = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 2.83 (sept. / = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 6.60 (t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 6.61 (t, 27H,F = 73.5 Hz, 1H), 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.65 (s, 1H), 7.68 (dd, / = 8.7, 1.6 Hz, 1H), 7.74 (s, 1H), 7.75 (d, / = 8.7 Hz, 1H), 8.02 (s (broad), 1H); HPLC (purity): 100%.

Preparation 3: Preparation of Compound 1 from Compound 6

At room temperature, 6 (3.00 g, 5.84 mmol) was dissolved in MeOH (19.8 mL). NaOH (1.0 M, 19.8 mL) was added in one portion and the reaction mixture was stirred for 1 h at room temperature. The reaction progress was monitored by HPLC, which showed 98% conversion after 1 h. Aq. HC1 (19.8 mL) was added and the mixture was diluted with water (120 mL) and MTBE (60 mL), resulting in a clear biphasic solution. After phase separation, the organic phase was washed with aq NaHC03 (20 mL). The organic layer was concentrated under high vacuum (25 mbar, 45 °C) to yield 2.77 g of 1 as a greenish oil. The identity was confirmed by comparison of HPLC retention time with an authentic sample of 1 as well as by 1H NMR.

Recrystallization of Compound 1

Wet 1 (40 kg; isopropylacetate/heptane wet) was treated with isopropylacetate (110 L) and heptane (440 L). The suspension was heated to reflux (approx. 88 °C) and stirred under reflux for 15-20 min. Subsequently, the mixture was cooled to 0-5 °C within 2 h and stirred at 0-5 °C for 2 hours. The solids were isolated via filtration and washed with

heptane/isopropylacetate (5:1; v/v; 2×30 L; 0-5 °C). A sample was taken for analysis

(criterion: a) purity; NLT 99.0 A% by HPLC; b) single impurities, NMT 0.15 A% by HPLC; c) enantiomer VT-463, NMT 1.0 A% by HPLC). Wet 1 was dried under vacuum at 60 °C for not less than 12 h. A sample was taken for analysis: criterion: a) LOD; NMT 0.5 wt% by gravimetry; b) residual toluene, NMT 890 ppm by HS-GC. 1 was obtained as a white, crystalline solid (28.5 kg, 66.7% from 31).

PAPER

 Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2014), 24(11), 2444-2447.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960894X14003606

PATENT

WO 2016040896

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2016040896A1/en

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e http://adisinsight.springer.com/drugs/800035241
  2. ^ http://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/news/newsfda-grants-fast-track-status-innocrins-seviteronel-treat-metastatic-crpc-4770025
  3. ^ Yin L, Hu Q, Hartmann RW (2013). “Recent progress in pharmaceutical therapies for castration-resistant prostate cancer”Int J Mol Sci14 (7): 13958–78. doi:10.3390/ijms140713958PMC 3742227PMID 23880851.
  4. Jump up to:a b Stein MN, Patel N, Bershadskiy A, Sokoloff A, Singer EA (2014). “Androgen synthesis inhibitors in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer”Asian J. Androl16 (3): 387–400. doi:10.4103/1008-682X.129133PMC 4023364PMID 24759590.
  5. Jump up to:a b Rafferty SW, Eisner JR, Moore WR, Schotzinger RJ, Hoekstra WJ (2014). “Highly-selective 4-(1,2,3-triazole)-based P450c17a 17,20-lyase inhibitors”. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett24 (11): 2444–7. doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2014.04.024PMID 24775307.
  6. Jump up to:a b c d Toren PJ, Kim S, Pham S, Mangalji A, Adomat H, Guns ES, Zoubeidi A, Moore W, Gleave ME (2015). “Anticancer activity of a novel selective CYP17A1 inhibitor in preclinical models of castrate-resistant prostate cancer”. Mol. Cancer Ther14 (1): 59–69. doi:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-14-0521PMID 25351916.
  7. Jump up to:a b c Stephen Neidle (30 September 2013). Cancer Drug Design and Discovery. Academic Press. pp. 341–342. ISBN 978-0-12-397228-6.
  8. Jump up to:a b Wm Kevin Kelly; Edouard J. Trabulsi, MD; Nicholas G. Zaorsky, MD (17 December 2014). Prostate Cancer: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Diagnosis and Management. Demos Medical Publishing. pp. 342–. ISBN 978-1-936287-59-8.
  9. ^ http://www.who.int/medicines/publications/druginformation/innlists/RL76.pdf

Further reading

External links[

Seviteronel
VT-464.svg
Clinical data
Synonyms VT-464; INO-464
Routes of
administration
By mouth
Drug class Androgen biosynthesis inhibitorNonsteroidal antiandrogen
ATC code
  • None
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
Chemical and physical data
Formula C18H17F4N3O3
Molar mass 399.339 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

References

  1. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals Created as a Spin-out of the Prostate Cancer Program from Viamet Pharmaceuticals.

    Media Release 

  2. Viamet Pharmaceuticals and the Novartis Option Fund Enter Agreement for Development of Novel Metalloenzyme Inhibitors.

    Media Release 

  3. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Granted SME Status Designation by the European Medicines Agency.

    Media Release 

  4. A Single arm, open label, signal seeking, Phase II a trial of the activity of seviteronel in patients with androgen receptor (AR) positive solid tumours

    ctiprofile 

  5. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals and the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Join Forces for Innovative Phase 2 Clinical Study.

    Media Release 

  6. A Phase 2 Open-label Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Seviteronel in Subjects With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Progressing on Enzalutamide or Abiraterone

    ctiprofile 

  7. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Granted Fast Track Designation by FDA for VT-464 Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Media Release 

  8. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Begins Phase 2 Study of Seviteronel in Women with Estrogen Receptor-positive or Triple-negative Breast Cancer and Expands Two Phase 2 Studies of Seviteronel in Men with Metastatic Castrate-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Media Release 

  9. A Phase 2 Open-Label Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of VT-464 in Patients With Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Who Have Previously Been Treated With Enzalutamide, Androgen Receptor Positive Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Patients, and Men With ER Positive Breast Cancer

    ctiprofile 

  10. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals Inc. to Present Interim Results from Its Phase 1/2 Prostate Cancer Clinical Study and Preclinical Results That Demonstrate VT-464 Efficacy in a Clinically-Relevant Enzalutamide-Resistant Mouse Model.

    Media Release 

  11. A Phase 1/2 Open-Label Study to Evaluate the Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Seviteronel in Subjects With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ctiprofile 

  12. A Phase 1/2 Open-Label, Multiple-Dose Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of Once-Daily VT-464 in Patients With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ctiprofile 

  13. Viamet Pharmaceuticals Appoints Former Novartis Executive Marc Rudoltz, M.D. as Chief Medical Officer.

    Media Release 

  14. VIAMET PHARMACEUTICALS AND THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH TO JOINTLY DEVELOP NOVEL VIAMET COMPOUND.

    Media Release 

  15. Viamet Pharmaceuticals Initiates Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial of Novel Prostate Cancer Therapy, VT-464.

    Media Release 

  16. Viamet Pharmaceuticals to Present at the 32nd Annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference.

    Media Release 

  17. VIAMET PHARMACEUTICALS TO PRESENT AT THE 31st Annual J.P. MORGAN HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE.

    Media Release 

  18. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Initiates Phase 2 Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Study in Men Who Have Failed Enzalutmaide or Abiraterone.

    Media Release 

  19. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals Appoints Fred Eshelman, PharmD as CEO and is Granted Fast Track Designation by FDA for Seviteronel Treatment of Women with Triple-negative Breast Cancer and Women or Men with Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer.

    Media Release 

  20. Gucalp A, Bardia A, Gabrail N, DaCosta N, Danso M, Elias AD, et al. Phase 1/2 study of oral seviteronel (VT-464), a dual CYP17-lyase inhibitor and androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, in patients with advanced AR positive triple negative (TNBC) or estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer (BC). SABCS-2016 2016; abstr. P2-08-04.

    Available from: URL:http://www.abstracts2view.com/sabcs/view.php?nu=SABCS16L_1479

  21. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals Presents Data from the Ongoing Phase 2 Trial of Seviteronel in Estrogen Receptor-positive or Triple-negative Breast Cancer (CLARITY-01) at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

    Media Release 

  22. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Appoints Edwina Baskin-Bey, MD as Chief Medical Officer and Expands the Ongoing Phase 2 Study of Seviteronel in Women with Estrogen Receptor-positive or Triple-negative Breast Cancer (TNBC).

    Media Release 

  23. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Raises $28 Million in Series D Financing.

    Media Release 

  24. A Phase 1/2 Open-Label Study to Evaluate the Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Efficacy of Seviteronel in Subjects With Advanced Breast Cancer

    ctiprofile 

  25. Speers CW, Chandler B, Zhao S, Liu M, Wilder-Romans K, Olsen E, et al. Radiosensitization of androgen receptor (AR)-positive triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells using seviteronel (SEVI), a selective CYP17 lyase and AR inhibitor. ASCO-2017 2017; abstr. e12102.

    Available from: URL: http://abstracts.asco.org/199/AbstView_199_193240.html

  26. Innocrin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Appoints Charles F. Osborne Jr. as its Chief Financial Officer.

    Media Release 

  27. Viamet Pharmaceuticals Secures $18 Million Financing.

    Media Release 

  28. Viamet Pharmaceuticals Raises $4 Million Round of Financing.

    Media Release 

///////////SEVITERONEL, VT-464, INO-464, VT 464, INO 464, Phase II,  Breast cancer,  Prostate cancer,  Solid tumours, viamet, CANCER, севитеронел سيفيتيرونيل 赛维罗奈 

C1(=CN=NN1)C(C1=CC2=C(C=C1)C=C(C(=C2)OC(F)F)OC(F)F)(C(C)C)O

ACLIMOSTAT


img

Image result for Aclimostat

Aclimostat
CAS: 2082752-83-6
Chemical Formula: C26H42N2O6
Molecular Weight: 478.63
Elemental Analysis: C, 65.25; H, 8.85; N, 5.85; O, 20.06

ZGN-1061; ZGN1061; ZGN 1061; Aclimostat,

UNII-X150A3JK8R

X150A3JK8R

(3R,4S,5S,6R)-5-Methoxy-4-[(2R,3R)-2-methyl-3-(3- methylbut-2-en-1-yl)oxiran-2-yl]-1-oxaspiro[2.5]octan-6-yl 3-[2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethyl]azetidine-1-carboxylate

1-Azetidinecarboxylic acid, 3-[2-(4-morpholinyl)ethyl]-, (3R,4S,5S,6R)-5-methoxy-4-[(2R,3R)-2-methyl-3-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-2-oxiranyl]-1-oxaspiro[2.5]oct-6-yl ester

3R,4S,5S,6R)-5-methoxy-4-((2R,3R)-2-methyl-3-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)oxiran-2-yl)-1- oxaspiro[2.5]octan-6-yl 3-(2-morpholinoethyl)azetidine-1-carboxylate

ZAFGEN,  PHASE 2,  DIABETES

Aclimostat, also known as ZGN-1061, is an anti-diabetic, anti-obesity MetAP2 inhibitor.

Over 1.1 billion people worldwide are reported to be overweight. Obesity is estimated to affect over 90 million people in the United States alone. Twenty-five percent of the population in the United States over the age of twenty is considered clinically obese. While being overweight or obese presents problems (for example restriction of mobility, discomfort in tight spaces such as theater or airplane seats, social difficulties, etc.), these conditions, in particular clinical obesity, affect other aspects of health, i.e., diseases and other adverse health conditions associated with, exacerbated by, or precipitated by being overweight or obese. The estimated mortality from obesity-related conditions in the United States is over 300,000 annually (O’Brien et al. Amer J Surgery (2002) 184:4S-8S; and Hill et al. (1998) Science, 280:1371). [0003] There is no curative treatment for being overweight or obese. Traditional pharmacotherapies for treating an overweight or obese subject, such as serotonin and noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitors, noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitors, selective serotonin re- uptake inhibitors, intestinal lipase inhibitors, or surgeries such as stomach stapling or gastric banding, have been shown to provide minimal short-term benefits or significant rates of relapse, and have further shown harmful side-effects to patients. [0004] MetAP2 encodes a protein that functions at least in part by enzymatically removing the amino terminal methionine residue from certain newly translated proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Warder et al. (2008) J. Proteome Res.7:4807). Increased expression of the MetAP2 gene has been historically associated with various forms of cancer. Molecules inhibiting the enzymatic activity of MetAP2 have been identified and have been explored for their utility in the treatment of various tumor types (Wang et al. (2003) Cancer Res.63:7861) and infectious diseases such as microsporidiosis, leishmaniasis, and malaria (Zhang et al. (2002) J. Biomed. Sci.9:34). Notably, inhibition of MetAP2 activity in obese and obese-diabetic animals leads to a reduction in body weight in part by increasing the oxidation of fat and in part by reducing the consumption of food (Rupnick et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:10730).

[0005] Such MetAP2 inhibitors may be useful as well for patients with excess adiposity and conditions related to adiposity including type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis, and

cardiovascular disease (via e.g. ameliorating insulin resistance, reducing hepatic lipid content, and reducing cardiac workload). Accordingly, compounds capable of modulating MetAP2 are needed to address the treatment of obesity and related diseases as well as other ailments favorably responsive to MetAP2 modulator treatment.

Synthesis

CONTD……………….

contd………………….

Tetrahedron, 73(30), 4371-4379; 2017

WO 2017027684

PATENT

WO 2017027684

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2017027684A1/en

Example 1

(3R,4S,5S,6R)-5-methoxy-4-((2R,3R)-2-methyl-3-(3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl)oxiran-2-yl)-1- oxaspiro[2.5]octan-6-yl 3-(2-morpholinoethyl)azetidine-1-carboxylate

Figure imgf000117_0001

[00312] To a mixture of 4-(2-(azetidin-3-yl)ethyl)morpholine, trifluoroacetate (2.33 g, 3.7 mmol) in CH3CN (150 mL) was added DIPEA (2.9 mL, 17 mmol) drop-wise at 0-5oC. The mixture was then stirred at 0-5oC for 10 min, and carbonate Intermediate 1 (1.3 g, 2.9 mmol) was added to the mixture in portions at 0oC under a N2atmosphere. The reaction mixture was stirred at 25oC for 16 hrs. TLC (PE : EtOAc = 3 : 1) showed that the reaction was complete. The solvent was removed under vacuum below 40oC. The residue was diluted with DCM (60 mL), and the DCM solution was washed with ammonium acetate buffer (pH~4, 15 mL x 2). The combined aqueous layers were back-extracted with DCM (20 mL x 2). The combined organic layers were washed with aq. NaHCO3 solution (15 mL x 2, 5% wt), dried over Na2SO4 and concentrated. Purification by silica gel column chromatography (DCM: MeOH=100: 0~60: 1), followed by preparative HPLC (Method A, H2O (0.1% FA) / CH3CN) gave the title compound (1.15 g) as a light yellow syrup. LC-MS: m/z = 479 [M+H]+1H-NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 5.43 (br, 1H), 5.13 (t, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 3.87-4.15 (m, 2H), 3.63-3.65 (m, 4H), 3.52- 3.56 (m, 3H), 3.49 (s, 3H), 2.90 (d, J = 4.4 Hz, 1H), 2.46-2.54 (m, 3H), 2.19-2.36 (m, 7H), 1.97-2.13 (m, 2H), 1.78-1.89 (m, 5H), 1.73 (s, 3H), 1.62 (s, 3H), 1.13 (s, 3H), 0.99 (d, J = 13.6 Hz, 1H).

REFERENCES

1: Malloy J, Zhuang D, Kim T, Inskeep P, Kim D, Taylor K. Single and multiple dose evaluation of a novel MetAP2 inhibitor: Results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2018 Aug;20(8):1878-1884. doi: 10.1111/dom.13305. Epub 2018 Apr 23. PubMed PMID: 29577550; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6055687.

2: Burkey BF, Hoglen NC, Inskeep P, Wyman M, Hughes TE, Vath JE. Preclinical Efficacy and Safety of the Novel Antidiabetic, Antiobesity MetAP2 Inhibitor ZGN-1061. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2018 May;365(2):301-313. doi: 10.1124/jpet.117.246272. Epub 2018 Feb 28. PubMed PMID: 29491038.

//////////////Aclimostat, ZGN-1061, ZAFGEN,  PHASE 2,  DIABETES

 O=C(N1CC(CCN2CCOCC2)C1)O[C@H](CC3)[C@@H](OC)[C@H]([C@@]4(C)O[C@@H]4C/C=C(C)\C)[C@]53CO5

Cavosonstat (N-91115)


Cavosonstat.png

Cavosonstat (N-91115)

CAS 1371587-51-7

C16H10ClNO3, 299.71 g/mol

UNII-O2Z8Q22ZE4, O2Z8Q22ZE4, NCT02589236; N91115-2CF-05; SNO-6

3-chloro-4-(6-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)benzoic acid

Treatment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD), AND Cystic fibrosis,  Nivalis Therapeutics, phase 2

The product was originated at Nivalis Therapeutics, which was acquired by Alpine Immune Sciences in 2017. In 2018, Alpine announced the sale and transfer of global rights to Laurel Venture Capital for further product development.

In 2016, orphan drug and fast track designations were granted to the compound in the U.S. for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  • Originator N30 Pharma
  • Developer Nivalis Therapeutics
  • Class Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators; Glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitors; Nitric oxide stimulants
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Cystic fibrosis
  • 20 Jul 2018 Laurel Venture Capital acquires global rights for cavosonstat from Alpine Immune Sciences
  • 20 Jul 2018 Laurel Venture Capital plans a phase II trial for Asthma
  • 24 Jun 2018 Biomarkers information updated

 Cavosonstat, alos known as N91115) an orally bioavailable inhibitor of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase, promotes cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) maturation and plasma membrane stability, with a mechanism of action complementary to CFTR correctors and potentiators.

cavosonstat-n91115Cavosonstat (N91115) was an experimental therapy being developed by Nivalis Therapeutics. Its primary mechanism of action was to inhibit the S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) enzyme and to stabilize cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) protein activity. A press release published in February announced the end of research for this therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with F508del mutations. The drug, which did not meet primary endpoints in a Phase 2 trial, had been referred to as the first of a new class of compounds that stabilizes the CFTR activity.

History of cavosonstat

During preclinical studies, N91115 (later named cavosonstat) demonstrated an improvement in cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) stability.

Phase 1 study was initiated in 2014 to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (how a drug is processed in the body) of the drug in healthy volunteers. Later that year, the pharmacokinetics of the drug were assessed in another Phase 1 trial involving CF patients with F508del mutation suffering from pancreatic insufficiency. Results were presented a year later by Nivalis, revealing good tolerance and safety in study participants.

A second, much smaller Phase 2 study (NCT02724527) assessed cavosonstat as an add-on therapy to ivacaftor (Kalydeco). This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study included 19 participants who received treatment with cavosonstat (400 mg) added to Kalydeco or with placebo added to Kalydeco. The primary objective was change in lung function from the study’s start to week 8. However, the treatment did not demonstrate a benefit in lung function measures or in sweat chloride reduction at eight weeks (primary objective). As a result, Nivalis decided not to continue development of cavosonstat for CF treatment.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had granted cavosonstat both fast track and orphan drug designations in 2016.

How cavosonstat works

The S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is a signaling molecule that is present in high concentrations in the fluids of the lungs or muscle tissues, playing an important role in the dilatation of the airways. GSNO levels are regulated by the GSNO reductase (GSNOR) enzyme, altering CFTR activity in the membrane. In CF patients, GSNO levels are low, causing a loss of the airway function.

Cavosonstat’s mechanism of action is achieved through GSNOR inhibition, which was presumed to control the deficient CFTR protein. Preclinical studies showed that cavosonstat restored GSNO levels.

PATENT
WO 2012083165

The chemical compound nitric oxide is a gas with chemical formula NO. NO is one of the few gaseous signaling molecules known in biological systems, and plays an important role in controlling various biological events. For example, the endothelium uses NO to signal surrounding smooth muscle in the walls of arterioles to relax, resulting in vasodilation and increased blood flow to hypoxic tissues. NO is also involved in regulating smooth muscle proliferation, platelet function, and neurotransmission, and plays a role in host defense. Although NO is highly reactive and has a lifetime of a few seconds, it can both diffuse freely across membranes and bind to many molecular targets. These attributes make NO an ideal signaling molecule capable of controlling biological events between adjacent cells and within cells.

[0003] NO is a free radical gas, which makes it reactive and unstable, thus NO is short lived in vivo, having a half life of 3-5 seconds under physiologic conditions. In the presence of oxygen, NO can combine with thiols to generate a biologically important class of stable NO adducts called S-nitrosothiols (SNO’s). This stable pool of NO has been postulated to act as a source of bioactive NO and as such appears to be critically important in health and disease, given the centrality of NO in cellular homeostasis (Stamler et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 89:7674-7677 (1992)). Protein SNO’s play broad roles in the function of cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, gastrointestinal, immune, and central nervous system (Foster et al., Trends in Molecular Medicine, 9 (4): 160-168, (2003)). One of the most studied SNO’s in biological systems is S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) (Gaston et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90: 10957-10961 (1993)), an emerging key regulator in NO signaling since it is an efficient trans-nitrosating agent and appears to maintain an equilibrium with other S-nitrosated proteins (Liu et al., Nature, 410:490-494 (2001)) within cells. Given this pivotal position in the NO-SNO continuum, GSNO provides a therapeutically promising target to consider when NO modulation is pharmacologically warranted.

[0004] In light of this understanding of GSNO as a key regulator of NO homeostasis and cellular SNO levels, studies have focused on examining endogenous production of GSNO and SNO proteins, which occurs downstream from the production of the NO radical by the nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) enzymes. More recently there has been an increasing understanding of enzymatic catabolism of GSNO which has an important role in governing available concentrations of GSNO and consequently available NO and SNO’s.

[0005] Central to this understanding of GSNO catabolism, researchers have recently identified a highly conserved S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) (Jensen et al., Biochem J., 331 :659-668 (1998); Liu et al., (2001)). GSNOR is also known as glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (GSH-FDH), alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH-3) (Uotila and Koivusalo, Coenzymes and Coƒactors., D. Dolphin, ed. pp. 517-551 (New York, John Wiley & Sons, (1989)), and alcohol dehydrogenase 5 (ADH-5). Importantly GSNOR shows greater activity toward GSNO than other substrates (Jensen et al., (1998); Liu et al., (2001)) and appears to mediate important protein and peptide denitrosating activity in bacteria, plants, and animals. GSNOR appears to be the major GSNO-metabolizing enzyme in eukaryotes (Liu et al., (2001)). Thus, GSNO can accumulate in biological compartments where GSNOR activity is low or absent (e.g. , airway lining fluid) (Gaston et al., (1993)).

[0006] Yeast deficient in GSNOR accumulate S-nitrosylated proteins which are not substrates of the enzyme, which is strongly suggestive that GSNO exists in equilibrium with SNO-proteins (Liu et al., (2001)). Precise enzymatic control over ambient levels of GSNO and thus SNO-proteins raises the possibility that GSNO/GSNOR may play roles across a host of physiological and pathological functions including protection against nitrosative stress wherein NO is produced in excess of physiologic needs. Indeed, GSNO specifically has been implicated in physiologic processes ranging from the drive to breathe (Lipton et al., Nature, 413: 171-174 (2001)) to regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (Zaman et al., Biochem Biophys Res Commun, 284:65-70 (2001)), to regulation of vascular tone, thrombosis, and platelet function (de Belder et al., Cardiovasc Res.; 28(5):691-4 (1994)), Z. Kaposzta, et al., Circulation; 106(24): 3057 – 3062, (2002)) as well as host defense (de Jesus-Berrios et al., Curr. Biol., 13: 1963-1968 (2003)). Other studies have found that GSNOR protects yeast cells against nitrosative stress both in vitro (Liu et al., (2001)) and in vivo (de Jesus-Berrios et al., (2003)).

[0007] Collectively, data suggest GSNO as a primary physiological ligand for the enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), which catabolizes GSNO and

consequently reduces available SNO’s and NO in biological systems (Liu et al., (2001)), (Liu et al., Cell, 116(4), 617-628 (2004)), and (Que et al., Science, 308, (5728): 1618-1621 (2005)). As such, this enzyme plays a central role in regulating local and systemic bioactive NO. Since perturbations in NO bioavailability has been linked to the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, asthma, gastrointestinal disorders, inflammation, and cancer, agents that regulate GSNOR activity are candidate therapeutic agents for treating diseases associated with NO imbalance.

[0008] Nitric oxide (NO), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) regulate normal lung physiology and contribute to lung pathophysiology. Under normal conditions, NO and GSNO maintain normal lung physiology and function via their anti-inflammatory and bronchodilatory actions. Lowered levels of these mediators in pulmonary diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may occur via up-regulation of GSNOR enzyme activity. These lowered levels of NO and GSNO, and thus lowered anti-inflammatory capabilities, are key events that contribute to pulmonary diseases and which can potentially be reversed via GSNOR inhibition.

[0009] S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) has been shown to promote repair and/or regeneration of mammalian organs, such as the heart (Lima et al., 2010), blood vessels (Lima et al., 2010) skin (Georgii et al., 2010), eye or ocular structures (Haq et al., 2007) and liver (Prince et al., 2010). S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) is the major catabolic enzyme of GSNO. Inhibition of GSNOR is thought to increase endogenous GSNO.

[0010] Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD’s), including Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis, are chronic inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, in which NO, GSNO, and GSNOR can exert influences. Under normal conditions, NO and GSNO function to maintain normal intestinal physiology via anti-inflammatory actions and maintenance of the intestinal epithelial cell barrier. In IBD, reduced levels of GSNO and NO are evident and likely occur via up-regulation of GSNOR activity. The lowered levels of these mediators contribute to the pathophysiology of IBD via disruption of the epithelial barrier via dysregulation of proteins involved in maintaining epithelial tight junctions. This epithelial barrier dysfunction, with the ensuing entry of micro-organisms from the lumen, and the overall lowered anti-inflammatory capabilities in the presence of lowered NO and GSNO, are key events in IBD progression that can be potentially influenced by targeting GSNOR.

[0011] Cell death is the crucial event leading to clinical manifestation of

hepatotoxicity from drugs, viruses and alcohol. Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant redox molecule in cells and thus the most important determinant of cellular redox status. Thiols in proteins undergo a wide range of reversible redox modifications during times of exposure to reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, which can affect protein activity. The maintenance of hepatic GSH is a dynamic process achieved by a balance between rates of GSH synthesis, GSH and GSSG efflux, GSH reactions with reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species and utilization by GSH peroxidase. Both GSNO and GSNOR play roles in the regulation of protein redox status by GSH.

[0012] Acetaminophen overdoses are the leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the United States, Great Britain and most of Europe. More than 100,000 calls to the U.S. Poison Control Centers, 56,000 emergency room visits, 2600 hospitalizations, nearly 500 deaths are attributed to acetaminophen in this country annually. Approximately, 60% recover without needing a liver transplant, 9% are transplanted and 30% of patients succumb to the illness. The acetaminophen-related death rate exceeds by at least three-fold the number of deaths due to all other idiosyncratic drug reactions combined (Lee, Hepatol Res 2008; 38 (Suppl. 1):S3-S8).

[0013] Liver transplantation has become the primary treatment for patients with fulminant hepatic failure and end-stage chronic liver disease, as well as certain metabolic liver diseases. Thus, the demand for transplantation now greatly exceeds the availability of donor organs, it has been estimated that more than 18 000 patients are currently registered with the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) and that an additional 9000 patients are added to the liver transplant waiting list each year, yet less than 5000 cadaveric donors are available for transplantation.

[0014] Currently, there is a great need in the art for diagnostics, prophylaxis, ameliorations, and treatments for medical conditions relating to increased NO synthesis and/or increased NO bioactivity. In addition, there is a significant need for novel compounds, compositions, and methods for preventing, ameliorating, or reversing other NO-associated disorders. The present invention satisfies these needs.

Schemes 1-6 below illustrate general methods for preparing analogs.

[00174] For a detailed example of General Scheme 1 see Compound IV-1 in Example 1.

[00175] For a detailed example of Scheme 2, A conditions, see Compound IV-2 in Example 2.

[00176] For a detailed example of Scheme 2, B conditions, see Compound IV-8 in Example 8.

[00177] For a detailed example of Scheme 3, see Compound IV-9 in Example 9.

[00178] For a detailed example of Scheme 4, Route A, see Compound IV-11 in Example 11.

[00179] For a detailed example of Scheme 4, Route B, see Compound IV-12 in Example 12.

[00180] For a detailed example of Scheme 5, Compound A, see Compound IV-33 in Example 33.

[00181] For a detailed example of Scheme 5, Compound B, see Compound IV-24 in Example 24.

[00182] For a detailed example of Scheme 5, Compound C, see Compound IV-23 in Example 23.

Example 8: Compound IV-8: 3-chloro-4-(6-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)benzoic acid

[00209] Followed Scheme 2, B conditions:

[00210] Step 1: Synthesis of 3-chloro-4-(6-methoxyquinolin-2-yl)benzoic acid:

[00211] A mixture of 2-chloro-6-methoxyquinoline (Intermediate 1) (200 mg, 1.04 mmol), 4-carboxy-2-chlorophenylboronic acid (247 mg, 1.24 mmol) and K2CO3(369 mg, 2.70 mmol) in DEGME / H2O (7.0 mL / 2.0 mL) was degassed three times under N2 atmosphere. Then PdCl2(dppf) (75 mg, 0.104 mmol) was added and the mixture was heated to 110 °C for 3 hours under N2 atmosphere. The reaction mixture was diluted with EtOAc (100 mL) and filtered. The filtrate was washed with brine (20 mL), dried over Na2SO4, filtered and concentrated to give 3-chloro-4-(6-methoxyquinolin-2-yl)benzoic acid (150 mg, yield 46%) as a yellow solid, which was used for the next step without further purification.

[00212] Step 2: Synthesis of Compound IV-8: To a suspension of 3-chloro-4-(6-methoxyquinolin-2-yl)benzoic acid (150 mg, 0.479 mmol) in anhydrous CH2Cl2 (5 mL) was added AlCl3 (320 mg, 2.40 mmol). The reaction mixture was refluxed overnight. The mixture was quenched with saturated NH4Cl (10 mL) and the aqueous layer was extracted with CH2Cl2 / MeOH (v/v=10: l, 30 mL x3). The combined organic layer was washed with brine, dried over Na2SO4, filtered, and concentrated to give the crude product, which was purified by prep-HPLC (0.1% TFA as additive) to give 3-chloro-4-(6-hydroxyquinolin-2-yl)benzoic acid (25 mg, yield 18%). 1H NMR (DMSO, 400 MHz): δ 10.20 (brs, 1H), 8.30 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 1H), 8.10-8.00 (m, 2H), 7.95 (d, J = 9.2 Hz, 1H), 7.80 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H), 7.72 (d, J = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 7.38 (dd, J = 6.4, 2.8 Hz, 1H), 7.22 (d, J = 2.4 Hz, 1H), MS (ESI): m/z 299.9 [M+H]+.

PATENT
WO 2012048181
PATENT
WO 2012170371

REFERENCES

1: Donaldson SH, Solomon GM, Zeitlin PL, Flume PA, Casey A, McCoy K, Zemanick ET,
Mandagere A, Troha JM, Shoemaker SA, Chmiel JF, Taylor-Cousar JL.
Pharmacokinetics and safety of cavosonstat (N91115) in healthy and cystic
fibrosis adults homozygous for F508DEL-CFTR. J Cyst Fibros. 2017 Feb 13. pii:
S1569-1993(17)30016-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jcf.2017.01.009. [Epub ahead of print]
PubMed PMID: 28209466.

//////////Cavosonstat, N-91115, Orphan Drug Status, NCT02589236, N91115-2CF-05,  SNO-6, PHASE 2, N30 Pharma, Nivalis Therapeutics, CYSTIC FIBROSIS, FAST TRACK

O=C(O)C1=CC=C(C2=NC3=CC=C(O)C=C3C=C2)C(Cl)=C1

Deutivacaftor


2D chemical structure of 1413431-07-8

Ivacaftor D9.png

Structure of DEUTIVACAFTOR

Deutivacaftor

RN: 1413431-07-8
UNII: SHA6U5FJZL

N-[2-tert-butyl-4-[1,1,1,3,3,3-hexadeuterio-2-(trideuteriomethyl)propan-2-yl]-5-hydroxyphenyl]-4-oxo-1H-quinoline-3-carboxamide

Molecular Formula, C24-H28-N2-O3, Molecular Weight, 401.552

Synonyms

  • CTP-656
  • D9-ivacaftor
  • Deutivacaftor
  • Ivacaftor D9
  • UNII-SHA6U5FJZL
  • VX-561
  • WHO 10704

Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis

  • Originator Concert Pharmaceuticals
  • Class Amides; Aminophenols; Antifibrotics; Organic deuterium compounds; Quinolones; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator stimulants
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Cystic fibrosis
  • Phase II Cystic fibrosis
  • 15 Apr 2019 Vertex Pharmaceuticals plans a phase II trial for Cystic fibrosis in April 2019 , (EudraCT2018-003970-28), (NCT03911713)
  • 11 Apr 2019 Vertex Pharmaceuticals plans a phase II trial for Cystic Fibrosis (Combination therapy) in May 2019 (NCT03912233)
  • 24 Oct 2018 Vertex Pharmaceuticals plans a phase II trial for Cystic fibrosis (with gating mutation) in the US in the first half of 2019

Patent

WO 2012158885

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=A7EFB561D919F34531D65DF294F8D74C.wapp1nB?docId=WO2012158885&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&queryString=%28+&recNum=99&maxRec=1000

Many current medicines suffer from poor absorption, distribution, metabolism and/or excretion (ADME) properties that prevent their wider use or limit their use in certain indications. Poor ADME properties are also a major reason for the failure of drug candidates in clinical trials. While formulation technologies and prodrug strategies can be employed in some cases to improve certain ADME properties, these approaches often fail to address the underlying ADME problems that exist for many drugs and drug candidates. One such problem is rapid metabolism that causes a number of drugs, which otherwise would be highly effective in treating a disease, to be cleared too rapidly from the body. A possible solution to rapid drug clearance is frequent or high dosing to attain a sufficiently high plasma level of drug. This, however, introduces a number of potential treatment problems such as poor patient compliance with the dosing regimen, side effects that become more acute with higher doses, and increased cost of treatment. A rapidly metabolized drug may also expose patients to undesirable toxic or reactive metabolites.

[3] Another ADME limitation that affects many medicines is the formation of toxic or biologically reactive metabolites. As a result, some patients receiving the drug may experience toxicities, or the safe dosing of such drugs may be limited such that patients receive a suboptimal amount of the active agent. In certain cases, modifying dosing intervals or formulation approaches can help to reduce clinical adverse effects, but often the formation of such undesirable metabolites is intrinsic to the metabolism of the compound.

[4] In some select cases, a metabolic inhibitor will be co-administered with a drug that is cleared too rapidly. Such is the case with the protease inhibitor class of drugs that are used to treat HIV infection. The FDA recommends that these drugs be co-dosed with ritonavir, an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4), the enzyme typically responsible for their metabolism (see Kempf, D.J. et al., Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, 1997, 41(3): 654-60). Ritonavir, however, causes adverse effects and adds to the pill burden for HIV patients who must already take a combination of different drugs. Similarly, the CYP2D6 inhibitor quinidine has been added to dextromethorphan for the purpose of reducing rapid CYP2D6 metabolism of dextromethorphan in a treatment of pseudobulbar affect. Quinidine, however, has unwanted side effects that greatly limit its use in potential combination therapy (see Wang, L et al., Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1994, 56(6 Pt 1): 659-67; and FDA label for quinidine at http://www.accessdata.fda.gov).

[5] In general, combining drugs with cytochrome P450 inhibitors is not a satisfactory strategy for decreasing drug clearance. The inhibition of a CYP enzyme’s activity can affect the metabolism and clearance of other drugs metabolized by that same enzyme. CYP inhibition can cause other drugs to accumulate in the body to toxic levels.

[6] A potentially attractive strategy for improving a drug’s metabolic properties is deuterium modification. In this approach, one attempts to slow the CYP-mediated metabolism of a drug or to reduce the formation of undesirable metabolites by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms with deuterium atoms. Deuterium is a safe, stable, nonradioactive isotope of hydrogen. Compared to hydrogen, deuterium forms stronger bonds with carbon. In select cases, the increased bond strength imparted by deuterium can positively impact the ADME properties of a drug, creating the potential for improved drug efficacy, safety, and/or tolerability. At the same time, because the size and shape of deuterium are essentially identical to those of hydrogen, replacement of hydrogen by deuterium would not be expected to affect the biochemical potency and selectivity of the drug as compared to the original chemical entity that contains only hydrogen.

[7] Over the past 35 years, the effects of deuterium substitution on the rate of metabolism have been reported for a very small percentage of approved drugs (see, e.g., Blake, MI et al, J Pharm Sci, 1975, 64:367-91; Foster, AB, Adv Drug Res, 1985, 14: 1-40 (“Foster”); Kushner, DJ et al, Can J Physiol Pharmacol, 1999, 79-88; Fisher, MB et al, Curr Opin Drug Discov Devel, 2006, 9: 101-09 (“Fisher”)). The results have been variable and unpredictable. For some compounds deuteration caused decreased metabolic clearance in vivo. For others, there was no change in metabolism. Still others demonstrated increased metabolic clearance. The variability in deuterium effects has also led experts to question or dismiss deuterium modification as a viable drug design strategy for inhibiting adverse metabolism (see Foster at p. 35 and Fisher at p. 101).

[8] The effects of deuterium modification on a drug’s metabolic properties are not predictable even when deuterium atoms are incorporated at known sites of metabolism. Only by actually preparing and testing a deuterated drug can one determine if and how the rate of metabolism will differ from that of its non-deuterated counterpart. See, for example, Fukuto et al. (J. Med. Chem., 1991, 34, 2871-76). Many drugs have multiple sites where metabolism is possible. The site(s) where deuterium substitution is required and the extent of deuteration necessary to see an effect on metabolism, if any, will be different for each drug.

[9] This invention relates to novel derivatives of ivacaftor, and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof. This invention also provides compositions comprising a compound of this invention and the use of such compositions in methods of treating diseases and conditions that are beneficially treated by administering a CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) potentiator.

[10] Ivacaftor, also known as VX-770 and by the chemical name, N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide, acts as a CFTR potentiator. Results from phase III trials of VX-770 in patients with cystic fibrosis carrying at least one copy of the G551D-CFTR mutation demonstrated marked levels of improvement in lung function and other key indicators of the disease including sweat chloride levels, likelihood of pulmonary exacerbations and body weight. VX-770 is also currently in phase II clinical trials in combination with VX-809 (a CFTR corrector) for the oral treatment of cystic fibrosis patients who carry the more common AF508-CFTR mutation. VX-770 was granted fast track designation and orphan drug designation by the FDA in 2006 and 2007, respectively.

[11] Despite the beneficial activities of VX-770, there is a continuing need for new compounds to treat the aforementioned diseases and conditions.

Patent

US 20140073667

Patent

JP 2014097964

PATENT

WO 2018183367

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/zh/detail.jsf?docId=WO2018183367&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&office=&prevFilter=%26fq%3DOF%3AWO%26fq%3DICF_M%3A%22A61K%22&sortOption=%E5%85%AC%E5%B8%83%E6%97%A5%E9%99%8D%E5%BA%8F&queryString=&recNum=555&maxRec=186391

The use according to embodiment 1, comprising administering to the patient an effect amount of (N-(2-(tert-butyl)-5-hydroxy-4-(2-(methyl-d3)propan-2-yl-l, 1, 1,3, 3,3-d6)phenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (Compound Il-d):

Il-d

PATENT

WO 2019018395,

CONTD…………………………..

//////////////////deutivacaftor, Orphan Drug Status, Cystic fibrosis, CTP-656, D9-ivacaftor, Deutivacaftor, Ivacaftor D9, UNII-SHA6U5FJZL, VX-561, WHO 10704, PHASE 2

[2H]C([2H])([2H])C(c1cc(c(NC(=O)C2=CNc3ccccc3C2=O)cc1O)C(C)(C)C)(C([2H])([2H])[2H])C([2H])([2H])[2H]

VX-659, Bamocaftor potassium


VX-659 Chemical Structure

VX-659, BAMOCAFTOR

N-(Benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-1-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-1-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide

3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N-(phenylsulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethyl-1-pyrrolidinyl]-

N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide

CAS Number 2204245-48-5
UNII: 8C7XEW3K7S
BAMOCAFTOR
M. Wt 591.65
Formula C28H32F3N5O4S

str1

2D chemical structure of 2204245-47-4

Bamocaftor potassium

CAS 2204245-47-4

Molecular Formula C28 H31 F3 N5 O4 S . K
 Molecular Weight 629.735

VX-659
VX-659 potassium salt
VY7D8MTV72 (UNII code)

WHO 11167

3-Pyridinecarboxamide, N-(phenylsulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethyl-1-pyrrolidinyl]-, potassium salt (1:1)

Potassium (benzenesulfonyl)[6-(3-[2-[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-1-yl]pyridine-3-carbonyl]azanide

PHASE 2 CYSTIC FIBRIOSIS , VERTEX

Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (DeltaF508 Mutant) Correctors

Bamocaftor potassium is a CFTR channel (DeltaF508-CFTR Mutant) corrector in phase II clinical trials at Vertex, in patients with CF who are homozygous for the F508del mutation of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, or who are heterozygous for the F508del mutation and a minimal function (MF) CFTR mutation not likely to respond to tezacaftor, ivacaftor, or tezacaftor/ivacaftor and also in combination with tezacaftor and VX-561 in F508del/MF in patients with cystic fibrosis.

The compound is also developed by the company as a fixed-dose combination of VX-659, tezacaftor and ivacaftor.

Vertex Pharmaceuticals is developing a combination regimen comprising VX-659, a next-generation cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) corrector, with tezacaftor and ivacaftor, as a triple fixed-dose combination tablet. In March 2019, Vertex planned to file an NDA in the US in 3Q19 concurrently in patients aged 12 years or older with one F508del mutation and one minimal function mutation and in patients with two F508del mutations for either the VX-659 or VX-445 triple combination regimen; the regimen selected for a regulatory filing would be based on final 24-week data.

PATENT

WO 2018064632

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2018064632

Example 4: Synthesis of Compounds 1-65

[00229] Synthetic Example 1: Synthesis of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (Compound 1)

[00230] Part A: Synthesis of (4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride

[00231] Step 1: Synthesis of methyl-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate

[00232] Tetrahydrofuran (THF, 4.5 L) was added to a 20 L glass reactor and stirred under N2 at room temperature. 2-Nitropropane (1.5 kg. 16.83 mol) and 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) (1.282 kg, 8.42 mol) were then charged to the reactor, and the jacket temperature was increased to 50 °C. Once the reactor contents were close to 50 °C, methyl methacrylate (1.854 kg, 18.52 mol) was added slowly over 100 minutes. The reaction temperature was maintained at or close to 50 °C for 21 hours. The reaction mixture was concentrated in vacuo then transferred back to the reactor and diluted with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (14 L). 2 M HC1 (7.5 L) was added, and this mixture was stirred for 5 minutes then allowed to settle. Two clear layers were visible – a lower yellow aqueous phase and an upper green organic phase. The aqueous layer was removed, and the organic layer was stirred again with 2 M HC1 (3 L). After separation, the HC1 washes were recombined and stirred with MTBE (3 L) for 5 minutes. The aqueous layer was removed, and all of the organic layers were combined in the reactor and stirred with water (3 L) for 5 minutes. After separation, the organic layers were concentrated in vacuo to afford a cloudy green oil. This was dried with MgSC and filtered to afford methyl-2,4-dimethyl-4-mtro-pentanoate as a clear green oil (3.16 kg, 99% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 3.68 (s, 3H), 2.56 – 2.35 (m, 2H), 2.11 – 2.00 (m, 1H), 1.57 (s, 3H), 1.55 (s, 3H), 1.19 (d, J= 6.8 Hz, 3H). [00233] Step 2: Synthesis of methyl (2S)-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate

[00234] A reactor was charged with purified water (2090 L; 10 vol) and then potassium phosphate monobasic (27 kg, 198.4 moles; 13 g/L for water charge). The pH of the reactor contents was adjusted to pH 6.5 (± 0.2) with 20% (w/v) potassium carbonate solution. The reactor was charged with racemic methyl-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate (209 kg; 1104.6 moles), and Palatase 20000L lipase (13 L, 15.8 kg; 0.06 vol).

[00235] The reaction mixture was adjusted to 32 ± 2 °C and stirred for 15-21 hours, and pH 6.5 was maintained using a pH stat with the automatic addition of 20% potassium carbonate solution. When the racemic starting material was converted to >98% ee of the S-enantiomer, as determined by chiral GC, external heating was switched off. The reactor was then charged with MTBE (35 L; 5 vol), and the aqueous layer was extracted with MTBE (3 times, 400-1000L). The combined organic extracts were washed with aqueous Na2CO3 (4 times, 522 L, 18 % w/w 2.5 vol), water (523 L; 2.5 vol), and 10% aqueous NaCl (314 L, 1.5 vol). The organic layer was concentrated in vacuo to afford methyl (2S)-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate as a mobile yellow oil (>98% ee, 94.4 kg; 45 % yield).

[00236] Step 3: Synthesis of (3S)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one

[00237] A 20 L reactor was purged with N2. The vessel was charged sequentially with DI water-rinsed, damp Raney® Ni (2800 grade, 250 g), methyl (2S)-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate (1741g, 9.2 mol), and ethanol (13.9 L, 8 vol). The reaction was stirred at 900 rpm, and the reactor was flushed with H2 and maintained at -2.5 bar. The reaction mixture was then warmed to 60 °C for 5 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled and filtered to remove Raney nickel, and the solid cake was rinsed with ethanol (3.5 L, 2 vol). The ethanolic solution of the product was combined with a second equal sized batch and concentrated in vacuo to reduce to a minimum volume of ethanol (-1.5 volumes). Heptane (2.5 L) was added, and the suspension was concentrated again to -1.5 volumes. This was repeated 3 times; the resulting suspension was cooled to 0-5 °C, filtered under suction, and washed with heptane (2.5 L). The product was dried under vacuum for 20 minutes then transferred to drying trays and dried in a vacuum oven at 40 °C overnight to afford (3S)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one as a white crystalline solid (2.042 kg, 16.1 mol, 87 %). 1H NMR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 6.39 (s, 1H), 2.62 (ddq, J = 9.9, 8.6, 7.1 Hz, 1H), 2.17 (dd, J = 12.4, 8.6 Hz, 1H), 1.56 (dd, J = 12.5, 9.9 Hz, 1H), 1.31 (s, 3H), 1.25 (s, 3H), 1.20 (d, J = 7.1 Hz, 3H).

[00238] Step 4: Synthesis of (4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride

[00239] A glass lined 120 L reactor was charged with lithium aluminium hydride pellets (2.5 kg, 66 mol) and dry THF (60 L) and warmed to 30 °C. The resulting suspension was charged with (S)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one (7.0 kg, 54 mol) in THF (25 L) over 2 hours while maintaining the reaction temperature at 30 to 40 °C. After complete addition, the reaction temperature was increased to 60 – 63 °C and maintained overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to 22 °C, then cautiously quenched with the addition of ethyl acetate (EtOAc) (1.0 L, 10 moles), followed by a mixture of THF (3.4 L) and water (2.5 kg, 2.0 eq), and then a mixture of water (1.75 kg) with 50 % aqueous sodium hydroxide (750 g, 2 equiv water with 1.4 equiv sodium hydroxide relative to aluminum), followed by 7.5 L water. After the addition was complete, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, and the solid was removed by filtration and washed with THF (3 x 25 L). The filtrate and washings were combined and treated with 5.0 L (58 moles) of aqueous 37% HCl (1.05 equiv.) while maintaining the temperature below 30°C. The resultant solution was concentrated by vacuum distillation to a slurry. Isopropanol (8 L) was added and the solution was concentrated to near dryness by vacuum distillation. Isopropanol (4 L) was added, and 1he product was slurried by warming to about 50 °C. MTBE (6 L) was added, and the

slurry was cooled to 2-5 °C. The product was collected by filtration and rinsed with 12 L MTBE and dried in a vacuum oven (55 °C/300 torr/N2 bleed) to afford (4S)-2,2,4- trimethylpyrrolidine’HCl as a white, crystalline solid (6.21 kg, 75% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 9.34 (br d, 2H), 3.33 (dd, J = 11.4, 8.4 Hz, 1H), 2.75 (dd, / = 11.4, 8.6 Hz, 1H), 2.50 – 2.39 (m, 1H), 1.97 (dd, J= 12.7, 7.7 Hz, 1H), 1.42 (s, 3H), 1.38 (dd, J = 12.8, 10.1 Hz, 1H), 1.31 (s, 3H), 1.05 (d, J= 6.6 Hz, 3H).

[00240] Part B: Synthesis of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l- (trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4- trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide

[00241] Synthesis of starting materials:

[00242] Synthesis of tert-Butyl 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylate

[00243] A solution of 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylic acid (10 g, 52.08 mmol) in THF (210 mL) was treated successively with di-tert-butyl dicarbonate (17 g, 77.89 mmol) and 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (3.2 g, 26.19 mmol) and stirred overnight at room temperature. At this point, HC1 IN (400 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred vigorously for about 10 minutes. The product was extracted with ethyl acetate (2x300mL), and the combined organic layers were washed with water (300 mL) and brine (150 mL) and dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to give 12.94 g (96% yield) of tert- butyl 2,6-dichloropyndine-3-carboxylate as a colorless oil. ESI-MS m/z calc. 247.02, found 248.1 (M+l) +; Retention time: 2.27 minutes. 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDC13) ppm 1.60 (s, 9H), 7.30 (d, .7=7.9 Hz, 1H), 8.05 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H).

[00244] Synthesis of tert-Butyl 3-oxo-2,3-dihydro-lH-pyrazole-l-carboxylate

[00245] A 50L reactor was started, and the jacket was set to 20 °C, with stirring at 150 rpm, reflux condenser (10 °C) and nitrogen purge. MeOH (2.860 L) and methyl (E)-3-methoxyprop-2-enoate (2.643 kg, 22.76 mol) were added, and the reactor was capped. The reaction was heated to an internal temperature of 40 °C, and the system was set to hold jacket temperature at 40 °C. Hydrazine hydrate (1300 g of 55 %w/w, 22.31 mol) was added portion wise via addition funnel over 30 min. The reaction was heated to 60 °C for 1 h. The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 °C and triethyamine (2.483 kg, 3.420 L, 24.54 mol) was added portion-wise, maintaining reaction temperature <30 °C. A solution of Boc anhydride (di-tert-butyl dicarbonate) (4.967 kg, 5.228 L. 22.76 mol) in MeOH (2.860 L) was added portion-wise maintaining temperature <45 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 20 °C for 16 h. The reaction solution was partially concentrated to remove MeOH, resulting in a clear, light amber oil. The resulting oil was transferred to the 50L reactor, stirred and water (7.150 L) and heptane (7.150 L) were added. The additions caused a small amount of the product to precipitate. The aqueous layer was drained into a clean container, and the interface and heptane layer were filtered to separate the solid (product). The aqueous layer was transferred back to the reactor, and the collected solid was placed back into the reactor and mixed with the aqueous layer. A dropping funnel was added to the reactor and loaded with acetic acid (1.474 kg, 1.396 L, 24.54 mol) and added dropwise. The jacket was set to 0 °C to absorb the quench exotherm. After the addition was complete (pH=5), the reaction mixture was stirred for 1 h. The solid was collected by filtration and washed with water (7.150 L), and washed a second time with water (3.575 L). The crystalline solid was transferred into a 20L rotovap bulb, and heptane (7.150 L) was added. The mixture was slurried at 45 °C for 30 mins, and 1-2 volumes of solvent were distilled off The slurry in the rotovap flask was filtered, and the solids were washed with heptane (3.575 L). The solid was further dried in vacuo (50 °C, 15 mbar) to give tert-butyl 5-oxo-lH-pyrazole-2-carboxylate (2921 g, 71%) as a coarse, crystalline solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 10.95 (s, 1H), 7.98 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 5.90 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 1.54 (s, 9H).

[00246] Synthesis of 2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethanol

[00247] To a solution of lithium aluminum hydride (293 mg, 7.732 mmol) in THF (10.00 mL) in an ice-bath, 2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]acetic acid (1.002 g, 5.948 mmol) in THF (3.0 mL) was added dropwise over a period of 30 minutes keeping the reaction temperature below 20 ° C. The mixture was allowed to gradually warm to ambient temperature and was stirred for 18 h. The mixture was cooled with an ice-bath and sequentially quenched with water (294 mg, 295 μL, 16.36 mmol), NaOH (297 μL of 6 M, 1.784 mmol), and then water (884.0 μL, 49.07 mmol) to afford a granular solid in the mixture. The solid was filtered off using celite, and the precipitate was washed with ether. The filtrate was further dried with MgSO4 and filtered and concentrated in vacuo to afford the product with residual THF and ether. The mixture was taken directly into the next step without further purification.

[00248] Step 1: tert-Butyl 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazole-1-carboxylate

[00249] rerf-Butyl 5-oxo-lH-pyrazole-2-carboxylate (1.043 g, 5.660 mmol), 2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethanol (916 mg, 5.943 mmol), and triphenyl phosphine (1.637 g, 6.243 mmol) were combined in THF (10.48 mL) and the reaction was cooled in an ice-bath. Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (1.288 g, 1.254 mL, 6.368 mmol) was added dropwise to the reaction mixture, and the reaction was allowed to warm to room temperature for 16 hours. The mixture was evaporated, and the resulting material was partitioned between ethyl acetate (30 mL) and IN sodium hydroxide (30 mL). The organic layer was separated, washed with brine (30 mL), dried over sodium sulfate, and concentrated. The crude material was purified by silica gel chromatography eluting with a gradient of ethyl acetate in hexanes (0- 30%) to give tert-butyl 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazole-l-carboxylate (1.03 g, 57%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 320.13, found 321.1 (M+l) +; Retention time: 0.72 minutes.

[00250] Step 2: 3-[2-[l-(Trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole

[00251] terr-Butyl-3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazole-l-carboxylate (1.03 g, 3.216 mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane (10.30 mL) with trifluoroacetic acid (2.478 mL, 32.16 mmol), and the reaction was stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. The reaction was evaporated, and the resulting oil was partitioned between ethyl acetate (10 mL) and a saturated sodium bicarbonate solution.

The organic layer was separated, washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, and evaporated to give 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole (612 mg, 86%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 220.08, found 221.0 (M+1) +; Retention time: 0.5 minutes. ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 11.86 (s, 1H), 7.50 (t, J = 2.1 Hz, 1H), 5.63 (t, J= 2.3 Hz, 1H), 4.14 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 2.01 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 0.96 – 0.88 (m, 2H), 0.88 -0.81 (m, 2H).

[00252] Step 3: tert- Butyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate

[00253] tert-Butyl 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylate (687 mg, 2.770 mmol), 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole (610 mg, 2.770 mmol), and freshly ground potassium carbonate (459 mg, 3.324 mmol) were combined in anhydrous DMSO (13.75 mL). l,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane), 62 mg, 0.5540 mmol) was added, and the mixture was stirred at room temperature under nitrogen for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was diluted with water (20 mL) and stirred for 15 minutes. The resulting solid was collected and washed with water. The solid was dissolved in dichloromethane and dried over magnesium sulfate. The mixture was filtered and concentrated to give ferf-butyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (1.01 g, 84%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 431.12, found 432.1 (M+1) +; Retention time: 0.88 minutes.

[00254] Step 4: 2-Chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid

[00255] tert-Butyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (1.01 g, 2.339 mmol) and trifluoroacetic acid (1.8 mL, 23.39 mmol) were combined in dichloromethane (10 mL) and heated at 40 °C for 3 h. The reaction was concentrated. Hexanes were added, and the mixture was concentrated again to give 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (873 mg, 99%) ESI-MS m/z calc. 375.06, found 376.1 (M+l)+; Retention time: 0.69 minutes.

[00256] Step 5: N-(Benzenesulfonyl)-2-chloro-6-[3- [2- [1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide

[00257] A solution of 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l- (trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (0.15 g, 0.3992 mmol) and carbonyl diimidazole (77 mg, 0,4790 mmol) in THF (2.0 mL) was stirred for one hour, and benzenesulfonamide (81 mg, 0.5190 mmol) and DBU (72 μL, 0.4790 mmol) were added. The reaction was stirred for 16 hours, acidified with 1 M aqueous citric acid, and extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were dried over sodium sulfate and evaporated. The residue was purified by silica gel chromatography eluting with a gradient of methanol in dichloromethane (0-5%) to give N-(benzenesulfonyl)-2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyndine-3-carboxamide (160 mg, 78%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 514.07, found 515.1 (M+l)+; Retention time: 0.74 minutes.

[00258] Step 6: N-(Benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy] pyrazol-l-yl] -2- [(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl] pyridine-3-carboxamide

[00259] A mixture of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l -(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (160 mg, 0.3107 mmol), (4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride salt (139 mg, 0.9321 mmol), and potassium carbonate (258 mg, 1.864 mmol) in DMSO (1.5 mL) was stirred at 130 °C for 17 hours. The reaction mixture was acidified with 1 M aqueous citric acid and extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were dried over sodium sulfate and evaporated to yield a crude product that was purified by reverse-phase HPLC utilizing a gradient of 10-99% acetonitrile in 5 mM aqueous HCI to yield N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (87 mg, 47%). ESI-MS mJz calc. 591.21, found 592.3 (M+l) +; Retention time: 2.21 minutes. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 12.48 (s, 1H), 8.19 (d, J = 2.8 Hz, 1H), 8.04 – 7.96 (m, 2H), 7.81 (d, J= 8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.77 – 7.70 (m, 1H), 7.70 – 7.62 (m, 2H), 6.92 (d, J= 8.2 Hz, 1H), 6.10 (d, J= 2.8 Hz, 1H), 4.31 (t, J= 7.0 Hz, 2H), 2.42 (t, J = 10.5 Hz, 1H), 2.28 (dd, J = 10.2, 7.0 Hz, 1H), 2.17 – 2.01 (m, 3H), 1.82 (dd, J= 11.9, 5.5 Hz, 1H), 1.52 (d, .7= 9.4 Hz, 6H), 1.36 (t, J= 12.1 Hz, 1H), 1.01 – 0.92 (m, 2H), 0.92 – 0.85 (m, 2H), 0.65 (d, J = 6.3 Hz, 3H). pKa: 4.95±0.06.

Alternate synthesis of 2-Chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid

[00263] Step 1: ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate

[00264] A mixture of EtOH (20.00 L, 10 vol) and diethyl 2-(ethoxymethylene)propanedioate (2000 g, 9.249 mol, 1.0 equiv) was added under nitrogen purge a to a 50 L reactor equipped with a reflux condenser (10 °C) and the jacket set to 40 °C. The mixture was stirred, and then hydrazine hydrate (538.9 g of 55 %w/w, 523.7 mL of 55 %w/w, 9.249 mol, 1.00 equiv) was added in portions via an addition funnel. Once the addition was complete, the reaction was heated to 75 °C for 22 h to afford a solution of ethy l 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate that was used directly in the next step.

[00265] Step 2: l-(tert-butyl) 4-ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-l,4-dicarboxylate

[00266] The solution of ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate was cooled from 75 °C to 40 °C, then triethylamine (TEA) (46.80 g, 64.46 mL, 462.5 mmol, 0.05 eq.) was added. A solution of Boc anhydride (2.119 kg, 9.711 mol 1.05 equiv) in EtOH (2.000 L, 1 equiv) was added to the reactor over 35 min. The mixture was stirred for 4 hours to complete the reaction; then water (10.00 L, 5.0 vol) was added over 15 mins. The resulting mixture was cooled to 20 °C to complete crystallization of the product. The crystals were allowed to age for 1 hour, then the mixture was filtered. The solid was washed with a mixture of EtOH (4.000 L, 2.0 vol) and water (2.000 L, 1 0 vol) The solid was then dried in vacuo to afford l-(tert-butyl)-4-ethyl-3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-1,4-dicarboxylate (1530 g, 65%) as colorless, fine needle, crystalline solid. ‘H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 11.61 (s, 1H), 8.40 (s, 1H), 4.20 (q, J = 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.56 (s, 9H), 1.25 (t, J = 7.1 Hz, 3H).

[00267] Step 3: l-(tert-butyl) 4-ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-l,4-dicarboxylate

[00268] A 5L reactor was started with the jacket set to 40 °C, stirring at 450 rpm, reflux condenser at room temperature and nitrogen purge. The vessel was charged with toluene (1.0L, 10.0 vol), 2-[l-(tnfluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethanol (lOO.Og, 648.8 mmol, 1.0 equiv), and l-(tert-butyl) 4-ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-l,4-dicarboxylate (166.3 g, 648.8 mmol), and the mixture was stirred. The reaction mixture was charged with triphenyl phosphine (195.7 g, 746.1 mmol, 1.15 equiv), then the reactor was set to maintain an internal temperature of 40 °C. Diisopropyl azoldicarboxylate (150.9 g, 746.1 mmol, 1.15 equiv) was added into an addition funnel and was added to the

reaction while maintaining the reaction temperature between 40 and 50 °C (addition was exothermic, exotherm addition controlled), and stirred for a total of 2.5 hours. Once the reaction was deemed complete by HPLC, heptane was added (400 mL, 4 vol), the solution was cooled to 20 °C over 60 minutes, and the bulk of tnphenylphosphine oxide-DIAD complex (TPPO-DIAD) crystallized out. Once at room temp, the mixture was filtered, and the solid was washed with heptane (400 mL, 4.0 vol) and pulled dry. The filtrate was used in the next step as a solution in toluene-heptane without further purification.

[00269] Step 4: ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate

[00270] A 500mL reactor was started with the jacket set to 40 °C, stirring at 450 rpm, reflux condenser at room temp, and nitrogen purge. The vessel was charged with a toluene solution consisting of approximately 160 mmol, 65.0 g of 1 -(tert-buty 1) 4-ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-l,4-dicarboxylate in 3 vol of toluene (prepared by concentrating a 25% portion of filtrate from previous reaction down to 4 volumes in a rotovap). The reaction was set to maintain an internal temperature at 40 °C and KOH (33.1 g, 1.5 eq. of aqueous 45 % KOH solution) was added in one portion, resulting in a mild exothermic addition, while CO2 was generated upon removal of the protecting group. The reaction proceeded for 1.5 hr, monitored by HPLC, with the product partially crystallizing during the reaction. Heptane (160 mL, 2.5 vol) was added to the reaction mixture and the reaction was cooled to room temperature over 30 minutes. The resulting mixture was filtered, and the solid was washed with heptane (80.00 mL, 1.25 vol), pulled dry, then dried in vacuo (55 °C, vacuum). 52.3 g of ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate was obtained as a crude, colorless solid that was used without further purification.

[00271] Step 5: 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid

[00272] A 500mL reactor was started with the jacket set to 40 °C, stirring at 450 rpm, reflux condenser at room temp, and nitrogen purge. The vessel was charged with methanol (150.0 mL, 3.0 vol), a solution of ethyl 3-(2-(l-(triiluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate (50.0 g, 171.1 mmol, 1.0 equiv), and the reaction was stirred to suspend the solids. The reactor was set to maintain internal temperature at 40 °C. To the mixture was added KOH (96 g of aqueous 45 % KOH, 1.71 mol, 10.0 equiv) in portions maintaining the internal temperature <50 °C. Once addition was complete, the reaction was set to maintain temperature at 50 °C, and the reaction proceeded for 23 hours, monitored by HPLC. Once complete the reaction was cooled to 10 °C then partially concentrated on a rotary evaporator to remove most of the MeOH. The resulting solution was diluted with water (250 mL, 5.0 vol) and 2-Me-THF (150 mL, 3.0 vol), and transferred to the reactor, stirred at room temp, then stopped, and layers were allowed to separate. The layers were tested, with remaining TPPO-DIAD complex in the organic layer and product in the aqueous layer. The aqueous layer was washed again with 2-Me-THF (100 mL, 2.0 vol), the layers separated, and the aqueous layer returned to the reactor vessel. The stirrer was started and set to 450 rpm, and the reactor jacket was set to 0 °C. The pH was adjusted to pH acidic by addition of 6M aqueous HC1 (427mL, 15 equiv) portion wise, maintaining the internal temperature between 10 and 30 °C. The product began to crystallize close to pH neutral and was accompanied with strong off-gassing, and so the acid was added slowly, and then further added to reach pH 1 once the off-gassing had ended. To the resulting suspension was added 2-Me-THF (400 mL, 8.0 vol), and the product was allowed to dissolve into the organic layer. Stirring was stopped, the layers were separated, and the aqueous layer was returned to the reactor, stirred and re-extracted with 2-Me-THF (100 mL, 2.0 vol). The organic lay ers were combined in the reactor and stirred at room temperature, washed with brine (lOOmL, 2 vols), dried over Na2S04, filtered through celite, and the solid was washed with 2-Me-THF (50 mL, 1.0 vol). The filtrate was transferred to a clean rotovap flask, stirred, warmed to 50 °C and heptane (200 mL, 4.0 vol) added, and then partially concentrated with the addition of heptane (300 mL, 6.0 vol) and then seeded with 50mg of 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid), and the product crystallized during solvent removal. The distillation was stopped when the bulk of the 2-Me-THF had distilled off. The bath heater was turned off, the vacuum removed, and the mixture was allowed to stir and cool to room temperature. The mixture was filtered (slow speed) and the solid was washed with heptane (100 mL, 2.0 vol), and the solid was collected and dried in vacuo (50 °C, rotovap). 22.47 g of 3-(2-(l-(triiluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid was obtained as an off-white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d) δ 12.45 (s, 2H), 8.01 (s, 1H), 4.26 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 2H), 2.05 (t, J= 7.0 Hz, 2H), 0.92 (m, 4H).

[00273] Step 6: 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole

[00274] A mixture of toluene (490.0 mL), 3-(2-(l- (triiluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid (70.0 g, 264.9 mmol), and DMSO (70.00 mL) was placed in a reactor and heated to 100 °C with stirring. DBU (approximately 20.16 g, 19.80 mL, 132.4 mmol) was added to the reactor over 15 min. The mixture was stirred for 20 h to complete the reaction and then cooled to 20 °C. The mixture was washed with water (350.0 mL), then 0.5N aq HC1 (280.0 mL), then water (2 x 140.0 mL), and lastly with bnne (210.0 mL). The organic layer was dried with Na2S04, and then activated charcoal (5 g, Darco 100 mesh) was added to the stirred slurry. The dried mixture was filtered through celite, and the solid was washed with toluene (140.0 mL) and then pulled dry. The filtrate was concentrated in a rotovap (50 °C, vac) to afford 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-

pyrazole (30.89 g, 53%) as an amber oil. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-4,) δ 11.87 (s, 1H), 7.50 (d, J= 2.4 Hz, 1H), 5.63 (d, 7= 2.4 Hz, 1H), 4.23 – 4.06 (m, 2H), 2.01 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.00 – 0.77 (m, 4H).

[00275] Step 7: ethyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l- (trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate

[00276] A mixture of DMF (180.0 mL), ethyl 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylate (approximately 29.97 g, 136.2 mmol), 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole (30.0 g, 136.2 mmol), and K2CO3, (325 mesh, approximately 24.48 g, 177.1 mmol) was added to a stirred reactor at 20 °C. DABCO (approximately 2.292 g, 20.43 mmol) was then added to the reactor, and the mixture was stirred at 20 °C for 1 hour, and then the temperature was increased to 30 °C, and the mixture stirred for 24 hours to complete the reaction. The mixture was cooled to 20 °C; then water (360 mL) was added slowly. The mixture was then drained from the reactor and the solid was isolated by filtration. The solid was then washed with water (2 x 150 mL), and then the solid was dried under vacuum at 55 °C to afford ethyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (51.37 g, 93%) as a fine, beige colored solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-c4) δ 8.44 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 8.41 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 1H), 7.75 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 1H), 6.21 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 4.34 (m, 4H), 2.09 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.34 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 3H), 1.00 – 0.84 (m, 4H).

[00277] Step 8: 2-Chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid

[00278] A solution of ethyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l- (trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (50.0 g, 123.8 mmol) in THF (300.0 mL) was prepared in a reactor at 20 °C. EtOH (150.0 mL) was added, followed by aqueous NaOH (approximately 59.44 g of 10 %w/w, 148.6 mmol). The mixture was stirred for 1 hour to complete the reaction; then aq IN HCl (750.0 mL) was slowly added. The resulting suspension was stirred for 30 mm at 10 °C, and then the solid was isolated by filtration. The solid was washed with water (150 mL then 2 x 100 mL) and then pulled dry by vacuum. The solid was then further dried under vacuum with heating to afford 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (42.29 g, 91%). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d 6) 5 13.63 (s, 1H), 8.48 – 8.35 (m, 2H), 7.73 (d, J= 8.4 Hz, 1H), 6.20 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 4.35 (t, J = 7.1 Hz, 2H), 2.09 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.01 – 0.82 (m, 4H).

PATENT

WO2018227049

Follows on from WO2018227049 , claiming a composition comprising this compound and at least one of tezacaftor, ivacaftor, deutivacaftor or lumacaftor, useful for treating CF.

PATENT

WO-2019079760

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019079760&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&maxRec=1000

Novel crystalline forms of the compound, the potassium salt of which is presumed to be VX-659 , Such as Forms A, B, C, D, E, H and M , processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them are claimed. Also claimed are their use for treating cystic fibrosis, and compositions comprising VX-659, ivacaftoR,  lumacaftor and tezacaftor .

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No.

62/574,677, filed October 19, 2017; U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/574,670, filed October 19, 2017; and U.S. Provisional Application No. 62/650,057, filed March 29, 2018, the entire contents of each of which are expressly incorporated herein by reference in their respective entireties.

[0002] Disclosed herein are crystalline forms of Compound I and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof, which are modulators of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR), compositions comprising the same, methods of using the same, and processes for making the same.

[0003] Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive genetic disease that affects approximately 70,000 children and adults worldwide. Despite progress in the treatment of CF, there is no cure.

[0004] In patients with CF, mutations in CFTR endogenously expressed in respiratory epithelia lead to reduced apical anion secretion causing an imbalance in ion and fluid transport. The resulting decrease in anion transport contributes to enhanced mucus accumulation in the lung and accompanying microbial infections that ultimately cause death in CF patients. In addition to respiratory disease, CF patients typically suffer from gastrointestinal problems and pancreatic insufficiency that, if left untreated, result in death. In addition, the majority of males with cystic fibrosis are infertile, and fertility is reduced among females with cystic fibrosis.

[0005] Sequence analysis of the CFTR gene has revealed a variety of disease-causing mutations (Cutting, G. R. et al. (1990) Nature 346:366-369; Dean, M. et al. (1990) Cell 61 :863 :870; and Kerem, B-S. et al. (1989) Science 245: 1073-1080; Kerem, B-S et al. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:8447-8451). To date, greater than 2000 mutations in the CF gene have been identified; currently, the CFTR2 database contains information on only 322 of these identified mutations, with sufficient evidence to define 281 mutations as disease causing. The most prevalent disease-causing mutation is a deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 of the CFTR amino acid sequence and is

commonly referred to as the F508del mutation. This mutation occurs in approximately 70% of the cases of cystic fibrosis and is associated with severe disease.

[0006] The deletion of residue 508 in CFTR prevents the nascent protein from folding correctly. This results in the inability of the mutant protein to exit the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and traffic to the plasma membrane. As a result, the number of CFTR channels for anion transport present in the membrane is far less than observed in cells expressing wild-type CFTR, i.e., CFTR having no mutations. In addition to impaired trafficking, the mutation results in defective channel gating.

Together, the reduced number of channels in the membrane and the defective gating lead to reduced anion and fluid transport across epithelia. (Quinton, P. M. (1990), FASEB J. 4: 2709-2727). The channels that are defective because of the F508del mutation are still functional, albeit less functional than wild-type CFTR channels. (Dalemans et al. (1991), Nature Lond. 354: 526-528; Pasyk and Foskett (1995), J. Cell. Biochem. 270: 12347-50). In addition to F508del, other disease-causing mutations in CFTR that result in defective trafficking, synthesis, and/or channel gating could be up-or down-regulated to alter anion secretion and modify disease progression and/or severity.

[0007] CFTR is a cAMP/ATP-mediated anion channel that is expressed in a variety of cell types, including absorptive and secretory epithelia cells, where it regulates anion flux across the membrane, as well as the activity of other ion channels and proteins. In epithelial cells, normal functioning of CFTR is critical for the maintenance of electrolyte transport throughout the body, including respiratory and digestive tissue. CFTR is composed of approximately 1480 amino acids that encode a protein which is made up of a tandem repeat of transmembrane domains, each containing six

transmembrane helices and a nucleotide binding domain. The two transmembrane domains are linked by a large, polar, regulatory (R)-domain with multiple

phosphorylation sites that regulate channel activity and cellular trafficking.

[0008] Chloride transport takes place by the coordinated activity of ENaC and CFTR present on the apical membrane and the Na+-K+-ATPase pump and CI- channels expressed on the basolateral surface of the cell. Secondary active transport of chloride from the luminal side leads to the accumulation of intracellular chloride, which can then passively leave the cell via CI channels, resulting in a vectorial transport. Arrangement of Na+/2C17K+ co-transporter, Na+-K+– ATPase pump and the basolateral membrane K+ channels on the basolateral surface and CFTR on the luminal side coordinate the secretion of chloride via CFTR on the luminal side. Because water is probably never actively transported itself, its flow across epithelia depends on tiny transepithelial osmotic gradients generated by the bulk flow of sodium and chloride.

[0009] Compound I and pharmaceutically acceptable salts thereof are potent CFTR modulators. Compound I is N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl) cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide, and has the following structure:

Example 1: Synthesis of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l- (trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy] pyrazol-l-yl]-2- [(4S)-2,2,4- trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (Compound I)

Part A: Synthesis of (4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride

° THF, Base

N02 1 “* N02 | -k/ B) HC

Step 1: Synthesis of methyl-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate

[00381] Tetrahydrofuran (THF, 4.5 L) was added to a 20 L glass reactor and stirred under N2 at room temperature. 2-Nitropropane (1.5 kg, 16.83 mol) and 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU) (1.282 kg, 8.42 mol) were then charged to the reactor, and the jacket temperature was increased to 50 °C. Once the reactor contents were close to 50 °C, methyl methacrylate (1.854 kg, 18.52 mol) was added slowly over 100 minutes. The reaction temperature was maintained at or close to 50 °C for 21 hours. The reaction mixture was concentrated in vacuo then transferred back to the reactor and diluted with methyl fert-butyl ether (MTBE) (14 L). 2 M HC1 (7.5 L) was added, and this mixture was stirred for 5 minutes then allowed to settle. Two clear layers were visible – a lower yellow aqueous phase and an upper green organic phase. The aqueous layer was removed, and the organic layer was stirred again with 2 M HC1 (3 L). After separation, the HC1 washes were recombined and stirred with MTBE (3 L) for 5 minutes. The aqueous layer was removed, and all of the organic layers were combined in the reactor and stirred with water (3 L) for 5 minutes. After separation, the organic layers were concentrated in vacuo to afford a cloudy green oil. This was dried with MgS04 and filtered to afford methyl-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate as a clear green oil (3.16 kg, 99% yield). ¾ MR (400 MHz, Chloroform-i ) δ 3.68 (s, 3H), 2.56 – 2.35 (m, 2H), 2.11 – 2.00 (m, 1H), 1.57 (s, 3H), 1.55 (s, 3H), 1.19 (d, J= 6.8 Hz, 3H).

Step 2: Synthesis of methyl (2S)-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate

[00382] A reactor was charged with purified water (2090 L; 10 vol) and then potassium phosphate monobasic (27 kg, 198.4 moles; 13 g/L for water charge). The pH of the reactor contents was adjusted to pH 6.5 (± 0.2) with 20% (w/v) potassium carbonate solution. The reactor was charged with racemic methyl-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate (209 kg; 1104.6 moles), and Palatase 20000L lipase (13 L, 15.8 kg; 0.06 vol).

[00383] The reaction mixture was adjusted to 32 ± 2 °C and stirred for 15-21 hours, and pH 6.5 was maintained using a pH stat with the automatic addition of 20% potassium carbonate solution. When the racemic starting material was converted to >98% ee of the S-enantiomer, as determined by chiral GC, external heating was

switched off. The reactor was then charged with MTBE (35 L; 5 vol), and the aqueous layer was extracted with MTBE (3 times, 400-1000L). The combined organic extracts were washed with aqueous Na2CCb (4 times, 522 L, 18 % w/w 2.5 vol), water (523 L; 2.5 vol), and 10% aqueous NaCl (314 L, 1.5 vol). The organic layer was concentrated in vacuo to afford methyl (2,S)-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate as a mobile yellow oil (>98% ee, 94.4 kg; 45 % yield).

Step 3: Synthesis of (3S)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one

[00384] A 20 L reactor was purged with N2. The vessel was charged sequentially with DI water-rinsed, damp Raney® Ni (2800 grade, 250 g), methyl (2S)-2,4-dimethyl-4-nitro-pentanoate (1741g, 9.2 mol), and ethanol (13.9 L, 8 vol). The reaction was stirred at 900 rpm, and the reactor was flushed with H2 and maintained at -2.5 bar. The reaction mixture was then warmed to 60 °C for 5 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled and filtered to remove Raney nickel, and the solid cake was rinsed with ethanol (3.5 L, 2 vol). The ethanolic solution of the product was combined with a second equal sized batch and concentrated in vacuo to reduce to a minimum volume of ethanol (-1.5 volumes). Heptane (2.5 L) was added, and the suspension was concentrated again to -1.5 volumes. This was repeated 3 times; the resulting suspension was cooled to 0-5 °C, filtered under suction, and washed with heptane (2.5 L). The product was dried under vacuum for 20 minutes then transferred to drying trays and dried in a vacuum oven at 40 °C overnight to afford (3S)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one as a white crystalline solid (2.042 kg, 16.1 mol, 87 %). ¾ MR (400 MHz, Chloroform-i ) δ 6.39 (s, 1H), 2.62 (ddq, J = 9.9, 8.6, 7.1 Hz, 1H), 2.17 (dd, J = 12.4, 8.6 Hz, 1H), 1.56 (dd, J = 12.5, 9.9 Hz, 1H), 1.31 (s, 3H), 1.25 (s, 3H), 1.20 (d, J = 7.1 Hz, 3H).

Step 4: Synthesis of (4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride

[00385] A glass lined 120 L reactor was charged with lithium aluminium hydride pellets (2.5 kg, 66 mol) and dry THF (60 L) and warmed to 30 °C. The resulting suspension was charged with (¾)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one (7.0 kg, 54 mol) in THF (25 L) over 2 hours while maintaining the reaction temperature at 30 to 40 °C. After complete addition, the reaction temperature was increased to 60 – 63 °C and maintained overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to 22 °C, then cautiously quenched with the addition of ethyl acetate (EtOAc) (1.0 L, 10 moles), followed by a mixture of THF (3.4 L) and water (2.5 kg, 2.0 eq), and then a mixture of water (1.75 kg) with 50 % aqueous sodium hydroxide (750 g, 2 equiv water with 1.4 equiv sodium hydroxide relative to aluminum), followed by 7.5 L water. After the addition was complete, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, and the solid was removed by filtration and washed with THF (3 x 25 L). The filtrate and washings were combined and treated with 5.0 L (58 moles) of aqueous 37% HC1 (1.05 equiv.) while maintaining the temperature below 30°C. The resultant solution was concentrated by vacuum distillation to a slurry. Isopropanol (8 L) was added and the solution was concentrated to near dryness by vacuum distillation. Isopropanol (4 L) was added, and the product was slurried by warming to about 50 °C. MTBE (6 L) was added, and the slurry was cooled to 2-5 °C. The product was collected by filtration and rinsed with 12 L MTBE and dried in a vacuum oven (55 °C/300 torr/N2 bleed) to afford (4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine»HCl as a white, crystalline solid (6.21 kg, 75% yield). ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-^6) δ 9.34 (br d, 2H), 3.33 (dd, J= 11.4, 8.4 Hz, 1H), 2.75 (dd, J = 11.4, 8.6 Hz, 1H), 2.50 – 2.39 (m, 1H), 1.97 (dd, J= 12.7, 7.7 Hz, 1H), 1.42 (s, 3H), 1.38 (dd, J= 12.8, 10.1 Hz, 1H), 1.31 (s, 3H), 1.05 (d, J= 6.6 Hz, 3H).

Part B: Synthesis of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l- (trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4- trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide

HO CF,

Synthesis of starting materials:

Synthesis of terf-Butyl 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylate

[00386] A solution of 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylic acid (10 g, 52.08 mmol) in THF (210 mL) was treated successively with di-tert-butyl dicarbonate (17 g, 77.89 mmol) and 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (3.2 g, 26.19 mmol) and stirred overnight at room temperature. At this point, HCI IN (400 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred vigorously for about 10 minutes. The product was extracted with ethyl acetate (2x300mL), and the combined organic layers were washed with water (300 mL) and brine (150 mL) and dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to give 12.94 g (96% yield) of tert-butyl 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylate as a colorless oil. ESI-MS m/z calc. 247.02, found 248.1 (M+1) +; Retention time: 2.27 minutes. ¾ NMR (300 MHz, CDCh) ppm 1.60 (s, 9H), 7.30 (d, J=7.9 Hz, 1H), 8.05 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H).

Synthesis of terf-Butyl 3-oxo-2,3-dihydro-lH-pyrazole-l-carboxylate

[00387] A 50L reactor was started, and the jacket was set to 20 °C, with stirring at 150 rpm, reflux condenser (10 °C) and nitrogen purge. MeOH (2.860 L) and methyl (E)-3-methoxyprop-2-enoate (2.643 kg, 22.76 mol) were added, and the reactor was capped. The reaction was heated to an internal temperature of 40 °C, and the system was set to hold jacket temperature at 40 °C. Hydrazine hydrate (1300 g of 55 %w/w, 22.31 mol) was added portion wise via addition funnel over 30 min. The reaction was heated to 60 °C for 1 h. The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 °C and triethyamine (2.483 kg, 3.420 L, 24.54 mol) was added portion-wise, maintaining reaction

temperature <30 °C. A solution of Boc anhydride (di-tert-butyl dicarbonate) (4.967 kg, 5.228 L, 22.76 mol) in MeOH (2.860 L) was added portion-wise maintaining temperature <45 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 20 °C for 16 h. The reaction solution was partially concentrated to remove MeOH, resulting in a clear, light amber oil. The resulting oil was transferred to the 50L reactor, stirred and water (7.150 L) and heptane (7.150 L) were added. The additions caused a small amount of the product to precipitate. The aqueous layer was drained into a clean container, and the interface and heptane layer were filtered to separate the solid (product). The aqueous layer was transferred back to the reactor, and the collected solid was placed back into the reactor and mixed with the aqueous layer. A dropping funnel was added to the reactor and loaded with acetic acid (1.474 kg, 1.396 L, 24.54 mol) and added dropwise. The jacket was set to 0 °C to absorb the quench exotherm. After the addition was complete (pH=5), the reaction mixture was stirred for 1 h. The solid was collected by filtration and washed with water (7.150 L) and washed a second time with water (3.575 L). The crystalline solid was transferred into a 20L rotovap bulb, and heptane (7.150 L) was added. The mixture was slurried at 45 °C for 30 mins, and 1-2 volumes of solvent were distilled off. The slurry in the rotovap flask was filtered, and the solids were washed with heptane (3.575 L). The solid was further dried in vacuo (50 °C, 15 mbar) to give tert-butyl 5-oxo-lH-pyrazole-2-carboxylate (2921 g, 71%) as a coarse, crystalline solid. ¾ MR

(400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 10.95 (s, 1H), 7.98 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 5.90 (d, J

1H), 1.54 (s, 9H).

Synthesis of 2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethanol

[00388] To a solution of lithium aluminum hydride (293 mg, 7.732 mmol) in THF (10.00 mL) in an ice-bath, 2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]acetic acid (1.002 g, 5.948 mmol) in THF (3.0 mL) was added dropwise over a period of 30 minutes keeping the reaction temperature below 20 0 C. The mixture was allowed to gradually warm to ambient temperature and was stirred for 18 h. The mixture was cooled with an ice-bath and sequentially quenched with water (294 mg, 295 μΐ., 16.36 mmol), NaOH (297 μΐ. of 6 M, 1.784 mmol), and then water (884.0 μΐ., 49.07 mmol) to afford a granular solid in the mixture. The solid was filtered off using celite, and the precipitate was washed with ether. The filtrate was further dried with MgS04 and filtered and concentrated in vacuo to afford the product with residual THF and ether. The mixture was taken directly into the next step without further purification.

Step 1: tert-Butyl 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazole-l-carboxylate

[00389] tert-Butyl 5-oxo-lH-pyrazole-2-carboxylate (1.043 g, 5.660 mmol), 2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethanol (916 mg, 5.943 mmol), and triphenyl phosphine (1.637 g, 6.243 mmol) were combined in THF (10.48 mL) and the reaction was cooled in an ice-bath. Diisopropyl azodicarboxylate (1.288 g, 1.254 mL, 6.368 mmol) was added dropwise to the reaction mixture, and the reaction was allowed to warm to room temperature for 16 hours. The mixture was evaporated, and the resulting material was partitioned between ethyl acetate (30 mL) and IN sodium hydroxide (30 mL). The organic layer was separated, washed with brine (30 mL), dried over sodium sulfate, and concentrated. The crude material was purified by silica gel chromatography eluting with a gradient of ethyl acetate in hexanes (0- 30%) to give tert-butyl 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazole-l-carboxylate (1.03 g, 57%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 320.13, found 321.1 (M+1) +; Retention time: 0.72 minutes.

Step 2: 3-[2-[l-(Trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole

[00390] tert-Butyl-3 -[2-[ 1 -(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazole- 1 -carboxylate (1.03 g, 3.216 mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane (10.30 mL) with trifluoroacetic acid (2.478 mL, 32.16 mmol), and the reaction was stirred at room temperature for 2 hours. The reaction was evaporated, and the resulting oil was partitioned between ethyl acetate (10 mL) and a saturated sodium bicarbonate solution. The organic layer was separated, washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, and evaporated to give 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole (612 mg, 86%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 220.08, found 221.0 (M+1) +; Retention time: 0.5 minutes. ¾ MR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 11.86 (s, 1H), 7.50 (t, J= 2.1 Hz, 1H), 5.63 (t, J= 2.3 Hz, 1H), 4.14 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 2.01 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 0.96 – 0.88 (m, 2H), 0.88 -0.81 (m, 2H).

Step 3: tert-Butyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate

[00391] tert-Butyl 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylate (687 mg, 2.770 mmol), 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole (610 mg, 2.770 mmol), and freshly ground potassium carbonate (459 mg, 3.324 mmol) were combined in anhydrous DMSO (13.75 mL). l,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DAB CO (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane), 62 mg, 0.5540 mmol) was added, and the mixture was

stirred at room temperature under nitrogen for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was diluted with water (20 mL) and stirred for 15 minutes. The resulting solid was collected and washed with water. The solid was dissolved in dichloromethane and dried over magnesium sulfate. The mixture was filtered and concentrated to give tert-butyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (1.01 g, 84%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 431.12, found 432.1 (M+l) +; Retention time: 0.88 minutes.

Step 4: 2-Chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid

[00392] tert-Butyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (1.01 g, 2.339 mmol) and trifluoroacetic acid (1.8 mL, 23.39 mmol) were combined in dichloromethane (10 mL) and heated at 40 °C for 3 h. The reaction was concentrated. Hexanes were added, and the mixture was concentrated again to give 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (873 mg, 99%) ESI-MS m/z calc. 375.06, found 376.1 (M+l)+; Retention time: 0.69 minutes.

Step 5: N-(Benzenesulfonyl)-2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide

[00393] A solution of 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]

ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (0.15 g, 0.3992 mmol) and carbonyl diimidazole (77 mg, 0.4790 mmol) in THF (2.0 mL) was stirred for one hour, and

benzenesulfonamide (81 mg, 0.5190 mmol) and DBU (72 μΐ^, 0.4790 mmol) were added. The reaction was stirred for 16 hours, acidified with 1 M aqueous citric acid, and extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were dried over sodium sulfate and evaporated. The residue was purified by silica gel chromatography eluting with a gradient of methanol in dichloromethane (0-5%) to give N-(benzenesulfonyl)-2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (160 mg, 78%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 514.07, found 515.1 (M+l)+; Retention time: 0.74 minutes.

Step 6: N-(Benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide

[00394] A mixture of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (160 mg, 0.3107 mmol), (4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride salt (139 mg, 0.9321 mmol), and potassium carbonate (258 mg, 1.864 mmol) in DMSO (1.5 mL) was stirred at 130 °C for 17 hours. The reaction mixture was acidified with 1 M aqueous citric acid and extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were dried over sodium sulfate and evaporated to yield a crude product that was purified by reverse-phase HPLC utilizing a gradient of 10-99%) acetonitrile in 5 mM aqueous HC1 to yield N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (87 mg, 47%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 591.21, found 592.3 (M+l) +; Retention time: 2.21 minutes. 1H MR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 12.48 (s, 1H), 8.19 (d, J= 2.8 Hz, 1H), 8.04 – 7.96 (m, 2H), 7.81 (d, J= 8.2 Hz, 1H), 7.77 – 7.70 (m, 1H), 7.70 – 7.62 (m, 2H), 6.92 (d, J= 8.2 Hz, 1H), 6.10 (d, J= 2.8 Hz, 1H), 4.31 (t, J= 7.0 Hz, 2H), 2.42 (t, J= 10.5 Hz, 1H), 2.28 (dd, J = 10.2, 7.0 Hz, 1H), 2.17 – 2.01 (m, 3H), 1.82 (dd, J= 11.9, 5.5 Hz, 1H), 1.52 (d, J = 9.4 Hz, 6H), 1.36 (t, J= 12.1 Hz, 1H), 1.01 – 0.92 (m, 2H), 0.92 – 0.85 (m, 2H), 0.65 (d, J = 6.3 Hz, 3H). pKa: 4.95±0.06.

Synthesis of sodium salt of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl) cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (sodium salt of Compound I)

[00395] N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide (1000 mg, 1.679 mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (19.87 ml) under warming, filtered clear through a syringe filter (0.2 μπι), washed with warm ethanol (10 ml) and the warm solution was treated with 1M NaOH (1.679 ml, 1.679 mmol). The solution was evaporated at 30-35 °C, co-evaporated 3 times with ethanol (-20 ml), to give a solid, which was dried overnight under vacuum in a drying cabinet at 45 °C with a nitrogen bleed to give 951 mg of a cream colored solid. The solid was further dried under vacuum in a drying cabinet at 45 °C with a nitrogen bleed over the weekend. 930 mg (89%) of the sodium salt of N-(benzenesulfonyl)-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]-2-[(4S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidin-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxamide was obtained as an off-white amorphous solid. ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d) δ 8.15 (d, J= 2.7 Hz, 1H), 7.81 (dd, J= 6.7, 3.1 Hz, 2H), 7.61 (d, J= 7.9 Hz, 1H), 7.39 (dd, J= 4.9, 2.0 Hz, 3H), 6.74 (d, J= 7.9 Hz, 1H), 6.01 (d, J= 2.6 Hz, 1H), 4.29 (t, J= 7.0 Hz, 2H), 2.93 – 2.78 (m, 2H), 2.07 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 3H), 1.78 (dd, J= 11.8, 5.6 Hz, 1H), 1.52 (d, J= 13.6 Hz, 6H), 1.33 (t, J= 12.0 Hz, 1H), 1.00 – 0.92 (m, 2H), 0.89 (q, J= 5.3, 4.6 Hz, 2H), 0.71 (d, J= 6.3 Hz, 3H). EST-MS m/z calc. 591.2127, found 592.0 (M+l)+; Retention time: 3.28 minutes. XRPD (see FIG. 16).

Alternate synthesis of 2-Chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy] pyrazol-l-yl] pyridine-3-carboxylic acid

Step 1: ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate

[00396] A mixture of EtOH (20.00 L, 10 vol) and diethyl 2-(ethoxymethylene) propanedioate (2000 g, 9.249 mol, 1.0 equiv) was added under nitrogen purge a to a 50 L reactor equipped with a reflux condenser (10 °C) and the jacket set to 40 °C. The mixture was stirred, and then hydrazine hydrate (538.9 g of 55 %w/w, 523.7 mL of 55 %w/w, 9.249 mol, 1.00 equiv) was added in portions via an addition funnel. Once the addition was complete, the reaction was heated to 75 °C for 22 h to afford a solution of ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate that was used directly in the next step.

Step 2: l-(tert-butyl) 4-ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-l,4-dicarboxylate

[00397] The solution of ethyl 3 -hydroxy- lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate was cooled from 75 °C to 40 °C, then triethylamine (TEA) (46.80 g, 64.46 mL, 462.5 mmol, 0.05 eq.) was added. A solution of Boc anhydride (2.119 kg, 9.711 moll .05 equiv) in EtOH (2.000 L, 1 equiv) was added to the reactor over 35 min. The mixture was stirred for 4 hours to complete the reaction; then water (10.00 L, 5.0 vol) was added over 15 mins. The resulting mixture was cooled to 20 °C to complete crystallization of the product. The crystals were allowed to age for 1 hour, then the mixture was filtered. The solid was washed with a mixture of EtOH (4.000 L, 2.0 vol) and water (2.000 L, 1.0 vol). The solid was then dried in vacuo to afford l-(tert-butyl)-4-ethyl-3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-1,4-dicarboxylate (1530 g, 65%) as colorless, fine needle, crystalline solid. ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 11.61 (s, 1H), 8.40 (s, 1H), 4.20 (q, J = 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.56 (s, 9H), 1.25 (t, J = 7.1 Hz, 3H).

Step 3: l-(tert-butyl) 4-ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-ΙΗ-pyr azole- 1 ,4-dicarboxylate

[00398] A 5L reactor was started with the jacket set to 40 °C, stirring at 450 rpm, reflux condenser at room temperature and nitrogen purge. The vessel was charged with toluene (1.0L, 10.0 vol), 2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethanol (lOO.Og, 648.8 mmol, 1.0 equiv), and l-(tert-butyl) 4-ethyl 3-hydroxy-lH-pyrazole-l,4-dicarboxylate (166.3 g, 648.8 mmol), and the mixture was stirred. The reaction mixture was charged with triphenyl phosphine (195.7 g, 746.1 mmol, 1.15 equiv), then the reactor was set to maintain an internal temperature of 40 °C. Diisopropyl azoldicarboxylate (150.9 g, 746.1 mmol, 1.15 equiv) was added into an addition funnel and was added to the reaction while maintaining the reaction temperature between 40 and 50 °C (addition was exothermic, exotherm addition controlled), and stirred for a total of 2.5 hours. Once the reaction was deemed complete by HPLC, heptane was added (400 mL, 4 vol), the solution was cooled to 20 °C over 60 minutes, and the bulk of triphenylphosphine oxide-DIAD complex (TPPO-DIAD) crystallized out. Once at room temp, the mixture was filtered, and the solid was washed with heptane (400 mL, 4.0 vol) and pulled dry. The filtrate was used in the next step as a solution in toluene-heptane without further purification.

Step 4: ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate

[00399] A 500mL reactor was started with the jacket set to 40 °C, stirring at 450 rpm, reflux condenser at room temp, and nitrogen purge. The vessel was charged with a toluene solution consisting of approximately 160 mmol, 65.0 g of l-(tert-butyl) 4-ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-l,4-dicarboxylate in 3 vol of toluene (prepared by concentrating a 25% portion of filtrate from previous reaction down to 4 volumes in a rotovap). The reaction was set to maintain an internal temperature at 40 °C and KOH (33.1 g, 1.5 eq. of aqueous 45 % KOH solution) was added in one portion, resulting in a mild exothermic addition, while CO2 was generated upon removal of the protecting group. The reaction proceeded for 1.5 hr, monitored by HPLC, with the product partially crystallizing during the reaction. Heptane (160 mL, 2.5 vol) was added to the reaction mixture and the reaction was cooled to room temperature over 30 minutes. The resulting mixture was filtered, and the solid was

washed with heptane (80.00 mL, 1.25 vol), pulled dry, then dried in vacuo (55 °C, vacuum). 52.3 g of ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate was obtained as a crude, colorless solid that was used without further purification.

Step 5: 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid

[00400] A 500mL reactor was started with the jacket set to 40 °C, stirring at 450 rpm, reflux condenser at room temp, and nitrogen purge. The vessel was charged with methanol (150.0 mL, 3.0 vol), a solution of ethyl 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl) ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylate (50.0 g, 171.1 mmol, 1.0 equiv), and the reaction was stirred to suspend the solids. The reactor was set to maintain internal temperature at 40 °C. To the mixture was added KOH (96 g of aqueous 45 % KOH, 1.71 mol, 10.0 equiv) in portions maintaining the internal temperature <50 °C. Once addition was complete, the reaction was set to maintain temperature at 50 °C, and the reaction proceeded for 23 hours, monitored by HPLC. Once complete the reaction was cooled to 10 °C then partially concentrated on a rotary evaporator to remove most of the MeOH. The resulting solution was diluted with water (250 mL, 5.0 vol) and 2-Me-THF (150 mL, 3.0 vol), and transferred to the reactor, stirred at room temp, then stopped, and layers were allowed to separate. The layers were tested, with remaining TPPO-DIAD complex in the organic layer and product in the aqueous layer. The aqueous layer was washed again with 2-Me-THF (100 mL, 2.0 vol), the layers separated, and the aqueous layer returned to the reactor vessel. The stirrer was started and set to 450 rpm, and the reactor jacket was set to 0 °C. The pH was adjusted to pH acidic by addition of 6M aqueous HC1 (427mL, 15 equiv) portion wise, maintaining the internal temperature between 10 and 30 °C. The product began to crystallize close to pH neutral and was accompanied with strong off-gassing, and so the acid was added slowly, and then further added to reach pH 1 once the off-gassing had ended. To the resulting suspension was added 2-Me-THF (400 mL, 8.0 vol), and the product was allowed to dissolve into

the organic layer. Stirring was stopped, the layers were separated, and the aqueous layer was returned to the reactor, stirred and re-extracted with 2-Me-THF (100 mL, 2.0 vol). The organic layers were combined in the reactor and stirred at room temperature, washed with brine (lOOmL, 2 vols), dried over Na2S04, filtered through celite, and the solid was washed with 2-Me-THF (50 mL, 1.0 vol). The filtrate was transferred to a clean rotovap flask, stirred, warmed to 50 °C and heptane (200 mL, 4.0 vol) added, and then partially concentrated with the addition of heptane (300 mL, 6.0 vol) and then seeded with 50mg of 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid), and the product crystallized during solvent removal. The distillation was stopped when the bulk of the 2-Me-THF had distilled off. The bath heater was turned off, the vacuum removed, and the mixture was allowed to stir and cool to room temperature. The mixture was filtered (slow speed) and the solid was washed with heptane (100 mL, 2.0 vol), and the solid was collected and dried in vacuo (50 °C, rotovap). 22.47 g of 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid was obtained as an off-white solid. ¾ MR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ

12.45 (s, 2H), 8.01 (s, 1H), 4.26 (t, J= 7.0 Hz, 2H), 2.05 (t, J= 7.0 Hz, 2H), 0.92 (m,

4H).

Step 6: 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl)ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole

[00401] A mixture of toluene (490.0 mL), 3-(2-(l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl) ethoxy)-lH-pyrazole-4-carboxylic acid (70.0 g, 264.9 mmol), and DMSO (70.00 mL) was placed in a reactor and heated to 100 °C with stirring. DBU (approximately 20.16 g, 19.80 mL, 132.4 mmol) was added to the reactor over 15 min. The mixture was stirred for 20 h to complete the reaction and then cooled to 20 °C. The mixture was washed with water (350.0 mL), then 0.5N aq HC1 (280.0 mL), then water (2 x 140.0 mL), and lastly with brine (210.0 mL). The organic layer was dried with Na2S04, and then activated charcoal (5 g, Darco 100 mesh) was added to the stirred slurry. The dried mixture was filtered through celite, and the solid was washed with toluene (140.0 mL) and then pulled dry. The filtrate was concentrated in a rotovap (50 °C, vac) to afford 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole (30.89 g, 53%) as an amber oil. 1H MR (400 MHz, DMSO-d) δ 11.87 (s, 1H), 7.50 (d, J= 2.4 Hz, 1H), 5.63 (d, J = 2.4 Hz, 1H), 4.23 – 4.06 (m, 2H), 2.01 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.00 – 0.77 (m, 4H).

Step 7: ethyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy] pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate

[00402] A mixture of DMF (180.0 mL), ethyl 2,6-dichloropyridine-3-carboxylate (approximately 29.97 g, 136.2 mmol), 3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]-lH-pyrazole (30.0 g, 136.2 mmol), and K2CO3, (325 mesh, approximately 24.48 g, 177.1 mmol) was added to a stirred reactor at 20 °C. DABCO (approximately 2.292 g, 20.43 mmol) was then added to the reactor, and the mixture was stirred at 20 °C for 1 hour, and then the temperature was increased to 30 °C, and the mixture stirred for 24 hours to complete the reaction. The mixture was cooled to 20 °C; then water (360 mL) was added slowly. The mixture was then drained from the reactor and the solid was isolated by filtration. The solid was then washed with water (2 x 150 mL), and then the solid was dried under vacuum at 55 °C to afford ethyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (51.37 g, 93%) as a fine, beige colored solid. ¾ MR (400 MHz, DMSO-^e) δ 8.44 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 8.41 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 1H), 7.75 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 1H), 6.21 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 4.34 (m, 4H), 2.09 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.34 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 3H), 1.00 – 0.84 (m, 4H).

Step 8: 2-Chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid

[00403] A solution of ethyl 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl] ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylate (50.0 g, 123.8 mmol) in THF (300.0 mL) was prepared in a reactor at 20 °C. EtOH (150.0 mL) was added, followed by aqueous NaOH (approximately 59.44 g of 10 %w/w, 148.6 mmol). The mixture was stirred for 1 hour to complete the reaction; then aq IN HC1 (750.0 mL) was slowly added. The resulting suspension was stirred for 30 min at 10 °C, and then the solid was isolated by filtration. The solid was washed with water (150 mL then 2 x 100 mL) and then pulled dry by vacuum. The solid was then further dried under vacuum with heating to afford 2-chloro-6-[3-[2-[l-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]ethoxy]pyrazol-l-yl]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (42.29 g, 91%). ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ 13.63 (s, 1H), 8.48 -8.35 (m, 2H), 7.73 (d, J= 8.4 Hz, 1H), 6.20 (d, J= 2.9 Hz, 1H), 4.35 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 2.09 (t, J= 7.1 Hz, 2H), 1.01 – 0.82 (m, 4H).

Example 2: Preparation of a Spray Dried Dispersion (SDD) of Compound I

[00404] A spray dried dispersion of Compound I (free form) was prepared using Buchi Mini Spray Dryer B290. HPMCAS-HG (6.0 grams) was dissolved in 200 mL of MeOH/DCM (1/1), and Compound I (6.0 grams) was added and stirred for 30 minutes forming a clear solution. The resulting solution was spray dried under the following conditions resulting in a 50 wt% Compound 1/50 wt% HPMCAS- HG spray dried dispersion (Yield: 80%, Solid load: 6%). FIG. 14 shows the XRPD spectrum of a SDD of 50% Compound I in HPMCAS-HG. FIG. 15 is spectrum showing modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) spectrum of a spray dried dispersion (SDD) of 50% Compound I in HPMCAS-HG.

Table 64 SDD of Compound I

Example 3: Synthesis of Compound II: (R)-l-(2,2-Difluorobenzo[d][l,3]dioxol-5- yl)-N-(l-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-6-fluoro-2-(l-hydroxy-2- -2-yl)-lH-indol-5-yl)cyclopropanecarboxamide

Step 1: (R)-Benzyl 2-(l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropanoate and ((S)-2,2-Dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl 2-(l-(((R)-2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropanoate

[00405] Cesium carbonate (8.23 g, 25.3 mmol) was added to a mixture of benzyl 2-(6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropanoate (3.0 g, 8.4 mmol) and (S)-(2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate (7.23 g, 25.3 mmol) in DMF (N,N-dimethylformamide) (17 mL). The reaction was stirred at 80 °C for 46 hours under a nitrogen atmosphere. The mixture was then partitioned between ethyl acetate and water. The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined ethyl acetate layers were washed with brine, dried over MgS04, filtered and concentrated. The crude product, a viscous brown oil which contains both of the products shown above, was taken directly to the next step without further purification. (R)-Benzyl 2-(l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropanoate, ESI-MS m/z calc. 470.2, found 471.5 (M+l)+. Retention time 2.20 minutes. ((S)-2,2-Dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl 2-(l-(((R)-2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropanoate, ESI-MS m/z calc. 494.5, found 495.7 (M+l)+. Retention time 2.01 minutes.

Step 2: (R)-2-(l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropan-l-ol

[00406] The crude reaction mixture obtained in step (A) was dissolved in THF (tetrahydrofuran) (42 mL) and cooled in an ice-water bath. LiAlH4 (16.8 mL of 1 M solution, 16.8 mmol) was added drop-wise. After the addition was complete, the

mixture was stirred for an additional 5 minutes. The reaction was quenched by adding water (1 mL), 15% NaOH solution (1 mL) and then water (3 mL). The mixture was filtered over Celite, and the solids were washed with THF and ethyl acetate. The filtrate was concentrated and purified by column chromatography (30-60% ethyl acetate-hexanes) to obtain (R)-2-(l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropan-l-ol as a brown oil (2.68g, 87 % over 2 steps). ESI-MS m/z calc. 366.4, found 367.3 (M+l)+. Retention time 1.68 minutes. 1H MR (400 MHz, DMSO-^6) δ 8.34 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.65 (d, J = 13.4 Hz, 1H), 6.57 (s, 1H), 4.94 (t, J = 5.4 Hz, 1H), 4.64 – 4.60 (m, 1H), 4.52 – 4.42(m, 2H), 4.16 – 4.14 (m, 1H), 3.76 – 3.74 (m, 1H), 3.63 – 3.53 (m, 2H), 1.42 (s, 3H), 1.38 – 1.36 (m, 6H) and 1.19 (s, 3H) ppm. (DMSO is dimethylsulfoxide).

Step 3: (R)-2-(5-amino-l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropan-l-ol

[00407] (R)-2-(l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-5-nitro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropan-l-ol (2.5 g, 6.82 mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (70 mL) and the reaction was flushed with N2. Then Pd-C (250 mg, 5% wt) was added. The reaction was flushed with nitrogen again and then stirred under H2 (atm). After 2.5 hours only partial conversion to the product was observed by LCMS. The reaction was filtered through Celite and concentrated. The residue was re-subjected to the conditions above. After 2 hours LCMS indicated complete conversion to product. The reaction mixture was filtered through Celite. The filtrate was concentrated to yield the product (1.82 g, 79 %). ESI-MS m/z calc. 336.2, found 337.5 (M+l)+. Retention time 0.86 minutes. ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-^6) δ 7.17 (d, J = 12.6 Hz, 1H), 6.76 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 1H), 6.03 (s, 1H), 4.79 – 4.76 (m, 1H), 4.46 (s, 2H), 4.37 – 4.31 (m, 3H),4.06 (dd, J = 6.1, 8.3 Hz, 1H), 3.70 – 3.67 (m, 1H), 3.55 – 3.52 (m, 2H), 1.41 (s, 3H), 1.32 (s, 6H) and 1.21 (s, 3H) ppm.

Step 4: (R)-l-(2,2-difluorobenzo[d] [l,3]dioxol-5-yl)-N-(l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-2-(l-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-yl)-lH-indol-5-yl)cyclopropanecarboxamide

[00408] DMF (3 drops) was added to a stirring mixture of l-(2,2-difluorobenzo[d][l,3]dioxol-5-yl)cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (1.87 g, 7.7 mmol) and thionyl chloride (1.30 mL, 17.9 mmol). After 1 hour a clear solution had formed. The

solution was concentrated under vacuum and then toluene (3 mL) was added and the mixture was concentrated again. The toluene step was repeated once more and the residue was placed on high vacuum for 10 minutes. The acid chloride was then dissolved in dichloromethane (10 mL) and added to a mixture of (R)-2-(5 -amino- 1-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-lH-indol-2-yl)-2-methylpropan-l-ol (1.8 g, 5.4 mmol) and triethylamine (2.24 mL, 16.1 mmol) in dichloromethane (45 mL). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour. The reaction was washed with IN HC1 solution, saturated NaHCCb solution and brine, dried over MgSCb and concentrated to yield the product (3g, 100%). ESI-MS m/z calc. 560.6, found 561.7 (M+l)+. Retention time 2.05 minutes. ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-^6) δ 8.31 (s, 1H), 7.53 (s, 1H), 7.42 – 7.40 (m, 2H), 7.34 – 7.30 (m, 3H), 6.24 (s, 1H), 4.51 – 4.48 (m, 1H), 4.39 – 4.34 (m,2H), 4.08 (dd, J = 6.0, 8.3 Hz, 1H), 3.69 (t, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 3.58 – 3.51 (m, 2H), 1.48 – 1.45 (m, 2H), 1.39 (s, 3H), 1.34 – 1.33 (m, 6H), 1.18 (s, 3H) and 1.14 -1.12 (m, 2H) ppm

Step 5: (R)-l-(2,2-difluorobenzo[d] [l,3]dioxol-5-yl)-N-(l-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-6-fluoro-2-(l-hydroxy-2-methylpropan-2-yl)-lH-indol-5-yl)cyclopropanecarboxamide

[00409] (R)-l-(2,2-difluorobenzo[d][l,3]dioxol-5-yl)-N-(l-((2,2-dimethyl-l,3-dioxolan-4-yl)methyl)-6-fluoro-2-(l -hydroxy -2-methylpropan-2-yl)-lH-indol-5-yl)cyclopropanecarboxamide (3.0 g, 5.4 mmol) was dissolved in methanol (52 mL). Water (5.2 mL) was added followed by p-TsOH.H20 (p-toluenesulfonic acid hydrate) (204 mg, 1.1 mmol). The reaction was heated at 80 °C for 45 minutes. The solution was concentrated and then partitioned between ethyl acetate and saturated NaHCCb solution. The ethyl acetate layer was dried over MgS04 and concentrated. The residue was purified by column chromatography (50-100 % ethyl acetate – hexanes) to yield the product. (1.3 g, 47 %, ee >98% by SFC). ESI-MS m/z calc. 520.5, found 521.7 (M+l)+. Retention time 1.69 minutes. ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSC 6) δ 8.31 (s, 1H), 7.53 (s, 1H), 7.42 – 7.38 (m, 2H), 7.33 – 7.30 (m, 2H), 6.22 (s, 1H), 5.01 (d, J = 5.2 Hz, 1H), 4.90 (t, J = 5.5 Hz, 1H), 4.75 (t, J = 5.8 Hz, 1H), 4.40 (dd, J = 2.6, 15.1 Hz, 1H), 4.10 (dd, J = 8.7, 15.1 Hz, 1H), 3.90 (s, 1H), 3.65 – 3.54 (m, 2H), 3.48 – 3.33 (m, 2H), 1.48 -1.45 (m, 2H), 1.35 (s, 3H), 1.32 (s, 3H) and 1.14 – 1.11 (m, 2H) ppm.

Example 4: Synthesis of Compound III: N-(2,4-di-terf-butyl-5-hydroxyphi oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide

Part A: Synthesis of 4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid

Step 1: 2-Phenylaminomethylene-malonic acid diethyl ester

[00410] A mixture of aniline (25.6 g, 0.275 mol) and diethyl 2-(ethoxymethylene)malonate (62.4 g, 0.288 mol) was heated at 140-150 °C for 2 h. The mixture was cooled to room temperature and dried under reduced pressure to afford 2-phenylaminomethylene-malonic acid diethyl ester as a solid, which was used in the next step without further purification. ¾ MR (OMSO-de) δ 1 1.00 (d, 1H), 8.54 (d, J = 13.6 Hz, 1H), 7.36-7.39 (m, 2H), 7.13-7.17 (m, 3H), 4.17-4.33 (m, 4H), 1.18-1.40 (m, 6H).

Step 2: 4-Hydroxyquinoline-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester

[00411] A I L three-necked flask fitted with a mechanical stirrer was charged with 2-phenylaminomethylene-malonic acid diethyl ester (26.3 g, 0.100 mol), polyphosphoric acid (270 g) and phosphoryl chloride (750 g). The mixture was heated to 70 °C and stirred for 4 h. The mixture was cooled to room temperature and filtered. The residue was treated with aqueous Na2CCb solution, filtered, washed with water and dried. 4-Hydroxyquinoline-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester was obtained as a pale brown solid (15.2 g, 70%). The crude product was used in next step without further purification.

Step 3: 4-Oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid

[00412] 4-Hydroxyquinoline-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (15 g, 69 mmol) was suspended in sodium hydroxide solution (2N, 150 mL) and stirred for 2 h at reflux. After cooling, the mixture was filtered, and the filtrate was acidified to pH 4 with 2N HCl. The resulting precipitate was collected via filtration, washed with water and dried under vacuum to give 4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid as a pale white solid (10.5 g, 92 %). ¾ MR (DMSO-^e) δ 15.34 (s, 1 H), 13.42 (s, 1 H), 8.89 (s, 8.28 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H), 7.88 (m, 1H), 7.81 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 1H), 7.60 (m, 1H).

Part B: Synthesis of N-(2,4-di-terf-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide

Step 1: Carbonic acid 2,4-di-ferf-butyl-phenyl ester methyl ester

[00413] Methyl chloroformate (58 mL, 750 mmol) was added dropwise to a solution of 2,4-di-fert-butyl-phenol (103.2 g, 500 mmol), Et3N (139 mL, 1000 mmol) and DMAP (3.05 g, 25 mmol) in dichloromethane (400 mL) cooled in an ice-water bath to 0 °C. The mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature while stirring overnight, then filtered through silica gel (approx. 1L) using 10% ethyl acetate – hexanes (~ 4 L) as the eluent. The combined filtrates were concentrated to yield carbonic acid 2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenyl ester methyl ester as a yellow oil (132 g, quant.). ¾ MR (400 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ 7.35 (d, J = 2.4 Hz, 1H), 7.29 (dd, J = 8.5, 2.4 Hz, 1H), 7.06 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 1H), 3.85 (s, 3H), 1.30 (s, 9H), 1.29 (s, 9H).

Step 2: Carbonic acid 2,4-di-ferf-butyl-5-nitro-phenyl ester methyl ester and Carbonic acid 2,4-di-terf-butyl-6-nitro-phenyl ester methyl ester

[00414] To a stirring mixture of carbonic acid 2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenyl ester methyl ester (4.76 g, 180 mmol) in cone, sulfuric acid (2 mL), cooled in an ice-water bath, was added a cooled mixture of sulfuric acid (2 mL) and nitric acid (2 mL). The addition was done slowly so that the reaction temperature did not exceed 50 °C. The reaction was allowed to stir for 2 h while warming to room temperature. The reaction mixture was then added to ice-water and extracted into diethyl ether. The ether layer was dried (MgS04), concentrated and purified by column chromatography (0 – 10% ethyl acetate – hexanes) to yield a mixture of carbonic acid 2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-nitro-phenyl ester methyl ester and carbonic acid 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-nitro-phenyl ester methyl ester as a pale yellow solid (4.28 g), which was used directly in the next step.

Step 3: 2,4-Di-terf-butyl-5-nitro-phenol and 2,4-Di-terf-butyl-6-nitro-phenol

[00415] The mixture of carbonic acid 2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-nitro-phenyl ester methyl ester and carbonic acid 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-nitro-phenyl ester methyl ester (4.2 g, 14.0 mmol) was dissolved in MeOH (65 mL) before KOH (2.0 g, 36 mmol) was added. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 2 h. The reaction mixture was then made acidic (pH 2-3) by adding cone. HC1 and partitioned between water and diethyl ether. The ether layer was dried (MgS04), concentrated and purified by column

chromatography (0 – 5 % ethyl acetate – hexanes) to provide 2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-nitro-phenol (1.31 g, 29% over 2 steps) and 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-nitro-phenol. 2,4-Oi-tert-butyl-5-nitro-phenol: ¾ MR (400 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ 10.14 (s, 1H, OH), 7.34 (s, 1H), 6.83 (s, 1H), 1.36 (s, 9H), 1.30 (s, 9H). 2,4-Di-tert-butyl-6-nitro-phenol: ¾ MR (400 MHz, CDCh) δ 11.48 (s, 1H), 7.98 (d, J = 2.5 Hz, 1H), 7.66 (d, J = 2.4 Hz, 1H), 1.47 (s, 9H), 1.34 (s, 9H).

Step 4: 5-Amino-2,4-di-terf-butyl-phenol

[00416] To a refluxing solution of 2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-nitro-phenol (1.86 g, 7.40 mmol) and ammonium formate (1.86 g) in ethanol (75 mL) was added Pd-5% wt. on activated carbon (900 mg). The reaction mixture was stirred at reflux for 2 h, cooled to room temperature and filtered through Celite. The Celite was washed with methanol and the combined filtrates were concentrated to yield 5-amino-2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenol as a grey solid (1.66 g, quant.). ¾ MR (400 MHz, DMSO-^e) δ 8.64 (s, 1H, OH), 6.84 (s, 1H), 6.08 (s, 1H), 4.39 (s, 2H, H2), 1.27 (m, 18H); HPLC ret. time 2.72 min, 10-99 % CftCN, 5 min run; ESI-MS 222.4 m/z [M+H]+.

Step 5: N-(5-hydroxy-2,4-di-ieri-butyl-phenyl)-4-oxo-lH-quinoline-3-carboxamide

[00417] To a suspension of 4-oxo-l,4-dihydroquinolin-3-carboxylic acid (35.5 g, 188 mmol) and HBTU (85.7 g, 226 mmol) in DMF (280 mL) was added Et3N (63.0 mL, 451 mmol) at ambient temperature. The mixture became homogeneous and was allowed to stir for 10 min before 5-amino-2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenol (50.0 g, 226 mmol) was added in small portions. The mixture was allowed to stir overnight at ambient temperature. The mixture became heterogeneous over the course of the reaction. After all of the acid was consumed (LC-MS analysis, MH+ 190, 1.71 min), the solvent was removed in vacuo. EtOH (ethyl alcohol) was added to the orange solid material to produce a slurry. The mixture was stirred on a rotovap (bath temperature 65 °C) for 15 min without placing the system under vacuum. The mixture was filtered and the captured solid was washed with hexanes to provide a white solid that was the EtOH crystalate. Et20

(diethyl ether) was added to the solid obtained above until a slurry was formed. The mixture was stirred on a rotovapor (bath temperature 25 °C) for 15 min without placing the system under vacuum. The mixture was filtered and the solid captured. This procedure was performed a total of five times. The solid obtained after the fifth precipitation was placed under vacuum overnight to provide N-(5-hydroxy-2,4-di-tert-butyl-phenyl)-4-oxo-lH-quinoline-3-carboxamide (38 g, 52%). HPLC ret. time 3.45 min, 10-99% CftCN, 5 min run; 1H MR (400 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ 12.88 (s, 1H), 11.83 (s, 1H), 9.20 (s, 1H), 8.87 (s, 1H), 8.33 (dd, J = 8.2, 1.0 Hz, 1H), 7.83-7.79 (m, 1H), 7.76 (d, J = 7.7 Hz, 1H), 7.54-7.50 (m, 1H), 7.17 (s, 1H), 7.10 (s, 1H), 1.38 (s, 9H), 1.37 (s, 9H); ESI-MS m/z calc’d 392.21; found 393.3 [M+H]+.

PAPER

The New England journal of medicine (2018), 379(17), 1599-1611

https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1807119

////////////VX-659, VX 659,  VX659, PHASE 2,  CYSTIC FIBRIOSIS , VERTEX, Bamocaftor potassium

[K+].C[C@@H]1CN(c2nc(ccc2C(=O)[N-]S(=O)(=O)c3ccccc3)n4ccc(OCCC5(CC5)C(F)(F)F)n4)C(C)(C)C1

C[C@@H]1CN(c2nc(ccc2C(=O)NS(=O)(=O)c3ccccc3)n4ccc(OCCC5(CC5)C(F)(F)F)n4)C(C)(C)C1

Rovafovir Etalafenamide


2D chemical structure of 912809-27-9

Rovafovir etalafenamide

GS-9131

UNII-U8S0IC8DY7

 ethyl ((S)-((((2R,5R)-5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-4-fluoro-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)oxy)methyl)(phenoxy)phosphoryl)-L-alaninate

L-Alanine, N-((S)-((((2R,5R)-5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-4-fluoro-2,5-dihydro-2-furanyl)oxy)methyl)phenoxyphosphinyl)-, ethyl ester
CAS: 912809-27-9
Chemical Formula: C21H24FN6O6P
Molecular Weight: 506.43

  • Originator Gilead Sciences
  • Class Antiretrovirals; Purine nucleosides; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors
  • Phase II HIV-1 infections
  • 03 Apr 2018 Phase-II clinical trials in HIV-1 infections (Treatment-experienced) in Uganda (PO) (NCT03472326)
  • 21 Mar 2018 Gilead Sciences plans a phase II study for HIV-1 infections in March 2018 (NCT03472326)
  • 26 Mar 2009 Preclinical pharmacokinetics data in HIV-1 infections presented at the 237th American Chemical Society National Meeting (237th-ACS-2009)

Rovafovir Etalafenamide, also known as GS-9131, is an anti-HIV Nucleoside Phosphonate prodrug.

POSTER

http://www.croiconference.org/sites/default/files/posters-2017/436_White.pdf

Patent

WO 2006110157

WO 2008103949

WO 2010005986

PATENT

WO 2012159047

 

PATENT

WO-2019027920

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019027920&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&maxRec=1000

As discussed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 7,871,991, 9,381,206, 8,951,986, and 8,658,617, ethyl ((S)-((((2R,5R)-5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-4-fluoro-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)oxy)methyl)(phenoxy)phosphoryl)-L-alaninate is a reverse transcriptase inhibitor that blocks the replication of HIV viruses, in vivo and in vitro, and has limited undesirable side effects when administered to human beings. This compound has a favorable in vitro resistance profile with activity against Nucleoside RT Inhibitor (NRTI)-Resistance Mutations, such as Ml 84V, K65R, L74V, and one or more (e.g., 1, 2, 3, or 4) TAMs (thymidine analogue mutations). It has the following formula (see, e.g., U.S. Pat. No. 7,871,991), which is referred to as Formula I:

[0004] Ethyl ((S)-((((2R,5R)-5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-4-fluoro-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)oxy)methyl)(phenoxy)phosphoryl)-L-alaninate is difficult to isolate, purify, store for an extended period, and formulate as a pharmaceutical composition.

[0005] The compound of formula la was previously identified as the most chemically stable form of ethyl ((S)-((((2R,5R)-5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-4-fluoro-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-

yl)oxy)methyl)(phenoxy)phosphoryl)-L-alaninate. See, e.g. , U.S. Pat. Nos. 8,658,617,

8,951,986, and 9,381,206. However, a total degradation increase of 2.6% was observed when the compound of formula (la) was stored at 25 °C/60% RH over 6 months. Therefore, the compound of formula la requires refrigeration for long-term storage.

[0006] Accordingly, there is a need for stable forms of the compound of Formula I with suitable chemical and physical stability for the formulation, therapeutic use, manufacturing, and storage of the compound. New forms, moreover, can provide better stability for the active pharmaceutical substance in a pharmaceutical formulation.

PAPER

Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry (2010), 18(10), 3606-3617.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0968089610002452?via%3Dihub

Image result for Discovery of GS-9131: Design, synthesis and optimization of amidate prodrugs of the novel nucleoside phosphonate HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor GS-9148

Image result for Discovery of GS-9131: Design, synthesis and optimization of amidate prodrugs of the novel nucleoside phosphonate HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor GS-9148

PAPER

 RSC Drug Discovery Series (2011), 4(Accounts in Drug Discovery), 215-237.

PAPER

https://aac.asm.org/content/52/2/648

Image result for GS-9131

REFERENCES

1: Rai MA, Pannek S, Fichtenbaum CJ. Emerging reverse transcriptase inhibitors for HIV-1 infection. Expert Opin Emerg Drugs. 2018 May 10:1-9. doi: 10.1080/14728214.2018.1474202. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 29737220.

2: Mackman RL. Anti-HIV Nucleoside Phosphonate GS-9148 and Its Prodrug GS-9131: Scale Up of a 2′-F Modified Cyclic Nucleoside Phosphonate and Synthesis of Selected Amidate Prodrugs. Curr Protoc Nucleic Acid Chem. 2014 Mar 26;56:14.10.1-21. doi: 10.1002/0471142700.nc1410s56. Review. PubMed PMID: 25606977.

3: De Clercq E. The clinical potential of the acyclic (and cyclic) nucleoside phosphonates: the magic of the phosphonate bond. Biochem Pharmacol. 2011 Jul 15;82(2):99-109. doi: 10.1016/j.bcp.2011.03.027. Epub 2011 Apr 8. Review. PubMed PMID: 21501598.

4: Mackman RL, Ray AS, Hui HC, Zhang L, Birkus G, Boojamra CG, Desai MC, Douglas JL, Gao Y, Grant D, Laflamme G, Lin KY, Markevitch DY, Mishra R, McDermott M, Pakdaman R, Petrakovsky OV, Vela JE, Cihlar T. Discovery of GS-9131: Design, synthesis and optimization of amidate prodrugs of the novel nucleoside phosphonate HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor GS-9148. Bioorg Med Chem. 2010 May 15;18(10):3606-17. doi: 10.1016/j.bmc.2010.03.041. Epub 2010 Mar 27. PubMed PMID: 20409721.

5: Cihlar T, Laflamme G, Fisher R, Carey AC, Vela JE, Mackman R, Ray AS. Novel nucleotide human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase inhibitor GS-9148 with a low nephrotoxic potential: characterization of renal transport and accumulation. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009 Jan;53(1):150-6. doi: 10.1128/AAC.01183-08. Epub 2008 Nov 10. PubMed PMID: 19001108; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2612154.

6: Cihlar T, Ray AS, Boojamra CG, Zhang L, Hui H, Laflamme G, Vela JE, Grant D, Chen J, Myrick F, White KL, Gao Y, Lin KY, Douglas JL, Parkin NT, Carey A, Pakdaman R, Mackman RL. Design and profiling of GS-9148, a novel nucleotide analog active against nucleoside-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and its orally bioavailable phosphonoamidate prodrug, GS-9131. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2008 Feb;52(2):655-65. Epub 2007 Dec 3. PubMed PMID: 18056282; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2224772.

7: Ray AS, Vela JE, Boojamra CG, Zhang L, Hui H, Callebaut C, Stray K, Lin KY, Gao Y, Mackman RL, Cihlar T. Intracellular metabolism of the nucleotide prodrug GS-9131, a potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus agent. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2008 Feb;52(2):648-54. Epub 2007 Dec 3. PubMed PMID: 18056281; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2224749.

8: Birkus G, Wang R, Liu X, Kutty N, MacArthur H, Cihlar T, Gibbs C, Swaminathan S, Lee W, McDermott M. Cathepsin A is the major hydrolase catalyzing the intracellular hydrolysis of the antiretroviral nucleotide phosphonoamidate prodrugs GS-7340 and GS-9131. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2007 Feb;51(2):543-50. Epub 2006 Dec 4. PubMed PMID: 17145787; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1797775.

//////////////Rovafovir etalafenamide, GS-9131, PHASE 2

C[C@@H](C(OCC)=O)N[P@@](OC1=CC=CC=C1)(CO[C@H]2O[C@@H](N3C=NC4=C(N)N=CN=C34)C(F)=C2)=O

OLACAFTOR, VX 440


Image result for VX 440

NHOUNZMCSIHKHJ-FQEVSTJZSA-N.png

OLACAFTOR, VX 440

CAS 1897384-89-2

Molecular Formula: C29H34FN3O4S
Molecular Weight: 539.666 g/mol

CFTR corrector; UNII-RZ7027HK8F; RZ7027HK8F;

Target-based Actions, CFTR modulator

Indications, Cystic fibrosis

CS-0044588

UNII-RZ7027HK8F

RZ7027HK8F

Olacaftor (VX-440, VX440) is a next-generation CFTR corrector, shows the potential to enhance the amount of CFTR protein at the cell’s surface and for treatment of cystic fibrosis..

  • Originator Vertex Pharmaceuticals
  • Class Pyridines; Pyrrolidines
  • Mechanism of Action Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator stimulants
  • Phase II Cystic fibrosis
  • 01 Jun 2018 Chemical structure information added
  • 01 Aug 2017 Vertex Pharmaceuticals completes a phase II trial in Cystic fibrosis (In adolescents, In adults, In the elderly, Combination therapy) in USA, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Spain, Netherlands and United Kingdom (PO) (NCT02951182) (EudraCT2016-000454-36)
  • 18 Jul 2017 Efficacy and events data from a phase II trial in Cystic fibrosis released by Vertex Pharmaceuticals

PATENT

WO2016057572

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=B67642F2D5C265D1AF3AC60194173694.wapp1nB?docId=WO2016057572&recNum=6&office=&queryString=&prevFilter=%26fq%3DOF%3AWO%26fq%3DICF_M%3A%22A01N%22&sortOption=Pub+Date+Desc&maxRec=22922

PATENT

US9782408

PATENT

WO-2019028228

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019028228&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&maxRec=1000

Processes for preparing (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine and its salts, particularly hydrochloride comprising the reaction of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-4-one with chloroform and a base (sodium hydroxide), followed by reaction with an acid (hydrochloric acid), hydrogenation, reduction and salt synthesis is claimed. Also claimed is a process for the preparation of an intermediate of (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride. The compound is useful as an intermediate for the synthesis of CFTR modulators, useful for treating cystic fibrosis.
(5)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine free base and salt forms thereof, (R)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine free base and salt forms thereof, (,S)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidine-2-one, (R)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidine-2-one, and 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one are useful molecules that can be used in the synthesis of pharmaceutically active molecules, such as modulators of CFTR activity, for example those disclosed in PCT Publication Nos. WO 2016/057572, WO 2018/064632, and WO 2018/107100, including the following molecules, which are being investigated in clinical trials for the treatment of cystic fibrosis:

[0003] There remains, however, a need for more efficient, convenient, and/or economical processes for the preparation of these molecules.

[0004] Disclosed herein are processes for preparing 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one, (,S)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidine-2-one, (R)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidine-2-one, (,S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine, and (R)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine, and their salt forms:


trimethylpyrrolidine-2-one)); ((R)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidine-2-one));

((,S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine) ;and 

Scheme 1. Synthesis of (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine

(2) (3) (4S) (1 S)

Scheme 2. Synthesis of (R)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine

(2) (3) (4R) (1 R)

Scheme 3. Synthesis of 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one

3 C

EXAMPLES

Example 1. Reaction (a) and (b): Synthesis of 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin- 2-one

(2) (3) C (3)

Example 1A:

[0055] 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one (50.00 g, 305.983 mmol, 1.000 equiv), tributylmethylammonium chloride (2.89 g, 3.0 mL, 9.179 mmol, 0.030 equiv), chloroform (63.92 g, 43.2 mL, 535.470 mmol, 1.750 equiv), and DCM (dichloromethane) (100.0 mL, 2.00 vol) were charged to a 1000 mL three-neck round bottom flask equipped with an overhead stirrer. The reaction mixture was stirred at 300 rpm, and 50 wt% NaOH (195.81 g, 133.2 mL, 2,447.863 mmol, 8.000 equiv) was added dropwise (via addition funnel) over 1.5 h while maintaining the temperature below 25 °C with intermittent ice/acetone bath. The reaction mixture was stirred at 500 rpm for 18 h, and monitored by GC (3% unreacted piperidinone after 18 h). The suspension was diluted with DCM (100.0 mL, 2.00 vol) and H2O (300.0 mL, 6.00 vol), and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (100.0 mL, 2.00 vol). The organic phases were combined and 3 M hydrochloric acid (16.73 g, 153.0 mL, 458.974 mmol, 1.500 equiv) was added. The mixture was stirred at 500 rpm for 2 h. The conversion was complete after approximately 1 h. The aqueous phase was saturated with NaCl, H2O (100.0 mL, 2.00 vol) was added to help reduce the emulsion, and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (100.0 mL, 2.00 vol) twice. H2O (100.0 mL, 2.00 vol) was added to help with emulsion separation. The organic phases were combined, dried (MgS04), and

concentrated to afford 32.6 g (85%) of crude Compound (3) as a pale orange clumpy solid. The crude was recrystallized from hot (90°C) iPrOAc (isopropyl acetate) (71.7 mL, 2.2 vol. of crude), cooled to 80 °C, and -50 mg of crystalline Compound (3) was added for seeding. Crystallization started at 77 °C, the mixture was slowly cooled to ambient temperature, and aged for 2 h. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with 50/50 iPrOAc/heptane (20.0 mL, 0.40 vol) twice, and dried overnight in the vacuum oven at 40 °C to afford the desired product (23.70 g, 189.345 mmol, 62% yield) as a white sand colored crystalline solid. ¾ MR (400 MHz, CDCh, 7.26 ppm) δ 7.33 (bs, 1H), 5.96-5.95 (m, 1H), 5.31-5.30 (m, 1H), 2.6 (t, J= 2.5 Hz, 2H), 1.29 (s, 6H).

Synthesis IB:

[0056] i. Under a nitrogen atmosphere, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one (257.4 kg, 1658.0 mol, 1.00 eq.), tri-butyl methyl ammonium chloride (14.86 kg, 63.0 mol, 0.038 eq.), chloroform (346.5 kg, 2901.5 mol, 1.75 eq.) and DCM (683.3 kg) were added to a 500 L enamel reactor. The reaction was stirred at 85 rpm and cooled to 15~17°C. The solution of 50wt% sodium hydroxide (1061.4 kg, 13264.0 mol, 8.00 eq.) was added dropwise over 40 h while maintaining the temperature between 15~25°C. The reaction mixture was stirred and monitored by GC.

ii. The suspension was diluted with DCM (683.3 kg) and water (1544.4 kg). The organic phase was separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (683.3 kg). The organic phases were combined, cooled to 10°C and then 3 M hydrochloric acid (867.8 kg, 2559.0 mol, 1.5 eq.) was added. The mixture was stirred at 10-15 °C for 2 h. The organic phase was separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (683.3 kg x 2). The organic phases were combined, dried over Na2S04 (145.0 kg) for 6 h. The solid was filtered off and washed with DCM (120.0 kg). The filtrate was stirred with active charcoal (55 kg) for 6 h. The resulting mixture was filtered and the filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure (30~40°C, -O. lMPa). Then isopropyl acetate (338 kg) was added and the mixture was heated to 87-91°C, stirred for 1 h. Then the solution was cooled to 15 °C in 18 h and stirred for 1 h at 15 °C. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with 50% isopropyl acetate/hexane (80.0 kg x 2) and dried overnight in the vacuum oven at 50 °C to afford 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one as an off white solid, 55% yield.

Example 2. Reaction (c): Synthesis of (S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one from 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one

(3) (4S)

Example 2A: Use of Rh Catalyst

[0057] Step 1 : Preparation of Rh Catalyst Formation: In a 3 L Schlenk flask, 1.0 L of tetrahydrofuran (THF) was degassed with an argon stream. Mandyphos Ligand SL-M004-1 (1.89 g) and [Rh(nbd)Cl]2 (98%, 0.35 g) (chloronorbornadiene rhodium(I) dimer) were added. The resulting orange catalyst solution was stirred for 30 min at room temperature to form a catalyst solution.

[0058] Step 2: A 50 L stainless steel autoclave was charged with 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one (6.0 kg, Compound (3)) and THF (29 L). The autoclave was

sealed and the resulting suspension was flushed with nitrogen (3 cycles at 10 bar), and then released of pressure. Next the catalyst solution from Step 1 was added. The autoclave was flushed with nitrogen without stirring (3 cycles at 5 bar) and hydrogen (3 cycles at 5 bar). The pressure was set to 5 bar and a 50 L reservoir was connected. After 1.5 h with stirring at 1000 rpm and no hydrogen uptake the reactor was flushed again with nitrogen (3 cycles at 10 bar) with stirring and additional catalyst solution was added. The autoclave was again flushed to hydrogen with the above described procedure (3 x 5 bar N2, 3 x 5 bar H2) and adjusted to 5 bar. After 2 h, the pressure was released, the autoclave was flushed with nitrogen (3 cycles at 5 bar) and the product solution was discharged into a 60 L inline barrel. The autoclave was charged again with THF (5 L) and stirred with 1200 rpm for 5 min. The wash solution was added to the reaction mixture.

[0059] Step 3 : The combined solutions were transferred into a 60 L reactor. The inline barrel was washed with 1 L THF which was also added into the reactor. 20 L THF were removed by evaporation at 170 mbar and 40°C. 15 L heptane were added. The distillation was continued and the removed solvent was continuously replaced by heptane until the THF content in the residue was 1% w/w (determined by NMR). The reaction mixture was heated to 89°C (turbid solution) and slowly cooled down again (ramp: 14°C/h). Several heating and cooling cycles around 55 to 65°C were made. The off-white suspension was transferred to a stirred pressure filter and filtered (ECTFE-pad, d = 414 mm, 60 my, Filtration time = 5 min). 10 L of the mother liquor was transferred back into the reactor to wash the crystals from the reactor walls and the obtained slurry was also added to the filter. The collected solid was washed with 2 x 2.5 1 heptane, discharged and let dry on the rotovap at 40°C and 4 mbar to obtain the product, (S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one; 5.48 Kg (91%), 98.0% ee.

Synthesis 2B: Use of Ru Catalyst

[0060] The reaction was performed in a similar manner as described above in Example 2A except the use of a Ru catalyst instead of a Rh catalyst.

[0061] Compound (3) (300 g) was dissolved in THF (2640 g, 10 Vol) in a vessel. In a separate vessel, a solution of [RuCl(p-cymene){(R)-segphos}]Cl (0.439g, 0.0002 eq) in THF (660 g, 2.5 Vol) was prepared. The solutions were premixed in situ and passed

through a Plug-flow reactor (PFR). The flow rate for the Compound (3) solution was at 1.555 mL/min and the Ru catalyst solution was at 0.287 mL/min. Residence time in the PFR was 4 hours at 30 °C, with hydrogen pressure of 4.5 MPa. After completion of reaction, the TFIF solvent was distilled off to give a crude residue. Heptane (1026 g, 5 vol) was added and the resulting mixture was heated to 90 °C. The mixture was seeded with 0.001 eq. of Compound 4S seeds. The mixture was cooled to -15 °C at 20 °C/h. After cooling, heptane (410 g, 2 vol) was added and the solid product was recovered by filtration. The resulting product was dried in a vacuum oven at 35 °C to give (S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one (281.77 g, 98.2 % ee, 92 % yield).

Example 2C: Analytical Measurements

[0062] Analytical chiral HPLC method for the determination of the conversion, chemoselectivity and enantiomeric excess of the products form Example 2A and 2B was made under the following conditions: Instrument: Agilent Chemstation 1100; Column: Phenomenex Lux 5u Cellulose— 2, 4.6 mm x 250 mm x 5 um, LHS6247; Solvent:

Heptane/iPrOH (90: 10); Flow: 1.0 ml/min; Detection: UV (210 nm); Temperature: 25°C; Sample concentration: 30 μΐ of reaction solution evaporated, dissolved in 1 mL;

heptane/iPrOH (80/20); Injection volume: 10.0 
Run time 20 min; Retention times: 5,5–dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one: 13.8 min, (,S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pynOlidin-2-one: 10.6 min, and (R)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one: 12.4 min.

Example 3: Alternate Synthesis of (S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one from 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one

Ru(Me-allyl)2(C0D)2BF4

1 eq HBF4 Et20

5 bar H2 at 45°C

[0063] Mandyphos (0.00479 mmol, 0.12 eq) was weighed into a GC vial. In a separate vial, Ru(Me-allyl)2(COD) (16.87 mg, 0.0528 mmol) was weighed and dissolved in DCM (1328 \iL). In another vial HBF4 Et20 (6.6 μΐ,) and BF3 Et20 (2.0 μΐ,) were dissolved in DCM (240 μΐ.). To the GC vial containing the ligand was added, under a flow of argon, the Ru(Me-allyl)2(COD) solution (100 μΐ,; 0.00399 mmol, O. leq) and the HBF4 Et20 / BF3 -Et20 solution (20 μΐ^ 1 eq HBF4 Et20 and catalytic BF3 Et20). The resulting mixtures were stirred under a flow of argon for 30 minutes. 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one (5 mg, 0.0399 mmol) in EtOH (1 mL) was added. The vials were placed in the hydrogenation apparatus. The apparatus was flushed with H2 (3 χ) and charged with 5 bar H2. After standing for 45 minutes, the apparatus was placed in an oil bath at temperature of 45°C. The reaction mixtures were stirred overnight under H2. 200 μΙ_, of the reaction mixture was diluted with MeOH (800 μΐ.) and analyzed for conversion and ee. 1H MR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 6.39 (s, 1H), 2.62 (ddq, J = 9.9, 8.6, 7.1 Hz, 1H), 2.17 (ddd, J = 12.4, 8.6, 0.8 Hz, 1H), 1.56 (dd, J = 12.5, 9.9 Hz, 1H), 1.31 (s, 3H), 1.25 (s, 3H), 1.20 (d, J = 7.1 Hz, 3H).

IPC analytical method for Asymmetric Hydrogenation

(3) (4S) (4R)

Example 4. Synthesis of (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride from (S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one

(4S) (1S)HCI

Example 4A:

[0064] Anhydrous THF (100 ml) was charged to a dry 750 ml reactor and the jacket temperature was set to 50° C. Once the vessel contents were at 50° C, LiAlH4pellets (10 g, 263 mmol, 1.34 eq.) were added. The mixture was stirred for 10 minutes, then a solution of (4S) (25 g, 197 mmol) in anhydrous THF (100 ml) was added dropwise over 45 minutes, maintaining the temperature between 50-60° C. Once the addition was complete the jacket temperature was increased to 68° C and the reaction was stirred for 18.5 hrs. The reaction mixture was cooled to 30° C then saturated sodium sulfate solution (20.9 ml) was added dropwise over 30 minutes, keeping the temperature below 40° C. Vigorous evolution of hydrogen was observed and the reaction mixture thickened but remained mixable. The mixture thinned towards the end of the addition. The mixture was cooled to 20° C, diluted with iPrOAc (100 ml) and stirred for an additional 10 minutes. The suspension was then drained and collected through the lower outlet valve, washing through with additional iPrOAc (50 ml). The collected suspension was filtered through a Celite pad on a sintered glass funnel under suction and washed with iPrOAc (2×50 ml).

[0065] The filtrate was transferred back to the cleaned reactor and cooled to 0° C under nitrogen. 4M HCI in dioxane (49.1 ml, 197 mmol, leq.) was then added dropwise over 15 minutes, maintaining the temperature below 20°C. A white precipitate formed. The reactor was then reconfigured for distillation, the jacket temperature was increased to 100 °C, and distillation of solvent was carried out. Additional z-PrOAc (100 mL) was added during concentration, after >100 mL distillate had been collected. Distillation was continued until -250 mL total distillate was collected, then a Dean-Stark trap was attached and reflux continued for 1 hour. No water was observed to collect. The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 °C and filtered under suction under nitrogen. The filtered solid was washed with i-PrOAc (100 mL), dried under suction in nitrogen, then transferred to a glass dish and dried in a vacuum oven at 40 °C with a nitrogen bleed. Compound (1S)»HC1 was obtained as a white solid (24.2g, 82%).

Synthesis 4B:

[0066] To a glass lined 120 L reactor was charged LiAlH4 pellets (2.5 kg 66 mol, 1.2 equiv.) and dry THF (60 L) and warmed to 30 °C. To the resulting suspension was charged (¾)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one (7.0 kg, 54 mol) in THF (25 L) over 2 hours while maintaining the reaction temperature at 30 to 40 °C. After complete addition, the reaction temperature was increased to 60 – 63 °C and maintained overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to 22 °C and sampled to check for completion, then cautiously quenched with the addition of EtOAc (1.0 L, 10 moles, 0.16 eq) followed by a mixture of THF (3.4 L) and water (2.5 kg, 2.0 eq) then followed by a mixture of water (1.75 kg) with 50 % aqueous sodium hydroxide (750 g, 2 eq water with 1.4 eq sodium hydroxide relative to aluminum), followed by 7.5 L water (6 eq “Fieser” quench). After the addition was completed, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, and the solid was removed by filtration and washed with THF (3 x 25 L). The filtrate and washings were combined and treated with 5.0 L (58 moles) of aqueous 37% HC1 (1.05 equiv.) while maintaining the temperature below 30°C. The resultant solution was concentrated by vacuum distillation to a slurry in two equal part lots on the 20 L Buchi evaporator.

Isopropanol (8 L) was charged and the solution reconcentrated to near dryness by vacuum distillation. Isopropanol (4 L) was added and the product slurried by warming to about 50 °C. Distillation from Isopropanol continued until water content by KF is < 0.1 %. Methyl tertbutyl ether (6 L) was added and the slurry cooled to 2-5 °C. The product was collected by filtration and rinsed with 12 L methyl tert-butyl ether and pulled dry with a strong nitrogen flow and further dried in a vacuum oven (55 °C/300 torr/N2 bleed) to afford (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine»HCl ((1S HC1) as a white, crystalline solid (6.21 kg, 75% yield). ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-^6) δ 9.34 (s, 2H), 3.33 (dd, J= 11.4, 8.4 Hz, 1H), 2.75 (dd, J= 11.4, 8.6 Hz, 1H), 2.50 – 2.39 (m, 1H), 1.97 (dd, 7= 12.7, 7.7 Hz, 1H), 1.42 (s, 3H), 1.38 (dd, 7= 12.8, 10.1 Hz, 1H), 1.31 (s, 3H), 1.05 (d, 7= 6.6 Hz, , 3H).

Synthesis 4C:

[0067] With efficient mechanical stirring, a suspension of LiAlH4 pellets (100 g 2.65 mol; 1.35 eq.) in THF (1 L; 4 vol. eq.) warmed at a temperature from 20 °C – 36 °C (heat of mixing). A solution of (¾)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one (250 g; 1.97 mol) in THF (1 L; 4 vol. eq.) was added to the suspension over 30 min. while allowing the reaction temperature to rise to -60 °C. The reaction temperature was increased to near reflux (-68 °C) and maintained for about 16 h. The reaction mixture was cooled to below 40 °C and cautiously quenched with drop-wise addition of a saturated aqueous solution of Na2S04 (209 mL) over 2 h. After the addition was completed, the reaction mixture was cooled to ambient temperature, diluted with /-PrOAc (1 L), and mixed thoroughly. The solid was removed by filtration (Celite pad) and washed with /-PrOAc (2 x 500 mL). With external cooling and N2 blanket, the filtrate and washings were combined and treated with drop-wise addition of anhydrous 4 M HC1 in dioxane (492 mL; 2.95 mol; 1 equiv.) while maintaining the temperature below 20 °C. After the addition was completed (20 min), the resultant suspension was concentrated by heating at reflux (74 – 85 °C) and removing the distillate. The suspension was backfilled with /-PrOAc (1 L) during concentration. After about 2.5 L of distillate was collected, a Dean-Stark trap was attached and any residual water was azeotropically removed. The suspension was cooled to below 30 °C when the solid was collected by filtration under a N2 blanket. The solid is dried under N2 suction and further dried in a vacuum oven (55 °C/300 torr/N2 bleed) to afford 261 g (89% yield) of (S 2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine»HCl ((1S HC1) as a white, crystalline solid. ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-^6) δ 9.34 (s, 2H), 3.33 (dd, J = 11 A, 8.4 Hz, 1H), 2.75 (dd, J= 11.4, 8.6 Hz, 1H), 2.50 – 2.39 (m, 1H), 1.97 (dd, J= 12.7, 7.7 Hz, 1H), 1.42 (s, 3H), 1.38 (dd, J = 12.8, 10.1 Hz, 1H), 1.31 (s, 3H), 1.05 (d, J= 6.6 Hz, 3H). ¾ MR (400 MHz, CDCh) δ 9.55 (d, J= 44.9 Hz, 2H), 3.52 (ddt, J= 12.1, 8.7, 4.3 Hz, 1H), 2.94 (dq, J= 11.9, 5.9 Hz, 1H), 2.70 – 2.51 (m, 1H), 2.02 (dd, J= 13.0, 7.5 Hz, 1H), 1.62 (s, 3H), 1.58 – 1.47 (m, 4H), 1.15 (d, J= 6.7 Hz, 3H).

Synthesis 4D:

[0068] A 1L four-neck round bottom flask was degassed three times. A 2M solution of LiAlHun THF (100 mL) was charged via cannula transfer. (¾)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one (19.0 g) in THF (150 mL) was added dropwise via an addition funnel over 1.5 hours at 50-60 °C, washing in with THF (19 mL). Upon completion of the addition, the reaction was stirred at 60 °C for 8 hours and allowed to cool to room temperature overnight. GC analysis showed <1% starting material remained. Deionized water (7.6 mL) was added slowly to the reaction flask at 10-15 °C, followed by 15% potassium hydroxide (7.6 mL). Isopropyl acetate (76 mL) was added, the mixture was stirred for 15 minutes and filtered, washing through with isopropyl acetate (76 mL). The filtrate was charged to a clean and dry 500 mL four neck round bottom flask and cooled to 0-5 °C. 36% Hydrochloric acid (15.1 g, 1.0 eq.) was added keeping the temperature below 20 °C. Distillation of the solvent, backfilling with isopropyl acetate (190 mL), was carried out to leave a residual volume of -85 mL. Karl Fischer analysis = 0.11% w/w H2O. MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) (19 mL) was added at 20-30 °C and the solids were filtered off under nitrogen at 15-20 °C, washing with isopropyl acetate (25 mL) and drying under vacuum at 40-45 °C to give crude (,S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride as a white crystalline solid (17.4 g, 78% yield). GC purity = 99.5%. Water content = 0.20% w/w. Chiral GC gave an ee of 99.0% (S). Ruthenium content = 0.004 ppm. Lithium content = 0.07 ppm. A portion of the dried crude ,S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride (14.3g) was charged to a clean and dry 250 mL four-neck round bottom flask with isopropanol (14.3 mL) and the mixture held at 80-85 °C (reflux) for 1 hour to give a clear solution. The solution was allowed to cool to 50 °C (solids precipitated on cooling) then MTBE (43 mL) was added and the suspension held at 50-55 °C (reflux) for 3 hours. The solids were filtered off at 10 °C, washing with MTBE (14 mL) and dried under vacuum at 40 °C to give recrystallised (S)- 2.2.4- trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride ((1S)»HC1) as a white crystallised solid (13.5 g, 94% yield on recrystallisation, 73% yield). GC purity = 99.9%. Water content = 0.11% w/w. 99.6% ee (Chiral GC) (S). Ruthenium content = 0.001 ppm. Lithium content = 0.02 ppm.

Synthesis 4E:

[0069] A reactor was charged with lithium aluminum hydride (LAH) (1.20 equiv.) and 2-MeTHF (2-methyltetrahydrofuran) (4.0 vol), and heated to internal temperature of 60 °C while stirring to disperse the LAH. A solution of (¾)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one (1.0 equiv) in 2-MeTHF (6.0 vol) was prepared and stirred at 25 °C to fully dissolve the (S)- 3.5.5- trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one. The (¾)-3,5,5-trimethylpyrrolidin-2-one solution was added slowly to the reactor while keeping the off-gassing manageable, followed by rinsing the addition funnel with 2-MeTHF (1.0 vol) and adding it to the reactor. The reaction was stirred at an internal temperature of 60 ± 5 °C for no longer than 6 h. The internal temperature was set to 5 ± 5 °C and the agitation rate was increased. A solution of water (1.35 equiv.) in 2-MeTHF (4.0v) was prepared and added slowly to the reactor while the internal temperature was maintained at or below 25 °C. Additional water (1.35 equiv.) was charged slowly to the reactor while the internal temperature was maintained at or below 25 °C. Potassium hydroxide (0.16 equiv.) in water (0.40 vol) was added to the reactor over no less than 20 min while the temperature was maintained at or below 25 °C. The resulting solids were removed by filtration, and the reactor and cake were washed with 2-MeTHF (2 x 2.5 vol). The filtrate was transferred back to a jacketed vessel, agitated, and the temperature was adjusted to 15 ± 5 °C. Concentrated aqueous HC1 (35-37%, 1.05 equiv.) was added slowly to the filtrate while maintaining the temperature at or below 25 °C and was stirred no less than 30 min. Vacuum was applied and the solution was distilled down to a total of 4.0 volumes while maintaining the internal temperature at or below 55 °C, then 2-MeTHF (6.00 vol) was added to the vessel. The distillation was repeated until Karl Fischer analysis (KF) < 0.20% w/w H2O. Isopropanol was added (3.00 vol), and the temperature was adjusted to 70 °C (65 – 75 °C) to achieve a homogenous solution, and stirred for no less than 30 minutes at 70 °C. The solution was cooled to 50 °C (47 – 53 °C) over 1 hour and stirred for no less than 1 h, while the temperature was maintained at 50°C (47 – 53 °C). The resulting slurry was cooled to -10 °C (-15 to -5°C) linearly over no less than 12 h. The slurry was stirred at -10 °C for no less than 2 h. The solids were isolated via filtration or centrifugation and were washed with a solution of 2-MeTHF (2.25 vol) and IPA (isopropanol) (0.75 vol). The solids were dried under vacuum at 45 ± 5 °C for not less than 6 h to yield (,S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride ((1S)»HC1).

Example 5: Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC) Screens for the Synthesis of 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one

[0070] Various PTCs were tested as described below:

[0071] 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one (500.0 mg, 3.06 mmol, 1.0 eq.), PTC (0.05 eq.), and chloroform (0.64 g, 0.4 mL, 5.36 mmol, 1.75 eq.) were charged into a vial equipped with a magnetic stir bar. The vial was cooled in an ice bath and a solution of 50 wt% sodium hydroxide (0.98 g, 24.48 mmol, 8.0 eq.) was added dropwise over 2 min. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion as assessed by GC analysis. The reaction mixture was diluted with DCM (2.0 mL, 4.0v) and H2O (3.0 mL, 6.0v). The phases were separated and the aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (1.0 mL, 2.0v). The organic

phases were combined and 2 M hydrochloric acid (0.17 g, 2.3 mL, 4.59 mmol, 1.5 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion and assessed by

HPLC. The aqueous phase was saturated with NaCl and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (1.0 mL, 2.0v) twice, the organic phases were combined, and 50 mg of biphenyl in 2 mL of MeCN was added as an internal HPLC standard. Solution yield was assessed by HPLC. The reaction results are summarized in the following table:

Example 6: Solvent Screens for the Synthesis of 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one

[0072] Various solvents and amounts were tested as described below:

[0073] 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one (500.0 mg, 3.06 mmol, 1.0 eq. (“starting material”)), tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (0.12 g, 0.153 mmol, 0.050 eq), chloroform (0.64 g, 0.4 mL, 5.36 mmol, 1.75 eq.), and solvent (2v or 4v, as shown below) were charged into a vial equipped with a magnetic stir bar. The vial was cooled in an ice bath and a solution of 50 wt% sodium hydroxide (0.98 g, 24.48 mmol, 8.0 eq.) was added drop wise over 2 min. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion and assessed by GC analysis. The reaction mixture was diluted with DCM (2.0 mL, 4.0v) and H2O (3.0 mL, 6.0v). The phases were separated and the aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (1.0 mL, 2.0v). The organic phases were combined and 2 M hydrochloric acid (0.17 g, 2.3 mL, 4.59 mmol, 1.5 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion, assessed by HPLC. The aqueous phase was saturated with NaCl and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (1.0 mL, 2.0v) twice, the organic phases were combined, and 50 mg of biphenyl in 2 mL of MeCN was added as an internal HPLC standard. Solution yield was assessed by HPLC. Reaction results are summarized in the following table:

Example 7: Base Screens for the Synthesis of 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one

[0074] In this experiment, various concentrations of NaOH were tested as described below:

[0075] 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one (500.0 mg, 3.06 mmol, 1.0 eq. (“starting material”), tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (0.12 g, 0.153 mmol, 0.050 eq), and chloroform (0.64 g, 0.4 mL, 5.36 mmol, 1.75 eq.) were charged into a vial equipped with a magnetic stir bar. The vial was cooled in an ice bath, and a solution of an amount wt% sodium hydroxide as shown in the Table below in water (0.98 g, 24.48 mmol, 8.0 eq.) was added drop wise over 2 min. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion and assessed by GC analysis. The reaction mixture was diluted with DCM (2.0 mL, 4.0v) and H2O (3.0 mL, 6.0v). The phases were separated and the aqueous phase is extracted with DCM (1.0 mL, 2.0v). The organic phases were combined and 2 M hydrochloric acid (0.17 g, 2.3 mL, 4.59 mmol, 1.5 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion, assessed by HPLC. The aqueous phase was saturated with NaCl and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (1.0 mL,

2.0v) twice, the organic phases were combined, and 50 mg of biphenyl in 2 mL of MeCN was added as an internal HPLC standard. Solution yield was assessed by HPLC.

Reaction results are summarized in the following table:

Example 8: Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC) Synthesis of 5,5-dimethyl-3-methylenepyrrolidin-2-one

[0076] Various amounts of PTCs were tested as described below:

Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (0.01 eq.), TBAB (0.01 eq.), Tributylmethylammonium chloride (0.01 eq.), Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (0.02 eq.), TBAB (0.02 eq.), Tributylmethylammonium chloride (0.02 eq.), Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (0.03 eq.), TBAB (0.03 eq.), Tributylmethylammonium chloride (0.03 eq.).

[0077] 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one (500.0 mg, 3.06 mmol, 1.0 eq. (“starting material”)), PTC (0.12 g, 0.153 mmol, 0.050 eq), and chloroform (1.75 eq.) were charged into a vial equipped with a magnetic stir bar. The vial was cooled in an ice bath, and a solution of 50 wt% sodium hydroxide (0.98 g, 24.48 mmol, 8.0 eq.) was added drop wise over 2 min. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion, assessed by GC analysis. The reaction mixture was diluted with DCM (2.0 mL, 4.0v) and H20 (3.0 mL, 6.0v). The phases were separated and the aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (1.0 mL, 2.0v). The organic phases were combined and 2 M hydrochloric acid (0.17 g, 2.3 mL, 4.59 mmol, 1.5 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was stirred until completion, assessed by HPLC. The aqueous phase was saturated with NaCl and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was extracted with DCM (1.0 mL, 2.0v) twice, the organic phases were combined, and 50 mg of biphenyl in 2 mL of MeCN was added as an internal HPLC standard. Solution yield was assessed by HPLC. The reaction results are summarized in the following table:

Reactions Conditions Result

8D Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide Almost complete

(0.02 eq.) overnight (2% starting

material), 82% solution yield

8E TBAB (0.02 eq.) Almost complete

overnight (2% starting material), 71% solution yield

8F Tributylmethylammonium chloride Incomplete overnight (4%

(0.02 eq.) starting material), 72%

solution yield

8G Tetrabutylammonium hydroxide Almost complete

(0.03 eq.) overnight (3% starting

material), 76% solution yield

8H TBAB (0.03 eq.) Almost complete

overnight (3% starting material), 76% solution yield

81 Tributylmethylammonium chloride Almost complete

(0.03 eq.) overnight (2% starting

material), 78% solution yield

Example 9. Preparation of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one hydrochloride

2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-one hydrochloride

[0078] 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinone (30 g, 193.2 mmol, 1.0 eq) was charged to a 500 mL nitrogen purged three necked round bottomed flask equipped with condenser. IPA (300 mL, 10 vol) was added to the flask and the mixture heated to 60 °C until dissolved.

[0079] To the solution at 60 °C was added 5-6 M HC1 in IPA (40 mL, 214.7 mmol, 1.1 eq) over 10 min and the resulting suspension stirred at 60 °C for 30 min then allowed to cool to ambient temperature. The suspension was stirred at ambient temperature overnight, then filtered under vacuum and washed with IPA (3 x 60 mL, 3 x 2 vol). The cream colored solid was dried on the filter under vacuum for 10 min.

[0080] The wet cake was charged to a 1 L nitrogen purged three necked round bottomed flask equipped with condenser. IPA (450 mL, 15 vol) was added to the flask and the suspension heated to 80 °C until dissolved. The mixture was allowed to cool slowly to ambient temperature over 3 h and the resulting suspension stirred overnight at ambient temperature.

[0081] The suspension was filtered under vacuum, washed with IPA (60 mL, 2 vol) and dried on the filter under vacuum for 30 min. The resulting product was dried in a vacuum oven at 40 °C over the weekend to give a white crystalline solid, 21.4 g, 64% yield.

Example 10. Synthesis of (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride from (S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one

[0082] Each reactor was charged with (,S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one in THF, H2, and the catalyst shown in the below table. The reactor was heated to 200 C and pressurized to 60 bar, and allowed to react for 12 hours. GC analysis showed that (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine was produced in the columns denoted by “+.”

[0083] A 2.5% solution of (,S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one in THF was flowed at 0.05 mL/min into a packed bed reactor prepacked with 2% Pt-0.5%>Sn/SiO2catalyst immobilized on silica gel. H2 gas was also flowed into the packed bed reactor at 20 mL/min. The reaction was carried out at 130 °C under 80 bar pressure with a WHSV (Weigh Hourly Space Velocity) of 0.01-0.02 h“1. The product feed was collected in a batch tank and converted to (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine HC1 in batch mode: 36%>

Hydrochloric acid (1.1 eq.) was added keeping the temperature below 20 °C. Distillation of the solvent, backfilling with isopropyl acetate (4v), was carried out to leave a residual volume of 5v. Karl Fischer analysis < 0.2% w/w H2O. MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) (lv) was added at 20-30 °C and the solids were filtered off under nitrogen at 15-20 °C, washing with isopropyl acetate (1.5v) and drying under vacuum at 40-45 °C to give (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride as a white crystalline solid (74.8%> yield, 96.1% ee).

Alternate synthesis

[0084] A 2.5%) solution of (,S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one in THF was flowed at 0.05 mL/min into a packed bed reactor prepacked with 4% Pt-2%>Sn/Ti02catalyst immobilized on silica gel. H2 gas was also flowed into the packed bed reactor at 20 mL/min. The reaction was carried out at 200 °C under 50 bar pressure with a WHSV (Weigh Hourly Space Velocity) of 0.01-0.02 h“1. The product feed was collected in a batch tank and converted to (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine HC1 in batch mode: 36%

Hydrochloric acid (1.1 eq.) was added keeping the temperature below 20 °C. Distillation of the solvent, backfilling with isopropyl acetate (4v), was carried out to leave a residual volume of 5v. Karl Fischer analysis < 0.2% w/w H2O. MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) (lv) was added at 20-30 °C and the solids were filtered off under nitrogen at 15-20 °C, washing with isopropyl acetate (1.5v) and drying under vacuum at 40-45 °C to give (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride as a white crystalline solid (88.5% yield, 29.6%> ee).

Alternate synthesis

[0085] A 2.5% solution of (,S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one in THF was flowed at 0.05 mL/min into a packed bed reactor prepacked with 2% Pt-0.5%>Sn/TiO2 catalyst immobilized on silica gel. H2 gas was also flowed into the packed bed reactor at 20 mL/min. The reaction was carried out at 150 °C under 50 bar pressure with a WHSV (Weigh Hourly Space Velocity) of 0.01-0.02 h“1. The product feed was collected in a batch tank and converted to (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine HC1 in batch mode: 36%>

Hydrochloric acid (1.1 eq.) was added keeping the temperature below 20 °C. Distillation of the solvent, backfilling with isopropyl acetate (4v), was carried out to leave a residual volume of 5v. Karl Fischer analysis < 0.2% w/w H20. MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) (lv) was added at 20-30 °C and the solids were filtered off under nitrogen at 15-20 °C, washing with isopropyl acetate (1.5v) and drying under vacuum at 40-45 °C to give (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride as a white crystalline solid (90.9% yield, 98.0%> ee).

Alternate synthesis

[0086] A 2.5%) solution of (,S)-3,5,5-trimethyl-pyrrolidin-2-one in THF was flowed at 0.03 mL/min into a packed bed reactor prepacked with 2% Pt-8%>Sn/Ti02catalyst immobilized on silica gel. H2 gas was also flowed into the packed bed reactor at 40 mL/min. The reaction was carried out at 180 °C under 55 bar pressure with a residence time of 6 min. The product feed was collected in a batch tank and converted to (S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine HC1 in batch mode: 36% Hydrochloric acid (1.1 eq.) was added keeping the temperature below 20 °C. Distillation of the solvent, backfilling with isopropyl acetate (4v), was carried out to leave a residual volume of 5v. Karl Fischer analysis < 0.2% w/w H2O. MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) (lv) was added at 20-30 °C and the solids were filtered off under nitrogen at 15-20 °C, washing with isopropyl acetate (1.5v) and drying under vacuum at 40-45 °C to give (,S)-2,2,4-trimethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride as a white crystalline solid (90.4%> yield, 96.8%> ee).

Patent

WO 2019010092

PATENT

US 20160095858

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20160095858A1/en

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive genetic disease that affects approximately 30,000 children and adults in the United States and approximately 30,000 children and adults in Europe. Despite progress in the treatment of CF, there is no cure.

In patients with CF, mutations in CFTR endogenously expressed in respiratory epithelia leads to reduced apical anion secretion causing an imbalance in ion and fluid transport. The resulting decrease in anion transport contributes to enhanced mucus accumulation in the lung and the accompanying microbial infections that ultimately cause death in CF patients. In addition to respiratory disease, CF patients typically suffer from gastrointestinal problems and pancreatic insufficiency that, if left untreated, results in death. In addition, the majority of males with cystic fibrosis are infertile and fertility is decreased among females with cystic fibrosis. In contrast to the severe effects of two copies of the CF associated gene, individuals with a single copy of the CF associated gene exhibit increased resistance to cholera and to dehydration resulting from diarrhea—perhaps explaining the relatively high frequency of the CF gene within the population.

Sequence analysis of the CFTR gene of CF chromosomes has revealed a variety of disease causing mutations (Cutting, G. R. et al. (1990) Nature 346:366-369; Dean, M. et al. (1990) Cell 61:863:870; and Kerem, B-S. et al. (1989) Science 245:1073-1080; Kerem, B-S et al. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:8447-8451). To date, greater than 1000 disease causing mutations in the CF gene have been identified (http://cftr2.org). The most prevalent mutation is a deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 of the CFTR amino acid sequence, and is commonly referred to as F508del. This mutation occurs in approximately 70% of the cases of cystic fibrosis and is associated with a severe disease.

The deletion of residue 508 in F508del prevents the nascent protein from folding correctly. This results in the inability of the mutant protein to exit the ER, and traffic to the plasma membrane. As a result, the number of channels present in the membrane is far less than observed in cells expressing wild-type CFTR. In addition to impaired trafficking, the mutation results in defective channel gating. Together, the reduced number of channels in the membrane and the defective gating lead to reduced anion transport across epithelia leading to defective ion and fluid transport. (Quinton, P. M. (1990), FASEB J. 4: 2709-2727). Studies have shown, however, that the reduced numbers of F508del in the membrane are functional, albeit less than wild-type CFTR. (Dalemans et al. (1991), Nature Lond. 354: 526-528; Denning et al., supra; Pasyk and Foskett (1995), J. Cell. Biochem. 270: 12347-50). In addition to F508del, other disease causing mutations in CFTR that result in defective trafficking, synthesis, and/or channel gating could be up- or down-regulated to alter anion secretion and modify disease progression and/or severity.

Accordingly, there is a need for novel treatments of CFTR mediated diseases.

////////////////OLACAFTOR, VX 440, Phase II,  Cystic fibrosis, CS-0044588UNII-RZ7027HK8FRZ7027HK8F

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