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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 29 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 29 year tenure till date Aug 2016, Around 30 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 25 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 13 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 212 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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GSK 2330672


Image result for GSK2330672Image result for GSK2330672

GSK 2330672

GSK 672; GSK-2330672

RN: 1345982-69-5
UNII: 386012Z45S

CAS: 1345982-69-5
Chemical Formula: C28H38N2O7S

Molecular Weight: 546.68

Pentanedioic acid, 3-((((3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7-methoxy-1,1-dioxido-5-phenyl-1,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl)methyl)amino)-

Pentanedioic acid, 3-((((3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7-methoxy-1,1-dioxido-5-phenyl-1,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl)methyl)amino)-

3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl- 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid

3-[[[(3R,5R)-3-Butyl-3-ethyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7-methoxy-1,1-dioxido-5-phenyl-1,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl]amino]pentanedioic acid

  • Originator GlaxoSmithKline
  • Class Antihyperglycaemics
  • Mechanism of Action Sodium-bile acid cotransporter-inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase II Primary biliary cirrhosis; Pruritus; Type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Phase I Cholestasis

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Jan 2017 Phase-II clinical trials in Pruritus in USA (PO) (NCT02966834)
  • 14 Nov 2016 GlaxoSmithKline completes a phase I trial for Cholestasis in Healthy volunteers in Japan (PO, Tablet) (NCT02801981)
  • 11 Nov 2016 Efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamic data from a phase II trial in Primary biliary cirrhosis and Pruritus presented at The Liver Meeting® 2016: 67th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD-2016)
Inventors Christopher Joseph AquinoJon Loren CollinsDavid John CowanYulin Wu
Applicant Glaxosmithkline Llc

Christopher Aquino

Christopher Joseph Aquino

GSK2330672 , an ileal bile acid transport (iBAT) inhibitor indicated for diabetes type II and cholestatic pruritus, is currently under Phase IIb evaluation in the clinic. The API is a highly complex molecule containing two stereogenic centers, one of which is quaternary

GSK-2330672 is highly potent, nonabsorbable apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter inhibitor for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

More than 200 million people worldwide have diabetes. The World Health Organization estimates that 1 .1 million people died from diabetes in 2005 and projects that worldwide deaths from diabetes will double between 2005 and 2030. New chemical compounds that effectively treat diabetes could save millions of human lives.

Diabetes refers to metabolic disorders resulting in the body’s inability to effectively regulate glucose levels. Approximately 90% of all diabetes cases are a result of type 2 diabetes whereas the remaining 10% are a result of type 1 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA). All forms of diabetes result in elevated blood glucose levels and, if left untreated chronically, can increase the risk of macrovascular (heart disease, stroke, other forms of cardiovascular disease) and microvascular [kidney failure (nephropathy), blindness from diabetic retinopathy, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy)] complications.

Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), can occur at any age, but it is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells, resulting in an inability to produce sufficient insulin. Insulin controls blood glucose levels by promoting transport of blood glucose into cells for energy use. Insufficient insulin production will lead to decreased glucose uptake into cells and result in accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream. The lack of available glucose in cells will eventually lead to the onset of symptoms of type 1 diabetes: polyuria (frequent urination), polydipsia (thirst), constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes, and fatigue. Within 5-10 years of being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, patient’s insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas are completely destroyed, and the body can no longer produce insulin. As a result, patients with type 1 diabetes will require daily administration of insulin for the remainder of their lives.

Type 2 diabetes, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes, occurs when the pancreas produces insufficient insulin and/or tissues become resistant to normal or high levels of insulin (insulin resistance), resulting in excessively high blood glucose levels. Multiple factors can lead to insulin resistance including chronically elevated blood glucose levels, genetics, obesity, lack of physical activity, and increasing age. Unlike type 1 diabetes, symptoms of type 2 diabetes are more salient, and as a result, the disease may not be diagnosed until several years after onset with a peak prevalence in adults near an age of 45 years. Unfortunately, the incidence of type 2 diabetes in children is increasing.

The primary goal of treatment of type 2 diabetes is to achieve and maintain glycemic control to reduce the risk of microvascular (diabetic neuropathy, retinopathy, or nephropathy) and macrovascular (heart disease, stroke, other forms of cardiovascular disease) complications. Current guidelines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) [Diabetes Care, 2008, 31 (12), 1 ] outline lifestyle modification including weight loss and increased physical activity as a primary therapeutic approach for management of type 2 diabetes. However, this approach alone fails in the majority of patients within the first year, leading physicians to prescribe medications over time. The ADA and EASD recommend metformin, an agent that reduces hepatic glucose production, as a Tier 1 a medication; however, a significant number of patients taking metformin can experience gastrointestinal side effects and, in rare cases, potentially fatal lactic acidosis. Recommendations for Tier 1 b class of medications include sulfonylureas, which stimulate pancreatic insulin secretion via modulation of potassium channel activity, and exogenous insulin. While both medications rapidly and effectively reduce blood glucose levels, insulin requires 1 -4 injections per day and both agents can cause undesired weight gain and potentially fatal hypoglycemia. Tier 2a recommendations include newer agents such as thiazolidinediones (TZDs pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), which enhance insulin sensitivity of muscle, liver and fat, as well as GLP-1 analogs, which enhance postprandial glucose-mediated insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. While TZDs show robust, durable control of blood glucose levels, adverse effects include weight gain, edema, bone fractures in women, exacerbation of congestive heart failure, and potential increased risk of ischemic cardiovascular events. GLP-1 analogs also effectively control blood glucose levels, however, this class of medications requires injection and many patients complain of nausea. The most recent addition to the Tier 2 medication list is DPP-4 inhibitors, which, like GLP-1 analogs, enhance glucose- medicated insulin secretion from beta cells. Unfortunately, DPP-4 inhibitors only modestly control blood glucose levels, and the long-term safety of DPP-4 inhibitors remains to be firmly established. Other less prescribed medications for type 2 diabetes include a-glucosidase inhibitors, glinides, and amylin analogs. Clearly, new medications with improved efficacy, durability, and side effect profiles are needed for patients with type 2 diabetes.

GLP-1 and GIP are peptides, known as incretins, that are secreted by L and K cells, respectively, from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood stream following ingestion of nutrients. This important physiological response serves as the primary signaling mechanism between nutrient (glucose/fat) concentration in the

gastrointestinal tract and other peripheral organs. Upon secretion, both circulating peptides initiate signals in beta cells of the pancreas to enhance glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, which, in turn, controls glucose concentrations in the blood stream (For reviews see: Diabetic Medicine 2007, 24(3), 223; Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 2009, 297(1-2), 127; Experimental and Clinical Endocrinology & Diabetes 2001 , 109(Suppl. 2), S288).

The association between the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP and type 2 diabetes has been extensively explored. The majority of studies indicate that type 2 diabetes is associated with an acquired defect in GLP-1 secretion as well as GIP action (see Diabetes 2007, 56(8), 1951 and Current Diabetes Reports 2006, 6(3), 194). The use of exogenous GLP-1 for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes is severely limited due to its rapid degradation by the protease DPP-4. Multiple modified peptides have been designed as GLP-1 mimetics that are DPP-4 resistant and show longer half-lives than endogenous GLP-1 . Agents with this profile that have been shown to be highly effective for treatment of type 2 diabetes include exenatide and liraglutide, however, these agents require injection. Oral agents that inhibit DPP-4, such as sitagliptin vildagliptin, and saxagliptin, elevate intact GLP-1 and modestly control circulating glucose levels (see Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2010, 125(2), 328; Diabetes Care 2007, 30(6), 1335; Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs 2008, 13(4), 593). New oral medications that increase GLP-1 secretion would be desirable for treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Bile acids have been shown to enhance peptide secretion from the

gastrointestinal tract. Bile acids are released from the gallbladder into the small intestine after each meal to facilitate digestion of nutrients, in particular fat, lipids, and lipid-soluble vitamins. Bile acids also function as hormones that regulate cholesterol homeostasis, energy, and glucose homeostasis via nuclear receptors (FXR, PXR, CAR, VDR) and the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 (for reviews see: Nature Drug Discovery 2008, 7, 672; Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism 2008, 10, 1004). TGR5 is a member of the Rhodopsin-like subfamily of GPCRs (Class A) that is expressed in intestine, gall bladder, adipose tissue, liver, and select regions of the central nervous system. TGR5 is activated by multiple bile acids with lithocholic and deoxycholic acids as the most potent activators {Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 2008, 51(6), 1831 ). Both deoxycholic and lithocholic acids increase GLP-1 secretion from an enteroendocrine STC-1 cell line, in part through TGR5

{Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 2005, 329, 386). A synthetic TGR5 agonist INT-777 has been shown to increase intestinal GLP-1 secretion in vivo in mice {Cell Metabolism 2009, 10, 167). Bile salts have been shown to promote secretion of GLP-1 from colonic L cells in a vascularly perfused rat colon model {Journal of Endocrinology 1995, 145(3), 521 ) as well as GLP-1 , peptide YY (PYY), and neurotensin in a vascularly perfused rat ileum model {Endocrinology 1998, 139(9), 3780). In humans, infusion of deoxycholate into the sigmoid colon produces a rapid and marked dose responsive increase in plasma PYY and enteroglucagon concentrations (Gi/M993, 34(9), 1219). Agents that increase ileal and colonic bile acid or bile salt concentrations will increase gut peptide secretion including, but not limited to, GLP-1 and PYY.

Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver then undergo conjugation of the carboxylic acid with the amine functionality of taurine and glycine. Conjugated bile acids are secreted into the gall bladder where accumulation occurs until a meal is consumed. Upon eating, the gall bladder contracts and empties its contents into the duodenum, where the conjugated bile acids facilitate absorption of cholesterol, fat, and fat-soluble vitamins in the proximal small intestine (For reviews see: Frontiers in Bioscience 2009, 74, 2584; Clinical Pharmacokinetics 2002,

41(10), 751 ; Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 2001 , 32, 407). Conjugated bile acids continue to flow through the small intestine until the distal ileum where 90% are reabsorbed into enterocytes via the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT, also known as iBAT). The remaining 10% are deconjugated to bile acids by intestinal bacteria in the terminal ileum and colon of which 5% are then passively reabsorbed in the colon and the remaining 5% being excreted in feces. Bile acids that are reabsorbed by ASBT in the ileum are then transported into the portal vein for recirculation to the liver. This highly regulated process, called enterohepatic recirculation, is important for the body’s overall maintenance of the total bile acid pool as the amount of bile acid that is synthesized in the liver is equivalent to the amount of bile acids that are excreted in feces.

Pharmacological disruption of bile acid reabsorption with an inhibitor of ASBT leads to increased concentrations of bile acids in the colon and feces, a physiological consequence being increased conversion of hepatic cholesterol to bile acids to compensate for fecal loss of bile acids. Many pharmaceutical companies have pursued this mechanism as a strategy for lowering serum cholesterol in patients with dyslipidemia/hypercholesterolemia (For a review see: Current Medicinal Chemistry 2006, 73, 997). Importantly, ASBT-inhibitor mediated increase in colonic bile acid/salt concentration also will increase intestinal GLP-1 , PYY, GLP-2, and other gut peptide hormone secretion. Thus, inhibitors of ASBT could be useful for treatment of type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, short bowel syndrome, Chronic Idiopathic Constipation, Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease, and arthritis.

Certain 1 ,4-thiazepines are disclosed, for example in WO 94/18183 and WO 96/05188. These compounds are said to be useful as ileal bile acid reuptake inhibitors (ASBT).

Patent publication WO 201 1/137,135 dislcoses, among other compounds, the following compound. This patent publication also discloses methods of synthesis of the compound.

The preparation of the above compound is also disclosed in J. Med. Chem, Vol 56, pp5094-51 14 (2013).

PATENT

WO 2016020785

EXAMPLES

Patent publication WO 201 1/137,135 dislcoses general methods for preparing the compound. In addition, a detailed synthesis of the compound is disclosed in Example 26. J. Med. Chem, Vol 56, pp5094-51 14 (2013) also discloses a method for synthesising the compound.

The present invention discloses an improved synthesis of the compound.

The synthetic scheme of the present invention is depicted in Scheme 1 .

Treatment of 2-methoxyphenyl acetate with sulfur monochloride followed by ester hydrolysis and reduction with zinc gave rise to thiophenol (A). Epoxide ring opening of (+)-2-butyl-ethyloxirane with thiophenol (A) and subsequent treatment of tertiary alcohol (B) with chloroacetonitrile under acidic conditions gave chloroacetamide (C), which was then converted to intermediate (E) by cleavage of the chloroacetamide with thiourea followed by classical resolution with dibenzoyl-L-tartaric acid.

Benzoylation of intermediate (E) with triflic acid and benzoyl chloride afforded intermediate (H). Cyclization of intermediate (H) followed by oxidation of the sulfide to a sulphone, subseguent imine reduction and classical resolution with (+)-camphorsulfonic acid provided intermediate (G), which was then converted to intermediate (H). Intermediate (H) was converted to the target compound using the methods disclosed in Patent publication WO 201 1/137,135.

Scheme 1

Dibenzoyl-L-tataric acid

The present invention also discloses an alternative method for construction of the quaternary chiral center as depicted in Scheme 2. Reaction of intermediate (A) with (R)-2-ammonio-2-ethylhexyl sulfate (K) followed by formation of di-p-toluoyl-L-tartrate salt furnished intermediate (L).

The present invention also discloses an alternative synthesis of intermediate (H) as illustrated in Scheme 3. Acid catalyzed cyclization of intermediate (F) followed by triflation gave imine (M), which underwent asymmetric reduction with catalyst lr(COD)2BArF and ligand (N) to give intermediate (O). Oxidation of the sulfide in intermediate (O) gave sulphone intermediate (H).

The present invention differs from the synthesis disclosed in WO 201 1/137,135 and J. Med. Chem, Vol56, pp5094-51 14 (2013) in that intermediate (H) in the present invention is prepared via a new, shorter and more cost-efficient synthesis while the synthesis of the target compound from intermediate (H) remains unchanged.

Intermediate A: 3-Hydroxy-4-methoxythiophenol

A reaction vessel was charged with 2-methoxyphenyl acetate (60 g, 0.36 mol), zinc chloride (49.2 g, 0.36 mol) and DME (600 mL). The mixture was stirred and S2CI2 (53.6 g, 0.40 mol) was added. The mixture was stirred at ambient temperature for 2 h. Concentrated HCI (135.4 mL, 1 .63 mol) was diluted with water (60 mL) and added slowly to the rxn mixture, maintaining the temperature below 60 °C. The mixture was stirred at 60 °C for 2 h and then cooled to ambient

temperature. Zinc dust (56.7 g, 0.87 mol) was added in portions, maintaining the temperature below 60 °C. The mixture was stirred at 20-60 °C for 1 h and then concentrated under vacuum to -300 mL. MTBE (1 .2 L) and water (180 mL) were added and the mixture was stirred for 10 min. The layers were separated and the organic layer was washed twice with water (2x 240 mL). The layers were separated and the organic layer was concentrated under vacuum to give an oil. The oil was distilled at 1 10-1 15 °C/2 mbar to give the title compound (42 g, 75%) as colorless oil, which solidified on standing to afford the title compound as a white solid. M.P. 41 -42 °C. 1 H NMR (500 MHz, CDCI3)$ ppm 3.39 (s, 1 H), 3.88 (s, 3H), 5.65 (br. S, 1 H), 6.75 (d, J – 8.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.84 (ddd, J – 8.3, 2.2, 0.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.94 (d, J – 2.2 Hz).

Intermediate E: (R)-5-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-2-methoxyphenol, dibenzoyl-L-tartrate salt

A reaction vessel was charged with 3-hydroxy-4-methoxythiophenol (5.0 g, 25.2 mmol), (+)-2-butyl-2-ethyloxirane (3.56 g, 27.7 mmol) and EtOH (30 mL). The mixture was treated with a solution of NaOH (2.22 g, 55.5 mmol) in water (20 mL), heated to 40 °C and stirred at 40 °C for 5 h. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature, treated with toluene (25 mL) and stirred for 10 min. The layers were separated and the organic layer was discarded. The aqueous layer was neutralized with 2N HCI (27.8 mL, 55.6 mmol) and extracted with toluene (100 mL). The organic layer was washed with water (25 mL), concentrated in vacuo to give an oil. The oil was treated with chloroacetonitrile (35.9 mL) and HOAc (4.3 mL) and cooled to 0 °C. H2SO4 (6.7 mL, 126 mmol, pre-diluted with 2.3 mL of water) was added at a rate maintaining the temperature below 10 °C. After stirred at 0 °C for 0.5 h, the reaction mixture was treated with 20% aqueous Na2CO3 solution to adjust the pH to

7-8 and then extracted with MTBE (70 ml_). The extract was washed with water (35 ml_) and concentrated in vacuo to give an oil. The oil was then dissolved in EOH (50 ml_) and treated with HOAc (10 ml_) and thiourea (2.30 g, 30.2 mmol). The mixture was heated at reflux overnight and then cooled to ambient temperature. The solids were filtered and washed with EtOH (10 ml_). The filtrate and the wash were combined and concentrated in vacuo, treated with MTBE (140 ml_) and washed successively with 10% aqueous Na2C03 and water. The mixture was concentrated in vacuo to give an oil. The oil was dissolved in MeCN (72 ml_), heated to -50 °C and then dibenzoyl-L-tartaric acid (9.0 g, 25.2 mmol) in acetonitrile (22 ml_) was added slowly. Seed crystals were added at -50 °C. The resultant slurry was stirred at 45-50 °C for 5 h, then cooled down to ambient temperature and stirred at ambient temperature overnight. The solids were filtered and washed with MeCN (2x 22 ml_). The wet cake was treated with MeCN (150 ml_) and heated to 50 °C. The slurry was stirred at 50 °C for 5 h, cooled over 1 h to ambient temperature and stirred at ambient temperature overnight. The solids were collected by filtration, washed with MeCN (2 x 20 ml_), dried under vacuum to give the title compound (5.5 g, 34% overall yield, 99.5% purity, 93.9% ee) as a white solid. 1 H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 0.78 (m, 6H), 1 .13 (m, 4H), 1 .51 (m, 2H), 1 .58 (q, J – 7.7 Hz, 2H), 3.08 (s, 2H), 3.75 (s, 3H), 5.66 (s, 2H), 6.88 (m, 2H), 6.93 (m, 1 H), 7.49 (m, 4H), 7.63 (m, 2H), 7.94 (m, 4H). EI-LCMS m/z 284 (M++1 of free base).

Intermediate F: (R)-(2-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-4-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)(phenyl)methanone

A suspension of (R)-5-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-2-methoxyphenol, dibenzoyl-L-tartrate salt (29 g, 45.2 mmol) in DCM (435 mL) was treated with water (1 16 mL) and 10% aqueous Na2C03 solution (1 16 mL). The mixture was stirred at ambient temperature until all solids were dissolved (30 min). The layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with water (2 x 60 mL), concentrated under vacuum to give (R)-5-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-2-methoxyphenol (free base) as an off-white solid (13.0 g, quantitative). A vessel was charged with TfOH (4.68 ml, 52.9 mmol) and DCM (30 mL) and the mixture was cooled to 0 °C. 5 g (17.6 mmol) of (R)-5-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-2-methoxyphenol (free base) was dissolved in DCM (10 mL) and added at a rate maintaining the temperature below 10 °C. Benzoyl chloride (4.5 mL, 38.8 mmol) was added at a rate maintaining the temperature below 10 °C. The mixture was then heated to reflux and stirred at reflux for 48 h. The mixture was cooled to 30 °C. Water (20 mL) was added and the mixture was concentrated to remove DCM. EtOH (10 mL) was added. The mixture was heated to 40 ° C, treated with 50% aqueous NaOH solution (10 mL) and stirred at 55 °C. After 1 h, the mixture was cooled to ambient temperature and the pH was adjusted to 6-7 with cone. HCI. The mixture was concentrated in vacuo to remove EtOH. EtOAc (100 mL) was added. The mixture was stirred for 5 min and the layers were separated. The organic layer was washed successively with 10% aqueous Na2CO3 (25 mL) and water (25 mL) and then concentrated in vacuo. The resultant oil was treated with DCM (15 mL). The resultant thick slurry was further diluted with DCM (15 mL) followed by addition of Hexanes (60 mL). The slurry was stirred for 5 min, filtered, washed with DCM/hexanes (1 :2, 2 x 10 mL) and dried under vacuum to give the title compound (7.67 g, 80%) as a yellow solid. 1 NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 0.70 (t, 7.1 Hz, 3 H), 0.81 (t, 7.1 Hz, 3H), 1 .04-1 .27 (m, 8H), 2.74 (s, 2H), 3.73 (s, 3H), 6.91 (s, 1 H), 7.01 (s, 1 H), 7.52 (dd, J – 7.8, 7.2 Hz, 2H), 7.63 (t, J = 7.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.67 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 2H). EI-LCMS m/z 388 (M++1 ).

Intermediate G: (3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-8-hydroxy-7-methoxy-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[f][1 ,4]thiazepine 1 ,1 -dioxide, (+)-camphorsulfonate salt

A vessel was charged with (R)-(2-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-4-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)(phenyl)methanone (1 .4 g, 3.61 mmol), toluene (8.4 ml_) and citric acid (0.035 g, 0.181 mmol, 5 mol%). The mixture was heated to reflux overnight with a Dean-Stark trap to remove water. The mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure to remove solvents. Methanol (14.0 ml_) and oxone (2.22 g, 3.61 mmol, 1 .0 equiv) were added. The mixture was stirred at gentle reflux for 2 h. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature, and filtered to remove solids. The filter cake was washed with small amount of Methanol. The filtrate was cooled to 5 °C, and treated with sodium borohydride (0.410 g, 10.84 mmol, 3.0 equiv.) in small portions. The mixture was stirred at 5 °C for 2 h and then concentrated to remove the majority of solvents. The mixture was quenched with Water (28.0 ml_) and extracted with EtOAc (28.0 ml_). The organic layer was washed with brine, and then concentrated to remove solvents. The residue was dissolved in MeCN (14.0 ml_) and concentrated again to remove solvents. The residue was dissolved in MeCN (7.00 ml_) and MTBE (7.00 ml_) at 40 °C, and treated with (+)-camphorsulfonic acid (0.839 g, 3.61 mmol, 1 .0 equiv.) at 40 °C for 30 min. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature, stirred for 2 h, and filtered to collect solids. The filter cake was washed with MTBE/MeCN (2:1 , 3 ml_), and dried at 50 °C to give the title compound (0.75 g, 32% overall yield, 98.6 purity, 97% de, 99.7% ee) as white solids. 1 NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ ppm 0.63 (s, 3H), 0.88 (t, J – 6.9 Hz, 3H), 0.97 (m, 6H), 1 .29-1 .39 (m, 5H), 1 .80-1 .97 (m, 6H), 2.08-2.10 (m, 1 H), 2.27 (d, J – 17.3 Hz, 1 H), 2.38-2.44 (m, 3H), 2.54 (b, 1 H), 2.91 (b, 1 H), 3.48 (d, J – 15.4 Hz, 1 H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 4.05 (d, J – 17.2 Hz, 1 H), 6.45 (s, 1 H), 6.56 (s, 1 H), 7.51 -7.56 (m, 4H), 7.68 (s, 1 H), 7.79 (b, 2H), 1 1 .46 (b, 1 H). EI-LCMS m/z 404 (M++1 of free base).

Intermediate H: (3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-methoxy-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2, 3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[f][1 ,4]thiazepin-8-yl trifluoromethanesulfonate

Method 1 : A mixture of (3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-8-hydroxy-7-methoxy-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[f][1 ,4]thiazepine 1 ,1 -dioxide, (+)-camphorsulfonate salt (0.5 g, 0.786 mmol), EtOAc (5.0 mL), and 10% of Na2C03 aqueuous solution (5 mL) was stirred for 15 min. The layers were separated and the aqueous layer was discarded. The organic layer was washed with dilute brine twice, concentrated to remove solvents. EtOAc (5.0 mL) was added and the mixture was concentrated to give a pale yellow solid free base. 1 ,4-Dioxane (5.0 mL) and pyridine (0.13 mL, 1 .57 mmol) were added. The mixture was cooled to 5-10 °C and triflic anhydride (0.199 mL, 1 .180 mmol) was added while maintaining the temperature below 15 °C. The mixture was stirred at ambient temperature until completion deemed by HPLC (1 h). Toluene (5 mL) and water (5 mL) were added. Layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with water, concentrated to remove solvents. Toluene (1 .0 mL) was added to dissolve the residue followed by Isooctane (4.0 mL). The mixture was stirred at rt overnight. The solids was filtered, washed with Isooctane (4.0 mL) to give the title compound (0.34 g, 81 %) as slightly yellow solids. 1 NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ ppm 0.86 (t, J – 7.2 Hz, 3H), 0.94 (t, J – 7.6 Hz, 3H), 1 .12-1 .15 (m, 1 H), 1 .22-1 .36 (m, 3H), 1 .48-1 .60 (m, 2H), 1 .86-1 .93 (m, 2H), 2.22 (dt, J = 4.1 Hz, 12 Hz, 1 H), 3.10 (d, J – 14.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.49 (d, J – 14.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.64 (s, 3H), 6.1 1 (s, 1 H), 6.36 (s, 1 H), 7.38-7.48 (m, 5), 7.98 (s, 1 H).

Method 2: A mixture of (R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-methoxy-5-phenyl-2,3-dihydrobenzo[f][1 ,4]thiazepin-8-yl trifluoromethanesulfonate (0.5 g, 0.997 mmol), ligand (N) (0.078 g, 0.1 10 mmol) and lr(COD)2BArF (0.127 g, 0.100 mmol) in DCM (10.0 mL) was purged with nitrogen three times, then hydrogen three times. The mixture was shaken in Parr shaker under 10 Bar of H2 for 24 h. The experiment described above was repeated with 1 .0 g (1 .994 mmol) input of (R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-methoxy-5-phenyl-2,3-dihydrobenzo[f][1 ,4]thiazepin-8-yl

trifluoromethanesulfonate. The two batches of the reaction mixture were combined,

concentrated to remove solvents, and purified by silica gel chromatography

(hexanes:EtOAc =9:1 ) to give the sulfide (O) as slightly yellow oil (0.6 g, 40% yield, 99.7% purity). The oil (0.6 g, 1 .191 mmol) was dissolved in TFA (1 .836 mL, 23.83 mmol) and stirred at 40 °C. H202 (0.268 mL, 2.62 mmol) was added slowly over 30 min. The mixture was stirred at 40 °C for 2 h and then cooled to room temperature. Water (10 mL) and toluene (6.0 mL) were added. Layers were separated and the organic layer was washed successively with aqueous sodium carbonate solution and wate, and concentrated to dryness. Toluene (6.0 mL) was added and the mixture was concentrated to dryness. The residue was dissolved in toluene (2.4 mL) and isooctane (7.20 mL) was added. The mixture was heated to reflux and then cooled to room temperature. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 min. The solid was filtered and washed with isooctane to give the title compound (0.48 g, 75%).

Intermediate L: (R)-5-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-2-methoxyphenol, di-p-toluoyl-L-tartrate salt

To a mixture of (R)-2-amino-2-ethylhexyl hydrogen sulfate (1 1 .1 g, 49.3 mmol) in water (23.1 mL) was added NaOH (5.91 g, 148 mmol). The mixture was stirred at reflux for 2 h. The mixture was cooled to room temperature and extracted with MTBE (30.8 mL). The extract was washed with brine (22 mL), concentrated under vacuum and treated with methanol (30.8 mL). The mixture was stirred under nitrogen and treated with 3-hydroxy-4-methoxythiophenol (7.70 g, 49.3 mmol). The mixture was stirred under nitrogen at room temperature for 1 h. The mixture was concentrated under vacuum, treated with acetonitrile (154 mL) and then heated to 45 °C. To the stirred mixture was added (2R,3R)-2,3-bis((4-methylbenzoyl)oxy)succinic acid (19.03 g, 49.3 mmol). The resultant slurry was

stirred at 45 °C. After 2 h, the slurry was cooled to room temperature and stirred for 5 h. The solids were filtered, washed twice with acetonitrile (30 mL) and dried to give the title compound (28.0 g, 85%) as white solids. 1 NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ (ppm): 0.70-0.75 (m, 6H), 1 .17 (b, 4H), 1 .46-1 .55 (m, 4H), 2.30 (s, 6H), 3.71 (s, 3H), 5.58 (s, 2H), 6.84 (s, 2H), 6.89 (s, 1 H), 7.24 (d, J – 1 1 .6 Hz, 4H), 7.76 (d, J – 1 1 .6 Hz, 4H).

Intermediate M: (R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-methoxy-5-phenyl-2,3

dihydrobenzo[f][1 ,4]thiazepin-8-yl trifluoromethanesulfonate

A flask was charged with (R)-(2-((2-amino-2-ethylhexyl)thio)-4-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)(phenyl)methanone (3.5 g, 9.03 mmol), citric acid (0.434 g, 2.258 mmol), 1 ,4-Dioxane (17.50 mL) and Toluene (17.50 mL). The mixture was heated to reflux with a Dean-Stark trap to distill water azetropically. The mixture was refluxed for 20 h and then cooled to room temperature. EtOAc (35.0 mL) and water (35.0 mL) were added and layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with aqueous sodium carbonate solution and concentrated to remove solvents to give crude imine as brown oil. The oil was dissolved in EtOAc (35.0 mL) and cooled to 0-5 °C. To the mixture was added triethylamine (1 .888 mL, 13.55 mmol) followed by slow addition of Tf2O (1 .831 mL, 10.84 mmol) at 0-5 °C. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 h. Water was added and layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with brine, dried over Na2SO4 and concentrated under vacuum. The crude triflate was purified by silica gel chromatography

(hexane:EtOAc =90:10) to give the title compound (3.4 g, 75%) as amber oil. 1 NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ ppm 0.86 (t, J – 7.2 Hz, 3H), 0.92 (t, J – 7.9 Hz, 3H), 1 .19-1 .34 (m, 4H), 1 .47-1 .71 (m, 4H), 3.25 (s, 2H), 3.75 (s, 3H), 6.75 (s, 1 H), 7.35-7.43 (m, 3H), 7.48 (s, 1 H), 7.54 (d, J – 7.6 Hz, 2H).

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2013), 56(12), 5094-5114.

Abstract Image

The apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) transports bile salts from the lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to the liver via the portal vein. Multiple pharmaceutical companies have exploited the physiological link between ASBT and hepatic cholesterol metabolism, which led to the clinical investigation of ASBT inhibitors as lipid-lowering agents. While modest lipid effects were demonstrated, the potential utility of ASBT inhibitors for treatment of type 2 diabetes has been relatively unexplored. We initiated a lead optimization effort that focused on the identification of a potent, nonabsorbable ASBT inhibitor starting from the first-generation inhibitor 264W94 (1). Extensive SAR studies culminated in the discovery of GSK2330672 (56) as a highly potent, nonabsorbable ASBT inhibitor which lowers glucose in an animal model of type 2 diabetes and shows excellent developability properties for evaluating the potential therapeutic utility of a nonabsorbable ASBT inhibitor for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes.

PATENT

WO 2011137135

Example 26: 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl- 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid

Figure imgf000082_0001

Method 1 , Step 1 : To a solution of (3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-5- phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepine-8-carbaldehyde 1 ,1 -dioxide (683 mg, 1 .644 mmol) in 1 ,2-dichloroethane (20 mL) was added diethyl 3- aminopentanedioate (501 mg, 2.465 mmol) and acetic acid (0.188 mL, 3.29 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 1 hr then treated with NaHB(OAc)3 (697 mg, 3.29 mmol). The reaction mixture was then stirred at room temperature overnight and quenched with aqueous potassium carbonate solution. The mixture was extracted with DCM. The combined organic layers were washed with H2O, saturated brine, dried (Na2SO4), filtered, and concentrated under reduced pressure to give diethyl 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5- phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioate (880 mg, 88%) as a light yellow oil: MS-LCMS m/z 603 (M+H)+.

Method 1 , Step 2: To a solution of diethyl 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7- (methyloxy)-l ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8- yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioate (880 mg, 1 .460 mmol) in a 1 :1 :1 mixture of

THF/MeOH/H2O (30 mL) was added lithium hydroxide (175 mg, 7.30 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight then concentrated under reduced pressure. H2O and MeCN was added to dissolve the residue. The solution was acidified with acetic acid to pH 4-5, partially concentrated to remove MeCN under reduced pressure, and left to stand for 30 min. The white precipitate was collected by filtration and dried under reduced pressure at 50°C overnight to give the title compound (803 mg, 100%) as a white solid: 1 H NMR (MeOH-d4) δ ppm 8.05 (s, 1 H), 7.27 – 7.49 (m, 5H), 6.29 (s, 1 H), 6.06 (s, 1 H), 4.25 (s, 2H), 3.60 – 3.68 (m, 1 H), 3.58 (s, 3H), 3.47 (d, J = 14.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.09 (d, J = 14.8 Hz, 1 H), 2.52 – 2.73 (m, 4H), 2.12 – 2.27 (m, 1 H), 1 .69 – 1 .84 (m, 1 H), 1 .48 – 1 .63 (m, 1 H), 1 .05 – 1 .48 (m, 5H), 0.87 (t, J = 7.4 Hz, 3H), 0.78 (t, J = 7.0 Hz, 3H); ES-LCMS m/z 547 (M+H) Method 2: A solution of dimethyl 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-

1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8- yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioate (~ 600 g) in THF (2.5 L) and MeOH (1 .25 L) was cooled in an ice-bath and a solution of NaOH (206 g, 5.15 mol) in water (2.5 L) was added dropwise over 20 min (10-22°C reaction temperature). After stirring 20 min, the solution was concentrated (to remove THF/MeOH) and acidified to pH~4 with concentrated HCI. The precipitated product was aged with stirring, collected by filtration and air dried overnight. A second 600g batch of dimethyl 3-({[(3R,5R)-3- butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4- benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioate was saponified in a similar fashion. The combined crude products (~2 mol theoretical) were suspended in CH3CN (8 L) and water (4 L) and the stirred mixture was heated to 65°C. A solution formed which was cooled to 10°C over 2 h while seeding a few times with an authentic sample of the desired crystalline product. The resulting slurry was stirred at 10°C for 2 h, and the solid was collected by filtration. The filter cake was washed with water and air-dried overnight. Further drying to constant weight in a vacuum oven at 55°C afforded crystalline 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 – dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8- yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid as a white solid (790 g).

Method 3: (3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro- 1 ,4-benzothiazepine-8-carbaldehyde 1 ,1 -dioxide (1802 grams, 4.336 moles) and dimethyl 3-aminopentanedioate (1334 grams, 5.671 moles) were slurried in iPrOAc (13.83 kgs). A nitrogen atmosphere was applied to the reactor. To the slurry at 20°C was added glacial acetic acid (847 ml_, 14.810 moles), and the mixture was stirred until complete dissolution was observed. Solid sodium triacetoxyborohydride (1424 grams, 6.719 moles) was next added to the reaction over a period of 7 minutes. The reaction was held at 20°C for a total of 3 hours at which time LC analysis of a sample indicated complete consumption of the (3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl- 7-(methyloxy)-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepine-8-carbaldehyde 1 ,1 – dioxide. Next, water (20.36 kgs) and brine (4.8 kgs) were added to the reactor. The contents of the reactor were stirred for 10 minutes and then settled for 10 minutes. The bottom, aqueous layer was then removed and sent to waste. A previously prepared, 10% (wt/wt) aqueous solution of sodium bicarbonate (22.5 L) was added to the reactor. The contents were stirred for 10 minutes and then settled for 10 minutes. The bottom, aqueous layer was then removed and sent to waste. To the reactor was added a second wash of 10% (wt/wt) aqueous, sodium bicarbonate

(22.5 L). The contents of the reactor were stirred for 10 minutes and settled for 10 minutes. The bottom, aqueous layer was then removed and sent to waste. The contents of the reactor were then reduced to an oil under vacuum distillation. To the oil was added THF (7.15 kgs) and MeOH (3.68 kgs). The contents of the reactor were heated to 55°C and agitated vigorously until complete dissolution was observed. The contents of the reactor were then cooled to 25°C whereupon a previously prepared aqueous solution of NaOH [6.75 kgs of water and 2.09 kgs of NaOH (50% wt wt solution)] was added with cooling being applied to the jacket. The contents of the reactor were kept below 42°C during the addition of the NaOH solution. The temperature was readjusted to 25°C after the NaOH addition, and the reaction was stirred for 75 minutes before HPLC analysis indicated the reaction was complete. Heptane (7.66 kgs) was added to the reactor, and the contents were stirred for 10 minutes and then allowed to settle for 10 minutes. The aqueous layer was collected in a clean nalgene carboy. The heptane layer was removed from the reactor and sent to waste. The aqueous solution was then returned to the reactor, and the reactor was prepared for vacuum distillation. Approximately 8.5 liters of distillate was collected during the vacuum distillation. The vacuum was released from the reactor, and the temperature of the contents was readjusted to 25°C. A 1 N HCI solution (30.76 kgs) was added to the reactor over a period of 40 minutes. The resulting slurry was stirred at 25°C for 10 hours then cooled to 5°C over a period of 2 hours. The slurry was held at 5°C for 4 hours before the product was collected in a filter crock by vacuum filtration. The filter cake was then washed with cold (5°C) water (6 kgs). The product cake was air dried in the filter crock under vacuum for approximately 72 hours. The product was then transferred to three drying trays and dried in a vacuum oven at 50°C for 79 hours. The temperature of the vacuum oven was then raised to 65°C for 85 additional hours. The product was off-loaded as a single batch to give 2568 grams (93.4% yield) of intermediate grade 3-({[(3R,5R)-3- butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4- benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid as an off-white solid.

Intermediate grade 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5- phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid was dissolved (4690 g) in a mixture of glacial acetic acid (8850 g) and purified water (4200 g) at 70°C. The resulting solution was transferred through a 5 micron polishing filter while maintaining the temperature above 30°C. The reactor and filter were rinsed through with a mixture of glacial acetic acid (980 g) and purified water (470 g). The solution temperature was adjusted to 50°C. Filtered purified water (4230 g) was added to the solution. The cloudy solution was then seeded with crystalline 3-({[(3 5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3 ,4,5- tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid (10 g). While maintaining the temperature at 50°C, filtered purified water was charged to the slurry at a controlled rate (1 1030 g over 130 minutes). Additional filtered purified water was then added to the slurry at a faster controlled rate (20740 g over 100 minutes). A final charge of filtered purified water (3780 g) was made to the slurry. The slurry was then cooled to 10°C at a linear rate over 135 minutes. The solids were filtered over sharkskin filter paper to remove the mother liquor. The cake was then rinsed with filtered ethyl acetate (17280 g) then the wash liquors were removed by filtration. The resulting wetcake was isolated into trays and dried under vacuum at 50°C for 23 hours. The temperature was then increased to 60°C and drying was continued for an additional 24 hours to afford crystalline 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl- 7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8- yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid (3740 g, 79.7% yield) as a white solid.

To a slurry of this crystalline 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 – dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8- yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid (3660 g) and filtered purified water (3.6 L) was added filtered glacial acetic acid (7530 g). The temperature was increased to 60°C and full dissolution was observed. The temperature was reduced to 55°C, filtered, and treated with purified water (3.2 L). The solution was then seeded with crystalline 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl-2,3,4,5- tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid (18 g) to afford a slurry. Filtered purified water was charged to the slurry at a controlled rate (9 L over 140 minutes). Additional filtered purified water was then added to the slurry at a faster controlled rate (18 L over 190 minutes). The slurry was then cooled to

10°C at a linear rate over 225 minutes. The solids were filtered over sharkskin filter paper to remove the mother liquor. The cake was then rinsed with filtered purified water (18 L), and the wash liquors were removed by filtration. The resulting wetcake was isolated into trays and dried under vacuum at 60°C for 18.5 hours to afford a crystalline 3-({[(3R,5R)-3-butyl-3-ethyl-7-(methyloxy)-1 ,1 -dioxido-5-phenyl- 2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1 ,4-benzothiazepin-8-yl]methyl}amino)pentanedioic acid (3330 g, 90.8% yield) as a white solid which was analyzed for crystallinity as summarized below.

Paper

CowanD. J.CollinsJ. L.MitchellM. B.RayJ. A.SuttonP. W.SarjeantA. A.BorosE. E.Enzymatic- and Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Synthesis of a Benzothiazepinylphosphonate Bile Acid Transporter Inhibitor J. Org. Chem. 201378 ( 2412726– 12734DOI: 10.1021/jo402311e
Abstract Image

A synthesis of the benzothiazepine phosphonic acid 3, employing both enzymatic and transition metal catalysis, is described. The quaternary chiral center of 3 was obtained by resolution of ethyl (2-ethyl)norleucinate (4) with porcine liver esterase (PLE) immobilized on Sepabeads. The resulting (R)-amino acid (5) was converted in two steps to aminosulfate 7, which was used for construction of the benzothiazepine ring. Benzophenone 15, prepared in four steps from trimethylhydroquinone 11, enabled sequential incorporation of phosphorus (Arbuzov chemistry) and sulfur (Pd(0)-catalyzed thiol coupling) leading to mercaptan intermediate 18S-Alkylation of 18 with aminosulfate 7 followed by cyclodehydration afforded dihydrobenzothiazepine 20. Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of 20 with the complex of [Ir(COD)2BArF] (26) and Taniaphos ligand P afforded the (3R,5R)-tetrahydrobenzothiazepine 30 following flash chromatography. Oxidation of 30 to sulfone 31 and phosphonate hydrolysis completed the synthesis of 3 in 12 steps and 13% overall yield.

Paper

FigureImage result for GSK2330672
Scheme 1. Current Route to Chiral Intermediate 4 in the Synthesis of GSK2330672

Development of an Enzymatic Process for the Production of (R)-2-Butyl-2-ethyloxirane

Synthetic Biochemistry, Advanced Manufacturing Technologies, API Chemistry, Protein and Cellular Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Medicines Research Centre, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage SG1 2NY, United Kingdom
§API Chemistry, Synthetic Biochemistry, Advanced Manufacturing Technologies, GlaxoSmithKline, 709 Swedeland Road, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406, United States
# Biotechnology and Environmental Shared Service, Global Manufacturing and Supply, GlaxoSmithKline, Dominion Way, Worthing BN14 8PB, United Kingdom
 Molecular Design, Computational and Modeling Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, 1250 S. Collegeville Road, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, United States
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00179
Abstract Image

An epoxide resolution process was rapidly developed that allowed access to multigram scale quantities of (R)-2-butyl-2-ethyloxirane 2 at greater than 300 g/L reaction concentration using an easy-to-handle and store lyophilized powder of epoxide hydrolase from Agromyces mediolanus. The enzyme was successfully fermented on a 35 L scale and stability increased by downstream processing. Halohydrin dehalogenases also gave highly enantioselective resolution but were shown to favor hydrolysis of the (R)-2 epoxide, whereas epoxide hydrolase from Aspergillus nigerinstead provided (R)-7 via an unoptimized, enantioconvergent process.

REFERENCES

1: Nunez DJ, Yao X, Lin J, Walker A, Zuo P, Webster L, Krug-Gourley S, Zamek-Gliszczynski MJ, Gillmor DS, Johnson SL. Glucose and lipid effects of the ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter inhibitor GSK2330672: double-blind randomized trials with type 2 diabetes subjects taking metformin. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2016 Jul;18(7):654-62. doi: 10.1111/dom.12656. Epub 2016 Apr 21. PubMed PMID: 26939572.

2: Wu Y, Aquino CJ, Cowan DJ, Anderson DL, Ambroso JL, Bishop MJ, Boros EE, Chen L, Cunningham A, Dobbins RL, Feldman PL, Harston LT, Kaldor IW, Klein R, Liang X, McIntyre MS, Merrill CL, Patterson KM, Prescott JS, Ray JS, Roller SG, Yao X, Young A, Yuen J, Collins JL. Discovery of a highly potent, nonabsorbable apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter inhibitor (GSK2330672) for treatment of type 2 diabetes. J Med Chem. 2013 Jun 27;56(12):5094-114. doi: 10.1021/jm400459m. Epub 2013 Jun 6. PubMed PMID: 23678871.

///////GSK 2330672, phase 2

CCCC[C@@]1(CS(=O)(=O)c2cc(c(cc2[C@H](N1)c3ccccc3)OC)CNC(CC(=O)O)CC(=O)O)CC

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GSK 2982772


str1Image result

CAS: 1622848-92-3 (free base),  1987858-31-0 (hydrate)

Chemical Formula: C20H19N5O3

Molecular Weight: 377.404

5-Benzyl-N-[(3S)-5-methyl-4-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,5-benzoxazepin-3-yl]-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide

(S)-5-benzyl-N-(5-methyl-4-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[b][l,4]oxazepin-3-yl)-4H-l,2,4- triazole-3-carboxamide

  • 3-(Phenylmethyl)-N-[(3S)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-5-methyl-4-oxo-1,5-benzoxazepin-3-yl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5-carboxamide
  • (S)-5-Benzyl-N-(5-methyl-4-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[b][1,4]oxazepin-3-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide

GSK2982772 is a potent and selective receptor Interacting Protein 1 (RIP1) Kinase Specific Clinical Candidate for the Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases. GSK2982772 is, currently in phase 2a clinical studies for psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. GSK2982772 potently binds to RIP1 with exquisite kinase specificity and has excellent activity in blocking many TNF-dependent cellular responses. RIP1 has emerged as an important upstream kinase that has been shown to regulate inflammation through both scaffolding and kinase specific functions.

GSK-2982772, an oral receptor-interacting protein-1 (RIP1) kinase inhibitor, is in phase II clinical development at GlaxoSmithKline for the treatment of active plaque-type psoriasis, moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, and active ulcerative colitis. A phase I trial was also completed for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease using capsule and solution formulations.

  • Originator GlaxoSmithKline
  • Class Antipsoriatics
  • Mechanism of Action Receptor-interacting protein serine-threonine kinase inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase II Plaque psoriasis; Rheumatoid arthritis; Ulcerative colitis
  • Phase I Inflammatory bowel diseases

Most Recent Events

  • 15 Dec 2016 Biomarkers information updated
  • 01 Nov 2016 Phase-II clinical trials in Ulcerative colitis (Adjunctive treatment) in USA (PO) (NCT02903966)
  • 01 Oct 2016 Phase-II clinical trials in Rheumatoid arthritis in Poland (PO) (NCT02858492)

PHASE 2 Psoriasis, plaque GSK

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Agents for
Rheumatoid Arthritis, Treatment of
Antipsoriatics
Inventors Deepak BANDYOPADHYAYPatrick M. EidamPeter J. GOUGHPhilip Anthony HarrisJae U. JeongJianxing KangBryan Wayne KINGShah Ami LakdawalaJr. Robert W. MarquisLara Kathryn LEISTERAttiq RahmanJoshi M. RamanjuluClark A SehonJR. Robert SINGHAUSDaohua Zhang
Applicant Glaxosmithkline Intellectual Property Development Limited

Deepak Bandyopadhyay

Deepak BANDYOPADHYAY

Data Science and Informatics Leader | Innovation Advocate

GSK 

 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

He is  a data scientist and innovator with experience in both early and late stages of drug development. his current role involves the late stage of drug product development. I’m leading a project to bring GSK’s large molecule process and analytical data onto our big data platform and develop new data analysis and modeling capabilities. Also, working within GSK’s Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) initiative provides plenty of other opportunities to impact how we make medicines.

Previously as a computational chemist (i.e. a data scientist in drug discovery), he worked with scientists from many domains, including chemists, biologists, and other informaticians. he enjoys digging into all the computational aspects of life science research, and solving data challenges by exploiting adjacencies and connections – between diverse fields of knowledge, and the equally diverse scientists trained in them. 

He has supported multiple drug discovery projects at GSK starting from target identification (“how should we modulate disease X?”) through to candidate selection and early clinical development (“let’s see if what we discovered can become a medicine”). Deriving insight by custom data integration is one of my specialties; recently he designed and implemented a platform for integrating data sets from multiple experiments that will be used by GSK screening scientists to find and combine hits. 

A trained computer scientist and cheminformatician, he is  an active member of the algorithms, data science and internal innovation communities at GSK, leading many of these efforts. 

His Ph.D. work introduced new computational geometry techniques for structural bioinformatics and protein function prediction. I have touched on several other subject areas:

* data mining/machine learning (predictive modeling and graph mining), 
* computer graphics and augmented reality (one of the pioneers of projection mapping)
* robotics (keen current interest and future aspiration)

Receptor-interacting protein- 1 (RIP1) kinase, originally referred to as RIP, is a TKL family serine/threonine protein kinase involved in innate immune signaling. RIPl kinase is a RHIM domain containing protein, with an N-terminal kinase domain and a C-terminal death domain ((2005) Trends Biochem. Sci. 30, 151-159). The death domain of RIPl mediates interaction with other death domain containing proteins including Fas and TNFR-1 ((1995) Cell 81 513-523), TRAIL-Rl and TRAIL-R2 ((1997) Immunity 7, 821-830) and TRADD ((1996) Immunity 4, 387-396), while the RHIM domain is crucial for binding other RHFM domain containing proteins such as TRIF ((2004) Nat Immunol. 5, 503-507), DAI ((2009) EMBO Rep. 10, 916-922) and RIP3 ((1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 16871-16875); (1999) Curr. Biol. 9, 539-542) and exerts many of its effects through these interactions. RIPl is a central regulator of cell signaling, and is involved in mediating both pro-survival and programmed cell death pathways which will be discussed below.

The role for RIPl in cell signaling has been assessed under various conditions

[including TLR3 ((2004) Nat Immunol. 5, 503-507), TLR4 ((2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280,

36560-36566), TRAIL ((2012) J .Virol. Epub, ahead of print), FAS ((2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 7925-7933)], but is best understood in the context of mediating signals downstream of the death receptor TNFRl ((2003) Cell 114, 181-190). Engagement of the TNFR by TNF leads to its oligomerization, and the recruitment of multiple proteins, including linear K63-linked polyubiquitinated RIPl ((2006) Mol. Cell 22, 245-257), TRAF2/5 ((2010) J. Mol. Biol. 396, 528-539), TRADD ((2008) Nat. Immunol. 9, 1037-1046) and cIAPs ((2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 105, 1 1778-11783), to the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor. This complex which is dependent on RIPl as a scaffolding protein (i.e. kinase

independent), termed complex I, provides a platform for pro-survival signaling through the activation of the NFKB and MAP kinases pathways ((2010) Sci. Signal. 115, re4).

Alternatively, binding of TNF to its receptor under conditions promoting the

deubiquitination of RIPl (by proteins such as A20 and CYLD or inhibition of the cIAPs) results in receptor internalization and the formation of complex II or DISC (death-inducing signaling complex) ((2011) Cell Death Dis. 2, e230). Formation of the DISC, which contains RIPl, TRADD, FADD and caspase 8, results in the activation of caspase 8 and the onset of programmed apoptotic cell death also in a RIPl kinase independent fashion ((2012) FEBS J 278, 877-887). Apoptosis is largely a quiescent form of cell death, and is involved in routine processes such as development and cellular homeostasis.

Under conditions where the DISC forms and RJP3 is expressed, but apoptosis is inhibited (such as FADD/caspase 8 deletion, caspase inhibition or viral infection), a third RIPl kinase-dependent possibility exists. RIP3 can now enter this complex, become phosphorylated by RIPl and initiate a caspase-independent programmed necrotic cell death through the activation of MLKL and PGAM5 ((2012) Cell 148, 213-227); ((2012) Cell 148, 228-243); ((2012) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 109, 5322-5327). As opposed to apoptosis, programmed necrosis (not to be confused with passive necrosis which is not programmed) results in the release of danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) from the cell.

These DAMPs are capable of providing a “danger signal” to surrounding cells and tissues, eliciting proinflammatory responses including inflammasome activation, cytokine production and cellular recruitment ((2008 Nat. Rev. Immunol 8, 279-289).

Dysregulation of RIPl kinase-mediated programmed cell death has been linked to various inflammatory diseases, as demonstrated by use of the RIP3 knockout mouse (where RIPl -mediated programmed necrosis is completely blocked) and by Necrostatin-1 (a tool inhibitor of RIPl kinase activity with poor oral bioavailability). The RIP3 knockout mouse has been shown to be protective in inflammatory bowel disease (including Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease) ((2011) Nature 477, 330-334), Psoriasis ((2011) Immunity 35, 572-582), retinal-detachment-induced photoreceptor necrosis ((2010) PNAS 107, 21695-21700), retinitis pigmentosa ((2012) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 109:36, 14598-14603), cerulein-induced acute pancreatits ((2009) Cell 137, 1100-1111) and Sepsis/systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) ((2011) Immunity 35, 908-918). Necrostatin-1 has been shown to be effective in alleviating ischemic brain injury ((2005) Nat. Chem. Biol. 1, 112-119), retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury ((2010) J. Neurosci. Res. 88, 1569-1576), Huntington’s disease ((2011) Cell Death Dis. 2 el 15), renal ischemia reperfusion injury ((2012) Kidney Int. 81, 751-761), cisplatin induced kidney injury ((2012) Ren. Fail. 34, 373-377) and traumatic brain injury ((2012) Neurochem. Res. 37, 1849-1858). Other diseases or disorders regulated at least in part by RIPl -dependent apoptosis, necrosis or cytokine production include hematological and solid organ malignancies ((2013) Genes

Dev. 27: 1640-1649), bacterial infections and viral infections ((2014) Cell Host & Microbe 15, 23-35) (including, but not limited to, tuberculosis and influenza ((2013) Cell 153, 1-14)) and Lysosomal storage diseases (particularly, Gaucher Disease, Nature Medicine Advance Online Publication, 19 January 2014, doi: 10.1038/nm.3449).

A potent, selective, small molecule inhibitor of RIP1 kinase activity would block RIP 1 -dependent cellular necrosis and thereby provide a therapeutic benefit in diseases or events associated with DAMPs, cell death, and/or inflammation.

str1

Patent

WO 2014125444

Example 12

Method H

(S)-5-benzyl-N-(5-methyl-4-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[b][l,4]oxazepin-3-yl)-4H-l,2,4- triazole-3-carboxamide

A mixture of (S)-3-amino-5-methyl-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][l,4]oxazepin-4(5H)-one, hydrochloride (4.00 g, 16.97 mmol), 5-benzyl-4H-l,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid, hydrochloride (4.97 g, 18.66 mmol) and DIEA (10.37 mL, 59.4 mmol) in isopropanol (150 mL) was stirred vigorously for 10 minutes and then 2,4,6-tripropyl-l,3,5,2,4,6-trioxatriphosphinane 2,4,6-trioxide (T3P) (50% by wt. in EtOAc) (15.15 mL, 25.5 mmol) was added. The mixture was stirred at rt for 10 minutes and then quenched with water and concentrated to remove isopropanol. The resulting crude material is dissolved in EtOAc and washed with 1M HC1, satd. NaHC03 and brine. Organics were concentrated and purified by column chromatography (220 g silica column; 20-90% EtOAc/hexanes, 15 min.; 90%, 15 min.) to give the title compound as a light orange foam (5.37 g, 83%). 1H NMR (MeOH-d4) δ: 7.40 – 7.45 (m, 1H), 7.21 – 7.35 (m, 8H), 5.01 (dd, J = 11.6, 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.60 (dd, J = 9.9, 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.41 (dd, J = 11.4, 9.9 Hz, 1H), 4.17 (s, 2H), 3.41 (s, 3H); MS (m/z) 378.3 (M+H+).

Alternative Preparation:

To a solution of (S)-3-amino-5-methyl-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][l,4]oxazepin-4(5H)-one hydrochloride (100 g, 437 mmol), 5-benzyl-4H-l,2,4-triazole-3-carboxylic acid hydrochloride (110 g, 459 mmol) in DCM (2.5 L) was added DIPEA (0.267 L, 1531 mmol) at 15 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 10 min. and 2,4,6-tripropyl-l, 3, 5,2,4,6-trioxatriphosphinane 2,4,6-trioxide >50 wt. % in ethyl acetate (0.390 L, 656 mmol) was slowly added at 15 °C. After stirring for 60 mins at RT the LCMS showed the reaction was complete, upon which time it was quenched with water, partitioned between DCM and washed with 0.5N HCl aq (2 L), saturated aqueous NaHC03 (2 L), brine (2 L) and water (2 L). The organic phase was separated and activated charcoal (100 g) and sodium sulfate

(200 g) were added. The dark solution was shaken for 1 h before filtering. The filtrate was then concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the product as a tan foam (120 g). The product was dried under a high vacuum at 50 °C for 16 h. 1H MR showed 4-5% wt of ethyl acetate present. The sample was dissolved in EtOH (650 ml) and stirred for 30 mins, after which the solvent was removed using a rotavapor (water-bath T=45 °C). The product was dried under high vacuum for 16 h at RT (118 g, 72% yield). The product was further dried under high vacuum at 50 °C for 5 h. 1H NMR showed <1% of EtOH and no ethyl acetate. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-i¾) δ ppm 4.12 (s, 2 H), 4.31 – 4.51 (m, 1 H), 4.60 (t, J=10.36 Hz, 1 H), 4.83 (dt, 7=11.31, 7.86 Hz, 1 H), 7.12 – 7.42 (m, 8 H), 7.42 – 7.65 (m, 1 H), 8.45 (br. s., 1 H), 14.41 (br. s., 1 H). MS (m/z) 378 (M + H+).

Crystallization:

(S)-5-Benzyl-N-(5-methyl-4-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[b][l,4]oxazepin-3-yl)-4H-l,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide (100 mg) was dissolved in 0.9 mL of toluene and 0.1 mL of methylcyclohexane at 60 °C, then stirred briskly at room temperature (20 °C) for 4 days. After 4 days, an off-white solid was recovered (76 mg, 76% recovery). The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) pattern of this material is shown in Figure 7 and the corresponding diffraction data is provided in Table 1.

The PXRD analysis was conducted using a PANanalytical X’Pert Pro

diffractometer equipped with a copper anode X-ray tube, programmable slits, and

X’Celerator detector fitted with a nickel filter. Generator tension and current were set to 45kV and 40mA respectively to generate the copper Ka radiation powder diffraction pattern over the range of 2 – 40°2Θ. The test specimen was lightly triturated using an agate mortar and pestle and the resulting fine powder was mounted onto a silicon background plate.

Table 1.

Paper

Discovery of a first-in-class receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase specific clinical candidate (GSK2982772) for the treatment of inflammatory diseases
J Med Chem 2017, 60(4): 1247

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b01751

RIP1 regulates necroptosis and inflammation and may play an important role in contributing to a variety of human pathologies, including immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors of RIP1 kinase that are suitable for advancement into the clinic have yet to be described. Herein, we report our lead optimization of a benzoxazepinone hit from a DNA-encoded library and the discovery and profile of clinical candidate GSK2982772 (compound 5), currently in phase 2a clinical studies for psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. Compound 5 potently binds to RIP1 with exquisite kinase specificity and has excellent activity in blocking many TNF-dependent cellular responses. Highlighting its potential as a novel anti-inflammatory agent, the inhibitor was also able to reduce spontaneous production of cytokines from human ulcerative colitis explants. The highly favorable physicochemical and ADMET properties of 5, combined with high potency, led to a predicted low oral dose in humans.

J. Med. Chem. 2017, 60, 1247−1261

(S)-5-Benzyl-N-(5-methyl-4-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[b]- [1,4]oxazepin-3-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide (5).

EtOAc solvate. 1 H NMR (DMSO-d6) δ ppm 14.41 (br s, 1 H), 8.48 (br s, 1 H), 7.50 (dd, J = 7.7, 1.9 Hz, 1 H), 7.12−7.40 (m, 8 H), 4.83 (dt, J = 11.6, 7.9 Hz, 1 H), 4.60 (t, J = 10.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.41 (dd, J = 9.9, 7.8 Hz, 1 H), 4.12 (s, 2 H), 3.31 (s, 3 H). Anal. Calcd for C20H20N5O3·0.026EtOAc·0.4H2O C, 62.36; H, 5.17; N, 18.09. Found: C, 62.12; H, 5.05; N, 18.04.

Synthesis of (<it>S</it>)-3-amino-benzo[<it>b</it>][1,4]oxazepin-4-one via Mitsunobu and S<INF>N</INF>Ar reaction for a first-in-class RIP1 kinase inhibitor GSK2982772 in clinical trials
Tetrahedron Lett 2017, 58(23): 2306
Harris, P.A.
Identification of a first-in-class RIP1 kinase inhibitor in phase 2a clinical trials for immunoinflammatory diseases
ACS MEDI-EFMC Med Chem Front (June 25-28, Philadelphia) 2017, Abst 

Harris, P.
Identification of a first-in-class RIP1 kinase inhibitor in phase 2a clinical trials for immuno-inflammatory diseases
253rd Am Chem Soc (ACS) Natl Meet (April 2-6, San Francisco) 2017, Abst MEDI 313

1H NMR AND 13C NMR PREDICT

////////////GSK 2982772, phase 2, Plaque psoriasis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Ulcerative colitis

CN3c4ccccc4OC[C@H](NC(=O)c2nnc(Cc1ccccc1)n2)C3=O

Debio-1452


Image result for Debio-1452

Debio-1452, AFN 1252

AFN-1252; UNII-T3O718IKKM; API-1252; CAS 620175-39-5; CHEMBL1652621; (E)-N-methyl-N-((3-methylbenzofuran-2-yl)methyl)-3-(7-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)acrylamide

  • MFC22 H21 N3 O3
  • 2-Propenamide, N-methyl-N-[(3-methyl-2-benzofuranyl)methyl]-3-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-7-oxo-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)-, (2E)-
  •  MW375.42
  • Phase 2, clinical trials for the oral treatment of staphylococcal infections, including hospital and community-acquired MRSA and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections
  • Qualified Infectious Disease Product designation

GlaxoSmithKline plc INNOVATOR

Image result

Debiopharm SA,

Image result for DEBIOPHARM

Image result for Affinium

Melioidosis, Enoyl ACP reductase Fabl inhibitor

Debio-1452, a novel class fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) II pathway inhibitor, was studied in phase II clinical trials for the oral treatment of staphylococcal infections, including hospital and community-acquired MRSA and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. Debiopharm is developing oral and IV formulations of a prodrug of Debio-1452, Debio-1450.

Infections caused by or related to bacteria are a major cause of human illness worldwide. Unfortunately, the frequency of resistance to standard antibacterials has risen dramatically over the last decade, especially in relation to Staphylococcus aureus. For example, such resistant S. aureus includes MRSA, resistant to methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid and many other classes of antibiotics, or the newly discovered New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase- 1 (NDM-1) type resistance that has shown to afford bacterial resistant to most known antibacterials, including penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, quinolones and fluoroquinolones, macrolides, etc. Hence, there exists an urgent, unmet, medical need for new agents acting against bacterial targets..

In recent years, inhibitors of Fabl, a bacterial target involved in bacterial fatty acid synthesis, have been developed and many have been promising in regard to their potency and tolerability in humans, including a very promising Fabl inhibitor, (E)-N-methyl-N-((3-methylbenzofuran-2-yl)methyl)-3-(7-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-l,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)acrylamide. This compound, however, has been found to be difficult or impracticable to formulate into acceptable oral and parenteral (e.g., intravenous or subcutaneous) formulations, and has marked insolubility, poor solution stability, and oral bioavailability. Much effort, over a decade or more, has been expended to design and synthesize an alternative compound that retains the significant inhibition of Fabl upon administration, but has improved physical and chemical characteristics that finally allow for practical oral and parenteral formulations. Up to now, no such compound has been identified that has adequate stability in the solid state, in aqueous solutions, together with excellent oral bioavailability that is necessary for oral and/or a parenteral administration, and is capable of being formulated into an oral and/or intravenous or intramuscular drug product using practical and commonly utilized methods of sterile formulation manufacture.

Debio-1452 is expected to have high potency against all drug-resistant phenotypes of staphylococci, including hospital and community-acquired MRSA.

Affinium obtained Debio-1452, also known as API-1252, through a licensing deal with GlaxoSmithKline. In 2014, Debiopharm acquired the product from Affinium.

In 2013, Qualified Infectious Disease Product designation was assigned to the compound for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI).

Image result for Debio-1452

Image result for Debio-1452

AFN-1252.png

SYNTHESIS

Heck coupling of 6-bromo-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2-one with t-butyl acrylate in the presence of Pd(OAc)2, DIEA and P(o-tol)3  in propionitrile/DMF or acetonitrile/DMF affords naphthyridinyl-acrylate,

Whose t-butyl ester group is then cleaved using TFA in CH2Cl2 to furnish, after treatment with HCl in dioxane, 3-(7-oxo-6,8-dihydro-5H-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)acrylic acid hydrochloride

SEE BELOW………

Finally, coupling of acid with N-methyl-N-(3-methylbenzofuran-2-ylmethyl)amine using EDC, HOBt and DIEA in DMF provides the target AFN-1252

Preparation of N-methyl-N-(3-methylbenzofuran-2-ylmethyl)amine :

Chlorination of 3-methylbenzofuran-2-carboxylic acid  with (COCl)2 and catalytic DMF, followed by condensation with CH3NH2 in CH2Cl2 yields the corresponding benzofuran-2-carboxamide,

Which is then reduced with LiAlH4 in THF to furnish N-methyl-N-(3-methylbenzofuran-2-ylmethyl)amine.

CONTD……..

Reduction of 2-aminonicotinic acid  with LiAlH4 in THF gives (2-amino-3-pyridinyl)methanol ,

which upon bromination with Br2 in AcOH yields (2-amino-5-bromo-3-pyridinyl)methanol hydrobromide.

Substitution of alcohol  with aqueous HBr at reflux provides the corresponding bromide,

which undergoes cyclocondensation with dimethyl malonate  in the presence of NaH in DMF/THF to furnish methyl 6-bromo-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylate.

Hydrolysis of ester with NaOH in refluxing MeOH, followed by decarboxylation in refluxing HCl leads to 6-bromo-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-2-one

PATENT

US-20170088822

Image result for Aurigene Discovery Technologies Ltd

Aurigene Discovery Technologies Ltd

Novel co-crystalline polymorphic form of a binary enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) and FabI inhibitor ie AFN-1252. The FabI was isolated from Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bpm). The co-crystal is useful for identifying an inhibitor of FabI, which is useful for treating BpmFabI associated disease ie melioidosis. Appears to be the first patenting to be seen from Aurigene Discovery Technologies or its parent Dr Reddy’s that focuses on BpmFabI crystal; however, see WO2015071780, claiming alkylidine substituted heterocyclyl derivatives as FabI inhibitors, useful for treating bacterial infections. Aurigene was investigating FabI inhibitors, for treating infectious diseases, including bacterial infections such as MRSA infection, but its development had been presumed to have been discontinued since December 2015; however, publication of this application would suggest otherwise.

WO2015071780

PATENTS

US 20060142265

http://www.google.co.in/patents/US20060142265

PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2013190384&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US8901105 Prodrug derivatives of (E)-N-methyl-N-((3-M ethylbenzofuran-2-yl)methyl)-3-(7-oxo-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydro-1, 8-naphthyridin-3-yl)acrylamide 2013-08-26 2014-12-02
US2015065415 PRODRUG DERIVATIVES OF (E)-N-METHYL-N-((3-METHYLBENZOFURAN-2-YL)METHYL)-3-(7-OXO-5, 6, 7, 8-TETRAHYDRO-1, 8-NAPHTHYRIDIN-3-YL)ACRYLAMIDE 2014-11-06 2015-03-05
Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US7049310 Fab I inhibitors 2004-07-29 2006-05-23
US7250424 Fab I inhibitors 2006-06-01 2007-07-31
US7879872 Compositions comprising multiple bioactive agents, and methods of using the same 2006-06-29 2011-02-01
US2009042927 Salts, Prodrugs and Polymorphs of Fab I Inhibitors 2009-02-12
US7741339 Fab I Inhibitors 2009-09-03 2010-06-22
US8153652 Fab I Inhibitors 2011-04-28 2012-04-10
US2012010127 Compositions Comprising Multiple Bioactive Agents, and Methods of Using the Same 2012-01-12
US2013281442 Compounds for Treatment of Bovine Mastitis 2011-06-13 2013-10-24
US2013150400 SALTS, PRODRUGS AND POLYMORPHS OF FAB I INHIBITORS 2012-08-09 2013-06-13
US2014309191 SALTS, PRODRUGS AND POLYMORPHS OF FAB I INHIBITORS 2013-11-08 2014-10-16

////////////Debio-1452, AFN 1252,AFN-1252, UNII-T3O718IKKM, API-1252, 620175-39-5, PRECLINICAL, Phase 2, Qualified Infectious Disease Product designation

CC1=C(OC2=CC=CC=C12)CN(C)C(=O)C=CC3=CC4=C(NC(=O)CC4)N=C3

Tradipitant, традипитант , تراديبيتانت , 曲地匹坦 ,


LY686017.svgTradipitant.png

Tradipitant

VLY-686,  LY686017

традипитант
تراديبيتانت [Arabic]
曲地匹坦 [Chinese]
  • Molecular Formula C28H16ClF6N5O
  • Average mass 587.903 Da
622370-35-8  CAS
Methanone, [2-[1-[[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-5-(4-pyridinyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]-3-pyridinyl](2-chlorophenyl)-
(2-(1-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-5-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridin-3-yl)(2-chlorophenyl)methanone
[2-[1-[[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-5-(4-pyridinyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]-3-pyridinyl](2-chlorophenyl)methanone

PHASE 2, Gastroparesis; Pruritus

pyridine-containing NK-1 receptor antagonist ie tradipitant, useful for treating anxiety, pruritus and alcoholism.

Vanda Pharmaceuticals, under license from Eli Lilly, was developing tradipitant, a NK1 antagonist, for treating anxiety disorder, pruritus and alcohol dependence. The company was also investigating the drug for treating gastroparesis. In February 2017, tradipitant was reported to be in phase 2 clinical development for treating anxiety and pruritus.

  • Originator Eli Lilly
  • Developer Eli Lilly; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Vanda Pharmaceuticals
  • Class Antipruritics; Anxiolytics; Chlorobenzenes; Pyridines; Small molecules; Triazoles
  • Mechanism of Action Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists; Substance P inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase II Gastroparesis; Pruritus
  • Discontinued Alcoholism; Social phobia
  • The drug had been in phase II clinical trials at Lilly and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism for the treatment of alcoholism; however, no recent development has been reported for this research.
  • A phase II clinical trial for the treatment of social phobia has been completed by Lilly.

PATENT WO 2003091226

Albert Kudzovi Amegadzie, Kevin Matthew Gardinier, Erik James Hembre, Jian Eric Hong, Louis Nickolaus Jungheim, Brian Stephen Muehl, David Michael Remick, Michael Alan Robertson, Kenneth Allen Savin, Less «
Applicant Eli Lilly And Company

Image result for Eli Lilly And Company

Image result for tradipitant

SYNTHESIS

Condensation of 2-chloropyridine with thiophenol  in the presence of K2CO3 in DMF at 110ºC yields sulfide intermediate,

which is then oxidized by means of NaOCl in AcOH to give 2-(benzenesulfonyl)pyridine.

This is treated with (iPr)2NH and n-BuLi in THF at -60 to -70°C and subsequently couples with 2-chlorobenzaldehyde  in THF at -60 to -70°C to furnish (2-(phenylsulfonyl)pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone.

Ketone  couples with the enolate of 4-acetylpyridine (formed by treating 4-acetylpyridine (VII) with t-BuOK in DMSO) in the presence of LiOH in DMSO and subsequently is treated with PhCOOH in iPrOAc to give rise to pyridine benzoate derivative.

This finally couples with 1-azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene  (obtained by treating 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzylchloride with NaN3 ini DMSO) in the presence of K2CO3 in t-BuOH to afford the title compound Tradipitant.

Tradipitant (VLY-686 or LY686017) is an experimental drug that is a neurokinin 1 antagonist. It works by blocking substance P, a small signaling molecule. Originally, this compound was owned by Eli Lilly and named LY686017. VLY-686 was purchased by Vanda Pharmaceuticals from Eli Lilly and Company in 2012.[1] Vanda Pharmaceuticals is a U.S. pharmaceutical company that as of November 2015 only has 3 drugs in their product pipeline: tasimelteon, VLY-686, and iloperidone.[2]

Tachykinins are a family of peptides that are widely distributed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. These peptides exert a number of biological effects through actions at tachykinin receptors. To date, three such receptors have been characterized, including the NK-1 , NK-2, and NK-3 subtypes of tachykinin receptor.

The role of the NK-1 receptor subtype in numerous disorders of the central nervous system and the periphery has been thoroughly demonstrated in the art. For instance, NK-1 receptors are believed to play a role in depression, anxiety, and central regulation of various autonomic, as well as cardiovascular and respiratory functions. NK- 1 receptors in the spinal cord are believed to play a role in pain transmission, especially the pain associated with migraine and arthritis. In the periphery, NK-1 receptor activation has been implicated in numerous disorders, including various inflammatory disorders, asthma, and disorders of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract.

There is an increasingly wide recognition that selective NK-1 receptor antagonists would prove useful in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system and the periphery. While many of these disorders are being treated by new medicines, there are still many shortcomings associated with existing treatments. For example, the newest class of anti-depressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are increasingly prescribed for the treatment of depression; however, SSRIs have numerous side effects, including nausea, insomnia, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. This could significantly affect patient compliance rate. As another example, current treatments for chemotherapy- induced nausea and emesis, such as the 5-HT3receptor antagonists, are ineffective in managing delayed emesis. The development of NK-1 receptor antagonists will therefore greatly enhance the ability to treat such disorders more effectively. Thus, the present invention provides a class of potent, non-peptide NK-1 receptor antagonists, compositions comprising these compounds, and methods of using the compounds.

Indications

Pruritus

It is being investigated by Vanda Pharmaceuticals for chronic pruritus (itchiness) in atopic dermatitis. In March 2015, Vanda announced positive results from a Phase II proof of concept study.[3] A proof of concept study is done in early stage clinical trials after there have been promising preclinical results. It provides preliminary evidence that the drug is active in humans and has some efficacy.[4]

Alcoholism

VLY-686 reduced alcohol craving in recently detoxified alcoholic patients as measured by the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire.[5] In a placebo controlled clinical trial of recently detoxified alcoholic patients, VLY-686 significantly reduced alcohol craving as measured by the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire. It also reduced the cortisol increase seen after a stress test compared to placebo. The dose given was 50 mg per day.

Social anxiety disorder

In a 12-week randomized trial of LY68017 in 189 patients with social anxiety disorder, 50 mg of LY68017 did not provide any statistically significant improvement over placebo.[6]

PATENT

WO03091226,

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2003091226A1?cl=en

PATENT

WO2008079600, 

The compound {2-[l-(3,5-bis-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]- pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone, depicted below as the compound of Formula I, was first described in PCT published application WO2003/091226.

Figure imgf000003_0001

(I)

Because the compound of Formula I is an antagonist of the NK-I subtype of tachykinin receptor, it is useful for the treatment of disorders associated with an excess of tachykinins. Such disorders include depression, including major depressive disorder; anxiety, including generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and social phobia or social anxiety disorder; schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, including bipolar disorder; neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia, including senile dementia of the Alzheimer’s type or Alzheimer’s disease; disorders of bladder function such as bladder detrusor hyper-reflexia and incontinence, including urge incontinence; emesis, including chemotherapy-induced nausea and acute or delayed emesis; pain or nociception; disorders associated with blood pressure, such as hypertension; disorders of blood flow caused by vasodilation and vasospastic diseases, such as angina, migraine, and Reynaud’s disease; hot flushes; acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases such as adult respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopneumonia, bronchospasm, chronic bronchitis, drivercough, and asthma; inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease; gastrointestinal disorders or diseases associated with the neuronal control of viscera such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome (including constipation-predominant, diarrhea- -?-

predominant, and mixed irritable bowel syndrome); and cutaneous diseases such as contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, and other eczematoid dermatitis.

In PCT published application, WO2005/042515, novel crystalline forms of the compound of Formula I, identified as Form IV and Form V, are identified. Also described in WO2005/042515 is a process for preparation of the compound of Formula I, comprising reacting (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2- hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone or a phosphate salt thereof with l-azidomethyl-3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzene in the presence of a suitable base and a solvent. Use of this procedure results in several shortcomings for synthesis on a commercial scale. For example, use of the solvent DMSO, with (2- chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone phosphate, requires a complex work-up that has a propensity to emulsify. This process also requires extraction with CH2CI2, the use of which is discouraged due to its potential as an occupational carcinogen, as well as the use of MgSC>4 and acid-washed carbon, which can generate large volumes of waste on a commercial scale. Conducting the reaction with (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone in isopropyl alcohol, as also described in WO2005/042515, is also undesirable due to the need to incorporate a free base step. Furthermore, variable levels of residual l-azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene, a known mutagen, are obtained from use of the procedures described in WO2005/042515.

An improved process for preparing the compound of Formula I would control the level of 1- azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene impurity, and improve the yield. We have discovered that use of the novel salt, (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate, as well as use of tert-butanol as the reaction solvent, improves reaction times and final yield, and decreases impurities in the final product. In addition, a novel process for the preparation of (2-chlorophenyl)- [2-(2- hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate, in which a pre-formed enolate of 4-acetyl pyridine is added to (2-phenylsulfonyl-pyridine-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone, results in an overall improved yield and improved purity, and is useful on a commercial scale.

EXAMPLES

Example 1 {2-[l-(3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)- methanone (Form IV)

Figure imgf000005_0001

Suspend (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl] methanone benzoate (204.7 g; 1.04 equiv; 445 mmoles) in t-butanol (614 mL) and treat the slurry with potassium carbonate (124.2 g; 898.6 mmoles). Heat to 7O0C with mechanical stirring for 1 hour. Add l-azidomethyl-3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzene (115.6 g; 1.00 equiv; 429.4 mmoles) in a single portion, then heat the mixture to reflux. A circulating bath is used to maintain a condenser temperature of 3O0C. After 18 hours at reflux, HPLC reveals that the reaction is complete (<2% l-azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene remaining). The mixture is cooled to 7O0C, isopropanol (818 mL) is added, then the mixture is stirred at 7O0C for 1 hour. The mixture is filtered, and the waste filter cake is rinsed with isopropanol (409 mL). The combined filtrate and washes are transferred to a reactor, and the mechanically stirred contents are heated to 7O0C. To the dark purple solution, water (1.84 L) is added slowly over 35 minutes. The solution is cooled to 6O0C, then stirred for 1 hour, during which time a thin precipitate forms. The mixture is slowly cooled to RT, then the solid is filtered, washed with 1 : 1 isopropanol/water (614 mL), subsequently washed with isopropanol (410 mL), then dried in vacuo at 450C to produce 200.3 g of crude {2-[l-(3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone as a white solid. Crude {2-[l-(3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin- 3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone (200.3 g) and isopropyl acetate (600 mL) are charged to a 5L 3-neck jacketed flask, then the contents heated to 750C. After dissolution is achieved, the vessel contents are cooled to 550C, then the solution polish filtered through a 5 micron filter, and the filter rinsed with a volume of isopropyl acetate (200 mL). After the polish filtration operation is complete, the filtrates are combined, and the vessel contents are adjusted to 5O0C. After stirring for at least 15 minutes at 5O0C, 0.21 grams of {2-[l-(3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2- chlorophenyl)-methanone Form IV seed (d90 = 40 microns) is added, and the mixture stirred at 5O0C for at least 2 h. Heptanes (1.90 L) are then added over at least 2 h. After the heptanes addition is completed, the slurry is stirred for an hour at 5O0C, cooled to 230C at a rate less then 2O0C per hour, then aged at 230C for an hour prior to isolation. The mixture is then filtered in portions through the bottom outlet valve in the reactor into a 600 mL filter. The resulting wetcake is washed portionwise with a solution containing heptanes (420 mL) and isopropyl acetate (180 mL), which is passed directly through the 5L crystallization vessel. The wetcake is blown dry for 5 minutes with nitrogen, then transferred to a 500 mL plastic bottle. The product is dried at 5O0C for 4 h. to produce 190.3g of pure {2-[l-(3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)- methanone, Form IV in 75.0% yield with 100% purity, as determined by HPLC analysis. Particle size is reduced via pin or jet mill. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): 5.46 (s, 2H); 7.19 (m, 5H); 7.36 (dd, IH, J = 4.9, 7.8); 7.45 (s, 2H); 7.59 (m, IH); 7.83 (s, IH); 7.93 (dd, IH, J = 1.5, 7.8); 8.56 (dd, IH, J= 1.5, 4.9); 8.70 (d, 2H, J= 5.9).

Preparation 1-A (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate Charge powdered KOfBu (221.1 g, 1.93 moles, 1.40 eq.) to Reactor A, then charge DMSO (2 L) at

250C over 10 min. The KOfBu/DMSO solution is stirred for 30 min at 230C, then a solution of 4-acetyl pyridine (92 mL, 2.07 moles, 1.50 eq) in DMSO (250 mL) is prepared in reactor B. The contents of reactor B are added to Reactor A over 10 minutes, then the Reactor A enolate solution is stirred at 230C for Ih. In a separate 12-L flask (Reactor C), solid LiOH (84.26 g, 3.45 moles, 2.0 eq) is poured into a mixture of (2- phenylsulfonyl-pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone (500.0 g, 1.34 moles, 1.0 eq) and DMSO (2L), with stirring, at 230C. The enolate solution in reactor A is then added to Reactor C over a period of at least 15 minutes, and the red suspension warmed to 4O0C. The reaction is stirred for 3h, after which time HPLC analysis reveals less than 2% (2-phenylsulfonyl-pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone. Toluene (2.5 L) is charged, and the reactor temperature cooled to 3O0C. The mixture is quenched by addition of glacial acetic acid (316 mL, 5.52 moles, 4.0 eq), followed by 10 % NaCl (2.5 L). The biphasic mixture is transferred to a 22-L bottom-outlet Morton flask, and the aqueous layer is removed. The aqueous layer is then extracted with toluene (750 mL). The combined organic layers are washed with 10 % NaCl (750 mL), then concentrated to 4 volumes and transferred to a 12-L Morton flask and rinsed with isopropyl acetate (4 vol, 2 L). The opaque amber solution is warmed to 75 degrees to 750C over 40 min. Benzoic acid (171. Ig, 1.34 moles, 1.0 eq) is dissolved in hot isopropyl acetate (1.5 L), and charged to the crude free base solution over at least 30 min. The crude solution containing benzoate salt is stirred for 0.5 h at 750C then cooled to 23 0C. When solids are first observed, the cooling is stopped and the mixture is aged for an hour at the temperature at which crystals are first observed. Alternatively, if seed crystal is available, the mixture may be seeded with (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate (2.25g) at 750C, followed by stirring for 0.5 h at 750C, then cooling to 230C over at least 1.5 h. The mixture is then cooled to <5 0C, then filtered through paper on a 24cm single-plate filter. The filtercake is then rinsed with cold z-PrOAc (750 mL) to produce granular crystals of bright orange-red color. The wet solid is dried at 550C to produce 527.3 g (83% yield) with 99.9% purity. (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2- pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate. Anal. Calcd. for C26Hi9N2ClO4: C, 68.05; H, 4.17; N, 7.13. Found: C, 67.89; H, 4.15; N 6.05. HRMS: calcd for C19H13ClN2O2, 336.0666; found 336.0673.

The synthesis of(2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate proceeds optimally when the potassium enolate of 4-acetyl pyridine is pre-formed using KOfBu in DMSO. Pre-formation of the enolate allows the SNAR (nucleophilic aromatic substitution) reaction to be performed between room temperature and 4O0C, which minimizes the amount of degradation. Under these conditions, the SNAR is highly regioselective, resulting in a ratio of approximately 95:5 preferential C – acylation. In all cases, less polar solvents such as THF or toluene, or co-solvents of these solvents mixed with DMSO, results in a substantial increase of acylation at the oxygen in the SNAR, and leads to a lower yield of product. This is a substantial improvement over the procedures described in WO2005/042515 for synthesis of the free base or the phosphate salt, in which the SNAR is performed at 60-700C, resulting in a substantial increase in chemical impurity. Using the conditions described in WO2005/042515, when scaled to 2kg, results in maximum yields of 55%, with sub-optimal potency. In comparison, the improved conditions described herein can be run reproducibly from 0.4 to 2kg scale to give yields of 77-83%, with >99% purity. In addition, the reaction can be held overnight at 4O0C with minimal degradation, whereas holding the reaction for 1 h past completion at 60-70°C results in substantial aromatized impurity. The reaction may also be performed using sodium tert-amylate as the base, in combination with an aprotic solvent, such as DMSO or DMF.

The title compound exists as a mixture of tautomers and geometric isomers. It is understood that each of these forms is encompassed within the scope of the invention.

Figure imgf000008_0001

Preparation 1-B

(2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone toluate The procedure described in Preparation 1-A is followed, with the following exception. Solid toluic acid (1.0 eq) is added to the crude free base solution at 550C, then the solution cooled to 45 0C. The solution is stirred for one hour at 45 0C, then slowly cooled to 23 0C. When solids are first observed, the cooling is stopped and the mixture is aged for an hour at the temperature at which crystals are first observed. Alternatively, if seed crystal is available, the mixture may be seeded, aged for 3 h at 450C , then cooled to O0C over 4 h. The isolation slurry is filtered, and the wetcake washed with MeOH (3 volumes). The wetcake is dried at 5O0C to provide 14.0 g (76.4%) of (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl- vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone toluate as a light red powder.

As with the benzoate salt, the toluate salt can also exist as a mixture of tautomers and geometric isomers, each of which is encompassed within the scope of the invention. (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy- 2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone toluate . 13C NMR (125 MHz,DMS0-d6) δ 194.5, 167.8, 167.4, 155.5, 150.7 (2C), 147.4, 144.0, 143.4, 142.7, 138.6, 133.0, 130.8, 130.7, 130.5, 129.8(2C), 129.5(2C), 128.5, 128.0, 127.9, 119.9 (2C), 118.6, 92.6, 21.5.

Preparation 1-C

(2-phenylsulfonyl-pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone

A solution of 1.3 eq of diisopropylamine (based on 2-benzenesulfonyl pyridine) in 5 volumes of THF in a mechanically stirred 3 -necked flask is cooled to -70 to -75 0C. To this solution is added 1.05 eq of w-butyllithium (1.6M in hexanes) at such a rate as to maintain the temperature below -6O0C. The light yellow solution is stirred at -60 to -70 0C for 30 minutes. Once the temperature has cooled back down to – 60 to -650C, 1.0 eq of 2-benzene-sulfonyl pyridine, as a solution in 3 volumes of THF, is added at the fastest rate that will maintain the reaction temperature under -6O0C. A yellow suspension forms during the addition that becomes yellow-orange upon longer stirring. This mixture is stirred for 3 hours at -60 to – 750C, and then 1.06 eq of 2-chlorobenzaldehyde, as a solution in 1 volume of THF, is added dropwise at a sufficient rate to keep the temperature under -55 0C. The suspension gradually turns orange-red, thins out, and then becomes a clear red solution. The reaction mixture is allowed to stir at -60 to -7O0C for 1 hour, 3N aqueous HCl (7 volumes) is added over 20-30 minutes, and the temperature is allowed to exotherm to 0-100C. The color largely disappears, leaving a biphasic yellow solution. The solution is warmed to at least 1O0C, the layers are separated, and the aqueous layer is back-extracted with 10 volumes of ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers are washed with 10 volumes of saturated sodium bicarbonate solution and concentrated to about 2 volumes. Ethyl acetate (10 volumes) is added, and the solution is once again concentrated to 2 volumes. The thick solution is allowed to stand overnight and is taken to the next step with no purification of the crude alcohol intermediate. The crude alcohol intermediate is transferred to a 3 -necked flask with enough ethyl acetate to make the total solution about 10 volumes. The yellow solution is treated with 3.2 volumes of 10% aqueous (w/w) potassium bromide, followed by 0.07 eq of 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide (TEMPO). The orange mixture is cooled to 0-50C and treated with a solution of 1.25 eq of sodium bicarbonate in 12% w/w sodium hypochlorite (9 volumes) and 5 volumes of water over 30-60 minutes while allowing the temperature to exotherm to a maximum of 2O0C. The mixture turns dark brown during the addition, but becomes yellow, and a thick precipitate forms. The biphasic light yellow mixture is allowed to stir at ambient temperature for 1-3 hours, at which time the reaction is generally completed. The biphasic mixture is cooled to 0-50C and stirred for 3 hours at that temperature. The solid is filtered off, washed with 4 volumes of cold ethyl acetate, followed by 4 volumes of water, and dried in vacuo at 450C to constant weight. Typical yield is 80-83% with a purity of greater than 98%. 1H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3-^) δ ppm 7.38 (td, ./=7.52, 1.28 Hz, 1 H) 7.47 (dd, ./=7.80, 1.30 Hz, 1 H) 7.51 (td, ./=7.79, 1.60 Hz, 1 H) 7.51 (t, ./=7.89 Hz, 2 H) 7.50 – 7.54 (m, J=7.75, 4.63 Hz, 1 H) 7.60 (t, J=7.43 Hz, 1 H) 7.73 (dd, J=7.75, 1.60 Hz, 1 H) 7.81 (dd, J=7.79, 1.56 Hz, 1 H) 8.00 (dd, ./=8.44, 1.10 Hz, 2 H) 8.76 (dd, ./=4.63, 1.61 Hz, 1 H).

Preparation 1-D 1 -azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethyl-benzene

Sodium azide (74.3 g, 1.14 mol) is suspended in water (125 mL), then DMSO (625 mL) is added. After stirring for 30 minutes, a solution consisting of 3,5-Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl chloride (255.3 g, 0.97 moles) and DMSO (500 mL) is added over 30 minutes. (The 3,5-Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl chloride is heated to 350C to liquefy prior to dispensing (MP = 30-320C)). The benzyl chloride feed vessel is rinsed with DMSO (50 mL) into the sodium azide solution, the mixture is heated to 4O0C, and then maintained for an hour at 4O0C, then cooled to 230C.

In Process Analysis: A drop of the reaction mixture is dissolved in d6-DMSO and the relative intensities of the methylene signals are integrated (NMR verified as a 0.35% limit test for 3,5- Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl Chloride). Work-up: After the mixture reaches 230C , it is diluted with heptanes (1500 mL), then water (1000 mL) is added, and the mixture exotherms to 350C against a jacket setpoint of 230C. The aqueous layer is removed (-2200 mL), then the organic layer (approximately 1700 mL) is washed with water (2 X 750 mL). The combined aqueous layers (-3700 mL) are analyzed and discarded.

The solvent is then partially removed via vacuum distillation with a jacket set point of 850C, pot temperature of 60-650C and distillate head temperature of 50-550C to produce 485g (94.5% yield) of 51 Wt% solution title compound as a clear liquid. Heptanes can be either further removed by vacuum distillation or wiped film evaporation technology. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): 4.58 (s, 2H); 7.81 (s, 2H); 7.90 (s, IH).

Preparation 1-E 2-benzene-sulfonyl pyridine Charge 2-chloropyridine (75 mL, 790 mmol), thiophenol (90 mL, 852 mmol), and DMF (450 mL) to a 2L flask. Add K2CO3 (134.6 g, 962 mmol), then heat to HO0C and stir for 18 hours. Filter the mixture, then rinse the waste cake with DMF (195 mL). The combined crude sulfide solution and rinses are transferred to a 5-L flask, and the waste filtercake is discarded. Glacial acetic acid (57 mL, 995 mmol) is added to the filtrate, then the solution is heated to 4O0C, and 13 wt % NaOCl solution (850 mL, 1.7 mol) is added over 2 hours. After the reaction is complete, water (150 mL) is added, then the pH of the mixture adjusted to 9 with 20 % (w/v) NaOH solution (250 mL). The resulting slurry is cooled to <5 0C, stirred for 1.5 h, then filtered, and the cake washed with water (3 x 200 mL). The product wetcake is dried in a 550C vacuum oven to provide 2-benzene-sulfonyl pyridine (149 g, 676 mmol) in 86 % yield: 1H NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.66 (d, J = 5.5 Hz, IH), 8.19 (d, J = 1.1 Hz, IH), 8.05 (m, 2H), 7.92 (ddd, J= 9.3, 7.7, 1.6 Hz, IH), 7.60 (m, IH), 7.54 (m, 2H), 7.44 (m, IH); IR (KBr) 788, 984, 1124, 1166, 1306, 1424, 1446, 1575, 3085 cm“1; MS (TOF) mlz 220.0439 (220.0427 calcd for C11H10NO2S, MH); Anal, calcd for C11H9NO2S: C, 60.26; H, 4.14; N, 6.39; S, 14.62. Found: C, 60.40; H, 4.02; N, 6.40; S, 14.76.

As noted above, use of the improved process of the present invention results in an improved habit of the crystalline Form IV compound of Formula I. The improved habit reduces surface area of the crystal, improves the filtration, and washing, and improves the efficiency of azide mutagen rejection. These improvements are described in greater detail below.

In patent application WO2005/042515, the polish filtration is carried out in 7 volumes (L/kg) of isopropanol near its boiling point (65-83 0C), a process that is difficult and hazardous to execute in commercial manufacturing because of the high risk of crystallization on the filter and/or vessel transfer lines due to supersaturation. In the preferred crystallization solvent, isopropyl acetate, the polish filtration is conducted in four volumes of isopropyl acetate at temperatures from 45 to 55 0C. This temperature range is 35 to 45 0C lower than the boiling point of isopropyl acetate, which provides a key safety advantage.

PATENT

WO 2005042515

PATENT

WO 2017031215

EXAMPLES

Example 1: Preparation of Compound (I) via Negishi Coupling Route

Example 1 provides a scheme including preparations 1A-1D, described below, for the synthesis of the compound of Formula (I) and intermediates used in the route. An overview of the scheme is as follows:

80 on ma s ale

Example 1A: Preparation of Compound (I)

Zinc dust (200 mg, 3.06 mmol) combined with 2.0 mL of dimethylformamide was treated with 0.010 mL of 1,2-dibromoethane and heated to 65°C for 3 minutes. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature and treated with 0.010 mL of trimethylsilyl chloride. After 5 minutes, 1.26 mL of 1M zinc chloride in diethyl ether was added to the mixture followed by Compound (Ila) (600 mg, 1.20 mmol). The mixture was heated to 65°C and further treated with 0.020 mL each of 1,2-dibromoethane and trimethylsilyl chloride. After 2.5 hours, via HPLC chromatogram, the reaction showed some formation of the zincate and was allowed to stir at ambient temperature for 16 hours. At this time

tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) (70 mg, 0.06 mmol), Compound (Ilia) (357 mg, 1.20 mmol) were added to the reaction and the mixture heated to 65°C. HPLC analysis showed the formation of Compound (I) in the reaction.

IB: Preparation of Comp

To a solution of Compound (IV) (8.00 g, 18 mmol) in 40 mL of 1,2-dichloroethane was added a solution of iodine monochloride (10.7 g, 65.9 mmol) in 40 mL of 1,2-dichloroethane resulting in a slurry. The slurry was heated to 75°C for 4 hours then cooled to ambient temperature. The solids were collected by filtration, washed with heptane, then combined with 90 mL of ethyl acetate and 80 mL of saturated sodium thiosulfate solution. The organic phase was washed with saturated sodium chloride solution and dried with sodium sulfate. The mixture was concentrated to yield 7.80 g (87%) of Compound (Ila) as a yellow solid. The product could be further purified by silica gel chromatography. Thus 2.0 g of yellow solid was dissolved in dichloromethane and charged onto a silica gel column. The product was eluted using tert-butyl methyl ether to provide 1.87 g (93% recovery) of Compound (Ila) as a white powder. Analytical data: Iodine monochloride complex: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 8.80 (2 H), 8.05 (1 H), 7.77 (2 H), 7.59 (2 H), 5.86 (2 H).

Uncomplexed: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 8.71 (2 H), 8.03 (1 H), 7.74 (2 H), 7.44 (2 H), 5.86 (2 H).

It was observed that the iodination proceeded smoothly as a suspension in 1,2-dichloroethane with IC1 (4.0 equiv) at 75°C. An ICl-Compound (Ila) complex was initially isolated by filtration. Compound (Ila) was then obtained in approximately 85% yield by treatment of the ICl-Compound (Ila) complex with sodium thiosulfate. This protocol provided a viable means of isolation of Compound (Ila) without the use of DMF.

Example 1C: Preparation of silyl substituted triazole (Compound IV)

A mixture of Compound (V) (8.07 g, 30.0 mmol) and Compound (VI) (5.12 g, 29.2 mmol) was heated to 100°C for 18 hours. To the mixture was added 40 mL of heptane and the reaction was allowed to cool with rapid stirring. After 1 hour the solids were collected by filtration and washed with heptane then dried to 9.30 g (72%) of Compound (IV) as a tan solid. Analytical data: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 8.66 (2 H), 8.04 (1 H), 7.67 (2 H), 7.32 (2 H), 5.72 (2 H), 0.08 (9 H).

It was further found that combining Compound (V) and Compound (VI) (neat) and heating at 95 – 105°C afforded a 92: 8 mixture of regioisomers as shown below:

Crystallization of the mixture from heptane afforded Compound (IV) in 62-72% yield, thus obviating the need for chromatography to isolate Compound (IV).

Example ID: Preparation of starting material Compound (VI)

Zinc bromide (502 g, 2.23 mole) was added in approximately 100 g portions to 2.0 L of tetrahydrofuran cooled to between 0 and 10°C. To this cooled solution was added 4-bromopyridine hydrochloride (200 g, 1.02 mol), triphenylphosphine (54 g, 0.206 mol), and palladium (II) chloride (9.00 g, 0.0508 mol). Triethylamine (813 g, 8.03 mol) was then added at a rate to maintain the reaction temperature at less than 10°C, and finally

trimethylsilylacetylene (202 g, 2.05 mol) was added. The mixture was heated to 60°C for 4.5 hours. The reaction was cooled to -5°C and combined with 2.0 L of hexanes and treated with 2 L of 7.4 M NH4OH. Some solids were formed and were removed as much as possible with the aqueous phase. The organic phase was again washed with 2.0 L of 7.4 M NH4OH, followed by 2 washes with 500 mL of water, neutralized with 1.7 L of 3 M hydrochloric acid, dried with sodium sulfate, and concentrate to a thick slurry. The slurry was combined with 1.0 L of hexanes to give a precipitate. The precipitate was removed by filtration and the filtrate was concentrated to 209 g of dark oil. The product was purified by distillation (0.2 torr, 68°C) to give 172 g (96%) of Compound (VI) as colorless oil. Analytical data: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMDO-de) δ 8.57 (2 H), 7.40 (2 H), 0.23 (9 H).

EXAMPLE 2 – Preparation of Compound (Ilia)

Example 2 provides a morpholine amide route for the synthesis of Compound (Ilia). In this approach, morpholine amide (Compound VII) was prepared from 2-chlorobenzoyl chloride (Preparation 2A). Metallation of 2-bromopyridine with LDA (1.09 equiv.) in THF at -70°C followed by addition of (Compound VII) afforded Compound (Ilia) in 37% yield after crystallization from IP A/heptane (Preparation 2B). This sequence provides a direct route to Compound (Ilia), and a means to isolate Compound (Ilia) without the use of

chromatography. Compound (Ilia) may then be used to form Compound (I) as shown in Example 1A above (Preparation 2C).

Preparation 2A: Preparation of Compound (VII)

Toluene (1.5 L) was added to Compound (IX) (150 g, 0.86 mol) and cooled to 10°C. Morpholine (82 mL, 0.94 mol) was added to the clear solution over 10 minutes. The resulting white slurry was stirred for 20 minutes then pyridine (92 mL, 1.2 mol) was added dropwise over 20 minutes. The cloudy white mixture was stirred in a cold bath for 1 hour. Water (600 mL) was added in a single portion and the cold bath removed. The mixture was stirred for 20 minutes and the layers are separated. The organic layer was washed with a mixture of 1 N HC1 and water (2: 1, 500 mL:250 mL). The pH of the aqueous layer was ~ 2. The organic layer was washed with a mixture of saturated NaHCCb and water (1 : 1, 100 mL: 100 mL). The pH of the aqueous layer was ~ 9. The layers were separated. The organic layer was concentrated in vacuo to an oil. The oil was dissolved in IPA (70 mL) and heated at 60°C for 30 min. The clear solution was allowed to cool to 30°C, then heptane (700 mL, 4.7 v) was added dropwise. The resulting slurry was stirred at RT for 2 hours then cooled to 0°C for 1 hour. The slurry was filtered at RT, washed with heptane then dried under vacuum at 30°C overnight. Compound (VII) (156.2 g, 81%) was obtained as a white solid. Analytical data: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, CDCh) δ 7.42-7.40 (m, 1 H), 7.35-7.29 (m, 3 H), 3.91-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.80-3.76 (m, 3 H), 3.71 (ddd, J= 11.5, 6.8, 3.3 Hz, 1 H), 3.60 (ddd, J = 11.2, 6.4, 3.4 Hz, 1 H), 3.28 (ddd, J= 13.4, 6.3, 3.2 Hz, 1 H), 3.22 (ddd, J= 13.7, 6.8, 3.3 Hz, 1 H); LRMS (ES+) calcd for CnHi3F6ClN02 (M+H)+ 226.1, found 225.9 m/z.

Preparation 2B: Preparation of Compound (Ilia)

THF (75 mL) was added to diisopropyl amine (4.9 mL, 34.8 mmol) and cooled to a

temperature of -70°C under N2 atmosphere. 2.5 M w-BuLi in hexanes (13.9 mL, 34.8 mmol) was added in a single portion (a 30-40°C exotherm) to the clear solution and cooled back to -70°C. Compound (VIII) (5.0 g, 31.6 mmol) was added neat to the LDA solution (a 2 to 5°C exotherm) followed by a THF (10 mL) rinse, keeping T< -65°C. This clear yellow solution was stirred at -70°C for 15 min. Compound (VII) (7.1 g, 31.6 mmol) in THF (30 mL) was added keeping T< -65°C. The resulting clear orange solution was stirred at -70°C for 3 hours. MeOH (3 mL) was added to quench reaction mixture and the cold bath was removed. 5 N HC1 (25 mL) was added to the reaction solution. MTBE (25 mL) was added, and the layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with water (25 mL X 2). The organic layer was dried over MgS04 and filtered. The organic layer was concentrated in vacuo to an orange oil. The oil was dissolved in IPA (15 mL, 3 vol) at ambient temperature. Heptane (25 mL) was added dropwise and the resulting slurry was stirred at RT for 1 hour. The slurry was cooled to 0°C for 1 hour and filtered. The filter cake was rinsed with chilled heptane (20 mL) and dried under vacuum at 30°C overnight. Compound (Ilia) (4.25 g, 45%) was obtained as a yellow solid.

Several reactions were run at different temperatures and with different addition rates of Compound (VII). If the reaction temperature was maintained below -65°C and Compound (VII) was added in <5 min, it was found that the reaction worked well. If the temperature was increased and/or the addition time of Compound (VII) was increased, then yields suffered, and the work-up was complicated by emulsions.

Preparation 2C: Preparation of Compound (I)

Compound (Ilia) may then reacted with Compound (Ila) to produce Compound (I) as shown in Preparation 1A.

EXAMPLE 3

Example 3 describes a new route for the synthesis of an intermediate free base, which may be used to form Compound (I) as described further below.

Example 3A: Preparation of starting material (Compound X) from 2-Chloronicotinonitrile

A mixture of NaH (40.0 g, 1 mol, 60% dispersion in mineral oil) and 2-chloronicotinonitrile (69.3 g, 500 mmol) in THF (1 L) was heated to reflux. A solution of 4-acetylpyridine (60.6 g, 500 mmol) in THF (400 mL) was added over a period of 40 min. The resulting dark brown mixture was stirred at reflux for ~ 2 h. The heating mantle was then removed, and AcOH (58 mL, 1 mol) was added. EtOAc (1 L) and H2O (1 L) were then added, and the layers were separated. The organic layer was concentrated to afford an oily solid. CH3CN (500 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred for 30 min. H2O (1 L) was then added. The mixture was stirred for 1 h then filtered. The solid was rinsed with 2: 1

CH3CN-H2O (900 mL) and hexanes (400 mL) then dried under vacuum at 45°C overnight to afford 61.4 g (55% yield) of Compound (X) as yellow solid. Compound (X) exists as an approximate 95:5 enol-ketone mixture in CDCI3. Analytical data for enol: IR (CHCI3): 3024, 2973, 2229, 1631, 1597, 1579, 1550, 1497; ¾ NMR (500 MHz, CDCI3) δ 8.69 (dd, J= 4.4,

1.7 Hz, 2H), 8.55 (dd, J = 5.2, 1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.97 (dd, J= 7.9, 1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.70 (dd, J= 4.6, 1.5 Hz, 2H, 7.17 (dd, J = 7.8, 5.0 Hz, 1H), 6.59 (s, 1H); LRMS (ES+) calcd for C13H10N3O (M+H)+ 224.1, found 224.0 m/z.

Preparation 3B: Preparation of Compound (XI)

Preparation 3B(1):

(X) (XI)

Compound (XI) may be prepared using Compound (X).

Preparation 3B(2):

Alternatively, the following procedure for the conversion of nitrile into an acid which may also yield compound (XI). A mixture of Compound (X) (1 eq) and NaOH (1.5 eq) in 1 : 1 fhO-EtOH (3.5 mL/g of Compound (X)) was heated at 65°C overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to RT then added to CH2C12 (12.5 mL/g of Compound (X)) and H20 (12.5 mL/g of Compound (X)). Cone. HC1 (2.5 mL/g of Compound (X)) was then added, and the layers were separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with CH2CI2 (10 mL/g of Compound (X)). The combined organic extracts were washed with H2O (12.5 ml/g of Compound (X)), dried (MgS04), filtered and concentrated to afford Compound (XI).

Preparation 3C

Compound Compound (XI) may then be converted into a Stage C intermediate free base, with observed 87% conversion in Grignard reaction as shown above. A complete synthesis route for Com ound (I) starting from compound Compound (XI) is depicted below.

Detailed experimental procedures for the synthesis of benzoate salt and final step are given in

International Patent Application Publication WO 2008/079600 Al .

References

  1.  “Company Overview of Eli Lilly & Co., Worldwide License to Develop and Commercialize VLY-686”. Bloomberg Business. Retrieved 16 November 2015.
  2.  [1]
  3.  “Vanda Pharmaceuticals Announces Tradipitant Phase II Proof of Concept Study Results for Chronic Pruritus in Atopic Dermatitis”. PR Newswire. Retrieved 16 November 2015.
  4.  Schmidt, B (2006). “Proof of principle studies”. Epilepsy Res. 68 (1): 48–52. doi:10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2005.09.019. PMID 16377153.
  5.  George, DT; Gilman, J; Hersh, J; et al. (2008). “Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism as a possible therapy for alcoholism.”. Science. 6: 1536–1539. doi:10.2147/SAR.S70350. PMC 4567173Freely accessible. PMID 26379454.
  6.  Tauscher, J; Kielbasa, W; Iyengar, S; et al. (2010). “Development of the 2nd generation neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist LY686017 for social anxiety disorder”. European Neuropsychopharmacology. 20 (2): 80–87. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2009.10.005. PMID 20018493.

George, D.T.; Gilman, J.; Hersh, J.; Thorsell, A.; Herion, D.; Geyer, C.; Peng, X.; Kielbasa, W.; Rawlings, R.; Brandt, J.E.; Gehlert, D.R.; Tauscher, J.T.; Hunt, S.P.; Hommer, D.; Heilig, M. Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism as a possible therapy for alcoholism, Science 2008, 319(5869): 1536

Gackenheimer, S.L.; Gehlert, D.R.In vitro and in vivo autoradiography of the NK-1 antagonist (3H)-LY686017 in guinea pig brain39th Annu Meet Soc Neurosci (October 17-21, Chicago) 2009, Abst 418.16

Tonnoscj, K.; Zopey, R.; Labus, J.S.; Naliboff, B.D.; Mayer, E.A.
The effect of chronic neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism on sympathetic nervous system activity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Dig Dis Week (DDW) (May 30-June 4, Chicago) 2009, Abst T1261

Kopach, M.E.; Kobierski, M.E.; Coffey, D.S.; et al.  
Process development and pilot-plant synthesis of (2-chlorophenyl)[2-(phenylsulfonyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone
Org Process Res Dev 2010, 14(5): 1229

1 to 7 of 7
Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2016060250 NOVEL INTERMEDIATE AND PROCESS USEFUL IN THE PREPARATION OF -(2-CHLOROPHENYL)-METHANONE 2015-11-10 2016-03-03
US2015320866 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITION COMPRISING ANTIEMETIC COMPOUNDS AND POLYORTHOESTER 2013-12-13 2015-11-12
US2014206877 NOVEL INTERMEDIATE AND PROCESS USEFUL IN THE PREPARATION OF -(2-CHLOROPHENYL)-METHANONE 2014-03-27 2014-07-24
US2012225904 New 7-Phenyl-[1, 2, 4]triazolo[4, 3-a]Pyridin-3(2H)-One Derivatives 2010-11-09 2012-09-06
US2010056795 NOVEL INTERMEDIATE AND PROCESS USEFUL IN THE PREPARATION OF -(2-CHLOROPHENYL)-METHANONE 2010-03-04
US7381826 Crystalline forms of {2-[1-(3, 5-bis-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-1H-[1, 2, 3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone 2007-04-05 2008-06-03
US7320994 Triazole derivatives as tachykinin receptor antagonists 2005-10-27 2008-01-22
Tradipitant
LY686017.svg
Legal status
Legal status
  • Investigational
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
Chemical and physical data
Formula C28H16ClF6N5O
Molar mass 587.90 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)

TRADIPITANT

Overview

Tradipitant

Tradipitant is being evaluated in a Phase II study in treatment resistant pruritus in atopic dermatitis.

Tradipitant is an NK-1 receptor antagonist licensed from Eli Lilly in 2012. Tradipitant has demonstrated proof-of-concept in alcohol dependence in a study published by the NIH1. In that study tradipitant was shown to reduce alcohol cravings and voluntary alcohol consumption among patients with alcohol dependence. NK-1R antagonists have been evaluated in a number of indications including chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), alcohol dependence, anxiety, depression, and pruritus.

The NK-1R is expressed throughout different tissues of the body, with major activity found in neuronal tissue. Substance P (SP) and NK-1R interactions in neuronal tissue regulate neurogenic inflammation locally and the pain perception pathway through the central nervous system. Other tissues, including endothelial cells and immune cells, have also exhibited SP and NK-1R activity2. The activation of NK-1R by the natural ligand SP is involved in numerous physiological processes, including the perception of pain, behavioral stressors, cravings, and the processes of nausea and vomiting1,2,3. An inappropriate over-expression of SP either in nervous tissue or peripherally could result in pathological conditions such as substance dependence, anxiety, nausea/vomiting, and pruritus1,2,3,4. An NK-1R antagonist may possess the ability to reduce this over-stimulation of the NK-1R, and as a result address the underlying pathophysiology of the symptoms in these conditions.

References

  1. George DT, Gilman J, Hersh J, Thorsell A, Herion D, Geyer C, Peng X, Keilbasa W, Rawlings R, Brandt JE, Gehlert DR, Tauscher JT, Hunt SP, Hommer D, Heilig M. Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism as a possible therapy for alcoholism. Science. 2008; 319(5869):1536-9
  2. Almeida TA, Rojo J, Nieto PM, Pinto FM, Hernandez M, et al. Tachykinins and tachykinin receptors: structure and activity relationships. Current Medicinal Chemistry. 2004;11:2045-2081.
  3. Hargreaves R, Ferreira JC, Hughes D, Brands J, Hale J, Mattson B, Mill S. Development of aprepitant, the first neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2011; 1222:40-48.
  4. Stander S, Weisshaar E, Luger A. Neurophysiological and neurochemical basis of modern pruritus treatment. Experimental Dermatology. 2007;17:161-69.

///////////////////tradipitant, PHASE 2, VLY-686,  LY686017, традипитант , تراديبيتانت , 曲地匹坦 , VANDA, ELI LILLY, Gastroparesis Pruritus

Zydus receives approval from USFDA to initiate Phase II clinical studies of Saroglitazar Magnesium in patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC)


Zydus receives approval from USFDA to initiate Phase II clinical studies of Saroglitazar Magnesium in patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC) Read more: https://goo.gl/eugRnZ #ZydusAnnouncement

Zydus receives approval from USFDA to initiate Phase II clinical studies of Saroglitazar Magnesium in patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC)

Ahmedabad, India, February 23, 2017

Image result for INDIAN FLAG ANIMATED

Zydus Cadila, a research-driven, global healthcare provider, today announced that the USFDA has approved the group’s plans to initiate a Phase 2 clinical trial of Saroglitazar Magnesium (Mg) in patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC) of the liver. This randomized, double-blind Phase 2 trial will evaluate Saroglitazar Magnesium 2mg and 4 mg Vs. Placebo.

Speaking on the development, Mr. Pankaj R. Patel, Chairman and Managing Director, Zydus Cadila said, “We are very thankful to the USFDA for their timely and useful feedback on the clinical trial designs of Saroglitazar Mg in patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC). This development underlines our commitment to bridging unmet healthcare needs with innovative therapies.”

Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC) is a liver disease, caused due to progressive destruction of the bile ducts in the liver which leads to reduction of bile flow – a condition referred to as cholestasis. PBC is often discovered incidentally due to abnormal results on routine liver blood tests. Progression of PBC leads to symptoms of cirrhosis like yellowing of the skin, swelling of legs and feet (edema), ascites, internal bleeding (varices) and thinning of the bones (osteoporosis). The buildup of toxic bile in the liver leads to liver inflammation and fibrosis which can progress to cirrhosis. People with cirrhosis are at increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma or liver cancer, which is a leading cause of liver transplants or death.

With an increasing number of people being affected by PBC which can lead to progressive cholestasis and even turn fatal, there is a pressing need to develop therapies which help to achieve an adequate reduction in alkaline phosphotase (ALP) or bilirubin and bring in better tolerance and efficacy.

About Lipaglyn™ Lipaglyn™ is a prescription drug authorized for sale in India only. Lipaglyn™ was launched in India during Sept 2013 for the treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia and Diabetic Dyslipidemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes not controlled by statins. Saroglitazar Mg is an investigational new drug with the USFDA, and is currently under clinical investigation for three significant unmet medical needs in the United States – Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC), Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) and Severe Hypertriglyceridemia (TG>500).

About Zydus Zydus Cadila is an innovative, global healthcare provider that discovers, develops, manufactures and markets a broad range of healthcare therapies, including small molecule drugs, biologic therapeutics and vaccines. The group employs over 19,500 people worldwide, including 1200 scientists engaged in R & D, and is dedicated to creating healthier communities globally. For more information, please visit http://www.zyduscadila.com

http://zyduscadila.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/USFDA-approval-for-clinical-trial-of-Saro-Mg.pdf

Image result for Saroglitazar Magnesium

Image result for Saroglitazar Magnesium

Saroglitazar magnesium
CAS: 1639792-20-3

Molecular Formula, 2C25-H28-N-O4-S.Mg,

Molecular Weight, 901.4354

Magnesium, bis((alphaS)-alpha-(ethoxy-kappaO)-4-(2-(2-methyl-5-(4-(methylthio)phenyl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)ethoxy)benzenepropanoato-kappaO)-, (T-4)-

(2S)-2-Ethoxy-3-(4-(2-(2-methyl-5-(4-(methylsulfanyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl(ethoxy)phenyl)propanoic acid, magnesium salt (2:1)

Image result for RANJIT DESAI ZYDUS

DR RANJIT DESAI

ZYDUS

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//////////Zydus,  USFDA, Phase II,  clinical studies, Saroglitazar Magnesium,  Primary Biliary Cholangitis,  (PBC)

[Mg+2].CCO[C@@H](Cc1ccc(OCCn2c(C)ccc2c3ccc(SC)cc3)cc1)C(=O)[O-].CCO[C@@H](Cc4ccc(OCCn5c(C)ccc5c6ccc(SC)cc6)cc4)C(=O)[O-]

AZD 8931, Sapitinib,


AZD8931 (Sapitinib)Figure imgf000027_0003

AZD 8931, Sapitinib, SAPATINIB

PHASE 2, at AstraZeneca for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

CAS 848942-61-0,

MF C23H25ClFN5O3, MW 473.9,

pan-EGFR/pan-erbB inhibitor

4-[[4-[(3-Chloro-2-fluorophenyl)amino]-7-methoxy-6-quinazolinyl]oxy]-N-methyl-1-piperidineacetamide

4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-[[1-(N-methylcarbamoylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl] oxy]quinazoline

4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-[[1-(N-methylcarbamoylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl]oxy]quinazoline

2-[4-[4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoro-anilino)-7-methoxy-quinazolin-6-yl]oxy-1-piperidyl]-N-methyl-acetamide

AZD8931 is an oral, equipotent inhibitor of ErbB1, ErbB2 and ErbB3 receptor signaling.

WO 2005028469

Inventors Robert Hugh Bradbury, Laurent Francois Andre Hennequin, Bernard Christophe Barlaam
Applicant Astrazeneca Ab, Astrazeneca Uk Limited

Image resultDeregulation of the HER receptor family, comprising four related receptor tyrosine kinases (EGFR, HER2, HER3, and HER4), promotes proliferation, invasion, and tumor cell survival.Such deregulation has been observed in many human cancers, including lung, head and neck, and breast. Numerous small molecules have been investigated for inhibition of tyrosine kinases with the aminoquinazoline motif coming to the forefront as a privileged scaffold. Three of the clinically available treatments, gefitinib (1),lapatinib (2), and erlotinib (3),as well as the candidate drug dacomitinib (4), contain this arrangement

Figure

Figure 1. Structure of gefitinib (1), lapatinib (2), erlotinib (3), dacomitinib (4), and AZD8931 (5).

SYNTHESIS

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2005028469A1?cl=en

PAPER

The first radiosynthesis of [11C]AZD8931 as a new potential PET agent for imaging of EGFR, HER2 and HER3 signaling
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2014), 24, (18), 4455-4459.

Image for unlabelled figure

Synthesis of the reference standard AZD8931 (11a) and its precursor ...

Synthesis of the reference standard AZD8931 (11a)

Reagents and conditions: (a) SnCl2·H2O, concd HCl; (b) formamide, 168–170 °C; (c) l-methionine, methanesulfonic acid, 120 °C; (d) Ac2O, pyridine, DMAP, 100 °C; (e) POCl3, DEA, 100 °C; (f) 3-chloro-2-fluoroaniline, i-PrOH, refluxing; (g) conc. NH3, MeOH; (h) (1) Boc2O, CH2Cl2, dioxane; (2) methanesulfonyl chloride, Et3N, CH2Cl2; (i) Compound 8, CsF, DMA, 85 °C; (j) TFA; (k) Compound 11a: 2-chloro-N-methylacetamide, KI, K2CO3, CH3CN, refluxing; compound

PAPER

Discovery of AZD8931, an Equipotent, Reversible Inhibitor of Signaling by EGFR, HER2, and HER3 Receptors
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2013), 4, (8), 742-746.

Discovery of AZD8931, an Equipotent, Reversible Inhibitor of Signaling by EGFR, HER2, and HER3 Receptors

Centre de Recherches, AstraZeneca, Z.I. La Pompelle, B.P. 1050, Chemin de Vrilly, 51689 Reims, Cedex 2, France
Oncology iMed, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 4TG, United Kingdom
Abstract Image

Deregulation of HER family signaling promotes proliferation and tumor cell survival and has been described in many human cancers. Simultaneous, equipotent inhibition of EGFR-, HER2-, and HER3-mediated signaling may be of clinical utility in cancer settings where the selective EGFR or HER2 therapeutic agents are ineffective or only modestly active. We describe the discovery of AZD8931 (2), an equipotent, reversible inhibitor of EGFR-, HER2-, and HER3-mediated signaling and the structure–activity relationships within this series. Docking studies based on a model of the HER2 kinase domain helped rationalize the increased HER2 activity seen with the methyl acetamide side chain present in AZD8931. AZD8931 exhibited good pharmacokinetics in preclinical species and showed superior activity in the LoVo tumor growth efficacy model compared to close analogues. AZD8931 is currently being evaluated in human clinical trials for the treatment of cancer.

4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-{[1-(N-methylcarbamoylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl]oxy}quinazoline
(2). 2 as a white solid (60%).1H NMR (CDCl3):
δ 1.98 (m, 2H), 2.08 (m, 2H), 2.46 (m, 2H), 2.85 (m, 2H), 2.87 (d, 3H), 3.07 (s, 2H), 4.02 (s, 3H), 4.49 (m, 1H),
7.16 (m, 4H), 7.31 (m, 2H), 8.49 (m, 1H), 8.71 (s, 1H). MS-ESI m/z MH+ 474 [MH]+. Anal.
(C23H25ClFN5O3
.0.21 H2O) C, H, N. Found C, 57.88; H, 5.45; N, 14.67; Requires C, 57.83; H, 5.36; N, 14.66%.

PATENT

WO 2010122340

Compound (I) is disclosed in International Patent Application Publication number WO2005/028469 as Example 1 therein and is of the structure:

Figure imgf000002_0001

Compound (I)

Compound (I) is an erbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in particular compound (I) is a potent inhibitor of EGFR and erbB2 receptor tyrosine kinases. Compound (I) also inhibits erbB3 mediated signalling through the inhibition of phosphorylation of erbB3 following ligand stimulated EGFR/erbB3 and/or erbB2/erbB3 heterodimerisation. Compound (I) is expected to be useful in the treatment of hyperproliferative disorders such as cancer.

WO 03/082831 discloses the preparation of various 4-(3-chloro-2- fluoroanilino)quinazo lines. However, compound (I) is not disclosed therein.

WO2005/028469 discloses as Example 1 therein the preparation of compound (I) as follows: 2-Chloro-N-methylacetamide (32 mg, 0.3 mmol) was added to a mixture of

4-(3-chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-[(piperidin-4-yl)oxy]quinazoline (120 mg, 0.3 mmol), potassium iodide (16 mg, 0.1 mmol), and potassium carbonate (50 mg, 0.36 mmol) in acetonitrile (5 ml). The mixture was heated at reflux for one hour. After evaporation of the solvents under vacuum, the residue was taken up in dichloromethane. The organic solution was washed with water and brine, dried over magnesium sulfate. After evaporation of the solvents under vacuum, the residue was purified by chromatography on silica gel (eluant: 1% to 2% 7 N methanolic ammonia in dichloromethane) to give compound (I).

Scheme 1 :

Figure imgf000008_0001

Example 1 : Preparation of 4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-{[l-(N- methylcarbamoylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl]oxy } quinazoline (Compound (I)).

Compound (I) was prepared according to the scheme shown below:

Figure imgf000019_0001

Compound (III) Compound (IV)

Compound (V)

Figure imgf000019_0002

Compound (I)Compound (II)

Step 1. Preparation of tert-butyl 4-(5-cyano-2-methoxyphenoxy)piperidine-l- carboxylate (Intermediate 2). 3-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzonitrile (Compound (X), 6.00 g, 39.62 mmole), tert-butyl (4-methanesulfonyloxy)piperidine-l-carboxylate (16.6 g, 59.44 mmoles) (Chemical & Pharmaceutical Bulletin 2001, 49(7), 822-829); and potassium carbonate (6.71 g, 47.55 mmoles) were suspended in isopropanol (78.98 g) and the mixture was heated at reflux with stirring. Additional tert-butyl (4-methanesulfonyloxy)piperidine-l- carboxylate (2.08 g, 7.43 mmoles) was added to push the reaction to completion. The mixture was then cooled and quenched by the addition of water (100.47 g). Seeding with intermediate 2 followed by cooling to 00C resulted in a crystalline product, which was isolated by filtration. The filter cake was washed with a mixture of water (8.86 g) and isopropanol (6.97 g), followed by water (23.64 g) and then dried to give Intermediate 2 (10.75 g, 80% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 1.39 (s, 9 H) 1.48 (m, 2 H) 1.88 (m, 2 H) 3.13 (m, 2 H) 3.67 (m, 2 H) 3.83 (s, 3 H) 4.56 (tt, J=8.1, 3.8 Hz, 1 H) 7.13 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 1 H) 7.42 (dd, J=8.4, 1.9 Hz, 1 H) 7.51 (d, J=1.9 Hz, 1 H); Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 333.1. Step 2. Preparation of 4-methoxy-3-(piperidin-4-yloxy)benzonitrile (Compound

(VI)). Intermediate 2 (39.31 g, 118.26 mmoles) was suspended in ethanol (155.53 g) and heated to 40 0C. To this slurry was slowly added HCl (46.61 g, 573.04 mmoles). The mixture was heated to 60 0C and held for 3 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to 200C and seed was charged initiating crystallisation. The resulting solid was isolated by filtration at 00C, washed twice with ethanol (62.21 g) and then dried to give compound (VI) as the hydrochloride salt (29.84 g, 77% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 1.84 (m, 2 H) 2.09 (m, 2 H) 3.02 (ddd, J=12.7, 8.9, 3.4 Hz, 2 H) 3.20 (m, 2 H) 3.84 (s, 3 H) 4.63 (tt, J=7.7, 3.6 Hz, 1 H) 7.15 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1 H) 7.45 (dd, J=8.5, 1.9 Hz, 1 H) 7.56 (d, J=1.9 Hz, 1 H) 9.16 (br. s, 2 H); Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 233.2. Step 3. Preparation of 2-[4-(5-cyano-2-methoxyphenoxy)piperidin-l-yl]-JV- methylacetamide (Compound (V)). Compound (VI) (28.36 g, 95.82 mmoles), 2-chloro-N- methylacetamide (12.37 g, 114.98 mmoles) and potassium carbonate (33.11 g, 239.55 mmoles) were suspended in acetonitrile (161.36 g). The reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 3 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to 200C and water (386.26 g) was charged. The reaction was heated to 75°C and the volume reduced by distillation. Upon cooling crystallisation occurred. The resulting solid was isolated by filtration, washed twice with water (77.25 g and 128.75 g) and then dried to give compound (V) (27.95 g, 94% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-J6) δ ppm 1.68 (m, 2 H) 1.91 (m, 2 H) 2.29 (m, 2 H) 2.61 (d, J=4.7 Hz, 3 H) 2.67 (m, 2 H) 2.88 (s, 2 H) 3.83 (s, 3 H) 4.41 (tt, J=8.3, 4.0 Hz, 1 H) 7.11 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 1 H) 7.40 (dd, J=8.4, 1.9 Hz, 1 H) 7.47 (d, J=I.9 Hz, 1 H) 7.68 (q, J=4.7 Hz, 1 H); Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 304.2.

Step 4. Preparation of 2-[4-(5-cyano-2-methoxy-4-nitrophenoxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N- methylacetamide (Compound (IV)). Compound (V) (8.78 g, 26.11 mmoles) was suspended in acetic acid (22.82 g, 364.87 mmoles) and the resulting reaction mixture cooled to 5°C. To this was added sulfuric acid (23.64 g, 234.95 mmoles) maintaining the reaction temperature below 300C. To the resulting solution was added nitric acid (2.40 g, 26.63 mmoles). The reaction mixture was then heated to 35°C and held for 3 hours. Additional nitric acid (117 mg, 1.31 mmoles) and sulphuric acid (1.31 g 13.1 mmoles) were charged and the reaction mixture was heated at 35°C for 30 minutes. The solution was cooled to 200C and quenched with aqueous ammonia (92.45 g 1.36 moles), resulting in an increase in temperature to 500C. To the resulting slurry was added, propionitrile (61.58 g 1.12 moles) and water (19 g). The reaction mixture was heated to 80 0C resulting in a clear solution, which upon settling gave two layers. The bottom layer was removed. The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 0C resulting in a thick slurry. The solid was isolated by filtration, washed with propionitrile (6.16 g 112.0 mmoles) and dried to afford compound (IV) (7.44 g, 82% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ ppm 1.72 (m, 2 H) 1.97 (m, 2 H) 2.35 (m, 2 H) 2.61 (d, J=4.7 Hz, 3 H) 2.66 (m, 2 H) 2.90 (s, 2 H) 3.96 (s, 3 H) 4.73 (tt, J=8.4, 4.0 Hz, 1 H) 7.71 (q, J=4.7 Hz, 1 H) 7.82 (s, 1 H) 7.86 (s, 1 H). Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 349.2

Step 5. Preparation of 2-[4-(4-amino-5-cyano-2-methoxyphenoxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N- methylacetamide (Compound (III)). Compound (IV) (7.42 g, 19.38 mmoles) was suspended in water (44.52 g) and methanol (5.35 g). To this was added sodium dithionite (11.91 g, 58.15 mmoles) and the resulting reaction mixture was heated to 600C. To the reaction mixture was added hydrochloric acid (46.98 g, 463.89 mmoles)), resulting in a solution, which was held at 60 0C for 3 hours. The reaction mixture was then allowed to cool to 20 0C. Aqueous sodium hydroxide (15.51 g 182.2 mmoles) was charged followed by 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (58.0 g). The reaction mixture was heated to 60 0C, which upon settling gave two layers and the lower aqueous layer was discarded. The volume of the reaction mixture was reduced by vacuum distillation and methyl tert-butyl ether (18.54 g) was added to give a slurry which was cooled to 10 0C. and then the solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (5.8 g) and dried to give compound (III) (5.4 g, 78% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ ppm 1.62 (m, 2 H) 1.82 (m, 2 H) 2.20 (m, 2 H) 2.60 (d, J=4.7 Hz, 3 H) 2.65 (m, 2 H) 2.86 (s, 2 H) 3.72 (s, 3 H) 4.00 (tt, J=8.3, 4.0 Hz, 1 H) 5.66 (br. s, 2 H) 6.39 (s, 1 H) 6.94 (s, 1 H) 7.65 (q, J=4.7 Hz, 1 H). Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 319.2.

Step 6. Preparation of 2-[4-(5-cyano-4-{[(dimethylamino)methylene]amino}-2- methoxyphenoxy)piperidin-l-yl]-Λ/-methylacetamide (Compound (H)). Compound (III) (18.21 g, 52.05 mmoles) was suspended in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (99.62 g). To this was added acetic acid (162.79 mg), and N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal (DMA) (8.63 g, 70.27 mmoles) and the resulting reaction mixture was heated at 76 0C for 16 hrs. Additional N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal (639.41 mg, 5.20 mmoles) was added to the reaction mixture to ensure the reaction completed. The reaction mixture was cooled to 300C during which time crystallisation occurred. The resulting solid was isolated by filtration, washed with 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (14.23 g) and dried to afford compound (II) (19.53 g, 97% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-J6) δ ppm 1.65 (m, 2 H) 1.86 (m, 2 H) 2.24 (m, 2 H) 2.60 (d, J=4.7 Hz, 3 H) 2.66 (m, 2 H) 2.87 (s, 2 H) 2.95 (s, 3 H) 3.04 (s, 3 H) 3.81 (s, 3 H) 4.19 (tt, J=8.2, 3.8 Hz, 1 H) 6.72 (s, 1 H) 7.15 (s, 1 H) 7.67 (q, J=4.7 Hz, 1 H) 7.90 (s, 1 H); Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 374.2.

Step 7. Preparation of compound (I). 2-[4-(5-cyano-4-

{ [(dimethylamino)methylene] amino } -2-methoxyphenoxy)piperidin- 1 -yl] -JV-methylacetamide (compound (II), 7.00 g, 17.71 mmoles), was suspended in methoxybenzene (35.8 g). Acetic acid (16.6 g) was charged and to the resulting solution was added 3-chloro-2-fluoroaniline (2.71 g, 18.07 mmoles). The reaction mixture was heated at 90 0C for 20 hours then cooled to 200C. Water (37.04 g) was charged to the reaction mixture, and the organic layer discarded. To the resulting aqueous mixture was charged isopropanol (39.00 g), followed by aqueous ammonia (20.79 g, 25%). The reaction mixture was heated to 30 0C and seeded with compound (I), which induced crystallisation. The reaction was then cooled to 00C and the product isolated by filtration. The filter cake was washed twice with a mixture of water (7.28 g) and isopropanol (4.68 g), then dried to afford the compound (I) (5.65 g, 55% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-J6) δ ppm 1.79 (m, 2 H) 2.04 (m, 2 H) 2.38 (m, 2 H) 2.62 (d, J=4.5 Hz, 3 H) 2.74 (m, 2 H) 2.94 (s, 2 H) 3.93 (s, 3 H) 4.56 (tt, J=8.1, 3.8 Hz, 1 H) 7.21 (s, 1 H) 7.28 (m, 1 H) 7.50 (m, 2 H) 7.73 (q, J=4.5 Hz, 1 H) 7.81 (s, 1 H) 8.36 (s, 1 H) 9.56 (br.s, 1 H); Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 474.2, 476.2.

Example 2: Preparation of 4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-{[l-(N- methylcarbamoylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl]oxy } quinazoline (Compound (I)). Compound (I) was prepared according to the scheme shown below:

Figure imgf000023_0001

Compound (III) Compound (IV)

Compound (V)

Figure imgf000023_0002

Compound (Xl)

Figure imgf000023_0003

Compound (I)

Steps 1, 2, 3 and 4 as set forth in Example 1.

Step 5, alternate 1. Preparation of compound (III). 2-[4-(5-Cyano-2-methoxy-4- nitrophenoxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (compound (IV), 15.00 g, 42.50 mmoles) was suspended in water (90.00 g) and methanol (59.38 g). To this was added sodium dithionite (30.47 g, 148.75 mmoles) and water (90.00 g), the resulting reaction mixture was heated to 30 0C and held for 2 hrs. To the reaction mixture was added hydrochloric acid (27.98 g, 276.25 mmoles)), resulting in a solution, which was held at 600C for 2 hours. Aqueous sodium hydroxide (30.60 g 382.49 mmoles) was added followed by a line wash of water (30.00 g). The reaction mixture was cooled to 25°C to give a slurry which was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with water (30.00 g) and dried to give compound (III) (13.50 g, 82% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 1.62 (m, 2 H) 1.82 (m, 2 H) 2.20 (m, 2 H) 2.60 (d, J=4.7 Hz, 3 H) 2.65 (m, 2 H) 2.86 (s, 2 H) 3.72 (s, 3 H) 4.00 (tt, J=8.3, 4.0 Hz, 1 H) 5.66 (br. s, 2 H) 6.39 (s, 1 H) 6.94 (s, 1 H) 7.65 (q, J=4.7 Hz, 1 H). Mass Spectrum: m/z (M+H)+ 319.2.

Step 5, alternate 2. Preparation of compound (III). Compound (IV) (8.00 g, 22.67 mmoles) and 1% platinum + 2 % vanadium catalyst on carbon (1.23 g, 0.023 mmoles) were suspended in Acetonitrile (94.00 g). The reaction mixture was hydrogenated at a pressure of 3 Bar G and at a temperature of 35°C for 3 hrs. Once complete, the reaction mixture was filtered to remove the catalyst which is washed with acetonitrile (31.33 g). The volume of the reaction mixture was reduced by vacuum distillation to give a slurry which was cooled to 00C and then the solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with acetonitrile (12.53 g) and dried to give compound (III) (5.88 g, 78% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 1.62 (m, 2 H) 1.82 (m, 2 H) 2.20 (m, 2 H) 2.60 (d, J=4.7 Hz, 3 H) 2.65 (m, 2 H) 2.86 (s, 2 H) 3.72 (s, 3 H) 4.00 (tt, J=8.3, 4.0 Hz, 1 H) 5.66 (br. s, 2 H) 6.39 (s, 1 H) 6.94 (s, 1 H) 7.65 (q, J=4.7 Hz, 1 H). Mass Spectrum: m/z (M+H)+ 319.2.

Step 6. Preparation of N, ΛT-bis(3-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)imidoformamide (compound (XI)). 3-chloro-2-fluroaniline (51.21 g, 341.22 mmoles) was suspended in cyclohexane (87.07 g). To this ethyl orthoformate (22.28 g, 150.32 mmoles) and acetic acid (0.94 g, 15.03 mmoles) were added. The resulting reaction mixture was heated, with stirring, to 48°C for 12 hours. Following this the reaction mixture was cooled to 200C over 12 hours and the solid product was isolated by filtration. The filter cake was washed with cylcohexane (26.12 g) and dried in vacuo at 40 0C to give compound (XI) as a white crystalline product (33.95 g, 93% yield); IH NMR Spectrum (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 7.14 (t, 2 H) 7.22 (m, 2 H) 8.14 (s, 1 H), 9,98 (s, 1 H); Mass Spectrum (by GC-MS EI): m/z (M+) 300.0.

Step 7, alternate 1 : Preparation of compound (I). 2-[4-(4-Amino-5-cyano-2- methoxyphenoxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (compound (III)) (10 g, 29.84 mmol) and TV, ΛT-bis(3-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)imidoformamide (compound (XI)) (11.46 g, 37.3 mmol) were suspended in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (30.4 ml) and heated to 800C. To this yellow suspension was added acetic acid (7.6 ml, 127.33 mmol) and the resulting solution was heated to 92°C for 6 hours. 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (66.5 ml) and water (28.5 ml) were added and mixture was cooled to 550C before adding 50%w/w sodium hydroxide (7 ml, 131.29 mmol) resulting in a temperature rise to 63°C. The temperature was raised further to 69°C and after settling the aqueous phase was discarded. The organic phase was washed with water (3 x 20 ml) and each aqueous phase was discarded after settling. 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (100 ml, 997 mmol) was added and the volume reduced by distillation. Seed was added to induce crystallisation and the resulting mixture was cooled to 15°C. The crystalline form was initially obtained following a spontaneous crystallisation from the experiment as described. The resulting solid was isolated by filtration, washed twice with 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (19 ml) and dried under vacuum at 400C to yield compound (I) as a white solid (12.14 g, 95%). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-J6) δ ppm 1.12 (d, J= 6Hz, 1.3H), 1.26 -1.36 (m, 0.4H), 1.75-1.97 (m, 3.3H), 2.02-2.15 (m, 2H), 2.35-2.44 (m, 2H), 2.64 (d, J= 4.7Hz, 3H), 2.72-2.80 (m, 2H), 2.95 (s, 2H), 3.52-3.59 (m, 0.4H), 3.72-3.87 (m, 0.86H), 3.95 (s, 3H), 4.53-4.63 (m, IH), 7.22 (s, IH), 7.29 (dt J= IHz J= 8Hz, IH), 7.51 (dt J= 7.4Hz, J= 18Hz, 2H), 7.71-7.77 (m, IH), 7.82 (s, IH), 8.37 (s, IH), 9.57 (s, IH). Mass Spectrum: m/z (M+H)+ 474.0. The NMR data above includes signals for the 2-methyltetrahydrofuran solvent which is present in a 0.43 molar equivalence. The signals pertaining to the solvent are at δ ppm shifts of 1.12, 1.26-1.36, 3.52-3.59 and 3.72-3.87. The cluster at 1.75-1.93 contains signals for the solvent and the parent compound. The XRPD for this compound is shown in Figure 2.

Step 7, alternate 2. Preparation of compound (I). Compound (III) (15 g, 44.76 mmol) and compound (XI) (17.19 g, 55.95 mmol) were suspended in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (45.6 ml) and heated to 83°C. To this yellow suspension was added acetic acid (11.4 ml, 190.99 mmol) and the resulting solution was heated to 92°C for 3 Vi hours. 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (105 ml) and water (50 ml) were added and mixture was cooled to 49°C before adding 50%w/w sodium hydroxide (10.74 ml, 201.4 mmol), resulting in a temperature rise to 62°C. The temperature was maintained at 62°C and after settling the aqueous phase was discarded. The organic phase was washed with water (3 x 30 ml) and each aqueous phase was discarded after settling. The mixture was cooled to 15°C and seed was added to induce crystallisation. The crystalline form was initially obtained following a spontaneous crystallisation from the experiment as described. The resulting solid was isolated by filtration, washed twice with 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (21 ml) and dried under vacuum at 400C to yield compound (I) as a white solid (20.12 g, 95%). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-J6) δ ppm 1.75-1.86 (m, 2H), 2.02- 2.15 (m, 2H), 2.35-2.44 (m, 2H), 2.64 (d, J= 4.7Hz, 3H), 2.72-2.80 (m, 2H), 2.95 (s, 2H), 3.95 (s, 3H), 4.53-4.63 (m, IH), 7.22 (s, IH), 7.29 (dt J= IHz J= 8Hz, IH), 7.51 (dt J= 7.4Hz, J= 18Hz, 2H), 7.71-7.77 (m, IH), 7.82 (s, IH), 8.37 (s, IH), 9.57 (s, IH). Mass Spectrum: m/z (M+H)+ 474.0. The XRPD for this compound is shown in Figure 3.

Step 7, alternate 3. Preparation of compound (I). Compound (III) (15.1 g, 45.06 mmol) and compound (XI) (17.31 g, 56.32 mmol) were suspended in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (46 ml) and heated to 800C. To this yellow suspension was added acetic acid (12 ml, 458 mmol) and the resulting solution was heated to 92° C for 7 hours. 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (100 ml) and water (43 ml) were added and mixture was cooled to 59°C before adding 50%w/w sodium hydroxide (11 ml, 207 mmol), resulting in a temperature rise to 71.5°C. The temperature was adjusted to 69°C and the aqueous phase was discarded after settling. The organic phase was washed with water (2 x 43 ml) and each aqueous phase was discarded after settling. 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (72 ml) was removed by distillation at atmospheric pressure and was replaced by addition of isopropyl alcohol (72 ml). A further 72 ml of solvent was removed by distillation at atmospheric pressure and replaced by isopropyl alcohol (72 ml). Seed was added to induce crystallisation and the resulting mixture was cooled to 15°C. The solid was isolated by filtration, washed twice with isopropylalcohol (32 ml) and dried under vacuum at 400C to yield compound (I) as a white solid (20.86 g, 87%). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-J6) δ ppm 1.04 (d, J= 6Hz, 6H),1.75-1.88 (m, 2H), 2.02-2.15 (m, 2H), 2.35-2.44 (m, 2H), 2.64 (d, J= 4.7Hz, 3H), 2.72-2.80 (m, 2H), 2.95 (s, 2H), 3.73-3.84 (m, IH), 3.95 (s, 3H), 4.34 (d, J = 4.2Hz, IH), 4.53-4.63 (m, IH), 7.22 (s, IH), 7.29 (dt J= IHz J= 8Hz, IH), 7.51 (dt J= 7Hz, J= 18Hz, 2H), 7.71-7.77 (m, IH), 7.82 (s, IH), 8.37 (s, IH), 9.57 (s, IH). Mass Spectrum: m/z (M+H)+ 474.0. The NMR data include signals for 1 mole equivalent isopropanol present. The XRPD for this compound is shown in Figure 4.

Example 3. Preparation of 4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-{[l-(N- methylcarbamoylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl]oxy } quinazoline di- [(2E)-but-2-enedioate] (compound (I) difumarate salt). Compound (I) difumarate salt was prepared according to the scheme shown below:

Figure imgf000027_0001

Compound (III) Compound (IV) Compound (V)

Figure imgf000027_0002

Compound (Xl)

Figure imgf000027_0003

Difumarate Compound (I)

Steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were performed as set forth in Example 2. Step 7. Preparation of compound (I) difumarate salt. Compound (III) (17.90 mmoles) and N, ΛT-bis(3-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)imidoformamide (compound (XI)) (7.04 g, 23.27 mmoles) were suspended in tert-butyl alcohol (88.95 g). To this suspension fumaric acid (10.39 g, 89.52 mmoles) was added and the mixture was heated to 800C, with stirring, for 2.5 hrs. Water (11.40 g, 632.80 mmoles) was charged and the reaction continued for a further 21.5 hrs. The reaction was cooled to 200C over 12 hours, during which time crystallisation occurred. The resulting solid was isolated by filtration and was washed with a mixture of water (1.00) and tert-butyl alcohol (7.80 g) followed by a wash with a mixture of water (0.50 g) and tert-butyl alcohol (7.30 g). The solid was dried in vacuo at 40 0C to give compound (I) difumarate salt (8.17 g, 61.40%) as a mustard yellow powder; 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO- dβ) δ ppm 1.83 (m, 2 H, broad) 2.07 (m, 2 H, broad) 2.64 (d, J=5.0 Hz, 3 H) 2.80 (m, 2 H, broad) 3.03 (s, 2 H) 3.94 (s, 3 H) 4.58 (m, 1 H) 6.63 (s, 4 H) 7.22 (s, 1 H) 7.29 (td, J=8.5, 1.0 Hz, 1 H) 7.51 (m, 2 H) 7.82 (m, 2 H) 8.37 (s, 1 H); Mass Spectrum: m/z (M+H)+ 474.0. Example 4. Preparation of 4-(3-Chloro-2-fluoroanilino)-7-methoxy-6-{[l-(N- methylcarbamoylmethyl)piperidin-4-yl]oxy}quinazoline (compound (I)).

Compound (I) was prepared according to the scheme shown below:

Figure imgf000029_0001

Compound (III) Compound (IV)

Compound (V)

Figure imgf000029_0002

Compound (XII)

Figure imgf000029_0003

Compound (I)

Steps 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were performed as set forth in Example 2.

Step 6. Preparation of N’-(3-chloro-2-fluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-formamidine (compound (XII)). 3-chloro-2-fluroaniline (5.30 g, 35.29 mmoles) was dissolved in 2- methyltetrahydrofuran (52.94 g). To this N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal (6.07 g, 49.41 mmoles) and acetic acid (0.11 g, 1.76 mmoles) were added. The resulting reaction mixture was heated, with stirring, to 76 0C for 3 hours. Following this the solvent was removed in vacuo at 400C to give compound (XII) as a yellow oil (6.60 g, 93% yield); IH NMR Spectrum (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 2.74 (s, 0.29H), 2.89 (s, 0.31H), 2.94 (s, 2.75H), 3.03 (s, 2.66H), 3.34 (br s, 0.70H), 5.48 (s, 0.06H) 6.91-7.10 (m, 3H), 7.79 (s, 1 H), 7.96 (s, 1 H). The NMR data above includes signals for N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal which is present in a 0.06 molar equivalence. The signals pertaining to N5N- dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal are at δ ppm shifts of 3.75, and 6.90-6.95. The signal at δ ppm 3.35 is due to residual water. Mass Spectrum (by LCMS EI): m/z (M+H)+ 201.2. Step 7: Preparation of compound (I). 2-[4-(4-Amino-5-cyano-2- methoxyphenoxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (compound (III)) (0.50 g, 1.45 mmol) and N’-(3-chloro-2-fluoro-phenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-formamidine (compound (XII)) (0.32 g, 1.52 mmol) were suspended in methoxybenzene (3.1 ml). To this yellow suspension was added acetic acid (1.52 ml, 25.51 mmol) and the resulting solution was heated to 90 0C for 14 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 0C and water (2.58 mL) was added. The organic layer was removed and the aqueous layer washed with methoxybenzene (1.4 mL). Ethanol (2.45 mL) and ammonia (1.94 ml, 25.55 mmoles) were added to the aqueous layer. The solution was heated to 900C resulting in the loss of some ethanol by evaporation. The solution was cooled to 40 0C. Seed was added to induce crystallisation and the resulting mixture was cooled to 20 0C. The solid was isolated by filtration to yield compound (I) as a white solid (0.61 g, 73% yield). IH NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 1.75-1.87 (m, 2H), 2.02-2.15 (m, 2H), 2.35-2.44 (m, 2H), 2.64 (d, J= 4.8Hz, 3H), 2.72-2.80 (m, 2H), 2.95 (s, 2H), 3.35 (s, 5.4H), 3.75 (s, 1.3H), 3.95 (s, 3H), 4.58 (hept., J=4.0Hz, IH), 6.90-6.95 (m, 1.3H), 7.23 (s, 1.8H), 7.26-7.34 (m, IH), 7.45-7.58 (m 2H), 7.72-7.78 (m, IH), 7.83 (s, IH), 8.38 (s, IH), 9.58 (s, IH). The NMR data above includes signals for the methoxybenzene solvent which is present in a 0.40 molar equivalence. The signals pertaining to the solvent are at δ ppm shifts of 3.75, and 6.90-6.95. The cluster at 7.26-7.34 contains signals for the solvent and the parent compound. The signal at δ ppm 3.35 is due to residual water. Mass Spectrum: m/z (M + H)+ 474.0, 476.0. Example 5. Preparation of compound (I) difumarate Form A – 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2- fluorophenyl)amino]-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide di- [(2E)-but-2-enedioate] Form A. A solution of fumaric acid (2.7 g, 23.22 mmol) in methanol (95 ml) was added to a mixture of 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2-fluorophenyl)amino]-7- methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (compound (I)) (5.62 g at 89% w/w, 10.55 mmol) in isopropanol (100 ml) maintaining the temperature >65°C. The mixture was heated at reflux for one hour before clarification. The reaction mixture was cooled to 300C over 90 minutes and held for 30 minutes to establish crystallisation. The reaction was cooled to 00C over 2 hours and held for 1 hour before isolation by filtration. The filter cake was washed twice with cold isopropanol (2 x 10 ml) and dried in vacuo at 500C to give the title compound as a white solid (5.84 g, 78%); 1H NMR Spectrum: (DMSO) 1.85 (m, IH), 2.08 (m, IH), 2.50 (m, IH), 2.66 (d, 3H), 2.83 (m, IH), 3.05 (s, 2H), 3.96 (s, 3H), 4.58 (m, IH), 6.64 (s, 4H), 7.23 (s, IH), 7.28 (m, IH), 7.46 (ddd, IH), 7.55 (m, IH), 7.70 (broad q, IH), 7.85 (s, IH), 8.38 (s, IH).

Example 6. Preparation of compound (I) difumarate Form A: 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2- fluorophenyl)amino]-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide di- [(2E)-but-2-enedioate] Form A. A solution of fumaric acid (1.4 kg, 12.1 mol) in methanol (26.6 kg) was added to a mixture of 2-[4-({4-[(3-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)amino]-7- methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (2.93 kg, 84.8% w/w, 5.24 mol) in isopropanol (39 kg) maintaining the temperature >65°C. A line wash of methanol (3.6 kg) was charged. The mixture was heated at reflux for one hour before clarification, followed by a line wash of methanol (7 kg). The reaction mixture was distilled at atmospheric pressure to remove 47 kg of distillates. Isopropanol (15.8 kg was added and the reaction mixture distilled to remove 15.6 kg of distillates. Crystallisation occurred during the distillation. Isopropanol (21 kg) was added and the reaction cooled to 00C over 8 hours and held for 1 hour before isolation by filtration. The filter cake was washed with cold 50:50 isopropanol:MeOH (4 kg) followed by cold isopropanol (4 kg) and dried in vacuo at 500C to give the title compound as a white solid (3.64 kg, 98%); 1H NMR Spectrum: (DMSO) 1.85 (m, IH), 2.08 (m, IH), 2.50 (m, IH), 2.66 (d, 3H), 2.83 (m, IH), 3.05 (s, 2H), 3.96 (s, 3H), 4.58 (m, IH), 6.64 (s, 4H), 7.23 (s, IH), 7.28 (m, IH), 7.46 (ddd, IH), 7.55 (m, IH), 7.70 (broad q, IH), 7.85 (s, IH), 8.38 (s, IH).

Example 7. Preparation of compound (I) difumarate Form A: 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2- fluorophenyl)amino]-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide di- [(2E)-but-2-enedioate] Form A. 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2-fluorophenyl)amino]-7- methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (compound (I)) (60.19 g at 88% w/w, 111.8 mmol) was dissolved in ethyl acetate (1550 ml). The solution was clarified by filtration and the filter washed with ethyl acetate (53 ml). The solution was cooled to 400C. A clarified solution of fumaric acid (26.60 g, 257.0 mmol) in isopropanol (408 ml) was then added over 1 hour. The filter used to clarify the fumaric acid solution was then washed with isopropanol (37 ml). After holding for 1 hour at 400C the reaction was cooled to 200C over 1 hour. The reaction mixture was held for 13.5 hours before isolating the product by filtration. The filter cake was washed twice with ethyl acetate (82 ml) : isopropanol (24 ml) and then dried in vacuo at 400C to give the title compound as a white solid (72.32 g, 90%); 1H NMR Spectrum: (DMSO) 1.85 (m, IH), 2.08 (m, IH), 2.50 (m, IH), 2.66 (d, 3H), 2.83 (m, IH), 3.05 (s, 2H), 3.96 (s, 3H), 4.58 (m, IH), 6.64 (s, 4H), 7.23 (s, IH), 7.28 (m, IH), 7.46 (ddd, IH), 7.55 (m, IH), 7.70 (broad q, IH), 7.85 (s, IH), 8.38 (s, IH). Example 8. Preparation of compound (I) difumarate Form A: 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2- fluorophenyl)amino]-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide di- [(2E)-but-2-enedioate] Form A. 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2-fluorophenyl)amino]-7- methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (compound (I)) (2.75 g at assumed 100% w/w, 5.80 mmol) was dissolved in ethyl acetate (94 ml) and isopropanol (14 ml). The solution was distilled such that 25.2 ml of distillates were collected. The solution was cooled to 400C. A clarified solution of fumaric acid (1.38 g, 11.90 mmol) in isopropanol (21 ml) was then added over 1 hour. Compound (I) difumarate Form A seed was added (3.7 mg, 5.3 μmol). The filter used to clarify the fumaric acid solution was then washed with isopropanol (2 ml). After holding for 1 hour at 400C the reaction was cooled to 200C over 2 hours. The reaction mixture was held for 15 hours before isolating the product by filtration. The filter cake was washed twice with ethyl acetate (4.3 ml): isopropanol (1.2 ml) and then dried in vacuo at 400C to give the title compound as a white solid (72.32 g, 90%); 1H NMR Spectrum: (DMSO) 1.85 (m, IH), 2.08 (m, IH), 2.50 (m, IH), 2.66 (d, 3H), 2.83 (m, IH), 3.05 (s, 2H), 3.96 (s, 3H), 4.58 (m, IH), 6.64 (s, 4H), 7.23 (s, IH), 7.28 (m, IH), 7.46 (ddd, IH), 7.55 (m, IH), 7.70 (broad q, IH), 7.85 (s, IH), 8.38 (s, IH).

Example 9. Preparation of compound (I) difumarate Form A: 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2- fluorophenyl)amino]-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide di- [(2E)-but-2-enedioate] Form A. 2-[4-({4-[(3-Chloro-2-fluorophenyl)amino]-7- methoxyquinazolin-6-yl}oxy)piperidin-l-yl]-N-methylacetamide (compound (I)) (1 g, 1.86 mmoles) and fumaric acid (0.44 g, 3.81 mmoles) were suspended in water (4.4 g) and heated to 85°C. The reaction mixture was cooled to 600C at l°C/minute and compound (I) Form A seed was added when the temperature was 77°C. The resulting solid was isolated by filtration, washed twice with acetone (0.7O g per wash) and dried in a vacuum oven at 400C to afford the title compound (0.89 g, 68% yield), IH NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) d ppm 1.84 (m, 2 H) 2.08 (m, 2 H) 2.55 (m, 2 H) 2.63 (d, J=4.7 Hz, 3 H) 2.86 (m, 2 H) 3.12 (s, 2 H) 3.93 (s, 3 H) 4.59 (tt, J=7.8, 3.7 Hz, 1 H) 6.62 (s, 4 H) 7.21 (s, 1 H) 7.27 (td, J=8.1, 1.3 Hz, 1 H) 7.49 (m, 2 H) 7.86 (m, 2 H) 8.36 (s, 1 H) 9.63 (br. s., 1 H). Compound (I) difumarate Form A is a free flowing powder.

PAPER

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.oprd.6b00412

The Development of a Dimroth Rearrangement Route to AZD8931

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, AstraZeneca, Silk Road Business Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 2NA, United Kingdom
The Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Development, AstraZeneca, Silk Road Business Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK10 2NA, United Kingdom
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.6b00412

Abstract Image

Recently, the aminoquinazoline motif has been highly prevalent in anticancer pharmaceutical compounds. Synthetic methods are required to make this structure on a multikilo scale and in high purity. The initial route to aminoquinazoline AZD8931 suffered from the formation of late-stage impurities. To avoid these impurities, a new high-yielding Dimroth rearrangement approach to the aminoquinazoline core of AZD8931 was developed. Assessment of route options on a gram scale demonstrated that the Dimroth rearrangement is a viable approach. The processes were then evolved for large-scale production with learning from a kilo campaign and two plant-scale manufactures. Identification of key process impurities offers an insight into the mechanisms of the Dimroth rearrangement as well as the hydrogenation of a key intermediate. The final processes were operated on a 30 kg scale delivering the target AZD8931 in 41% overall yield.

2-[4-[4-(3-chloro-2-fluoro-anilino)-7-methoxy-quinazolin-6-yl]oxy-1-piperidyl]-N-methyl-acetamide IPA solvate (5) as a white solid (38.1 kg, 84.2% yield); 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 1.81 (m, 2 H), 2.06 (m, 2 H), 2.39 (m, 2 H), 2.63 (d, J = 4.7 Hz, 3 H), 2.75 (m, 2 H), 2.95 (s, 2 H), 3.94 (s, 3 H), 4.57 (Dt, J = 8.1, 4.2 Hz, 1 H), 7.22 (s, 1 H), 7.29 (t, J = 8.0 Hz, 1 H), 7.51 (m, 2 H), 7.74 (br d, J = 4.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.83 (s, 1 H), 8.37 (s, 1 H), 9.58 (br.s, 1 H); m/Z ES+ 474.2 [MH]+; HRMS found [MH]+ = 474.1706, C23H25ClFN5O3 requires [MH]+ = 474.1630; Assay (QNMR) 97.5 wt %/wt.

1H NMR PREDICT

13C NMR PREDICT

CHEMICAL & PHARMACEUTICAL BULLETIN, vol. 49, no. 7, 2001, pages 822 – 829
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO2013051883A3 * Oct 5, 2012 Jun 6, 2013 Hanmi Science Co., Ltd. Method for preparing 1-(4-(4-(3,4-dichloro-2-fluorophenylamino)-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yloxy)piperidin-1-yl)-prop-2-en-1-one hydrochloride and intermediates used therein
US8859767 Oct 5, 2012 Oct 14, 2014 Hanmi Science Co., Ltd Method for preparing 1-(4-(4-(3,4-dichloro-2-fluorophenylamino)-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yloxy)piperidin-1-yl)-prop-2-en-1-one hydrochloride and intermediates used therein

////////////////AZD 8931, Sapitinib, pan-EGFR, pan-erbB inhibitor, SAPATINIB, PHASE 2, 848942-61-0

CNC(=O)CN1CCC(CC1)OC2=C(C=C3C(=C2)C(=NC=N3)NC4=C(C(=CC=C4)Cl)F)OC

“ALL FOR DRUGS” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This article is a compilation for educational purposes only.

P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

Lorlatinib, лорлатиниб , لورلاتينيب , 洛拉替尼 , PF-6463922


Lorlatinib.svgChemSpider 2D Image | lorlatinib | C21H19FN6O2

Lorlatinib, PF-6463922

For Cancer; Non-small-cell lung cancer

  • Molecular Formula C21H19FN6O2
  • Average mass 406.413 Da

Phase 2

WO 2013132376

Andrew James Jensen, Suman Luthra, Paul Francis RICHARDSON
Applicant Pfizer Inc.
Image result for pfizer
(10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-4,8- methenopyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile
(16R)-19-Amino-13-fluoro-4,8,16-trimethyl-9-oxo-17-oxa-4,5,8,20-tetraazatetracyclo[16.3.1.02,6.010,15]docosa-1(22),2,5,10,12,14,18,20-octaene-3-carbonitrile
(10R)-7-Amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile
CAS 1454846-35-5 [RN]
UNII:OSP71S83EU
лорлатиниб [Russian]
لورلاتينيب [Arabic]
洛拉替尼 [Chinese]

Ros1 tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor; Anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor inhibitor

useful for treating cancer mediated by anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) or c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) receptor tyrosine kinase, particularly NSCLC.  an ATP-competitive inhibitor of ROS1/ALK, for treating NSCLC. In February 2017, lorlatinib was reported to be in phase 2 clinical development.

  • Originator Pfizer
  • Developer Pfizer; The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia; Yale University
  • Class Antineoplastics; Aza compounds; Benzoxazines; Pyrazoles; Pyrazolones; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors; ROS1-protein-inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Non-small cell lung cancer

Lorlatinib (PF-6463922) is an experimental anti-neoplastic drug in development by Pfizer. It is a orally-administered small molecule inhibitor of ROS1 and ALK.

In 2015, FDA granted Pfizer orphan drug status for lorlatinib for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.[1]

  • 05 Oct 2016 Massachusetts General Hospital plans a phase II trial for Non-small cell lung cancer (Late-stage disease, Metastatic disease) in USA (PO, unspecified formulation) (NCT02927340)
  • 01 Oct 2016 Pfizer completes a phase I trial in pharmacokinetic trial in Healthy volunteers in USA (NCT02804399)
  • 01 Aug 2016 Pfizer initiates a phase I drug-drug interaction trial in Healthy volunteers in Belgium (PO, unspecified formulation) (NCT02838264)

Figure

Structures of ALK inhibitors marketed or currently in the clinic

Synthesis

NEED COLOUR

Clinical studies

Several clinical trials are ongoing. A phase II trial comparing avelumab alone and in combination with lorlatinib or crizotinib for non-small cell lung cancer is expected to be complete in late 2017. A phase II trial comparing lorlatinib with crizotinib is expected to be complete in mid-2018.[2] A phase II trial for treatment of ALK-positive or ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer with CNA metastases is not expected to be complete until 2023.[3] Preclinical studies are investigating lorlatinib for treatment of neuroblastoma.

Lorlatinib is an investigational medicine that inhibits the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 proto-oncogene. Due to tumor complexity and development of resistance to treatment, disease progression is a challenge in patients with ALK-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A common site for progression in metastatic NSCLC is the brain. Lorlatinib was specifically designed to inhibit tumor mutations that drive resistance to other ALK inhibitors and to penetrate the blood brain barrier.

ABOUT LORLATINIB

ALK in NSCLC ROS1 in NSCLC PRECLINICAL DATA CLINICAL STUDIES Originally discovered as an oncogenic driver in a type of lymphoma, ALK gene alterations were also found to be among key drivers of tumor development in cancers, such as NSCLC.1 In ALK-positive lung cancer, a normally inactive gene called ALK is fused with another gene. This genetic alteration creates the ALK fusion gene and ultimately, the production of an ALK fusion protein, which is responsible for tumor growth.1,2 This genetic alteration is present in 3-5% of NSCLC patients.3,4,5 Another gene that can fuse with other genes is called ROS1. Sometimes a ROS1 fusion protein can contribute to cancer-cell growth and tumor survival. This genetic alteration is present in approximately 1% of NSCLC patients.5 Preclinical data showed lorlatinib is capable of overcoming resistance to existing ALK inhibitors and penetrated the blood brain barrier in ALK-driven tumor models.2 Specifically, in these preclinical models, lorlatinib had activity against all tested clinical resistance mutations in ALK.

A Phase 1/2 clinical trial of lorlatinib in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC is currently ongoing. • The primary objective of the Phase 1 portion was to assess safety and tolerability of single-agent lorlatinib at increasing dose levels in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC.6 • Data from the Phase 1 study showed that lorlatinib had promising clinical activity in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1- positive advanced NSCLC. Most of these patients had developed CNS metastases and had received ≥1 prior tyrosine kinase inhibitor.7 o The most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were hypercholesterolemia (69%) and peripheral edema (37%). Hypercholesterolemia was the most common (11%) grade 3 or higher treatment-related AE and the most frequent reason for dose delay or reduction. No patients discontinued due to treatment-related AEs. At the recommended Phase 2 dose, 4 out of 17 patients (24%) experienced a treatment-related AE of any grade that led to a dose delay or hold.

PATENT

WO2014207606

This invention relates to crystalline forms of the macrocyclic kinase inhibitor, (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10,16-trimethyl-15-OXO-10,15, 16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4, 3-?][2,5,1 1 ]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile, including crystalline solvates thereof, that may be useful in the treatment of abnormal cell growth, such as cancer, in mammals. The invention also relates to compositions including such crystalline forms, and to methods of using such compositions in the treatment of abnormal cell growth in mammals, especially humans.

Background of the Invention

The compound (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2,5,1 1 ]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile, represented by the formula (I):

(I)

is a potent, macrocyclic inhibitor of both wild type and resistance mutant forms of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) receptor tyrosine kinase. Preparation of the free base compound of formula (I) as an amorphous solid is disclosed in International Patent Publication No. WO 2013/132376 and in United States Patent Publication No. 2013/0252961 , the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

Human cancers comprise a diverse array of diseases that collectively are one of the leading causes of death in developed countries throughout the world (American Cancer Society, Cancer Facts and Figures 2005. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2005). The progression of cancers is caused by a complex series of multiple genetic and molecular events including gene mutations, chromosomal translocations, and karyotypic abnormalities (Hanahan & Weinberg, The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 2000; 100: 57-70). Although the underlying genetic causes of

cancer are both diverse and complex, each cancer type has been observed to exhibit common traits and acquired capabilities that facilitate its progression. These acquired capabilities include dysregulated cell growth, sustained ability to recruit blood vessels (i.e., angiogenesis), and ability of tumor cells to spread locally as well as metastasize to secondary organ sites (Hanahan & Weinberg 2000). Therefore, the ability to identify novel therapeutic agents that inhibit molecular targets that are altered during cancer progression or target multiple processes that are common to cancer progression in a variety of tumors presents a significant unmet need.

Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play fundamental roles in cellular processes, including cell proliferation, migration, metabolism, differentiation, and survival. RTK activity is tightly controlled in normal cells. The constitutively enhanced RTK activities from point mutation, amplification, and rearrangement of the corresponding genes have been implicated in the development and progression of many types of cancer. (Gschwind et al., The discovery of receptor tyrosine kinases: targets for cancer therapy. Nat. Rev. Cancer 2004; 4, 361-370; Krause & Van Etten, Tyrosine kinases as targets for cancer therapy. N. Engl. J. Med. 2005; 353: 172-187.)

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase, grouped together with leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) to a subfamily within the insulin receptor (IR) superfamily. ALK was first discovered as a fusion protein with nucleophosmin (NPM) in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines in 1994. (Morris et al., Fusion of a kinase gene, ALK, to a nucleolar protein gene, NPM, in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Science 1994; 263:1281-1284.) NPM-ALK, which results from a chromosomal translocation, is implicated in the pathogenesis of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) (Pulford et al., Anaplastic lymphoma kinase proteins in growth control and cancer. J. Cell Physiol., 2004; 199: 330-58). The roles of aberrant expression of constitutively active ALK chimeric proteins in the pathogenesis of ALCL have been defined (Wan et. al., Anaplastic lymphoma kinase activity is essential for the proliferation and survival of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells. Blood, 2006; 107:1617-1623). Other chromosomal rearrangements resulting in ALK fusions have been subsequently detected in ALCL (50-60%), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (27%), and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (2-7%). (Palmer et al., Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: signaling in development and disease. Biochem. J. 2009; 420:345-361 .)

The EML4-ALK fusion gene, comprising portions of the echinoderm microtubule associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene and the ALK gene, was first discovered in NSCLC archived clinical specimens and cell lines. (Soda et al., Identification of the transforming EML4-ALK fusion gene in non-small cell lung cancer. Nature 2007; 448:561-566; Rikova et al., Cell 2007; 131 :1 190-1203.) EML4-ALK fusion variants were demonstrated to transform NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and cause lung adenocarcinoma when expressed in transgenic mice, confirming the

potent oncogenic activity of the EML4-ALK fusion kinase. (Soda et al., A mouse model for EML4-ALK-positive lung cancer. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008; 105:19893-19897.) Oncogenic mutations of ALK in both familial and sporadic cases of neuroblastoma have also been reported. (Caren et al., High incidence of DNA mutations and gene amplifications of the ALK gene in advanced sporadic neuroblastoma tumors. Biochem. J. 2008; 416:153-159.)

ROS1 is a proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the insulin receptor subfamily, and is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation processes. (Nagarajan et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1986; 83:6568-6572). ROS is expressed, in humans, in epithelial cells of a variety of different tissues. Defects in ROS expression and/or activation have been found in glioblastoma, as well as tumors of the central nervous system (Charest et al., Genes Chromos. Can. 2003; 37(1): 58-71). Genetic alterations involving ROS that result in aberrant fusion proteins of ROS kinase have been described, including the FIG-ROS deletion translocation in glioblastoma (Charest et al. (2003); Birchmeier et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1987; 84:9270-9274; and NSCLC (Rimkunas et al., Analysis of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ROS1 -Positive Tumors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Identification of FIG-ROS1 Fusion, Clin Cancer Res 2012; 18:4449-4457), the SLC34A2-ROS translocation in NSCLC (Rikova et al. Cell 2007;131 :1 190-1203), the CD74-ROS translocation in NSCLC (Rikova et al. (2007)) and cholangiocarcinoma (Gu et al. PLoS ONE 201 1 ; 6(1 ): e15640), and a truncated, active form of ROS known to drive tumor growth in mice (Birchmeier et al. Mol. Cell. Bio. 1986; 6(9):3109-31 15). Additional fusions, including TPM3-ROS1 , SDC4-ROS1 , EZR-ROS1 and LRIG3-ROS1 , have been reported in lung cancer patient tumor samples (Takeuchi et al., RET, ROS1 and ALK fusions in lung cancer, Nature Medicine 2012; 18(3):378-381).

The dual ALK/c-MET inhibitor crizotinib was approved in 201 1 for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC that is ALK-positive as detected by an FDA-approved test. Crizotinib has also shown efficacy in treatment of NSCLC with ROS1 translocations. (Shaw et al. Clinical activity of crizotinib in advanced rson-smali cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring ROS1 gene rearrangement. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Chicago, June 1-5, 2012.) As observed clinically for other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mutations in ALK and ROS1 that confer resistance to ALK inhibitors have been described (Choi et ai., EML4-ALK Mutations in Lung Cancer than Confer Resistance to ALK Inhibitors, N Engl J Med 2010; 363:1734-1739; Awad et ai., Acquired Resistance to Crizotinib from a Mutation in CD74-ROS1, Engl J Med 2013; 368:2395-2401 ).

Thus, ALK and ROS1 are attractive molecular targets for cancer therapeutic intervention. There remains a need to identify compounds having novel activity profiles against wild-type and mutant forms of ALK and ROS1 .

The present invention provides crystalline forms of the free base of (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10,16-trimethyl-15-OXO-10,15, 16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2, 5,1 1 ]-benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile having improved properties, such as improved crystallinity, dissolution properties, decreased hygroscopicity, improved mechanical properties, improved purity, and/or improved stability, while maintaining chemical and enantiomeric stability.

Comparative Example 1A

Preparation of (10f?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?l[2,5,1 Hbenzoxadiazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile (amorphous)

Example 1A

Step 1 :

Palladium (II) acetate (53 mg, 0.24 mmol) and cataCXium® A (180 mg, 0.5 mmol) were mixed together in toluene (1 .5 mL, de-gassed) and the resulting solution was added via pipette to a stirred solution of compound 7 (0.9 g, 2.4 mmol), compound 15 (1 .0 g, 3.0 mmol) bis-pinacolato diboron (0.9 g, 3.6 mmol) and CsF (1 .9 g, 12.6 mmol) in MeOH/H20 (9:1 , 12 mL, degassed) at 60 °C. The resulting mixture was then stirred at reflux for 3 hrs. A further portion of Palladium (II) acetate (26 mg, 0.12 mmol) and cataCXium® A (90 mg, 0.25 mmol) in toluene (1 .5 mL, de-gassed) was added, and the yellow reaction mixture stirred at 60 °C overnight. After cooling to room temperature, the mixture was diluted with EtOAc (150 mL) and filtered through CELITE®. The filtrate was washed with water (100 mL), then brine (100 mL), dried (Na2S04) and evaporated. The residue was purified by flash chromatography over silica gel, which was eluted with 1 :1 EtOAc/cyclohexane, to give compound 22 as a yellow oil (570 mg, 43% yield). TLC (Rf = 0.40, 1 :1 EtOAc/cyclohexane). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 8.03 (m, 1 H), 7.65 (s, 1 H), 7.27 (dd,1 H, J = 9.9, 2.7 Hz), 7.01 (m, 1 H), 6.68 (m, 1 H), 6.40 (m, 1 H), 4.90 (br s, 2 H), 4.20 – 4.30 (m, 2 H), 3.96 (s, 3 H), 3.94 (s, 3 H), 2.55 – 2.85 (m, 3 H), 1 .68 (d, 3 H, J = 6.6 Hz), 1 .24 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 539 [M+H]+.

Step 2:

To a solution of compound 22 (69% purity, 0.95 g, assumed 1 .05 mmol) in MeOH (20 mL) was added a solution NaOH (1 .0 g, 25 mmol) in water (2 mL). The mixture was stirred at 40 °C for 3.5 hours. The reaction was diluted with water (80 mL), concentrated by 20 mL to remove MeOH on the rotary evaporator, and washed with MTBE (100 mL). The aqueous layer was then acidified carefully with 1 M aq HCI to approx. pH 2 (pH paper). Sodium chloride (15 g) was added to the mixture and the mixture was extracted with EtOAc (100 mL). The organic layer was separated, dried (Na2S04) and evaporated to give compound 23 as a pale yellow solid (480 mg, 87% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 8.05 (m, 1 H), 7.45 (s, 1 H), 7.37 (dd,1 H, J = 10.4, 2.8 Hz), 7.10 (dt, 1 H, J = 8.5, 2.4 Hz), 6.50 – 6.60 (m, 2 H), 4.05 – 4.30 (m, 2 H), 3.99 (s, 3 H), 2.60 – 2.80 (m, 3 H), 1 .72 (d, 3 H, J = 6.5 Hz). LCMS ES m/z 525 [M+H]+.

Step 3:

A solution of HCI in dioxane (4 M, 6.0 mL) was added to a solution of compound 23

(480 mg, 0.91 mmol) in MeOH (methanol) (6 mL) and the reaction was stirred at 40 °C for 2.5 hours. The reaction mixture was then concentrated to dryness under reduced pressure. The residue was taken-up in MeOH (50 mL) and acetonitrile (100 mL) was added and the mixture was then again evaporated to dryness, to give compound 24 as an off white solid (400 mg, 87% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 8.07 (dd, 1 H, J = 8.9. 5.9 Hz), 7.51 (d, 1 H, J = 1 .7 Hz), 7.42 (dd, 1 H, J = 9.8, 2.6 Hz), 7.23 (d, 1 H, J = 1 .6 Hz), 7.16 (dt, 1 H, J = 8.5, 2.7 Hz), 6.73 (dd, 1 H, J = 1 1 .9, 6.9 Hz), 4.22 (d, 1 H, J = 14.7 Hz), 4.14 (d, 1 H, J = 14.7 Hz), 4.07 (s, 3 H), 2.75 (s, 3 H), 1 .75 (d, 3 H, J = 5.5 Hz). LCMS ES m/z 425 [M+H]+.

Step 4:

A solution of compound 24 (400 mg, assumed 0.91 mmol) as the HCI salt and DIPEA

(diisopropylethylamine) (1 .17 g, 9.1 mmol) in DMF (dimethylformamide) (5.0 mL) and THF (0.5 mL) was added drop-wise to a solution of HATU (2-(1 H-7-azabenzotriazol-1 -yl)-1 ,1 ,3,3-tetramethyl uronium hexafluorophosphate methanaminium) (482 mg, 1 .27 mmol) in DMF (10.0 mL) at 0 °C over 30 minutes. After complete addition, the mixture was stirred at 0 °C for a further 30 mins. Water (70 mL) was added and the mixture was extracted into EtOAc (2 x 60 mL). The combined organics were washed with saturated aqueous NaHC03 (2 x 100 mL), brine (100 mL), dried over Na2S04, and evaporated. The residue was purified by column chromatography over silica gel, which was eluted with 70% EtOAc/cyclohexane giving 205 mg of a pale yellow residue (semi-solid). The solids were dissolved in MTBE (7 mL) and cyclohexane (20 mL) was added slowly with good stirring to precipitate the product. After stirring for 30 minutes, the mixture was filtered, and Example 1A was collected as an

amorphous white solid (1 10 mg, 29% yield). TLC (Rf = 0.40, 70% EtOAc in cyclohexane). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.83 (d, 1 H, J = 2.0 Hz), 7.30 (dd, 1 H, J = 9.6, 2.4 Hz), 7.21 (dd, 1 H, J = 8.4, 5.6 Hz), 6.99 (dt, 1 H, J = 8.0, 2.8 Hz), 6.86 (d, 1 H, J = 1 .2 Hz), 5.75 – 5.71 (m, 1 H), 4.84 (s, 2 H), 4.45 (d, 1 H, J = 14.4 Hz), 4.35 (d ,1 H, J = 14.4 Hz), 4.07 (s, 3 H), 3.13 (s, 3 H), 1 .79 (d, 3 H, J = 6.4Hz). LCMS ES m/z 407 [M+H]+.

Example 1

Preparation of crystalline hydrate of (10 ?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo- 10,15,16,17-tetrahvdro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?l[2,5,1 Hbenzoxa-diazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile (Form 1)

Example 1A Example 1

(amorphous) (Form 1 }

Amorphous (10f?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2,5,11 ]benzoxa-diazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile free base, prepared as described in Example 1A (and Example 2 of United States Patent Publication No. 2013/0252961), was dissolved in 1 .0 : 1 .1 (v:v) H20:MeOH at a concentration of 22 mg/mL at 50°C, then allowed to cool to room temperature . This slurry was granulated for approximately 72 hours. The solids were isolated by filtration and vacuum dried overnight at 60°C to produce crystalline hydrate Form 1 of (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-/?][2,5,1 1 ]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile.

Example 4

Alternative preparation of crystalline acetic acid solvate of (10 ?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10,16-trimethyl-15-OXO-10,15, 16,17-tetrahvdro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?U2,5, 1 1 lbenzoxa-diazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile (Form 3)

Step 1 :

To a reaction vessel under N2 were charged compound 9 (9.97 kg, 17.95 mol), compound 21 (3.52 kg, 18.85 mol) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (97 L). Triethylamine (7.45 kg, 73.6 mol) was added while keeping the internal temperature below 35°C. The reaction mixture was held for 30 min and n-propylphosphonic anhydride (T3P), 50% solution in ethyl acetate (22.85 kg, 35.9 mol) was charged slowly, maintaining the internal temperature below 25°C. The reaction mixture was held at 20°C for at least 2 h until reaction was deemed complete. Ethyl acetate (35 L) and water (66 L) were added followed by 0.5N Hydrochloric acid solution (80 L). The aqueous layer was removed and the organic layer was washed with brine solution (80 L). The organic layer was concentrated and solvent exchanged with 2-methyl-2-butanol (80 L) give compound 25 (23 wt/wt%) solution in 2-methyl-2-butanol . This solution was carried forward to the next step directly in three batches, assuming 12.00 kg (100% yield) from this step.

Step 2:

2-Methyl-2-butanol (100 L) was combined with potassium acetate (1 .8 kg, 18.34 mol), palladium(ll) acetate (0.10 kg, 0.46 mol) and water (0.10 kg, 5.73 mol). The resulting mixture was purged with nitrogen. Di(1 -adamantyl)n-butylphosphine (0.23 kg, 0.43 mol) was added. An amount of 20% of compound 25 (3.97 kg active or 17.3 L of step 1 solution in 2-methyl-2-butanol) was added, and the resulting reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 2 h. The remaining solution of compound 25 in 2-methyl-2-butanol was subsequently added to the reaction over a period of 5 h. The resulting mixture was heated until the reaction was deemed complete (typically 16 – 20 h). This reaction step was processed in three batches, and the isolation was done in one single batch. Thus, the combined three batches were filtered through CELITE® to remove insoluble materials. The filtrate was concentrated to a low volume (approximately 20 L). Acetonitrile (60 L) was added. The resulting mixture was heated to reflux for 2 – 4 h, then cooled to RT for granulation. The resulting slurry was filtered to give compound 26 as a crude product. The crude product was combined with ethyl acetate (80 L) and Silicycle thiol (5 kg). The resulting mixture was heated for 2 h, cooled to RT and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated to approx. 20 L, and the resulting slurry was granulated and filtered. The filter cake was rinsed with ethyl acetate (4 L) and dried in a vacuum oven to give compound 26 as a pure product (4.74 kg, 43.5% overall last two steps). 1H NMR (CDCI3) δ 8.25 – 8.23 (m, 1 H), 7.28 (1 H, dd, 2.76 and 9.79 Hz), 7.22 (1 H, dd, 5.52 and 8.53 Hz), 7.18 (1 H, d, J = 1 .76 Hz), 7.01 (1 H, dt, J = 2.50 and 8.03 Hz), 5.78 – 5.70 (m, 1 H), 4.76 (1 H, d, J = 14.3 Hz), 4.13 (s, 3H), 3.16 (s, 3H), 1 .78 (d, 3H, J = 6.02 Hz), 1 .45 (s, 18H); 13C NMR (CDCI3) δ 167.0, 162.9, 160.4, 148.7, 146.3, 143.0, 140.7, 139.9, 135.5, 129.9, 129.8, 126.1 , 123.8, 123.5, 1 19.7, 1 13.8, 1 13.5, 1 1 1 .6, 108.1 , 81 .1 , 70.1 , 45.5, 37.0, 29.7, 26.0, 20.7; LCMS (M+1)+ 607.3, 507.1 , 451 .2.

Step 3:

To a reactor under N2 was added compound 26 (4.74 kg, 7.82 mol) and ethyl acetate (54 L). Hydrochloric acid 37% (5.19 L, 63.2 mol) was charged slowly while keeping the internal temperature below 25°C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 24 – 48 h until the reaction was complete. Ethyl acetate (54L) and water (54 L) were added. The reaction mixture was then treated with triethylamine until pH 8 – 9 was reached. The aqueous layer was removed and then the organic layer was washed water (2 x 54 L). The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure to approx. 54 L to give compound 27 (unisolated).

Step 4:

Acetic acid (1 .0 kg, 16.6 mol) was added to the organic layer containing compound 27. The reaction mixture was concentrated and then held for at least 3 h with stirring at RT. The resulted slurry was filtered. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (2 L) and dried under vacuum to give 3.20 kg (87.8% yield) of Example 4 acetic acid solvate (Form 3). The spectroscopic data of this material was identical to that of an authentic sample of the crystalline acetic acid Form 3 of (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10, 16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10, 15,16, 17-tetrahydro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2,5,1 1 ]-benzoxadiazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile prepared according to Example 3.

Preparation of Synthetic Intermediates

7 6 5

Step 1 :

A solution of (-)-DIPCI ((-)-B-chlorodiisopinocampheylborane) (57.1 g, 178 mmol) in THF

(tetrahydrofuran) (100 ml) was cooled to -20 to -30 °C. A solution of compound 1 (31 .3 g, 1 19 mmol) in THF (100 ml) was then added dropwise, via addition funnel (30 min addition). The reaction was left to warm up to room temperature (RT). After 2 h, the reaction was cooled to -30 °C and another portion of (-)-DIPCI (38.0 g, 1 19 mmol) was added. After 30 min, the reaction was allowed to warm to RT and after 1 h, the solvents were removed in vacuo and the residue re-dissolved in MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) (200 ml). A solution of diethanolamine (31 g, 296 mmol) in ethanol/THF (15 ml/30 ml) was added via addition funnel, to the reaction mixture under an ice bath. The formation of a white precipitate was observed. The suspension was heated at reflux for 2 hours then cooled to room temperature, filtered and the mother liquids concentrated in vacuo. The residue was suspended in heptane/EtOAc (7:3, 200 ml) and again

filtered. This procedure was repeated until no more solids could be observed after the liquids were concentrated. The final yellow oil was purified by column chromatography (eluent: cyclohexane/EtOAc 99:1 to 96:4). The resulting colorless oil was further purified by recrystallization from heptanes, to give alcohol compound 2 (25 g, 80% yield, 99% purity and 96% ee) as white crystals. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.73 (dd, 1 H), 7.32 (dd, 1 H), 6.74 (ddd, 1 H), 4.99 – 5.04 (m, 1 H), 2.01 (d, 1 H), 1 .44 (d, 3 H). LCMS-ES: No ionization, Purity 99%. Chiral GC (column CP-Chirasil-DexnCB): 96% ee; Rt (minor) 17.7 minutes and Rt (major) 19.4 minutes.

Step 2:

A solution of compound 2 (22 g, 83 mmol) in MTBE (350 mL) was cooled under an ice bath and triethylamine (23 mL, 166 mmol) followed by mesyl chloride (9.6 mL, 124 mmol) were added drop-wise. The reaction was then warmed to RT and stirred for 3 h. The reaction mixture was filtered and the solids washed with EtOAc. The mother liquids were concentrated in vacuo to give compound 3 (35 g, 80% yield) as a pale yellow oil. This material was taken into the following step without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.78 (dd, 1 H), 7.24 (dd, 1 H), 6.82 (ddd, 1 H), 2.92 (s, 3 H), 1 .64 (d, 3 H). LCMS-ES no ionization.

Step 3:

A suspension of Cs2C03 (65 g, 201 mmol) and compound 4 (13.3 g, 121 mmol) in 2-CH3-THF (2-methyitetrahydrofuran) (600 mL) and acetone (300 mL) was stirred at RT for 30 minutes then heated at 40 °C before drop-wise addition of a solution of compound 3 (34.4 g, 80 mmol) in 2-CH3-THF (300 mL) via addition funnel. The resulting mixture was left stirring at 75 -80 °C for 24 h. The reaction was then filtered through CELITE® with MTBE, the solvents removed in vacuo and the residue purified by column chromatography over silica gel which was eluted with cyclohexane/EtOAc (9:1 to 1 :1) to give compound 5 (14.3 g, 39 % yield, 90% ee) as a white solid. The solids were then re crystallized from heptane/EtOAc to give compound 5 (10.8 g, 37% yield, 95% ee). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) 5 7.38 (dd, 1 H), 7.62 (dd, 1 H), 7.10 (dd, 1 H), 6.75 (ddd, 1 H), 6.44 – 6.51 (m, 2 H), 5.34 – 5.39 (m, 1 H), 4.73 (br s, 2 H), 1 .61 (d, 3 H). LCMS-ES m/z 359 [M+H]+. HPLC (Chiralpak IC 4.6 x 250 mm): 95% ee; Rt (minor) 10.4 minutes; Rt (major) 14.7 minutes; eluent: Heptane 80%/IPA 20% with 0.2% DEA, 0.7 mL/min. Step 4:

Compound 5 (20 g, 57 mmol) was dissolved in methanol (300 mL), and sequentially treated with triethylamine (TEA) (15.4 mL, 1 13 mmol) and PdCI2(dppf) (1 ,1 -bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene]dichloropalladium(ll) ) (4.1 g, 5.7 mmol). This mixture was heated at 100 °C for 16 hours, under a 100 psi carbon monoxide atmosphere. LCMS indicated consumption of starting material. The reaction mixture was filtered through a pad of CELITE®, and the filtrate evaporated to a brown oil. The crude product was purified by flash

chromatography over silica gel which was eluted with 50% to 75% ethyl acetate in cyclohexane, affording the pure product 6 as a brick-red solid (13.0 g, 79% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 1 .65 (d, 3 H), 3.94 (s, 3 H), 4.75 (br s, 2 H), 6.32 (q, 1 H), 6.42 (dd, 1 H), 6.61 (dd, 1 H), 7.00 (ddd, 1 H), 7.28 (dd, 1 H), 7.60 (dd, 1 H), 8.03 (dd, 1 H). LCMS ES m/z 291 for [M+H]+.

Step 5:

Compound 6 (13.0 g, 45 mmol) was dissolved in acetonitrile (195 mL), and cooled to <10 °C in an ice water bath. NBS (N-bromosuccinimide) (7.9 g, 45 mmol) was added drop-wise to the cooled reaction mixture as a solution in acetonitrile (195 mL), monitoring the internal temperature to ensure it did not rise above 10 °C. After addition was complete, the mixture was stirred for 15 minutes. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) (1 :1 cyclohexane/ethyl acetate) showed consumption of starting material. The reaction mixture was evaporated, and the residue redissolved in ethyl acetate (400 mL), and washed with 2M aqueous NaOH (2 x 300 mL), and 10% aqueous sodium thiosulfate solution (300 mL). The organic extracts were dried over MgS04, and evaporated to a red oil (17.6 g). The crude product was purified over silica gel, which was eluted with 10% to 50% ethyl acetate in cyclohexane, which gave compound 7 (12.0 g, 73% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 1 .65 (d, 3 H), 3.96 (s, 3 H), 4.74 – 4.81 (br s, 2 H), 6.33 (q, 1 H), 6.75 (d, 1 H), 7.03 (ddd, 1 H), 7.25 (dd, 1 H), 7.66 (d, 1 H), 8.06 (dd, 1 H). LCMS ES m/z 369/371 [M+H]+. A Chiralpak AD-H (4.6 x 100 mm, 5 micron) column was eluted with 10% MeOH (0.1 % DEA) in C02 at 120 bar. A flow rate of 5.0 mL/min gave the minor isomer Rt 0.6 minutes and the major isomer Rt 0.8 minutes (99% ee). Optical rotation: [ ]d20 = -92.4 deg (c=1 .5, MeOH).

Preparation of (/?)-methyl 2-(1 -((N,N-di-Boc-2-amino-5-bromopyridin-3-yl)oxy)ethyl)-4-fluorobenzoic acid (9)

7

Step 1 :

To a solution of compound 7 (2000 g, 5.4 mol) in dry DCM (dichloromethane) (32000 mL) was added DIPEA (N.N-dsisopropyleibylamine) (2100 g, 16.28 mol) and DMAP (4-dimethylaminopyridine) (132 g, 1 .08 mol). Then Boc20 (di-tert-butyl-dicarbonate) (3552 g, 16.28 mol) was added to the mixture in portions. The reaction was stirred at RT for overnight. TLC (petroleum ether/EtOAc =5:1) show the reaction was complete, the mixture was washed with sat. NH4CI (15 L) two times, then dried over Na2S04and concentrated to give a crude product which was purified by column (silica gel, petroleum ether/EtOAc from 20:1 to 10:1) to give compound 8 (2300 g, 75%) as a white solid.

Step 2:

Compound 8 (50 g, 87.81 mmol, 100 mass%) was charged to a round bottom flask (RBF) containing tetrahydrofuran (12.25 mol/L) in Water (5 mL/g, 3060 mmol, 12.25 mol/L) and sodium hydroxide (1 mol/L) in Water (1 .5 equiv., 131 .7 mmol, 1 mol/L). The biphasic mixture was stirred at RT for 14 hours. 1 N HCI was added to adjust pH to < 2. THF was then removed by vacuum distillation. The product precipitated out was collected by filtration. The filter cake was rinsed with water, pulled dried then dried in vacuum oven to constant weight (48 h, 55°C, 25 mbar). 48.3g isolated, 99% yield. 1H NMR (CDCI3, 400MHz) δ 8.24 (1 H, dd, 1 H, J = 5.76 and 3.0 Hz), 8.16 (1 H, d, J = 2.0 Hz), 7.37 (1 H, dd, J = 2.5 and 9.8 Hz), 7.19 (1 H, d, J = 2 Hz), 7.14 – 7.06 (1 H, m), 6.50 (1 H, q, J = 6.3 Hz), 1 .67 (3H, d, J = 8.4 Hz), 1 .48 (18H, s). 13C NMR (CDCI3, 100 MHz), δ 170.1 , 169.2, 167.6, 165.1 , 150.6, 149.2, 148.6, 141 .4, 140.7, 135.2, 135.1 , 124.2, 122.2,122.1 , 1 19.9, 1 15.4, 1 15.1 , 1 13.4, 1 13.2, 100.0, 83.4, 73.3, 27.9, 23.9. LCMS (M+ +1) 557.2, 555.3, 457.1 , 455.1 , 401 , 0, 399.0.

Step 1 :

Ethyl 1 ,3-dimethylpyrazole-5-carboxylate (5.0 g, 30 mmol) was dissolved in 1 ,2-dichloroethane (200 mL), followed by addition of NBS (5.3 g, 30 mmol) and dibenzoyi peroxide (727 mg, 3.0 mmol), in small portions and stirred at 85 °C for 2 hours. The mixture was allowed to cool, diluted to 400 mL with dichloromethane, and washed with water (2 x 200 mL). The organic layer was dried over MgS04, and evaporated to give compound 10 (4.1 g, 42% yield). TLC (EtOAc/Cyclohexane; 1 :10; KMn04): Rf~0.3. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.47 (s, 2 H), 4.41 (q, 2 H), 4.15 (s, 3 H), 1 .42 (t, 3 H). LCMS ES m/z 324/326/328 [M+H]+.

Step 2:

Compound 10 (3.0 g, 9.2 mmol) was dissolved in methylamine solution (33% solution in ethanol, 70 mL), and stirred at RT for 16 hours. The mixture was evaporated to give compound 11 (1 .8 g, 71 % yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.39 (q, 2 H), 4.14 (s, 3 H), 4.05 (s, 2 H), 2.62 (d, 3 H), 1 .41 (t, 3 H). LCMS ES m/z 276/278 [M+H]+.

Step 3:

Compound 11 (1 .8 g, 6.5 mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane (20 mL), and the mixture cooled to 0 °C. A solution of di(fe/?-butyl) dicarbonate (1 .75 g, 8 mmol) in dichloromethane (17.5 mL) was added dropwise. The ice bath was removed and the mixture stirred for 18 hours at room temperature. The mixture was diluted to 100 mL with dichloromethane, and washed with water (2 x 50 mL). Organic extracts were dried over magnesium sulfate, and evaporated to give compound 12 (1 .8 g, 72% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.48 – 4.44 (m, 2 H), 4.41 (q, 2 H), 4.12 (s, 3 H), 2.82 – 2.79 (m, 3 H), 1 .47 (s, 9 H), 1 .41 (t, 3 H). LCMS ES m/z 376/378 [M+H]+ and 276/278 [M-BOC]+.

Step 4:

Compound 12 (4 g, 1 1 mmol) was dissolved in dioxane (43 mL). Sodium amide (1 g, 27 mmol) was added in one portion. The reaction mixture was stirred at 100 °C for 24 h. After this time, the solvent was removed under reduced pressure to give a white solid. The material was suspended in EtOAc (100 mL) and washed with 5% citric acid solution (100 mL). The organic phase was separated and washed with water (100 mL), dried over MgS04, filtered and the solvent removed in vacuo to give compound 13 as a yellow gum (3.1 g, 84% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-c/6) δ 4.27 (s, 2 H), 3.92 (s, 3 H), 2.70 (s, 3 H), 1 .40 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 348/350 [M+H]+ and 248/250 [M-BOC]+.

Step 5:

Compound 13 (3 g, 8.6 mmol) was dissolved in DMF (43 mL, 0.2 M). HOBt (1 .2 g, 8.6 mmol) was added, followed by ammonium chloride (0.9 g, 17.2 mmol). EDCI (2.5 g, 13 mmol) was then added, followed by TEA (2.4 mL, 17 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature. After 18h, the solvent was removed under reduced pressure to give a yellow oil

(8.0 g). The residue was dissolved in EtOAc (75ml_). The organic phase was washed with NaHC03 (sat. solution, 70 ml_) and then brine (100 ml_). The combined organic layers were dried over MgS04 and the solvent removed in vacuo to give compound 14 as a dark yellow oil (2.7 g, 91 % yield). This material was used directly in the next step without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 6.74 (br s, 1 H), 5.95 (br s, 1 H), 4.49 (br s, 2 H), 4.16 (s, 3 H), 2.81 (br s, 3 H), 1 .47 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 347/349 [M+H]+ and 247/249 [M-BOC]+.

Step 6:

Compound 14 (2.7 g, 7.9 mmol) was dissolved in DCM (80 ml_, 0.1 M). TEA (3.3 ml_, 23.8 mmol) was then added and the reaction mixture cooled down to -5 °C. Trifluoroacetic anhydride (2.2 ml_, 15.8 mmol) in DCM (15 ml_) was added dropwise over 30 min. After addition, the reaction mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 1 h. After this time, the solvents were removed under reduced pressure to give a dark yellow oil. This residue was diluted in DCM (100 ml_), washed with 5% citric acid, sat. NaHC03and brine, dried over MgS04, filtered and the solvents removed in vacuo to give a dark yellow oil (2.6 g). The crude product was purified by reverse phase chromatography to give compound 15 as a yellow oil (2.3 g, 87% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.46 (br s, 2 H), 4.01 (s, 3 H), 2.83 (br s, 3 H), 1 .47 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 331 /329 [M+H]+ and 229/231 [M-BOC]+ as the base ion.

Preparation o/: 1 -methyl-3-((methylamino)methyl)-1 H-pyrazole-5-carbonitrile (21)

Step 1 :

To /V-benzylmethylamine (2.40 kg, 19.8 mol) and ethyldiisopropylamine (2.61 kg, 20.2 mol) in acetonitrile (6 L) at 16°C was added chloroacetone (1 .96 kg, 21 .2 mol) over 60 mins [exothermic, temp kept <30°C]. The mixture was stirred at 22°C for 18 hours then concentrated to an oily solid. The residue was triturated with MTBE (5 L), and then filtered through a pad of CELITE® (600 g, top) and silica (1 .5 kg, bottom), washing with MTBE (8 L). The filtrate was evaporated to afford compound 16 (3.35 kg, 18.9 mol, 95%) as a brown oil.

Step 2:

Compound 16 (1 .68 kg, 9.45 mol), Boc-anhydride (2.1 kg, 9.6 mol) and 20wt% Pd/C (50% H20, 56 g) in ethanol (5 L) were hydrogenated in an 1 1 -L autoclave at 50 psi [exotherm to 40°C with 20°C jacket]. The atmosphere became saturated with carbon dioxide during the reaction and so needed to be vented and de-gassed twice to ensure sufficient hydrogen uptake and completion of the reaction. The total reaction time was ~1 .5 hours. Two runs (for a total of 18.9 mol) were combined and filtered through a pad of SOLKA-FLOC®, washing with methanol. The filtrate was treated with DMAP (45 g, 0.37 mol) and stirred at room temperature overnight to destroy the excess Boc-anhydride. The mixture was then concentrated to dryness, dissolved in MTBE (6 L) and filtered through a pad of magnesol (1 kg), washing with MTBE (4 L). The filtrate was evaporated to afford compound 17 (3.68 kg, ~95 wt%, 18.7 mol, 99%) as an orange-brown oil.

Step 3:

To compound 17 (3.25 kg, -95 wt%, 16.5 mol) and diethyl oxalate (4.71 kg, 32.2 mol) in methanol (12 L) at 15°C was added 25 wt% sodium methoxide in methanol (6.94 kg, 32.1 mol) over 25 mins [temp kept <25°C]. The mixture was stirred at 20°C for 16 hours then cooled to -37°C and 37% hydrochloric acid (3.1 kg, 31 mol) was added over 5 mins [temp kept <-10°C]. The mixture was cooled to -40°C and methylhydrazine (1 .42 kg, 30.8 mol) was added over 7 mins [temp kept <-17°C]. The mixture was warmed to 5°C over 90 minutes, then re-cooled to 0°C and quenched by addition of 2.4M KHS04 (6.75 L, 16.2 mol) in one portion [exotherm to 27°C]. The mixture was diluted with water (25 L) and MTBE (15 L), and the layers separated. The organic layer was washed with brine (7 L) and the aqueous layers then sequentially re-extracted with MTBE (8 L). The combined organics were evaporated and azeotroped with toluene (2 L) to afford crude compound 18. Chromatography (20 kg silica, 10-40% EtOAc in hexane) afforded compound 18 (3.4 kg, ~95 wt%, 11 .4 mol, 69%) as an orange oil.

Step 4:

Ammonia (3 kg, 167 mol) was bubbled in to cooled methanol (24 L) [temp kept <18°C]. A solution of compound 18 (4.8 kg, ~95 wt%, 16.1 mol) in methanol (1 .5 L) was added over 30 minutes and the mixture stirred at 25°C for 68 hours and then at 30°C for 24 hours. Two runs (from a total of 9.68 kg of ~95 wt% Step 3) were combined and concentrated to ~13 L volume. Water (30 L) was slowly added over 80 minutes, keeping the temperature 30 to 40°C. The resulting slurry was cooled to 20°C, filtered, washed with water (12 L) and pulled dry on the filter overnight. The solids were triturated in MTBE (8 L) and hexane (8 L) at 45°C then re-cooled to 15°C, filtered, washed with hexane (4 L) and dried under vacuum to afford compound 19 (7.95 kg, 29.6 mol, 90%) as an off-white solid.

Step 5:

To compound 19 (7.0 kg, 26.1 mol) in DCM (30 L) at 0°C was added triethylamine (5.85 kg, 57.8 mol). The mixture was further cooled to -6°C then trifluoroacetic anhydride (5.85 kg, 27.8 mol) added over 90 minutes [temp kept 0 to 5°C]. TLC assay showed the reaction was incomplete. Additional triethylamine (4.1 kg, 40.5 mol) and trifluoroacetic acid (4.1 kg, 19.5 mol) were added over 2 hours until TLC showed complete reaction. The reaction mixture was quenched in to water (40 L) [temp to 23°C]. The layers were separated and the aqueous re-extracted with DCM (8 L). The organic layers were sequentially washed with brine (7 L), filtered through a pad of silica (3 kg) and eluted with DCM (10 L). The filtrate was evaporated and chromatographed (9 kg silica, eluent 10-30% EtOAc in hexane). Product fractions were evaporated and azeotroped with IPA to afford compound 20 (6.86 kg, -94 wt%, 25.8 mol, 99%) as an orange oil.

Step 6:

To compound 20 (6.86 kg, -94 wt%, 25.8 mol) in IPA (35 L) at 17°C was added 37% hydrochloric acid (6.4 L, 77.4 mol). The mixture was heated to 35°C overnight then concentrated to a moist solid and residual water azeotroped with additional IPA (8 L). The resulting moist solid was triturated with MTBE (12 L) at 45°C for 30 minutes then cooled to 20°C and filtered, washing with MTBE (5 L). The solids were dried under vacuum at 45°C to afford compound 21 (4.52 kg, 24.2 mol, 94%) as a white solid. 1H-NMR was consistent with desired product; mp 203-205°C; HPLC 99.3%. 1H NMR (CD3OD, 400 MHz) δ 7.12 (1 H, s), 4.28 (2H, s), 4.09 (3H, s), 2.77 (3H, s). 13C NMR (CD3OD, 100 MHz) δ 144.5, 177.8, 1 14.9, 110.9, 45.9, 39.0, 33.2. LCMS (M++1) 151 .1 , 138.0, 120.0.

PATENT

WO2013132376

PATENT

WO 2016089208

PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017021823&redirectedID=true

Preparation of the free base of lorlatinib as an amorphous solid is disclosed in

International Patent Publication No. WO 2013/132376 and in United States Patent No. 8,680,1 1 1 . Solvated forms of lorlatinib free base are disclosed in International Patent Publication No. WO 2014/207606.

Example 1

Lab Scale Preparation of Form 7 of (10 ?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?l[2,5,1 l lbenzoxadiazacyclotetra-decine- -carbonitrile (lorlatinib) Free Base

[AcOH solvate]

Form 7 of lorlatinib free base was prepared by de-solvation of the acetic acid solvate of lorlatinib (Form 3), prepared as described in International Patent Publication No. WO 2014/207606, via an intermediate methanol solvate hydrate form of lorlatinib (Form 2).

The acetic acid solvate of lorlatinib (Form 3) (5 g, 10.72 mmol) was slurried in methanol

(10 mL/g, 1235.9 mmol) at room temperature in an Easymax flask with magnetic stirring to which triethylamine (1 .2 equiv., 12.86 mmol) was added over 10 minutes. The resulting solution was heated to 60°C and water (12.5 mL/g, 3469.3 mmol) was added over 10 minutes, while maintaining a temperature of 60°C. Crystallization was initiated by scratching the inside of the glass vessel to form a rapidly precipitating suspension which was triturated to make the system mobile. The suspension was then cooled to 25°C over 1 hour, then cooled to 5°C and granulated for 4 hours. The white slurry was filtered and washed with 1 mL/g chilled

water/methanol (1 :1) then dried under vacuum at 50°C overnight to provide the methanol solvate hydrate Form 2 of lorlatinib.

Form 7 was then prepared via a re-slurry of the methanol solvate hydrate Form 2 of lorlatinib in heptane. 100 mg of lorlatinib Form 2 was weighed into a 4-dram vial and 3 mL of heptane was added. The mixture was slurried at room temperature on a roller mixer for 2 hours. Form conversion was confirmed by PXRD revealing complete form change to Form 7 of lorlatinib free base.

Paper

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm500261q

*E-mail: ted.w.johnson@pfizer.com. Phone: (858) 526-4683., *E-mail: paul.f.richardson@pfizer.com. Phone: (858) 526-4290.

Abstract Image

Although crizotinib demonstrates robust efficacy in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients, progression during treatment eventually develops. Resistant patient samples revealed a variety of point mutations in the kinase domain of ALK, including the L1196M gatekeeper mutation. In addition, some patients progress due to cancer metastasis in the brain. Using structure-based drug design, lipophilic efficiency, and physical-property-based optimization, highly potent macrocyclic ALK inhibitors were prepared with good absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME), low propensity for p-glycoprotein 1-mediated efflux, and good passive permeability. These structurally unusual macrocyclic inhibitors were potent against wild-type ALK and clinically reported ALK kinase domain mutations. Significant synthetic challenges were overcome, utilizing novel transformations to enable the use of these macrocycles in drug discovery paradigms. This work led to the discovery of 8k (PF-06463922), combining broad-spectrum potency, central nervous system ADME, and a high degree of kinase selectivity.

Discovery of (10R)-7-Amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]-benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile (PF-06463922), a Macrocyclic Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) and c-ros Oncogene 1 (ROS1) with Preclinical Brain Exposure and Broad-Spectrum Potency against ALK-Resistant Mutations

La Jolla Laboratories, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 10770 Science Center Drive, San Diego, California 92121, United States
J. Med. Chem., 2014, 57 (11), pp 4720–4744
DOI: 10.1021/jm500261q
(10R)-7-Amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile (8k)
white solid:
TLC Rf = 0.40 (70% EtOAc in cyclohexane);
LC–MS (ESI), m/z 407.1 [M + H]+;
1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.83 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 1 H), 7.30 (dd, J = 9.6, 2.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.21 (dd, J = 8.4, 5.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.99 (dt, J = 8.0, 2.8 Hz, 1 H), 6.86 (d, J = 1.2 Hz, 1 H), 5.75–5.71 (m, 1 H), 4.84 (s, 2 H), 4.45 (d, J = 14.4 Hz, 1 H), 4.35 (d, J = 14.4 Hz, 1 H), 4.07 (s, 3 H), 3.13 (s, 3 H), 1.79 (d, J = 6.4 Hz, 3 H).

References

1H NMR PREDICT

13C NMR PREDICT

Lorlatinib
Lorlatinib.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
PO
Legal status
Legal status
  • experimental
Identifiers
CAS Number 1454846-35-5
ChemSpider 32813339
Chemical and physical data
Formula C22H20FN5O2
Molar mass 405.43 g·mol−1
3D model (Jmol) Interactive image

///////////////////Lorlatinib, PF-6463922,  anti-neoplastic,  Pfizer,  ROS1,  ALK, phase 2, UNII:OSP71S83EU, лорлатиниб لورلاتينيب 洛拉替尼 Orphan Drug, PF 6463922

Fc2ccc3C(=O)N(C)Cc1nn(C)c(C#N)c1c4cc(O[C@H](C)c3c2)c(N)nc4

MK 0633, SETILEUTON


SETILEUTON.pngstr1

Figure

MK 0633, SETILEUTON

(-)-enantiomer

910656-27-8 CAS free form

MW 463.3817, C22 H17 F4 N3 O4  FREE FORM

Tosylate cas 1137737-87-1

2H-1-Benzopyran-2-one, 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-7-[[[5-[(1S)-1-hydroxy-1-(trifluoromethyl)propyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]amino]methyl]-

4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-7-[[[5-[(1S)-1-hydroxy-1-(trifluoromethyl)propyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl]amino]methyl]-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one

Image result for Merck Frosst Canada Ltd.

WO2006099735A1

Inventors Thiadiazole substituted coumarin derivatives and their use as leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor
WO 2006099735 A1Marc Blouin, Erich L. Grimm, Yves Gareau, Marc Gagnon, Helene Juteau, Sebastien Laliberte, Bruce Mackay, Richard Friesen
Applicant Merck Frosst Canada Ltd.

Image result for Merck Frosst Canada Ltd.

MK-0633 had been in early clinical development for several indications, including the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and atherosclerosis

Leukotriene metabolism plays a central role in inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and atherosclerosis. In particular, the activation of the enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and its associated protein, 5-LO activating protein (FLAP), initiates a cascade that transforms arachidonic acid into inflammatory leukotrienes

Inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis has been an active area of pharmaceutical research for many years. The leukotrienes constitute a group of locally acting hormones, produced in living systems from arachidonic acid. Leukotrienes are potent contractile and inflammatory mediators deπved by enzymatic oxygenation of arachidonic acid by 5-hρoxygenase. One class of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitors are those known to act through inhibition of 5 -lipoxygenase (5-LO).
The major leukotrienes are Leukotriene B4 (abbreviated as LTB4), LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4. The biosynthesis of these leukotrienes begins with the action of the enzyme 5-lipoxygenases on arachidonic acid to produce the epoxide known as Leukotriene A4 (LT A4), which is converted to the other leukotπenes by subsequent enzymatic steps. Further details of the biosynthesis as well as the metabolism of the leukotπenes are to be found in the book Leukotrienes and Lipoxygenases, ed. J. Rokach, Elsevier, Amsterdam (1989). The actions of the leukotπenes in living systems and their contπbution to various diseases states are also discussed in the book by Rokach.
In general, 5 -LO inhibitors have been sought for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, asthma and inflammatory conditions including arthπtis. One example of a 5-LO inhibitor is the marketed drug zileuton (ZYLOFT®) which is indicated for the treatment of asthma. More recently, it has been reported that 5-LO may be an important contributor to the atherogenic process; see Mehrabian, M. et al., Circulation Research, 2002 JuI 26, 91(2): 120-126.
Despite significant therapeutic advances in the treatment and prevention of conditions affected by 5-LO inhibition, further treatment options are needed. The instant invention addresses that need by providing novel 5-LO inhibitors which are useful for inhibiting leukotriene biosynthesis.

Image result for mk 0633

Synthesis of coumarin intermediate in MK-0633. Reagents and conditions: a) 2.7 M H2SO4 (1 mL/1 mmol), 1.1 equiv. NaNO2, –5 °C, 15 min, 1.5 equiv. KI (1 M H2SO4, 1 mL/0.5 mmol), 0–70 °C, 20 min; b) 1.5 equiv. CuCN, DMF, 110 °C, 24 h, 72 % (over two steps); c) 0.05 equiv. H2SO4, MeOH, 60 °C, 12 h, 81 %; d) 2.5 equiv. 2 M AlMe3, 1.5 equiv. NH(OMe)Me·HCl, THF, room temp., 24 h, 86 %; e) 4.0 equiv. C6H4FMgBr, THF, 0 °C to room temp., 3 h, 74 %; f) toluene, reflux, 24 h, 83 %.

Study of the Chemoselectivity of Grignard Reagent Addition to Substrates Containing Both Nitrile and Weinreb Amide Funct…

Article · Aug 2013 · European Journal of Organic Chemistry
Paper
Synthesis of 4-arylcoumarins via palladium-catalyzed arylation/cyclization of ortho-hydroxylcinnamates with diaryliodonium salts
Tetrahedron Letters (2015), 56, (24), 3809-3812

An efficient method for the palladium-catalyzed arylation/cyclization of ortho-hydroxylcinnamate ester derivatives with diaryliodonium salts is described. A range of 4-arylcoumarins are obtained in good to excellent yield. Furthermore, the route can be applied to the synthesis of versatile building block of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor.

Image for unlabelled figure

PATENT

WO 2006099735

EXAMPLE 7
(+) and (-)-4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-7-[(|5-[l-hvdroxy-l-(tnfluoromethyl)propyn-K3,4-oxadiazol-2-vUammo)methyl1-2H-chromen-2-one
Step 1: Ethyl 2-hvdroxy-2-(trifluoromethyl)butanoate

To a -78 0C solution of ethyl tπfluoropyruvate (129 0 g 758 mmol) in ether was added dropwise withm 90 mm a solution of EtMgBr 3.0 M m ether (252 mL). The solution was brought over one Ih to ca. -10 0C and poured over 2L of saturated NH4Cl. The layers were separated and the aqueous phase extracted with ether (3 X 500 mL) The organic phases were combined, dried over MgSO4 and the solvent removed. Distillation at 50-65 0C (30 mm Hg) gave the title compound. 1H NMR (400 MHz, acetone- d6): δ 5.4 (s, IH), 4.35 (q, 2H), 2.07 (m, IH), 1.83 (m, IH), 1.3 (t, 3H) and 0.93 (t, 3H).
Step 2: 2-Hvdroxy-2-(tπfluoromethyl)butanohvdrazide

The ethyl ester of step 1 (50.04 g, 250 mmol) and hydrazine hydrate (25.03 g, 50 mmol) were heated at 80 0C for 18 h. The excess hydrazine was removed under vacuum and the crude product was filtered through a pad of silica gel with EtOAc-Hexane (ca. 3L) to furnish the title compound. 1H NMR (400 MHz, acetone-d6): δ 9.7 (s, IH), 6.10 (s, IH), 2.25 (m, IH), 1.85 (m, IH) and 0.95 t, (3H). Step 3: 2-(5-Ammo-l ,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)-l , 1 , l-tπfluorobutan-2-ol

To hydrazide (34.07 g, 183 mmol) of step 2 m 275 mL of water was added KHCO3 (18.33 g, 183 mmol) followed by BrCN (19.39 g, 183 mmol) portionwise. After 3h, the solid was filtered, washed with cold water and dπed to afford the title compound. Additional compound could be recovered from the aqueous phase by extraction (ether-hexane, 1:1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, acetone-d6): δ 6.54 (s, 2H), 6.01 (s, IH), 2.22 (m, IH), 2.08 (m, IH) and 0.99 (m, 3H).
Step 4: 4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-7-|Y { 5-[ 1 -hydroxy- 1 -(tnfluoromethyl)propyll -1,3,4- oxadiazol-2-yl}amino)methyl1-2H-chromen-2-one


A mixture of oxadiazole (14.41 g, 68.2 mmol) of step 3 and 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-7-carbaldehyde (14.1 g, 52.5 mmol) in toluene (160 mL) with 10% of PPTS was brought to reflux and let go overnight. The system was equipped with a Dean-Stark trap to collect water. The solvent was removed and the crude oil (1H NMR (400 MHz, acetone-d6): δ 9.33 (IH, s, imme)) obtained was diluted in EtOH (ca. 75 mL) at 0 0C. To this solution was added NaBH4 (1.9 g) portionwise and the reaction was quenched with a solution OfNH4Cl after 45 mm. The mixture was saturated with NaCl and extracted with EtOAc (3 X 200 mL). The organic phases were combined and dried over MgSO4.
Purification over silica gel chromatography using toluene-EtOAc (55.45) gave the title compound . 1H NMR (400 MHz, acetone-d6): δ 7.65 (m, 2H), 7.50 (m, 3H), 7.38 (m, 3H), 6.35 (s, IH), 6.06 (s, IH), 4.70 (m, 2H), 2.21 (m, IH), 2.11 (m, IH) and 0.98 (t, 3H).
Step 5: Separation on chiral HPLC column of (+) and (-) enantiomers of 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-7- [((5-ri-hvdroxy-l-(trifluoromethyl)propyl1-l,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl}amino)methvn-2H- chromen-2-one

A solution of (±)-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-7-[({5-[l-hydroxy-l-(trifluoromethyl)propyl]-l,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl}amino)methyl]-2H-chromen-2-one (0.5-0.6 g) in EtOΗ-Ηexane (30:70, ca. 40 mL) was injected onto a CΗIRALPAK AD® preparative (5cm x 50cm) ΗPLC column (eluting with
EtOΗ/Ηexane, 30/70 with UV detection at 280 nm). The enantiomers were separated with the faster eluting enantiomer having a retention time of – 34 mm for the (-)-enantiomer and the slower eluting enantiomer having a retention time of ~ 49 mm for the (+)-enantiomer.

PAPER

The Discovery of Setileuton, a Potent and Selective 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor

Merck Frosst Centre for Therapeutic Research, 16711 Trans Canada Highway, Kirkland, Quebec, Canada H9H 3L1
ACS Med. Chem. Lett., 2010, 1 (4), pp 170–174
DOI: 10.1021/ml100029k
Publication Date (Web): April 13, 2010
Copyright © 2010 American Chemical Society
*To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: yves_ducharme@merck.com.
Abstract Image
The discovery of novel and selective inhibitors of human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is described. These compounds are potent, orally bioavailable, and active at inhibiting leukotriene biosynthesis in vivo in a dog PK/PD model. A major focus of the optimization process was to reduce affinity for the human ether-a-go-go gene potassium channel while preserving inhibitory potency on 5-LO. These efforts led to the identification of inhibitor (S)-16 (MK-0633, setileuton), a compound selected for clinical development for the treatment of respiratory diseases.
4-(4-fluorophenyl)-7-[({5-[(2R)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-hydroxybutan-2-yl]- 1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl}amino)methyl]-2H-chromen-2-one ((R)-16) and 4-(4- fluorophenyl)-7-[({5-[(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-hydroxybutan-2-yl]-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2- yl}amino)methyl]-2H-chromen-2-one ((S)-16)
str1
A solution of (±)-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-7-[({5-[1-hydroxy-1-(trifluoromethyl)propyl]-1,3,4- oxadiazol-2-yl}amino)methyl]-2H-chromen-2-one (16) (0.5-0.6 g) in EtOH-Hexane (30:70, ca. 40 mL) was injected on a CHIRALPAK AD preparative (5 cm x 50 cm) HPLC column (eluting with EtOH/Hexane, 30/70 with UV detection at 280 nm). The enantiomers were separated with the fast-eluting enantiomer having a retention time of ~ 34 min for the (-) and the slow-eluting enantiomer having a retention time of ~ 49 min for the (+)-enantiomer.
4-(4-fluorophenyl)-7-[({5-[(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-hydroxybutan-2-yl]-1,3,4-oxadiazol- 2-yl}amino)methyl]-2H-chromen-2-one ((S)-16, MK-0633, setileuton):
str1
A mixture of oxadiazole (S)-35 (41.9 g, 156 mmol) and aldehyde 25 (39.2 g, 186 mmol) in toluene (2 L) with 10% of pyridinium p-toluenesulfonate was refluxed overnight. The system was equipped with a Dean-Stark apparatus to collect water. The solvent was removed and the crude oil [1 H NMR (400 MHz, acetone-d6): δ 9.33 (s, 1H, imine)] obtained was diluted in THF (600 mL) and EtOH (100 mL). To this solution was added at 0 o C NaBH4 (7.2 g) portionwise. After 1 h of stirring, aqueous ammonium acetate was added. The mixture was extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined organic fractions were washed with brine, dried over Na2SO4, filtered and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified on silica gel (toluene/EtOAc; 1:1) to give the title compound (39.4 g, 54%).
FREE FORM
1 H NMR (400 MHz, acetone-d6): δ 7.65 (m, 2H), 7.50 (m, 3H), 7.38 (m, 3H), 6.35 (s, 1H), 6.06 (s, 1H), 4.70 (m, 2H), 2.21 (m, 1H), 2.11 (m, 1H), 0.98 (t, 3H);
HRMS calcd for C22H17F4N3O4 [MH+]: 464.1233; found: 464.1228.
PATENT
Image result for mk 0633

CLIP

J. Org. Chem. 2010, 75, 4154−4160

Synthesis of a 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor

 Abstract Image

Practical, chromatography-free syntheses of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor MK-0633 p-toluenesulfonate (1) are described. The first route used an asymmetric zincate addition to ethyl 2,2,2-trifluoropyruvate followed by 1,3,4-oxadiazole formation and reductive amination as key steps. An improved second route features an inexpensive diastereomeric salt resolution of vinyl hydroxy-acid 22 followed by a robust end-game featuring a through-process hydrazide acylation/1,3,4-oxadiazole ring closure/salt formation sequence to afford MK-0633 p-toluenesulfonate (1).


Leukotriene metabolism plays a central role in inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and atherosclerosis. In particular, the activation of the enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and its associated protein, 5-LO activating protein (FLAP), initiates a cascade that transforms arachidonic acid into inflammatory leukotrienes. Consequently, compounds that can inhibit 5-LO have potential as new treatments for the conditions listed above. Gosselin and co-workers at Merck describe two routes towards one such compound (MK-0633) brought forward as a development candidate at Merck ( J. Org. Chem. 2010, 75, 4154−4160). The first route used an asymmetric zincate addition to ethyl 2,2,2-trifluoropyruvate followed by 1,3,4-oxadiazole formation and reductive amination as key steps. An improved second route (shown here) featured an inexpensive diastereomeric salt resolution of a vinyl hydroxy-acid followed by a through-process hydrazide acylation/1,3,4-oxadiazole ring-closure/salt-formation sequence to afford MK-0633 as the p-toluenesulfonate salt.

A Practical Synthesis of 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitor MK-0633

Department of Process Research, Merck Frosst Centre for Therapeutic Research, 16711 Route Transcanadienne, Kirkland, Québec, Canada H9H 3L1
Department of Process Research, Merck Research Laboratories, P.O. Box 2000, Rahway, New Jersey 07065
J. Org. Chem., 2010, 75 (12), pp 4154–4160
DOI: 10.1021/jo100561u
MK-0633 tosylate salt (1) was obtained as a white solid (6.64 kg, 91.4% yield): mp 164−165 °C;
[α]20D − 0.86 (c 10.0, EtOH);
1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.58 (1 H, t, J = 6.2 Hz), 7.62 (2 H, dd, J = 8.3, 5.4 Hz), 7.49 (2 H, d, J = 7.8 Hz), 7.47−7.38 (4 H, m), 7.33 (1 H, d, J = 8.3 Hz), 7.13 (2 H, d, J = 7.7 Hz), 6.44 (1 H, s), 4.53 (2 H, d, J = 5.6 Hz), 2.30 (3 H, s), 2.17−2.05 (1 H, m), 2.03−1.93 (1 H, m), 0.90 (3 H, t, J = 7.37 Hz);
13C NMR (125 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 164.1, 162.9 (d, J = 246.8 Hz), 159.6, 156.1, 153.7, 153.6, 145.5, 143.7, 137.7, 131.1 (d, J = 3.5 Hz), 130.9 (d, J = 8.7 Hz), 128.1, 126.8, 125.4, 124.5 (q, J = 286.6 Hz), 123.5, 117.4, 115.9 (d, J = 22.0 Hz), 115.4, 114.7, 73.7 (q, J = 28.6 Hz), 45.4, 26.1, 20.8, 7.0;
19F NMR (375 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ −79.7, −113.1;
HRMS calcd for C22H18F4N3O4 [M + H] 464.1228, found 464.1246.
IR (cm−1, NaCl thin film) 3324, 3010, 2977, 1735, 1716, 1618, 1510, 1428, 1215, 1178.
HPLC analysis: eclipse XDB-phenyl column 4.6 mm × 15 cm (0.1% aq H3PO4/CH3CN 65:35 to 10:90 over 50 min, 1.0 mL/min, 210 nm, 25 °C); MK-0633 (1) tR = 16.86 min. Chiral HPLC analysis: Chiralpak AD-H column 4.6 mm × 25 cm (EtOH/hexane 60:40, hold 15 min, 0.5 mL/min, 300 nm, 30 °C); (S)-enantiomer tR = 9.5 min; (R)-enantiomer tR = 11.5 min.
1 to 6 of 6
Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2016193168 Treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension with Leukotriene Inhibitors 2015-11-30 2016-07-07
US2013251787 Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension with Leukotriene Inhibitors 2013-03-15 2013-09-26
US7915298 Compounds and methods for leukotriene biosynthesis inhibition 2009-04-02 2011-03-29
US2009227638 Novel Pharmaceutical Compounds 2009-09-10
US7553973 Pharmaceutical compounds 2007-06-28 2009-06-30
US2009030048 Novel pharmaceutical compounds 2009-01-29
/////////////MK 0633, PHASE 2
CCC(C1=NN=C(O1)NCC2=CC3=C(C=C2)C(=CC(=O)O3)C4=CC=C(C=C4)F)(C(F)(F)F)O

Brigatinib, Бригатиниб, بريغاتينيب , 布格替尼 ,


ChemSpider 2D Image | Brigatinib | C29H39ClN7O2PImage result for BrigatinibFigure imgf000127_0001

Brigatinib, AP26113
Molecular Formula: C29H39ClN7O2P
Molecular Weight: 584.102 g/mol
CAS 1197953-54-0
2,4-Pyrimidinediamine, 5-chloro-N4-[2-(dimethylphosphinyl)phenyl]-N2-[2-methoxy-4-[4-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-1-piperidinyl]phenyl]-
Бригатиниб[Russian][INN]
بريغاتينيب[Arabic][INN]
布格替尼[Chinese][INN]
5-chloro-N4-[2-(dimethylphosphinyl)phenyl]-N2-[2-methoxy-4-[4-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-1-piperidinyl]phenyl]-2,4-pyrimidinediamine
AP-26113
MFCD29472221
UNII:HYW8DB273J
In 2016, orphan drug designation was assigned to the compound in the U.S. for the treatment of ALK, ROS1 or EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Inventors Yihan Wang, Wei-Sheng Huang, Shuangying Liu, William C. Shakespeare, R. Mathew Thomas, Jiwei Qi, Feng Li, Xiaotian Zhu, Anna Kohlmann, David C. Dalgarno, Jan Antoinette C. Romero, Dong Zou
Applicant Ariad Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Image result for Yihan Wang ARIAD

Yihan Wang

Dr. Wang founded Shenzhen TargetRx, Inc., in Aug 2014 and is now the  President/CEO. He  was the Associate Director of Chemistry at ARIAD  Pharmaceuticals, Inc., until April 2013.  Yihan Wang received his B.Sc. in  chemistry from University of Science and Technology of  China, and Ph.D.  in chemistry from New York University. Yihan’s research has focused    primarily on medicinal chemistry in the area of signal transduction drug  discovery,  integrating structure-based drug design, combinatorial  chemistry, and both biological and  pharmacological assays to identify  small-molecule clinical candidates. His career at ARIAD  includes innovative research in therapeutic areas involving bone diseases and cancer, and has  been a key contributor to the discovery of several clinical drugs, including Ponatinib (iClusigTM) (approved by the FDA for resistant CML in Dec 2012), Brigatinib (AP26113, Phase II for NSCLC), Ridoforolimus (Phase III for Sarcoma and multiple Phase II), and several pre-clinical compounds. Yihan is the primary author of approximately 90 peer-reviewed publications, patents, and invited meeting talks. Yihan is the editor of “Chemical Biology and Drug Design” and a reviewer for many professional journals.

Yihan is one of the co-founders of Chinese-American BioMedical Association (CABA) and currently on the Board of Directors.

EXAMPLE 19:

5-chloro-Λ’4-[4-(dimethylphosphoryl)phenyl]-Λr2-{2-methoxy-4-[4-(4-methylpiperazin-l- yl)piperidin-l-yI]phenyl}pyrimidine-2,4-diamine:

Figure imgf000127_0001

2,5-dichloro-N-[4-(dimethylphosphoryl)plienyl]pyrimiclin-4-amine: To a solution of 2,4,5- trichloropyrimindine (0.15ml, 1.31 mmol) in 1 mL of DMF was added 4- (dimethylphosphoryl)aniline (0.22 Ig, 1.31 mmol) and potassium carbonate (0.217g, 1.57mmol). The mixture was heated at 110 0C for 4h. It was basified with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution. The suspension was filtered and washed with ethyl acetate to give the final product (0.15g, 36% yield). MS/ES+: m/z=316.

l-[l-(3-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)piperidin-4-yl]-4-methylpiperazine: To a solution of 5- fluoro-2-nitroanisooIe (0.5g, 2.92 mmol) in 3 mL of DMF was added l-methyl-4- (piperidin)piperazine (0.536g, 2.92 mmol) and potassium carbonate (0.808, 5.84 mmol). The mixture was heated at 120 0C for 18h. The mixture was basified with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution and extracted with ethyl acetate. The organic layer was purified by chromatography to give final product as yellow solid (0.95g, 95% yield). MS/ES+: m/z=334.

2-methoxy-4-[4-(4-methylpiperazin-l-yl)piperidin-l-yl]aniline: The a solution of 1 -[I -(3- methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)piperidin-4-yl]-4-methylpiperazine (0.3g, 0.90 mmol) in 10 mL of ethanol purged with argon was added 10% Palladium on carbon (0.06Og). The hydrogenation was finished under 30psi after 4h. The mixture was passed through Celite to a flask containing HCl in ethanol. Concentration of the filtrate gave the final product (0.15g, 88% yield). MS/ES+: m/z=334.

S-chloro-JSP-ft-ζdimethylphosphorytyphenyll-rf-ft-methoxy^-ft-ø-methylpiperazin-l- yl)piperidin-l-yl]phenyl}pyrimidine-2,4-diamine: To the compound 2,5-dichloro-N-[4-

(dimethylphosphoryl)phenyl]pyrimidin-4-amine (0.005g, O.lόmmol) in ImL of 2-methoxyethanol was added 2-methoxy-4-[4-(4-methylpiperazin-l-yl)piperidin-l-yl]aniline (0.7 Ig, 0.16 mmol). The mixture was stirred at 1100C for 18h. The mixture was basified with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution and extracted with limited amount of ethyl acetate. The aqueous layer was purified by chromatography to give the final product (0.015g, 20% yield). MS/ES+: m/z=583.

Image result for Brigatinib
SYNTHESIS
WILL BE ADDED WATCH OUT………….
CONTD………..

SOME COLOUR

 
Dual ALK EGFR Inhibitor AP26113 is an orally available inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with potential antineoplastic activity. Brigatinib binds to and inhibits ALK kinase and ALK fusion proteins as well as EGFR and mutant forms. This leads to the inhibition of ALK kinase and EGFR kinase, disrupts their signaling pathways and eventually inhibits tumor cell growth in susceptible tumor cells. In addition, AP26113 appears to overcome mutation-based resistance. ALK belongs to the insulin receptor superfamily and plays an important role in nervous system development; ALK dysregulation and gene rearrangements are associated with a series of tumors. EGFR is overexpressed in a variety of cancer cell types.
Figure
Structures of select ALK inhibitors.

Brigatinib (previously known as AP26113) is an investigational small-molecule targeted cancer therapy being developed by ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc.[1] Brigatinib has exhibited activity as a potent dual inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

ARIAD has begun a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of brigatinib based on cancer patients’ molecular diagnoses in September 2011.

ALK was first identified as a chromosomal rearrangement in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). Genetic studies indicate that abnormal expression of ALK is a key driver of certain types of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and neuroblastomas, as well as ALCL. Since ALK is generally not expressed in normal adult tissues, it represents a highly promising molecular target for cancer therapy.

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is another validated target in NSCLC. Additionally, the T790M “gatekeeper” mutation is linked in approximately 50 percent of patients who grow resistant to first-generation EGFR inhibitors.[2] While second-generation EGFR inhibitors are in development, clinical efficacy has been limited due to toxicity thought to be associated with inhibiting the native (endogenous or unmutated) EGFR. A therapy designed to target EGFR, the T790M mutation but avoiding inhibition of native EGFR is another promising molecular target for cancer therapy.

Pre-clinical results

In 2010, ARIAD announced results of preclinical studies on brigatinib showing potent inhibition of the target protein and of mutant forms that are resistant to the first-generation ALK inhibitor, which currently is in clinical trials in patients with cancer. ARIAD scientists presented these data at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in Washington, D.C. in April.[3]

In 2011, ARIAD announced preclinical studies showing that brigatinib potently inhibited activated EGFR or its T790M mutant, both in cell culture and in mouse tumor models following once daily oral dosing. Importantly, the effective oral doses in these preclinical models were similar to those previously shown to be effective in resistant ALK models. When tested against the native form of EGFR, brigatinib lacked activity, indicating a favorable selectivity for activated EGFR. These data were presented at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 14th World Conference on Lung Cancer.[4]

Brigatinib

Phase 3 ALTA 1L trial of brigatinib

In April 2015, ARIAD announced the initiation of a randomized, first-line Phase 3 clinical trial of brigatinib in adult patients with ALK-positive locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously been treated with an ALK inhibitor. The ALTA 1L (ALK in Lung Cancer Trial of BrigAtinib in 1st Line) trial is designed to assess the efficacy of brigatinib in comparison to crizotinib based on evaluation of the primary endpoint of progression free survival (PFS).  Read Full Press Release

Phase 2 ALTA trial of brigatinib (AP26113)

In March 2014, ARIAD announced the initiation of its global Phase 2 ALTA (ALK in Lung Cancer Trial of brigatinib (AP26113) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC who test positive for the ALK oncogene and were previously treated with crizotinib. This trial has reached full enrollment of approximately 220 patients and explores two different dose levels. Read Full Press Release

Phase 1/2 study of oral ALK inhibitor brigatinib (AP26113)

The international Phase 1/2 clinical trial of brigatinib (AP26113) is being conducted in patients with advanced malignancies, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patient enrollment in the trial is complete, with the last patient enrolled in July 2014. The primary endpoint in the Phase 2 portion of the trial is overall response rate. In April 2016, ARIAD announced updated clinical data from the trial. Read Full Press Release

Expanded Access Study of brigatinib

The purpose of this Expanded Access Program (EAP) is to provide brigatinib for those patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic patients with ALK+ NSCLC on an expanded access basis due to their inability to meet eligibility criteria for on-going recruiting trials, inability to participate in other clinical trials (e.g., poor performance status, lack of geographic proximity), or because other medical interventions are not considered appropriate or acceptable.

About Brigatinib

Brigatinib (AP26113) is an investigational, targeted cancer medicine discovered internally at ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. It is in development for the treatment of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell cancer (NSCLC) whose disease is resistant to crizotinib. Brigatinib is currently being evaluated in the global Phase 2 ALTA (ALK in Lung Cancer Trial of AP26113) trial that is anticipated to form the basis for its initial regulatory review. ARIAD has also initiated the Phase 3 ALTA 1L trial to assess the efficacy of brigatinib in comparison to crizotinib. In June 2016, an Expanded Access Study of brigatinib will begin. More information on brigatinib clinical trials, including the expanded access program (EAP) for ALK+ NSCLC can be found here.

Brigatinib was granted orphan drug designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in May 2016 for the treatment of certain subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The designation is for anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK+), c-ros 1 oncogene positive (ROS1+), or epidermal growth factor receptor positive (EGFR+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Brigatinib received breakthrough therapy designation from the FDA in October 2014 for the treatment of patients with ALK+ NSCLC whose disease is resistant to crizotinib. Both designations were based on results from an ongoing Phase 1/2 trial that showed anti-tumor activity of brigatinib in patients with ALK+ NSCLC, including patients with active brain metastases.

We are on track to file for approval of brigatinib in the U.S. in the third quarter of 2016.

Brigatinib.png

PATENT

WO 2016065028

https://google.com/patents/WO2016065028A1?cl=ru

Brigatinib has the chemical formula C29H39QN7G2P which, corresponds to a formula weight of 584.09 g/moL Its chemical structure is shown below:

Brigatinib is a multi-targeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor useful for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other diseases, it is a potent inhibitor of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase} and is in clinical development for the treatment of adult patients with ALK-driven NSCLC. Crizotinib (XALKOR!®) is an FDA approved drug for first-line treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. “Despite initial responses to crizotinib, the majority of patients have a relapse within 12 months, owing to the development of resistance.” Shaw et al., New Eng. J. Med. 370:1 189-97 2014. Thus, a growing population of cancer patients are in need of new and effective therapies for ALK-positive cancers.

Brigatinib is also potentially useful for treating other diseases or conditions in which ALK or other protein kinases inhibited by brigatinib are implicated. Such kinases and their associated disorders or conditions are disclosed in WO 2009/143389, both of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference for all purposes.

FIG. 1 is a synthetic scheme for brigatinib,

FIG. 6 is an 1H-Niv1R spectrum obtained for a sample of brigatinib dissolved in CD3OD. Normalised intensity is shown on the vertical axis and chemical shift (ppm) is shown on the horizontal axis.

FIG. 7 is a 13C-NMR spectrum obtained for a sample of brigatinib dissolved in CDCi3. Normalized intensity is shown on the vertical axis and chemical shift (ppm) is shown on the horizontal axis.

FIG. 8 is a mass spectral fragmentation pattern of a sample of brigatinib Form A. Relative abundance is shown on the vertical axis and atomic weight (m/z) is shown on the horizontal axis.

Table 2 summarizes the relevant chemical shift data of Form A obtained from

the Ή, and 13C-N R experiments. The number of signals and their relative intensity (integrals) confinri the number of protons and carbons in the structure of Form A of brigatinib. The 31P-NMR chemical shift for the single phosphorous atom in brigatinib was 43.6 ppm. These 1H and 13C-NMR chemical shift data are reported according to the atom numbering scheme shown immediately below:

1H-N R Assignments – 13C~N R Assignments

Table 2: 1H and 3C Chemical Shift Data (in ppm) of Form A of Brigatinib

[00118] With reference to Figure 8, mass spectral experiments of Form A were carried out using an Agilsent eiectrospray time of fisght mass spectrometer (Model 6210} operating in positive son mode using flow injection sampie introduction. Samples of Form A were dissolved in methanol/water and were analyzed and the mass observed was m/ 584.263 ( +f-T) with the calculated exact mass being 584.2684 ( +H+). The observed moiecuiar mass is consistent with the elemental composition calculated from the molecular formula of brigatinib.

PAPER

Discovery of Brigatinib (AP26113), a Phosphine Oxide-Containing, Potent, Orally Active Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase

Abstract

Abstract Image

In the treatment of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase positive (ALK+) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), secondary mutations within the ALK kinase domain have emerged as a major resistance mechanism to both first- and second-generation ALK inhibitors. This report describes the design and synthesis of a series of 2,4-diarylaminopyrimidine-based potent and selective ALK inhibitors culminating in identification of the investigational clinical candidate brigatinib. A unique structural feature of brigatinib is a phosphine oxide, an overlooked but novel hydrogen-bond acceptor that drives potency and selectivity in addition to favorable ADME properties. Brigatinib displayed low nanomolar IC50s against native ALK and all tested clinically relevant ALK mutants in both enzyme-based biochemical and cell-based viability assays and demonstrated efficacy in multiple ALK+ xenografts in mice, including Karpas-299 (anaplastic large-cell lymphomas [ALCL]) and H3122 (NSCLC). Brigatinib represents the most clinically advanced phosphine oxide-containing drug candidate to date and is currently being evaluated in a global phase 2 registration trial.

(2-((5-Chloro-2-((2-methoxy-4-(4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)piperidin-1-yl)phenyl)amino)-pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)phenyl)dimethylphosphine Oxide (11q)

Mp 215 °C.
1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 8.33 (dd, J = 4.52, 8.03 Hz, 1H), 8.02 (s, 1H), 7.66 (d, J = 8.78 Hz, 1H), 7.59 (ddd, J = 1.51, 7.78, 14.05 Hz, 1H), 7.47–7.54 (m, 1H), 7.25 (ddt, J = 1.00, 2.26, 7.53 Hz, 1H), 6.65 (d, J = 2.51 Hz, 1H), 6.45 (dd, J = 2.51, 8.78 Hz, 1H), 3.84 (s, 3H), 3.69 (d, J = 12.30 Hz, 2H), 2.62–2.86 (m, 6H), 2.43–2.62 (m, 4H), 2.33–2.42 (m, 1H), 2.29 (s, 3H), 1.97–2.08 (m, 2H), 1.83 (d, J = 13.30 Hz, 6H), 1.66 (dq, J = 3.89, 12.09 Hz, 2H).
13C NMR (151 MHz, CDCl3) δ 18.57 (d, J = 71.53 Hz), 28.28 (s), 46.02 (s), 49.01 (s), 50.52 (s), 55.46 (s), 55.65 (s), 61.79 (s), 101.07 (s), 106.01 (s), 108.41 (s), 120.25 (d, J = 95.73 Hz), 120.68 (s), 122.09 (s), 122.41 (d, J = 12.10 Hz), 123.13 (br d, J = 6.60 Hz), 129.48 (d, J = 11.00 Hz), 132.36 (s), 143.91 (d, J = 2.20 Hz), 147.59 (s), 149.38 (s), 154.97 (s), 155.91 (s), 157.82 (s).
31P NMR (162 MHz, CDCl3) δ 43.55.
MS/ES+: m/z = 584.3 [M + H]+.
Anal. Calcd for C29H39ClN7O2P: C, 59.63; H, 6.73; Cl, 6.07; N, 16.79; O, 5.48; P, 5.30. Found: C, 59.26; H, 6.52; Cl, 6.58; N, 16.80.
PATENT
WO 2016089208

str1

New Patent, Suzhou MiracPharma Technology Co Ltd, Brigatinib, WO 2017016410

WO-2017016410

Preparation method for antitumor drug AP26113

Suzhou MiracPharma Technology Co Ltd

SUZHOU MIRACPHARMA TECHNOLOGY CO., LTD [CN/CN]; Room 1305, Building 1,Lianfeng Commercial Plaza, Industrial District Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (CN)
XU, Xuenong; (CN)

Improved process for preparing brigatinib, useful for treating cancer eg non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The present filing represents the first PCT patenting to be seen from Suzhou MiracPharma that focuses on brigatinib;  In February 2017, brigatinib was reported to be in pre-registration phase.

Disclosed is a preparation method for an antitumor drug AP26113 (I). The method comprises the following preparation steps: cyclizing N-[2-methoxyl-4-[4-(dimethyl amino)piperid-1-yl]aniline]guanidine and N,N-dimethylamino acrylate, condensing N-[2-methoxyl-4-[4-(dimethyl amino)piperid-1-yl]aniline]guanidine and 4-(dimethyl phosphitylate)aniline, and chlorinating N-[2-methoxyl-4-[4-(dimethyl amino)piperid-1-yl]aniline]guanidine by means of a chlorinating agent, sequentially, so as to prepare AP26113 (I). The preparation method adopts easily-obtained raw materials, causes few side reactions, and is economical, environmentally-friendly, and suitable for industrial production.

front page image

AP26113 is an experimental drug developed by Ariad Pharmaceuticals to target small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive (ALK) metastases resistant to crizotinib Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The drug was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in August 2014 for breakthrough drug treatment. The current clinical data show that AP26113 on ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients, including patients with brain metastases, have a sustained anti-tumor activity. And the inhibitory activity against ALK is about 10 times that of zolotriptan, which can inhibit all 9 kinds of identified mutations of kotatinib resistant ALK.
The chemical name of AP26113 is 5-chloro-N- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxyphenyl] -N4- [2- Phosphono) phenyl] -2,4-pyrimidinediamine (I) having the structural formula:
Methods for the preparation of AP26113 have been reported. AP26113 and its starting materials A and B are prepared by PCT Patent WO2009143389 of Ariad and U.S. Patent No. 20130225527, US20130225528 and US20140066406 of Ariad. The target compound AP26113 is prepared by substituting 2,4,5-trichloropyrimidine with the pyrimidine ring of starting materials A and B in turn.
Although the synthetic procedure is simple, the nucleophilic activity of the three chlorine atoms on 2,4,5-trichloropyrimidine is limited. When the same or similar aniline group is faced, its position Selectivity will inevitably produce interference, resulting in unnecessary side effects, thus affecting the quality of the product. At the same time, the reaction process for the use of precious metal palladium reagent also increased the cost of production is not conducive to the realization of its industrialization.
Therefore, how to use modern synthesis technology, the use of readily available raw materials, design and development of simple and quick, economical and environmentally friendly and easy to industrialization of the new synthesis route, especially customer service location on the pyrimidine ring side effects of selectivity, for the drug Economic and technological development is of great significance
The synthesis step comprises the following steps: N- [2-methoxy-4- [4- (dimethylamino) piperidin-1-yl] aniline] guanidine (II) and N, N-dimethylaminoacrylates Amino-4 (1H) -pyrimidinone (III) in the presence of a base such as N, N-dimethylformamide, N, N-dimethylformamide, (III) was reacted with 4- (dimethyl (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl) -2-methoxyphenyl] (A) is condensed under the action of a condensing agent and a base accelerator to obtain N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxybenzene (IV); the N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -l- (4-fluorophenyl) (IV) with a chlorinating agent in the presence of a base such as sodium hydride, sodium hydride, sodium hydride, potassium hydride, AP26113 (I).
Example 1:
A solution of 2-methoxy-4- [4- (dimethylamino) piperidin-1-yl] aniline (24.9 g, 0.1 mol) and 250 mL of methanol was added to the reaction flask and the temperature was lowered to 0C (15 mL, 0.15 mol) and a 50% solution of cyanamide (10 mL, 0.15 mol) were added successively. The reaction was stirred for 12 to 14 hours and the reaction was complete by TLC. After cooling to 0-5 ° C, 250 mL of methyl tert-butyl ether was added to the reaction mixture. A solid precipitated and was filtered, washed successively with water and cold acetonitrile, and dried to give N- [2-methoxy- 16.3 g, yield 56.0%, FAB-MS m / z: 292 [M + H] + . [4- (Dimethylamino) piperidin-1-yl] aniline] guanidine (II)
Example 2:
A solution of N- [2-methoxy-4- [4- (dimethylamino) piperidin-1-yl] aniline] guanidine (II) (2.9 g, 10 mmol), N, Methyl methacrylate (1.8 g, 13.7 mmol) and toluene (50 mL). The mixture was heated to reflux and stirred for 24-26 hours. The reaction was complete by TLC. After cooling to room temperature, a solid precipitated. The filter cake was washed with cold methanol and dried in vacuo to give an off-white solid of N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxyphenyl] 1H) -pyrimidinone (III), yield 77.3%, FAB-MS m / z: 344 [M + H] + .
Example 3:
A solution of N- [2-methoxy-4- [4- (dimethylamino) piperidin-1-yl] aniline] guanidine (II) (2.9 g, 10 mmol), N, (2.0 g, 14.0 mmol) and N, N-dimethylformamide (30 mL) was added and the temperature was raised to 115-125 ° C. The reaction was stirred for 22-24 hours and the reaction was complete by TLC. The mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure, and 50 mL of ethanol was added to the resulting residue. The mixture was cooled to room temperature while stirring to precipitate a solid. The filter cake was washed with cold ethanol and dried in vacuo to give an off-white solid of N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxyphenyl] 1H) -pyrimidinone (III) in 79.6% yield, FAB-MS m / z: 344 [M + H] + .
Example 4:
A mixture of N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxyphenyl] amino-4 (1H) -pyrimidinone III) (3.43 g, 10 mmol), benzotriazol-1-yloxytris (dimethylamino) phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (6.63 g, 15 mmol) and acetonitrile 100 mL. Diazabicyclo [5.4.0] -undec-7-ene (DBU) (2.28 g, 15 mmol) was added dropwise at room temperature for 12 hours. The temperature was raised to 60 ° C and the reaction was continued for 12 hours. The solvent was evaporated under reduced pressure, 100 mL of ethyl acetate was dissolved, and the mixture was washed with 20 mL of 2M sodium hydroxide and 20 mL of water. The organic layer was dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, and 50 mL of tetrahydrofuran-dissolved 4- (dimethylphosphoranylidene) A) (2.2 g, 13 mmol) and sodium hydride (0.31 g, 13 mmol) was added and the temperature was raised to 50-55 ° C. The reaction was stirred for 6-8 hours and monitored by TLC. The reaction was quenched with saturated brine, the organic phase was separated, dried and the solvent was distilled off under reduced pressure. The crude product was recrystallized from ethanol to give an off-white solid of N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidine Yl] -2-methoxyphenyl] -N4- [2- (dimethylphosphono) phenyl] -2,4-pyrimidinediamine (IV) in a yield of 83.2%. FAB-MS m / z: 495 [M + H] + .
Example 5:
A mixture of N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxyphenyl] amino-4 (1H) -pyrimidinone (Dimethylamino) phosphonium hexafluorophosphate (BOP) (6.63 g, 15 mmol), 4- (dimethylsulfamoyl) phosphonium hexafluorophosphate Phosphoryl) aniline (A) (2.2 g, 13 mmol) and N, N-dimethylformamide. Diazabicyclo [5.4.0] undec-7-ene (DBU) (2.28 g, 15 mmol) was added dropwise and reacted at room temperature for 12 hours. The temperature was raised to 60 ° C and the reaction was continued for 12 hours. The solvent was distilled off under reduced pressure, 100 mL of ethyl acetate was added to dissolve, and the mixture was washed with 2 M sodium hydroxide 20 mL. The organic phase was separated, dried and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was recrystallized from ethanol to give an off-white solid of N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxyphenyl] -N4- [2- Phenylidene] -2,4-pyrimidinediamine (IV) was obtained in a yield of 48.6%. FAB-MS m / z: 495 [M + H] + .
Example 6:
A solution of N2- [4- [4- (dimethylamino) -1-piperidinyl] -2-methoxyphenyl] -N4- [2- (dimethylphosphono) Phenyl] -2,4-pyrimidinediamine (IV) (4.9 g, 10 mmol) and 100 mL of acetonitrile were added and stirred at room temperature. N-Chlorosuccinimide (1.6 g, 12 mmol) was added in three portions, The reaction was allowed to proceed at room temperature for 4-6 hours, and the reaction was terminated by TLC. The reaction solution was poured into 50 mL of water to quench the reaction. Dichloromethane, and the combined organic layers were washed successively with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution, saturated brine and water. Dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate and concentrated. The resulting crude oil was recrystallized from ethyl acetate / n-hexane to give 3.5 g of a white solid AP26113 (I) in 66.3% yield, FAB-MS m / z: 529 [M + the H] + , 1 the H NMR (CDCl 3 ) 1.67 (m, 2H), 1.81 (S, 3H), 1.85 (S, 3H), 1.93 (m, 2H), 1.96 (m, 2H), 2.10 (m, 2H), 3.86 (s, 3H), 6.50 (m, 1H), 6.57 (m, 1H), 7.12 (m, 1H) ), 7.31 (m, 1H), 7.50 (m, 1H), 8.13 (m, 2H), 8.64 (m, 1H).

////////////New Patent, Suzhou MiracPharma Technology Co Ltd, Brigatinib, WO 2017016410

References

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Brigatinib
Brigatinib.svg
Names
IUPAC name

(2-((5-Chloro-2-((2-methoxy-4-(4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)piperidin-1-yl)phenyl)amino)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)phenyl)dimethylphosphine oxide
Other names

AP26113
Identifiers
1197953-54-0
3D model (Jmol) Interactive image
ChemSpider 34982928
PubChem 68165256
Properties
C29H39ClN7O2P
Molar mass 584.10 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
//////////Бригатиниб, بريغاتينيب  , 布格替尼 , Brigatinib,  AP26113, PHASE 2, ORPHAN DRUG, 1197953-54-0
CN1CCN(CC1)C2CCN(CC2)C3=CC(=C(C=C3)NC4=NC=C(C(=N4)NC5=CC=CC=C5P(=O)(C)C)Cl)OC

PIMODIVIR, VX 787


Pimodivir.pngFigure imgf000331_0001

PIMODIVIR

VX-787, JNJ-63623872, JNJ-872, VRT-0928787, VX-787, VX 787,  VX787,  JNJ-872, JNJ 872, JNJ872, VRT-0928787, VRT 0928787, VRT0928787, pimodivir

(2S,3S)-3-{[5-fluoro-2-(5-fluoro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl]amino}bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic acid

(2S,3S)-3-((2-(5-fluoro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridm-3-yl)-5- fluoropyrimidin-4-yl)amino)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic acid

(2S,3S)-3-((5-Fluoro-2-(5-fluoro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic Acid

MF C20H19F2N5O2, MW 399.4018

CAS 1629869-44-8

PHASE 2

Originator Vertex Pharmaceuticals
Developer Janssen Pharmaceuticals
Mechanism Of Action Viral polymerase inhibitor, Viral protein inhibitor
Who Atc Codes J05A-X (Other antivirals)
Ephmra Codes J5B4 (Influenza antivirals)
Indication Influenza A
Paul Charifson, Michael P. Clark, Upul K. Bandarage, Randy S. Bethiel, John J. Court,Hongbo Deng, Ioana Drutu, John P. Duffy, Luc Farmer, Huai Gao, Wenxin Gu, Dylan H. Jacobs, Joseph M. Kennedy, Mark W. Ledeboer, Brian Ledford, Francois Maltais,Emanuele Perola, Tiansheng Wang, M. Woods Wannamaker, Less «
INNOVATOR Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated

Pimodivir (also known as VX-787, JNJ-872 and VRT-0928787) is a novel inhibitor of influenza virus replication that blocks the PB2 cap-snatching activity of the influenza viral polymerase complex. VX-787 binds the cap-binding domain of the PB2 subunit with a KD (dissociation constant) of 24 nM as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC).

The cell-based EC50 (the concentration of compound that ensures 50% cell viability of an uninfected control) for VX-787 is 1.6 nM in a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay, with a similar EC50 in a viral RNA replication assay. VX-787 is active against a diverse panel of influenza A virus strains, including H1N1pdm09 and H5N1 strains, as well as strains with reduced susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs).

Image result for PIMODIVIR

Pimodivir hydrochloride hemihydrate
RN: 1777721-70-6
UNII: A256039515, Bicyclo(2.2.2)octane-2-carboxylic acid, 3-((5-fluoro-2-(5-fluoro-1H-pyrrolo(2,3-b)pyridin-3-yl)-4-pyrimidinyl)amino)-, hydrochloride, hydrate (2:2:1), (2S,3S)-

Molecular Formula, 2C20-H19-F2-N5-O2.2Cl-H.H2-O, Molecular Weight, 889.7348

C20 H19 F2 N5 O2 . Cl H . 1/2 H2 O
Bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic acid, 3-[[5-fluoro-2-(5-fluoro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)-4-pyrimidinyl]amino]-, hydrochloride, hydrate (2:2:1), (2S,3S)-

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, under license from Vertex Pharmaceuticals, was developing pimodivir (first disclosed in WO2010148197), a PB2 inhibitor, for treating influenza A virus infection. In December 2016, pimodivir was reported to be in phase 2 clinical development.

Influenza spreads around the world in seasonal epidemics, resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands annually – millions in pandemic years. For example, three influenza pandemics occurred in the 20th century and killed tens of millions of people, with each of these pandemics being caused by the appearance of a new strain of the virus in humans. Often, these new strains result from the spread of an existing influenza virus to humans from other animal species.

Influenza is primarily transmitted from person to person via large virus-laden droplets that are generated when infected persons cough or sneeze; these large droplets can then settle on the mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tracts of susceptible individuals who are near (e.g. within about 6 feet) infected persons. Transmission might also occur through direct contact or indirect contact with respiratory secretions, such as touching surfaces contaminated with influenza virus and then touching the eyes, nose or mouth. Adults might be able to spread influenza to others from 1 day before getting symptoms to approximately 5 days after symptoms start. Young children and persons with weakened immune systems might be infectious for 10 or more days after onset of symptoms. [00103] Influenza viruses are RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae, which comprises five genera: Influenza virus A, Influenza virus B, Influenza virus C, Isavirus and Thogoto virus.

The Influenza virus A genus has one species, influenza A virus. Wild aquatic birds are the natural hosts for a large variety of influenza A. Occasionally, viruses are transmitted to other species and may then cause devastating outbreaks in domestic poultry or give rise to human influenza pandemics. The type A viruses are the most virulent human pathogens among the three influenza types and cause the most severe disease. The influenza A virus can be subdivided into different serotypes based on the antibody response to these viruses. The serotypes that have been confirmed in humans, ordered by the number of known human pandemic deaths, are: HlNl (which caused Spanish influenza in 1918), H2N2 (which caused Asian Influenza in 1957), H3N2 (which caused Hong Kong Flu in 1968), H5N1 (a pandemic threat in the 2007-08 influenza season), H7N7 (which has unusual zoonotic potential), H1N2 (endemic in humans and pigs), H9N2, H7N2 , H7N3 and H10N7. [00105] The Influenza virus B genus has one species, influenza B virus. Influenza B almost exclusively infects humans and is less common than influenza A. The only other animal known to be susceptible to influenza B infection is the seal. This type of influenza mutates at a rate 2-3 times slower than type A and consequently is less genetically diverse, with only one influenza B serotype. As a result of this lack of antigenic diversity, a degree of immunity to influenza B is usually acquired at an early age. However, influenza B mutates enough that lasting immunity is not possible. This reduced rate of antigenic change, combined with its limited host range (inhibiting cross species antigenic shift), ensures that pandemics of influenza B do not occur.

The Influenza virus C genus has one species, influenza C virus, which infects humans and pigs and can cause severe illness and local epidemics. However, influenza C is less common than the other types and usually seems to cause mild disease in children. [00107] Influenza A, B and C viruses are very similar in structure. The virus particle is 80-120 nanometers in diameter and usually roughly spherical, although filamentous forms can occur. Unusually for a virus, its genome is not a single piece of nucleic acid; instead, it contains seven or eight pieces of segmented negative-sense RNA. The Influenza A genome encodes 11 proteins: hemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA), nucleoprotein (NP), Ml, M2, NSl, NS2(NEP), PA, PBl, PB1-F2 and PB2.

[HA and NA are large glycoproteins on the outside of the viral particles. HA is a lectin that mediates binding of the virus to target cells and entry of the viral genome into the target cell, while NA is involved in the release of progeny virus from infected cells, by cleaving sugars that bind the mature viral particles. Thus, these proteins have been targets for antiviral drugs. Furthermore, they are antigens to which antibodies can be raised. Influenza A viruses are classified into subtypes based on antibody responses to HA and NA, forming the basis of the H and N distinctions (vide supra) in, for example, H5N1. [00109] Influenza produces direct costs due to lost productivity and associated medical treatment, as well as indirect costs of preventative measures. In the United States, influenza is responsible for a total cost of over $10 billion per year, while it has been estimated that a future pandemic could cause hundreds of billions of dollars in direct and indirect costs. Preventative costs are also high. Governments worldwide have spent billions of U.S. dollars preparing and planning for a potential H5N1 avian influenza pandemic, with costs associated with purchasing drugs and vaccines as well as developing disaster drills and strategies for improved border controls.

Current treatment options for influenza include vaccination, and chemotherapy or chemoprophylaxis with anti-viral medications. Vaccination against influenza with an influenza vaccine is often recommended for high-risk groups, such as children and the elderly, or in people that have asthma, diabetes, or heart disease. However, it is possible to get vaccinated and still get influenza. The vaccine is reformulated each season for a few specific influenza strains but cannot possibly include all the strains actively infecting people in the world for that season. It takes about six months for the manufacturers to formulate and produce the millions of doses required to deal with the seasonal epidemics; occasionally, a new or overlooked strain becomes prominent during that time and infects people although they have been vaccinated (as by the H3N2 Fujian flu in the 2003-2004 influenza season). It is also possible to get infected just before vaccination and get sick with the very strain that the vaccine is supposed to prevent, as the vaccine takes about two weeks to become effective. [00111] Further, the effectiveness of these influenza vaccines is variable. Due to the high mutation rate of the virus, a particular influenza vaccine usually confers protection for no more than a few years. A vaccine formulated for one year may be ineffective in the following year, since the influenza virus changes rapidly over time, and different strains become dominant.

Also, because of the absence of RNA proofreading enzymes, the RNA- dependent RNA polymerase of influenza vRNA makes a single nucleotide insertion error roughly every 10 thousand nucleotides, which is the approximate length of the influenza vRNA. Hence, nearly every newly-manufactured influenza virus is a mutant — antigenic drift. The separation of the genome into eight separate segments of vRNA allows mixing or reassortment of vRNAs if more than one viral line has infected a single cell. The resulting rapid change in viral genetics produces antigenic shifts and allows the virus to infect new host species and quickly overcome protective immunity.

Antiviral drugs can also be used to treat influenza, with neuraminidase inhibitors being particularly effective, but viruses can develop resistance to the standard antiviral drugs.

Thus, there is still a need for drugs for treating influenza infections, such as for drugs with expanded treatment window, and/or reduced sensitivity to viral titer

U.S. Patent No. 8,829,007 discloses compounds that inhibit the replication of influenza viruses, including (2S,3S)-3-((5-fluoro-2-(5-fluoro-lH-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic acid (also known as VX-787). Boroylated intermediates are useful for preparing these compounds that inhibit the replication of influenza viruses. M. P. Clark et al., J. Med. Chem., 2014, 57-6668-6678. These borylated intermediates were previously prepared by incorporating a bromine at the position of the molecule to be borylated. For example, Clark reports preparing 5-chloro-3-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-l-tosyl-lH-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine from 3-bromo-5-fluoro-lH-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine.

Methods for preparing borylated compounds are described in U.S. Patent Publication Nos. 2008/0146814 and 2008/0167476.

Improved methods for preparing 3-boryl 7-azaindole compounds, such as 3-boryl-5-halo-7-azaindole compounds, in high yield and with no or few impurities are needed

Synthetic Scheme 1

Figure imgf000087_0001

(a) CHC13; (b) NaOMe, MeOH; (c) DPPA, Et3N, BnOH; (d) H2, Pd/C;

Synthetic Scheme 2

Figure imgf000088_0001

(a) Et3N, CH3CN; (b) cone. H2S04; (c) 9M H2S04; (d) Ag2C03, HOAc, DMSO, 100 °C; (e) X- phos, Pd2(dba)3, K3PO4, 2-methyl THF, H20, 120 °C (f) LiOH, THF, MeOH, 70 °C

Synthetic Scheme 3

Figure imgf000091_0001

(a) Et3N, THF; (b) chiral SFC separation; (c) 5-fluoro- l -(p-tolylsulfonyl)-3-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl- l,3,2-dioxaborolan-

SYNTHESIS

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2014), 57(15), 6668-6678

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm5007275

Discovery of a Novel, First-in-Class, Orally Bioavailable Azaindole Inhibitor (VX-787) of Influenza PB2

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc., 50 Northern Ave, Boston, Massachusetts 02210, United States
Vertex Pharmaceuticals (Canada) Inc., 275 Armand-Frappier, Laval, Quebec H7V 4A7, Canada
§ Arrowhead Research Corporation, 465 Science Drive, Suite C, Madison, Wisconsin 53711, United States
Sage Therapeutics, 215 First Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02141, United States
J. Med. Chem., 2014, 57 (15), pp 6668–6678
DOI: 10.1021/jm5007275
Publication Date (Web): July 14, 2014
Copyright © 2014 American Chemical Society
*Phone: 617-961-7727. E-mail: michael_clark@vrtx.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

In our effort to develop agents for the treatment of influenza, a phenotypic screening approach utilizing a cell protection assay identified a series of azaindole based inhibitors of the cap-snatching function of the PB2 subunit of the influenza A viral polymerase complex. Using a bDNA viral replication assay (Wagaman, P. C., Leong, M. A., and Simmen, K. A.Development of a novel influenza A antiviral assay. J. Virol. Methods 2002, 105, 105−114) in cells as a direct measure of antiviral activity, we discovered a set of cyclohexyl carboxylic acid analogues, highlighted by VX-787 (2). Compound 2 shows strong potency versus multiple influenza A strains, including pandemic 2009 H1N1 and avian H5N1 flu strains, and shows an efficacy profile in a mouse influenza model even when treatment was administered 48 h after infection. Compound 2represents a first-in-class, orally bioavailable, novel compound that offers potential for the treatment of both pandemic and seasonal influenza and has a distinct advantage over the current standard of care treatments including potency, efficacy, and extended treatment window.

Figure

aReagents and conditions: (a) CHCl3, 78%; (b) NaOMe, MeOH, 4 days, 85%; (c) DPPA, Et3N, BnOH, 77%; (d) H2, Pd/C, THF/MeOH, 99%; (e) 2,4-dichloro-5-fluoropyrimidine, iPr2NEt, THF, 77%; (f) SFC chiral separation; (g) 56, Pd2(dba)3, K3PO4, 2-MeTHF, water, 120 °C, 95%; (h) HCl, dioxane, MeCN, 95%; (i) NaOH, THF, MeOH, 95%.

(2S,3S)-3-((5-Fluoro-2-(5-fluoro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic Acid

1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 12.71 (br s, 1H), 8.58 (s, 1H), 8.47 (dd, J = 9.6, 2.8 Hz, 1H), 8.41 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1H), 8.39–8.34 (m, 1H), 4.89–4.76 (m, 1H), 2.94 (d, J = 6.9 Hz, 1H), 2.05 (br s, 1H), 1.96 (br s, 1H), 1.68 (complex m, 7H); 13C NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 174.96, 157.00, 155.07, 153.34, 152.97, 145.61, 142.67, 140.65, 134.24, 133.00, 118.02, 114.71, 51.62, 46.73, 28.44, 28.00, 24.90, 23.78, 20.88, 18.98; LCMS gradient 10–90%, 0.1% formic acid, 5 min, C18/ACN, tR = 2.24 min, (M + H) 400.14; HRMS (ESI) of C20H20F2N5O2 [M + H] calcd, 400.157 95; found, 400.157 56.

PATENT

WO2010148197

(1070) (2S,3S)-3-((2-(5-fluoro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridm-3-yl)-5- fluoropyrimidin-4-yl)amino)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic acid

Figure imgf000331_0001

Compound 1070 was made in a similar fashion as described above for compounds 946 and 947.

Figure imgf000330_0001

946 (+/-) 947 (+/-)

[001117] (946) (+/-)-2,3-*r«/ts-CTt</ø-3-(2-(5-chloro-1H-pyrrolo [2,3-b] pyridin-3-yl)-5- fluoropyrimidin-4-ylamino)bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid & (947) (+/-)-2,3-rr««s-^xo-3-(2-(5-chloro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)-5- fluoropyrimidin-4-ylamino)bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid

To a stirred solution of starting methyl esters, 53d, (0.076 g, 0.183 mmol) (84 : 16 = endo : exo) in THF (0.60 mL) and MeOH (0.10 mL), was added NaOH (0.10 mL of 2 M, 0.201 mmol). The reaction progress was monitored by TLC. After 30 min, additional NaOH (0.18 mL of 2 M solution, 0.37 mmol) and MeOH (0.18 mL) was added. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for a further 16 hours. The mixture was neutralized with HCl (IM) and concentrated in vacuo. Purification by preparative HPLC provided 52 mg of the major isomer (946) and 1 lmg of the minor isomer (947) as the hydrochloric acid salts.

(946) major {endo) isomer: 1H NMR (300 MHz, MeOD) δ 8.82 (d, J= 2.2 Hz, 1H), 8.48 (s, 1H), 8.39 (d, J= 2.2 Hz, 1H), 8.31 (d, J= 5.6 Hz, 1H), 5.11 (m, 1H), 2.85 (br s, 1H), 2.68 (br s, 1H), 2.62 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1H), 1.92 (d, J = 10.1 Hz, 1H) and 1.77 – 1.51 (m, 5H) ppm; LC/MS R, = 3.51, (M+H) 402.32.

(947) minor (exo) isomer: 1H NMR (300 MHz, MeOD) δ 8.87 (d, J = 2.1 Hz, 1H), 8.48 (s, 1H), 8.39 (d, J = 1.9 Hz, 1H), 8.30 (d, J = 5.7 Hz, 1H), 4.73 (d, J = 3.3 Hz, 1H), 3.12 (m, 1H), 2.76 (br s, 1H), 2.56 (d, J= 4.2 Hz, 1H), 1.86 (d, J= 9.5 Hz, 2H), 1.79 – 1.49 (complex m, 2H) and 1.51 (embedded d, J= 10.4 Hz, 2H) ppm; LC/MS R, = 3.42, (M+H) 402.32.

[001118] (1184) (2S,3S)-3-((2-(5-chloro-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)-5- fluoropyrimidin-4-yl)amino)bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2-carboxylic acid

Figure imgf000330_0002

Compound 1184 was made in a similar fashion as described above for compounds 946 and 947

PATENT

WO-2016191079

EXPERIMENTAL

Example 1: Synthesis of 3-BPin-5-bromo-7-azaindole

Chemical Formula: C7H5BrN2 Chemical Formula: Ci3H16BBrN202

Molecular Weight: 197.03 Molecular Weight: 322.99

5-fluoro-7-azaindole (1 g) and THF (10 mL) were added to a small screw-top vial fitted with a septum, argon inlet and exit needle. The flask was sparged with argon for -10 minutes. The iridium catalyst [Ir(OMe)COD]2 (0.168 mg) and 2,2′-bipyridyl (0.080 mg) were added as solids and the flask was covered with the septum and sparged with argon again for -10-15 minutes. When the catalyst was added, the reaction turned a dark red/purple. The argon was then turned off, and HBPin (1.5 mL) was added via syringe. The reaction bubbled, releasing hydrogen. The hydrogen was allowed to bubble out through the bubbler outlet and once bubbling stopped, the reaction was capped and placed in an oil bath heated to 80° C.

After approx. 20 hours, the flask was allowed to cool to room temperature and a sample was pulled from the reaction flask for HPLC analysis. The reaction was then quenched with methanol (10 mL) and allowed to stir for -5 minutes before it was concentrated in vacuo to afford a dark residue (2.44 g). The residue was dissolved in methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) (50 mL) and filtered through a silica plug (20 g, 150 mL frit). The cake was washed with MTBE (3 x 20 mL) and the filtrate was collected and concentrated in vacuo to afford 1.5 g of an off-white solid. The solid residue was taken up in 10 mL of isopropanol (IPA) and heated until it dissolved. The flask was allowed to cool to room temperature, at which point some crystals had precipitated out of solution. The flask was placed in the freezer overnight to afford white crystals.

The crystals were filtered in vacuo, washed with cold hexanes, and dried on a rotovap (yield: 0.5 g). The crystals were taken up again in hexanes (10 mL) and heated to reflux, but the crystals would not dissolve in the hexanes. Thus, the hexanes were removed on the rotovap, and the crystals were taken up in IPA (10 mL) and heated to reflux until the crystals dissolved. The flask was allowed to cool to room temperature, and then placed in the freezer overnight to crystallize, affording 300 mg (7.8 %) of product.

Example 2: Synthesis of 3-BPin-5-bromo-N-tosyl-7-azaindole

Chemical Formula: Ci4HiiBrN202S Chemical Formula: C 0H22BBrN2O4S Molecular Weight: 351.22 Molecular Weight: 477.18

A 250 mL 1-neck round bottom flask equipped with a thermocouple and argon inlet was sparged with argon for 15 minutes. 5-bromo-N-tosyl-7-azaindole (4.0 g), B2Pin2 (2.90 g), [Ir(OMe)COD]2 (0.114 g), 2,2’bipyridyl (0.054 g) and hexane (50 mL) were then added. The flask was again inerted with 3 vacuum purges. The resulting brown slurry was then heated to 60° C incrementally (setpoints: 45° C, 55° C, 58° C and 60° C) and stirred overnight.

After 15 hours at 60 ° C, HPLC of the reaction mixture indicated 3.0% starting material remaining and 94% product. After 18 hours at 60 ° C, HPLC of the reaction mixture indicated 2.7% starting material and 5% product.

The slurry was then cooled to room temperature and vacuum filtered. The solids were recombined with the mother liquor and concentrated to afford a solid. The solid was dissolved in dichloromethane (50 mL) and filtered through silica (5 g on a 60 mL frit). The plug was washed with dichloromethane (2 x 50 mL). The filtrate and washes were combined and concentrated by rotovap to approx. 50 mL. Hexane (50 mL) was added and the solution was again concentrated to approx. 50 mL. Hexane (50 mL) was again added and the solution was concentrated. Product that “bumped” was rinsed back into the flask with dichloromethane. The solution was concentrated to approx. 50 mL and hexane (35 mL) was added. The solution was then concentrated to approx. 50 mL. The slurry was vacuum filtered and the solids were washed with cold hexane, then dried by rotovap, to afford 4.7 g (88.7% of product. HPLC indicated approx. 97% purity.

Example 3: Synthesis of 3-BPin-5-fluoro-N-tosyl-7-azaindole

Chemic

Mol
ecular Weight: 290.31

Chemical Formula: C20H22BFN2O4S

Molecular Weight: 416.27

A I L 3 -necked flask equipped with mechanical stirring, argon inlet, thermocouple, and heating mantle was sparged with argon for 15 minutes. 5-fluoro-N-tosyl-7-azaindole (50.0 g), B2Pin2 (43.7 g), [IrClCOD]2 (2.89 g), dppe (3.43 g), and heptane (500 mL) were then added to the flask. The resulting slurry was then heated to 95 C for 53 hours with stirring.

The slurry was then cooled to room temperature and the solids were collected by vacuum filtration, washed with cold hexane, and dissolved in dichloromethane (450 mL). The solution was filtered through silica (100 g on a 600 mL frit) and the plug was washed with 5 x 100 mL dichloromethane. The filtrate and washes were combined and concentrated by rotovap. Hexane (400 mL) was then added and the solution was concentrated to approx 200 mL. The slurry was then filtered and the solids washed with cold hexane, dried by rotovap to afford 56.97 g (79.6 %) of product. HPLC indicated a purity of >99%.

Example 4: Synthesis of N-Boc-3-BPin-5-fluoro-7-azaindole

Mo 204

N-Boc-5-fluoro-7-azaindole (5.0 g), B2Pin2 (5.38 g), and hexane (50 mL) were added to a 250 mL 2-neck round bottom equipped with a condenser, magnetic stirring, heating mantle and nitrogen inlet. A colorless solution resulted with stirring. The flask was sparged with 3 nitrogen/vacuum cycles. The iridium catalyst [Ir(OMe)COD]2(0.21 g) and 2,2′-bipyridyl (0.10 g) were added as solids and another nitrogen/vacuum cycle was used to inert the flask. The resulting black solution was heated to 60° C. After 1 hour, TLC (eluting with DCM) of the reaction solution indicated that no starting material remained. The solution was cooled to room temperature and filtered through silica (10 g on a 60 mL frit). The plug was washed with dichloromethane (4 x 100 mL). The fractions were combined and concentrated by rotovap until a precipitate began to form. Dichloromethane was then added until a solution resulted and hexane (50 mL) was added. The solution was concentrated cold <25° C to approx. 50 mL. Hexane (50 mL) was added and the solution was concentrated to approx. 75 mL. The resulting white solids were collected by vacuum filtration, washed with cold hexane and dried by rotovap, to afford 4.6 g (60.5%) of product.

Example 5: Synthesis of 3-BPin-7-azaindole

Chemical Formula: C7H6N2 Chemical Formula: C13H17BN202

Molecular Weight: 118.14 Molecular Weight: 244.10

7-azaindole (5.0 g) and THF (50 mL) were added to an argon-inert small screw-top vial fitted with a septum, argon inlet and bubbler outlet. The flask was sparged with argon. The iridium catalyst [Ir(OMe)COD]2 (1.4 g) and 2,2’bipyridyl (1.4 g) were then added and the flask was again sparged with argon. The HBPin (12. 3 mL) was added by syringe and gas evolution was observed. The screwtop was sealed and the vial was placed in an oil bath and heated to 80° C for 16 hours.

The vessel was then allowed to cool to room temperature. The cap was removed and sampled while under an argon stream. The reaction appeared to stall at 50% completion. The cap was removed and 20 mL of methanol was added with visible degassing. The combined reaction solution was concentrated to an oil by rotovap (17.28 g). The crude product was dissolved in 50mL of MTBE and filtered through 50g of silica. The plug was washed with 3 x 50 mL of MTBE and the filtrate was concentrated by rotovap (13g of crude product). The crude product was dissolved in 13 mL of refluxing IPA, cooled to room temperature, and placed in the freezer. No crystals were observed.

Example 6: Synthesis of 3-BPin-5-fluoro-7-azaindole

Chemical Formula: C7H5FN2 Chemical Formula: Ci3H-ieBFN202 Molecular Weight: 136.13 Molecular Weight: 262.09

5-fluoro-7-azaindole (1.0 g) and THF (10 mL) were added to an argon-inert small screw-top vial fitted with a septum, argon inlet and bubbler outlet. The flask was sparged with argon. The iridium catalyst [Ir(OMe)COD]2 (0.24 g) and 3,4,7, 8-tetramethyl-l,10-phenanthroline (0.11 g) were then added and the flask was again sparged with argon. HBPin (2.13 mL) was added by syringe and gas evolution was observed. The screwtop was sealed and the vial was placed in an oil bath and heated to 80° C overnight.

The vial was then removed from the oil bath and allowed to cool to room temperature. The reaction was quenched by the addition of methanol (20 mL, very little gas evolution noted). The solution was then concentrated by rotovap to afford a dark oil (3.57 g). The oil was dissolved in MTBE (50 mL) and filtered though silica. The plug was washed with MTBE (4 x 25 mL) and the clear, yellow filtrate was concentrated by rotovap to an oil (2.7 g).

Upon standing overnight, solids precipitated out of the crude oil. The oil was then dissolved in refluxing hexane (3 mL, ~1 mL/g) and the solution was allowed to cool to room temperature then placed in the freezer.

The resulting white solids were collected by vacuum filtration, washed three times with cold hexane, and dried by rotovap (0.58 g crude product). HPLC indicated 92.2% purity. The crude solids were dissolved in refluxing IPA (1.2 mL, ~2 mL/g) and the resulting yellow solution was allowed to cool to room temperature (during which time crystals precipitated) then placed in the freezer. The resulting crystals were collected by vacuum filtration, washed three times with cold hexane (3x), and dried by rotovap to afford 0.33 g (17.1%) of product.

PATENT

WO2015073491

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015073491&redirectedID=true

Example 2: Preparation of Compound (l)and 2-MeTHF solvate of Compound (1)

Compound (1) can be prepared as described in WO 2010/148197. For example, an amorphous free base Compound (1) was prepared according to WO 2010/148197, followed by usual chiral separation and purification: SCF chiral chromatography with a modifier that included Et2NH (which generated Et2NH salt of Compound (1)) and then ion-exchange resin treatment. Alternatively, Compound (1) can be made by the following procedures as a 2-MeTHF solvate:

Preparation of Compound 2a (2- Amino-3-bromo-5-fluoropyridine)

1a 2a

To a slurry of 2-amino-5-fluoropyridine (6 kg, 53.6 mol) in water (24 L) at 14 °C was added over 10 minutes 48% hydrobromic acid (18.5 kg, 110 mol). The reaction was exothermic and the temperature went up to 24 °C. The mixture was re-cooled to 12 °C then bromine (9 kg, 56.3 mol) was added in nine portions over 50 minutes (exothermic, kept at 20 °C). The mixture was stirred at 22 °C overnight, and monitored by ‘HNMR of a quenched aliquot (quenched 5 drops in to mix of 1 ml 20% K2CO3, 0.3 ml 10% Na2S203 and 0.7 ml DCM. Organic layer evaporated and assayed). The mixture was cooled to 10 °C then quenched by addition of sodium bisulfite (560 g, 5.4 mol) in water (2 L), and further cooled to 0 °C. This mixture was added to a cold (-4 °C) mixture of DCM (18 L) and 5.4M sodium hydroxide (35 L, 189 mol). The bottom -35 L was filtered through a pad of Celite and then the phase break was made. The aqueous layer was re-extracted with DCM (10 L). The organics were filtered through a pad of 3 kg magnesol, washing with DCM (8 L). The filtrate was evaporated, triturated with hexane and filtered.

Despite the in-process assay indicating 97% completion, this initial product from all four runs typically contained -10% SM. These were combined and triturated in hexane (2 L per kg material) at 50 °C, then cooled to 15 °C and filtered to afford Compound 2a (30.0 kg, -95% purity, 149 mol, 67%). Mother liquors from the initial trituration and the re-purification were chromatographed (20 kg silica, eluent 25-50% EtOAc in hexane) to afford additional Compound 2a (4.7 kg, -99% purity, 24.4 mol, 11%).

Preparation of Compound 3a

To an inert 400-L reactor was charged 2a (27.5 kg, 96% purity, 138 mol), Pd(PPh3)4 (1044 g, 0.90 mol) and Cul (165 g, 0.87 mol), followed by toluene (90 kg). The mixture was de-oxygenated with three vacuum-nitrogen cycles, then triethylamine (19.0 kg, 188 mol) was added. The mixture was de-oxygenated with one more vacuum-nitrogen cycle, then

TMS-acetylene (16.5 kg, 168 mol) was added. The mixture was heated to 48 °C for 23 hours (the initial exotherm took the temperature to 53 °C maximum), then cooled to 18 °C. The slurry was filtered through a pad of Celite and washed with toluene (80 kg). The filtrate was washed with 12% Na2HP04 (75 L), then filtered through a pad of silica (25 kg), washing with 1 :1 hexane:MTBE (120 L). This filtrate was evaporated to a brown oil and then dissolved in NMP for the next step. Weight of a solution of Compound 3a – 58 kg, ~50wt%, 138 mol,

100%. 1H NMR (CDCI3, 300 MHz): δ 7.90 (s, 1H); 7.33-7.27 (m, 1H); 4.92 (s, NH2), 0.28 (s, 9H) ppm.

Preparation o Compound 4a

3a 4a

To an inert 400-L reactor was charged potassium t-butoxide (17.5 kg, 156 mol) and NMP (45 kg). The mixture was heated to 54 °C then a solution of Compound 3a (29 kg, 138 mol) in NMP (38 kg) was added over 2.75 hours and rinsed in with NMP (6 kg)

(exothermic, maintained at 70-77 °C) . The reaction was stirred at 74 °C for 2 hours then cooled to 30 °C and a solution of tosyl chloride (28.5 kg, 150 mol) in NMP (30 kg) added over 1.5 hours and rinsed in with NMP (4 kg). The reaction was exothermic and maintained at 30-43 °C. The reaction was stirred for 1 hour while cooling to 20 °C then water (220 L) was added over 35 minutes (exothermic, maintained at 18-23 °C). The mixture was stirred at 20 °C for 30 minutes then filtered and washed with water (100 L). The solids were dissolved off the filter with DCM (250 kg), separated from residual water and the organics filtered through a pad of magnesol (15 kg, top) and silica (15 kg, bottom), washing with extra DCM (280 kg). The filtrate was concentrated to a thick slurry (-50 L volume) then MTBE (30 kg) was added while continuing the distillation at constant volume (final distillate temperature of 51 °C). Additional MTBE (10 kg) was added and the slurry cooled to 15 °C, filtered and washed with MTBE (40 L) to afford Compound 4a (19.13 kg, 95% purity, 62.6 mol, 45%). Partial concentration of the filtrate afforded a second crop (2.55 kg, 91% purity, 8.0 mol, 6%). 1H NMR (CDCI3, 300 MHz): δ 8.28-8.27 (m, 1H); 8.06-8.02 (m, 2H); 7.77 (d, J= 4.0 Hz, 1H); 7.54-7.50 (m, 1H); 7.28-7.26 (m, 2H); 6.56 (d, J= 4.0 Hz, 1H); 2.37 (s, 3H) ppm.

Preparation of Compound 5a

4a 5a

To a slurry of N-bromosuccinimide (14.16 kg, 79.6 mol) in DCM (30 kg) at 15 °C was charged a solution of Compound 4a (19.13 kg, 95% purity, and 2.86 kg, 91% purity, 71.6 mol) in DCM (115 kg), rinsing in with DCM (20 kg). The mixture was stirred at 25 °C for 18 hours, and then cooled to 9 °C and quenched by addition of a solution of sodium

thiosulfate (400 g) and 50% sodium hydroxide (9.1 kg) in water (130 L). The mixture was warmed to 20 °C and the layers were separated and the organics were washed with 12% brine (40 L). The aqueous layers were sequentially re-extracted with DCM (4 x 50 kg). The organics were combined and 40 L distilled to azeotrope water, then the solution was filtered through a pad of silica (15 kg, bottom) and magensol (15 kg, top), washing with DCM (180 kg). The filtrate was concentrated to a thick slurry (-32 L volume) then hexane (15 kg) was added. Additional hexane (15 kg) was added while continuing the distillation at constant volume (final distillate temperature 52 °C). The slurry was cooled to 16 °C, filtered and washed with hexane (25 kg) to afford Compound 5a (25.6 kg, 69.3 mol, 97%). 1H NMR (CDC13, 300 MHz): δ 8.34-8.33 (m, 1H); 8.07 (d, J= 8.2Hz, 2H); 7.85 (s, 1H); 7.52-7.49 (m, 1H); 7.32-7.28 (m, 2H); 2.40 (s, 3H) ppm.

Preparation of Compound 6a: BEFTA1 Reaction

6a

To an inert 400-L reactor was charged Compound 5a (25.6 kg, 69.3 mol), bis(pinacolato)diboron (19 kg, 74.8 mol), potassium acetate (19 kg, 194 mol), palladium acetate (156 g, 0.69 mol) and triphenylphosphine (564 g, 2.15 mol), followed by dioxane (172 kg), that had been separately de-oxygenated using vacuum-nitrogen cycles (x 3). The mixture was stirred and de-oxygenated using vacuum-nitrogen cycles (x 2), then heated to 100 °C for 15 hours. The mixture was cooled to 35 °C then filtered, washing with 30 °C THF (75 kg). The filtrate was evaporated and the residue dissolved in DCM (-90 L). The solution was stirred with 1 kg carbon and 2 kg magnesol for 45 minutes then filtered through a pad of silica (22 kg, bottom) and magensol (10 kg, top), washing with DCM (160 kg). The filtrate was concentrated to a thick slurry (-40 L volume) then triturated at 35 °C and hexane (26 kg) was added. The slurry was cooled to 20 °C, filtered and washed with a mix of DCM (5.3 kg) and hexane (15 kg), then hexane (15 kg) and dried under nitrogen on the filter to afford Compound 6a (23.31 kg, 56.0 mol, 81%) as a white solid. 1H-NMR consistent with desired product, HPLC 99.5%, palladium assay 2 ppm. 1H NMR (CDC13, 300 MHz): δ 8.25 (s, 1H); 8.18 (s, 1H); 8.09-8.02 (m, 2H); 7.91-7.83 (m, 1H); 7.30-7.23 (m, 2H); 2.39 (s, 3H); 1.38 (s, 12H) ppm.

Preparation of Compounds 8a and 9a

9a

[0247] Compound 8a: Anhydride 7a (24.6 kgs, Apex) and quinine (49.2 kgs, Buchler) were added to a reactor followed by the addition of anhydrous PhMe (795.1 kgs). The reactor was then cooled to -16 °C and EtOH (anhydrous, 41.4 kgs) was added at such a rate to maintain the internal reactor temperature < -12 °C. The maximum reaction temp recorded for this experiment was -16 °C. The reaction mixture was then stirred for 16 h at -16 °C. A sample was removed and filtered. The solid was dried and evaluated by 1H-NMR which showed that no anhydride remained. The contents of the reactor were filtered. The reactor and subsequent wet cake were washed with PhMe (anhydrous, 20 kgs). The resulting solid was placed in a tray dryer at < 45 °C with a N2 sweep for at least 48 h. In this experiment, the actual temperature was 44 °C and the vacuum was -30 inHG. Material was sampled after 2.5 d drying and showed 3% PhMe by NMR. After an additional 8 hrs, the amt of PhMe analyzed showed the same 3% PhMe present and the drying was stopped. The weight of the white solid was 57.7 kgs, 76% yield. 1 H-NMR showed consistent with structure and Chiral SFC analysis showed material >99% ee.

Compound 9a: The reactor was charged with quinine salt 8a (57.7 kgs) and PhMe (250.5 kgs, Aldrich ACS grade, >99.5%) and the agitator was started. The contents were cooled to <15 °C and was treated with 6N HCI (18 kgs H20 were treated with 21.4 kgs of cone. HCI) while keeping the temperature <25 °C. The mixture was stirred for 40 min and visually inspected to verify that no solids were present. Stirring was stopped and the phases were allowed to settle and phases were separated. The aqueous phases were extracted again with PhMe (160 kgs; the amount typically used was much less, calc. 43 kgs. However, for efficient stirring due to minimal volume, additional PhMe was added. The organic phases were combined. Sample the organic phase and run HPLC analysis to insure product is present; for information only test.

To the organic phases were cooled to <5 °C (0-5 °C) and was added sodium sulfate (anhydrous, 53.1 kgs) with agitation for 8 hrs (in this instance 12 hrs). The contents of the reactor containing the organic phase were passed through a filter containing sodium sulfate (31 kgs, anhydrous) and into a cleaned and dried reactor. The reactor was rinsed with PhMe (57.4 kgs), passed through the filter into reactor 201. The agitator was started and an additional amount of PhMe (44 kgs) was added and the reaction mixture cooled to -20 °C. At that temperature PhMe solution of potassium tert-pentoxide was added over 2 h while keeping the temperature between -15 and -22 °C. The reaction mixture was held at -20 °C for an additional 30 min before being sampled. Sampling occurred by removing an aliquat with immediate quenching into 6N HC1. The target ratio here is 96:4 (trans is).

Having achieved the target ratio, the reactor was charged with acetic acid (2.8 kgs) over 6 min. The temperature stayed at – 20 °C. The temperature was then adjusted to -5 °C and aqueous 2N HC1 (65.7 kgs water treated with 15.4 kgs of cone HC1) was added. The contents were warmed to 5 °C +/- 5 °C, agitated for 45 min before warming to 20 °C +/- 5 °C with stirring for 15 min. The agitator was stopped and the phases allowed to settle. The aqueous layer was removed (temporary hold). The organic phase was washed with water (48 kgs, potable), agitated for 15 min and phases allowed to settle (at least 15 min) and the aqueous layer was removed and added to the aqueous layer. 1/3 of a buffer solution (50 L) that was prepared (7.9 kgs NaH2P04, 1.3 kgs of Na2HP04 and 143.6 kgs water) was added to the organic phase and stirred for at least 15 min. Agitation was stopped and phases were allowed to separate for at least 15 min. The lower layer was discarded. Another portion of the buffered solution (50 L) was used to wash the organic layer as previously described. The wash was done a third time as described above.

Vacuum distillation of the PhMe phase (150 L) was started at 42 °C/-13.9 psig and distilled to an oil of 20 L volume. After substantial reduction in volume the mixture was transferred to a smaller vessel to complete the distillation. Heptanes (13.7 kgs) was added and the mixture warmed to 40 +/- 5 °C for 30 min then the contents were cooled to 0-5 °C over 1.5 h. The solids were filtered and the reactor washed with approximately 14 kgs of cooled (0-5 °C) heptanes. The solids were allowed to dry under vacuum before placing in the oven at <40 °C under house vac (-28 psig) until LOD is <1%. 15.3 kgs, 64%, 96% HPLC purity. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) δ 11.45 (br. s, 1H), 6.41 (t, J= 7.2 Hz, 1H), 6.25 (t, J=

7.2 Hz, 1H), 4.18 (m, 2H), 3.27 (m, 1H), 3.03 (m, 1H), 2.95 (m, 1H), 2.77 (m, 1H), 1.68 (m,

1H), 1.49 (m, 1H), 1.25 (t, J= 7.2Hz), 1.12 (m, 1H).

Preparation of Compound 10a

9a 10a

A three neck flask equipped with a mechanical stirrer, temperature probe, reflux condenser, addition funnel and nitrogen inlet was charged with Compound 9a (145.0 g, 1 equiv) and anhydrous toluene (Aldrich, cat# 244511) (1408 g, 1655 ml) under an atmosphere of nitrogen. Then triethylamine (Aldrich, cat# 471283) (140 g, 193 ml,

2.14 equiv) was added in portions over 5 minutes to the stirred solution during which an exotherm to a maximum temperature of 27 °C was observed. Data acquisition by ReactIR was started. The reaction mixture was then heated to 95 °C over 70 minutes. Then diphenyl phosphoryl azide (Aldrich, cat# 178756) (176.2 g; 138.0 ml, 0.99 equiv) was added by addition funnel in portions over a total time of 2.25 hours.

Following completion of the addition of diphenyl phosphoryl azide (addition funnel rinsed with a small amount of toluene), the resulting mixture was heated at 96 °C for an additional 50 minutes. A sample of the reaction mixture diluted in toluene was analyzed by GC/MS which indicated consumption of diphenyl phosphoryl azide. Then benzyl alcohol (Aldrich, cat# 108006) (69.9 g, 67.0 ml, 1.0 equiv) was added by addition funnel over 5-10 minutes. The resulting mixture was then heated at 97 °C overnight (for approximately 19 hours). A sample of the reaction mixture diluted in toluene by GC/MS indicated formation of product (m/e =330). The reaction mixture was then cooled to 21 °C after which water (870 g, 870 ml) was added in portions (observed slight exotherm to maximum temperature of 22 °C). The reaction mixture was first quenched by addition of 500 g of water and mechanically stirred for 10 minutes. The mixture was then transferred to the separatory funnel containing the remaining 370 g of water and then manually agitated. After agitation and phase separation, the organic and aqueous layers were separated (aqueous cut at pH of -10). The organic layer was then washed with an additional portion of water (870 g; 1 x 870 ml). The organic and aqueous layers were separated (aqueous cut at pH of ~10). The collected organic phase was then concentrated to dryness under reduced pressure (water bath at 45-50 °C) affording 215 g of crude Compound 10a (approximate volume of 190 ml). The 1H NMR and GC/MS conformed to compound 10a (with residual toluene and benzyl alcohol).

Preparation o Compound 11a

10a 11a

HCI in ethanol preparation: A three neck flask equipped with a temperature probe, nitrogen inlet and magnetic stirrer was charged with ethanol (1000 ml, 773 g) under a

nitrogen atmosphere. The solution was stirred and cooled in a dry ice/acetone bath until an internal temperature of- 12 °C was reached. Then anhydrous HC1 (~ 80 g, 2.19 moles) was slowly bubbled in the cooled solution (observed temperature of -24 to -6 °C during addition) over 2 hours. Following the addition, the solution was transferred to a glass bottle and allowed to warm to ambient temperature. A sample of the solution was submitted for titration giving a concentration of 2.6 M. The solution was then stored in the cold room (approximately 5 °C) overnight.

Hydrogenation/HCl salt formation: A glass insert to a 2 gallon Parr autoclave was charged with palladium on carbon (Pd/C (Aldrich, cat# 330108), 10 % dry basis; (50 % wet), 13.11 g, 0.01 equiv on the basis of Compound 10a) under a nitrogen atmosphere and then moistened with ethanol (93 g; 120 ml). Then a solution of crude Compound 10a (212 g, 1 eq) in ethanol (1246 g; 1600 ml) was added to the glass insert (small rinse with ethanol to aid with transfer). The glass insert was placed in the autoclave after which HC1 in ethanol (prepared as described above; 2.6 M; 1.04 equiv based on Compound 10a; 223 g; 259 ml) was added. The autoclave was sealed and then purged with hydrogen (3 x at 20 psi). The hydrogenation was then started under an applied pressure of hydrogen gas (15 psi) for 3 hours at which time the pressure of hydrogen appeared constant. Analysis of an aliquot of the reaction mixture by 1H NMR and GC/MS indicated consumption of starting

material/formation of product. The resulting mixture was then filtered over a bed of Celite (192 g) after which the Celite bed was washed with additional ethanol (3 x; a total of 1176 g of ethanol was used during the washes). The filtrate (green in color) was then concentrated under reduced pressure (water bath at 45 °C) to ~ 382 g ((-435 ml; 2.9 volumes based on theoretical yield of Compound 11a. Then isopropyl acetate (1539 g; 1813 ml (12 volumes based on theoretical yield of Compound 11a was added to the remainder. The resulting solution was distilled under vacuum with gradual increase in temperature.

The distillation was stopped after which the remaining solution (370 g, -365 ml total volume; brownish in color) was allowed to stand at ambient temperature over the weekend. The mixture was filtered (isopropyl acetate used to aid with filtration) and the collected solids were washed with additional isopropyl acetate (2 x 116 ml; each wash was approximately 100 g). The solid was then dried under vacuum at 40 °C (maximum observed temperature of 42 °C) overnight to afford 1 18 g (78.1 % over two steps) of Compound 11a. The 1H NMR of the material conformed to the structure of Compound 11a, and GC/MS indicated 99% purity.

Preparation of Compound 13a

2a

Procedure A: A mixture of 5-fluoro-2,4-dichloropyrimidine (12a, 39.3 g, 235 mmol, 1.1 equiv), and HCI amine salt (11a, 50 g, 214 mmol) was treated with CH2C12(169 mL) and the mixture was warmed to 30 °C. The mixture was then treated slowly with DIEA (60.8 g, 82 mL, 471 mmol, 2.2 equiv) via syringe pump over 3 h. Peak temp was up to 32 °C. The reaction was stirred for 20 h, the reaction mixture was judged complete by HPLC and cooled to rt. The resulting reaction mixture was washed sequentially with water (21 1 mL, pH = 8-9), 5% NaHS04 (21 1 mL, pH = 1-2) then 5% aq. NaCl (211 mL, pH = 5-6).

The organic phase was then distilled under reduced pressure to 190 mL. PhMe was charged (422 mL) and temperature set at 70 -80 °C and internal temp at 60-65 °C until vol back down to 190 mL. The mixture was allowed to cool to approximately 37 °C with stirring – after approximately 10 min, crystallization began to occur and the temperature was observed to increase to approximately 41 °C. After equilibrating at 37 “C, the suspension was charged with n-heptane (421 mL) over 3.5 h followed by cooling to 22 °C over 1 h. The mixture was allowed to stir overnight at that temperature before filtering. The resulting solid on the filter was washed with a 10% PhMe in n-heptane solution (2 x 210 mL). The solid was then dried in the oven under vacuum with an N2 purge at 50 °C overnight. The resulting solid weighed 62 g (88% yield).

Procedure B: A three neck flask equipped with a mechanical stirrer, temperature probe, reflux condenser, nitrogen inlet and addition funnel was charged with Compound 11a (51.2 g) and Compound 12a (40.2 g) under an atmosphere of nitrogen. Dichloromethane (173 ml, 230 g) was added and the resulting mixture was stirred while warming to an internal temperature of 30 °C. Then N,N-diisopropylethylamine (85 ml, 63.09 g) was slowly added by addition funnel over 2.5-3 hours during which time an exotherm to a maximum observed temperature of 33.5 °C was observed. After complete addition, the resulting solution was stirred at 30-31 °C overnight under a nitrogen atmosphere (for approximately 19 hours).

A 100 μΐ sample of the reaction mixture was diluted with dichloromethane up to a total volume of 10 ml and the solution mixed well. A sample of the diluted aliquot was analyzed by GC/MS which indicated the reaction to be complete by GC/MS; observed

formation of product (m/e = 328)). The reaction mixture was cooled to 26 °C and transferred to a separatory funnel (aided with dichloromethane). The mixture was then sequentially washed with water (211 ml, 211 g; pH of aqueous cut was -8; small rag layer was transferred with aqueous cut), 5 % aqueous NaHS04 ((prepared using 50 g of sodium bisulfate monohydrate (Aldrich cat. # 233714) and 950 g water) 211 ml, 216 g; pH of aqueous cut was ~2) and then 5 % aqueous NaCl ((prepared using 50 g of sodium chloride (Aldrich cat. # S9888) and 950 g water) 211 ml, 215 g; pH of aqueous cut was -4-5). The collected organic phase was then concentrated under reduced pressure (water bath at 35 °C) to -190 ml (2.7 volumes based on theoretical yield of Compound 13a after which toluene (Aldrich cat. # 179418, 422 ml, 361 g) was added. The resulting mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure (water bath at 55-65 °C) to -190 ml (2.7 volumes based on theoretical yield of Compound 13a. Analysis of a sample of the solution at this stage by 1H NMR indicated the absence of dichloromethane. The remaining mixture was allowed to cool to 37 °C (using water bath at 37 °C on rotovap with agitation). During this time pronounced crystallization was observed. The mixture was then mechanically stirred and heated to approximately 37 °C (external heat source set to 38 °C) after which n-heptane (430 ml, 288 g; Aldrich cat# H2198) was slowly added by addition funnel over 3 hours. Following the addition, heating was stopped and the resulting slurry mechanically stirred while cooling to ambient temperature overnight. The resulting mixture was then filtered and the collected solids were washed with 10 % toluene in n-heptane (2 x 210 ml; each wash was prepared by mixing 21 ml (16 g) of toluene and 189 ml (132 g) of n-heptane). Vacuum was applied until very little filtrate was observed. The solids were then further dried under vacuum at 50 °C under a nitrogen bleed to constant weight (3.5 hours) giving 64.7 g (90 %) of Compound 13a. Analysis of a sample of the solid by Ή NMR showed the material to conform to structure and LC analysis indicated 99.8 % purity using the supplied LC method.

Preparation of Compound 14a

The ethyl ester 13a (85 g, 259 mmol) was dissolved in THF (340 mL) and treated with a solution of LiOH (2M, 389 mL, 778 mmol) over 10 min (temp from 21 to 24 °C). The mixture was warmed to 45 °C with stirring for 17 h at which time the reaction was judged complete by HPLC (no SM observed). The reaction mixture was cooled to rt and CH2C12 was added (425 mL). A solution of citric acid (2 M, 400 mL) was then added slowly over 45 min (temp up to 26 °C). It was noted that during the charge some white solids were formed but quickly dissolved with stirring. The reaction mixture was stirred for an additional 15 min before phases were allowed to separate. After the phases were split, the aqueous phase pH was measured pH = 4.0. The organic phase was washed (15 min stir) with water (255 mL) -phases were allowed to separate. The lower layer (organic) containing the desired product was then stored in the fridge overnight.

The organic phase was concentrated under reduced pressure (pot set to 65 °C) to 150 mL (est. 1.76 vol wrt SM). IPA (510 mL) was charged and distilled under reduced pressure (85 °C chiller temp setting) to 255 mL (3 vol). The level of solvent was brought to approximately 553 mL (6.5 vol) by the addition of IPA (298 mL). Water (16 mL) was then added and the reaction mixture warmed to reflux (77 °C) with good agitation which dissolved solids precipitated on the walls of the vessel. Reaction mixture was then cooled slowly to 65 °C (over 60 min) and held there – all material still in solution (sample pulled for residual solvent analysis). The reaction was further cooled to 60 °C and the reaction mixture appeared slightly opaque. After stirring for 15 min further cooled to 55 °C. While more product precipitates, the mixture is still thin and easily stirred. Water (808 mL) was added very slowly (2.5-3 hrs) while maintaining the temperature around 55 C. The mixture was then cooled to 22 °C over 2 h and allowed to stir overnight. Material was then filtered and washed with a mixture of water: IPA (75:25, 2 x 255 mL). The acid was dried in a vac oven at 55 °C overnight. Obtained 69 g of acid 14a, 88% yield of a white solid. The material analyzed >99% purity by HPLC.

Preparation o f Compound 15a: Suzuki Coupling

To 14a (91.4 g, 305 mmol), 6a (158.6 g, 381 mmol, 1.25 equiv.), Pd(OAc)2 (0.34 g, 1.5 mmol, 0.5 mol%), X-Phos (1.45 g, 3.0 mmol, 1.0 mol%), and K2C03 (168.6 g,

1220 mmol, 4 equiv.) was added THF (731 mL, 8 volumes) and water (29 mL, 0.32 vol). The reaction mixture was sparged with N2 for 30 min, then warmed to 65-70 °C and stirred for 5 h. HPLC analysis of the reaction mixture showed 99.3% conversion. The reaction mixture was cooled to 22-25 °C and water was added. The mixture was stirred, the phases

were allowed to separate, and the aqueous phase was decanted. A solution of 18 wt% NaCl in water (half-saturated aqueous NaCl) was added to the organic phase and the pH of the mixture was adjusted to 6.0-6.5 using 2N HC1. The phases were allowed to separate and the aqueous phase was decanted. The organic phase was concentrated to a minimum volume and acetonitrile was added. The process was repeated one more time and acetonitrile was added to bring the final volume to 910 mL (10 vol). The slurry was warmed to 80-85 °C for 6 h, then cooled to 20-25 °C. The slurry was stirred for 2 h, then filtered. The solids were rinsed with acetonitrile to give 15a (161 g, 89% yield).

Preparation of Compound (1): Detosylation Step

To 15a (25 g, 45.2 mmol) was added THF (125 ml, 5 vol), then MP-TMT resin (6.25 g, 25 wt%). The mixture was stirred at 20-25 °C for 16 h and filtered, rinsing with 1 vol THF. The resin treatment process and filtration were repeated. The THF solution was concentrated to 5 vol. To the mixture at 22-25 °C was added an aqueous solution of 2M LiOH (90.3 mL, 4 equiv). The reaction mixture was warmed to 40-45 °C and stirred for 5 h. HPLC analysis showed 99.7% conversion. The reaction mixture was cooled to 22-25 °C and MTBE (50 mL, 2 vol) was added. Phase separation occurred. The lower aqueous phase was collected. The aqueous phase was extracted with MTBE. The lower aqueous phase was collected. To the aqueous phase was added 2-MeTHF and the mixture was stirred. The pH of the mixture was adjusted to 6.0-6.5, and the lower aq. phase was decanted. The organic phase was washed with pH 6.5 buffer. The organic phase was concentrated to 85 mL, diluted with 2-MeTHF (150 mL), and concentrated to a final volume of 180 mL. The resultant slurry was warmed to 70-75 °C and stirred until complete dissolution, then cooled to 45-50 °C to give slurry. The slurry was stirred for 1 h, then heptane (180 mL) was added. The slurry was cooled to 20-25 °C over 1 h and stirred for 16 h. The batch was filtered, rinsing the solids with heptane. The solids were dried to give crude Compound (l)-2-MeTHF solvate, 79% yield.

PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015073476

Preparation of Compound (1): Detosylation Step

[0214] To 15a (25 g, 45.2 mmol) was added THF (125 ml, 5 vol), then MP-TMT resin (6.25 g, 25 wt%). The mixture was stirred at 20 °C – 25 °C for 16 h and filtered, rinsing with 1 vol. THF. The resin treatment process and filtration were repeated. The THF solution was concentrated to 5 vol. To the mixture at 22 °C – 25 °C was added an aqueous solution of 2M LiOH (90.3 mL, 4 equiv.). The reaction mixture was warmed to 40 °C – 45 °C and stirred for 5 h. HPLC analysis showed 99.7% conversion. The reaction mixture was cooled to 22 °C -25 °C and MTBE (50 mL, 2 vol) was added. Phase separation occurred. The lower aqueous phase was collected. The aqueous phase was extracted with MTBE. The lower aqueous phase was collected. To the aqueous phase was added 2-MeTHF and the mixture was stirred. The pH of the mixture was adjusted to 6.0 – 6.5, and the lower aq. phase was decanted. The organic phase was washed with pH 6.5 buffer. The organic phase was concentrated to 85 mL, diluted with 2-MeTHF (150 mL), and concentrated to a final volume of 180 mL. The resultant slurry was warmed to 70 °C – 75 °C and stirred until complete dissolution, then cooled to 45 °C – 50 °C to give slurry. The slurry was stirred for 1 h, then heptane (180 mL) was added. The slurry was cooled to 20 °C – 25 °C over 1 h and stirred for 16 h. The batch was filtered, rinsing the solids with heptane. The solids were dried to give crude Compound (l 2-MeTHF solvate, 79% yield.

PAPER

Discovery of a Novel, First-in-Class, Orally Bioavailable Azaindole Inhibitor (VX-787) of Influenza PB2

J. Med. Chem., 2014, 57 (15), pp 6668–6678

DOI: 10.1021/jm5007275

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm5007275

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc51

1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 12.71 (br s, 1H), 8.58 (s, 1H), 8.47 (dd, J = 9.6, 2.8 Hz, 1H), 8.41 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1H), 8.39–8.34 (m, 1H), 4.89–4.76 (m, 1H), 2.94 (d, J = 6.9 Hz, 1H), 2.05 (br s, 1H), 1.96 (br s, 1H), 1.68 (complex m, 7H);
13C NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 174.96, 157.00, 155.07, 153.34, 152.97, 145.61, 142.67, 140.65, 134.24, 133.00, 118.02, 114.71, 51.62, 46.73, 28.44, 28.00, 24.90, 23.78, 20.88, 18.98;
LCMS gradient 10–90%, 0.1% formic acid, 5 min, C18/ACN, tR = 2.24 min, (M + H) 400.14;
HRMS (ESI) of C20H20F2N5O2 [M + H] calcd, 400.157 95; found, 400.157 56.
Article
June 18, 2014

Vertex Licenses VX-787 to Janssen Pharmaceuticals for the Treatment of Influenza

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (Nasdaq: VRTX) today announced that it has entered into a licensing agreement with Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. for the worldwide development and commercialization of VX-787, a novel medicine discovered by Vertex for the treatment of influenza. As part of the agreement, Vertex will receive an up-front payment of $30 million from Janssen and has the potential to receive additional development and commercial milestone payments as well as royalties on future product sales. Vertex completed a Phase 2a study of VX-787 in 2013 that showed statistically significant improvements in viral and clinical measurements of influenza infection. VX-787 is designed to directly inhibit replication of the influenza virus.

“With a deep history in developing new medicines for viral infections and diseases, Janssen is well-positioned to advance the global development of VX-787 for the treatment of influenza,” said Jeffrey Leiden, M.D., Ph.D., Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Vertex. “This collaboration provides important support for the continued development of VX-787 in influenza and contributes to our financial strength to enable continued investment in our key development programs for cystic fibrosis and in research aimed at discovering new medicines.”

About the Collaboration

Under the terms of the collaboration, Janssen will have full global development and commercialization rights to VX-787. Vertex will receive a $30 million up-front payment from Janssen and could receive additional development and commercial milestone payments as well as royalties on future product sales. The collaboration, and the related $30 million up-front payment, is subject to the expiration of the waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act.

About VX-787

VX-787 is an investigational medicine that is designed to directly inhibit replication of influenza A, including recent H1 (pandemic) and H5 (avian) influenza strains, based on in-vitro data. VX-787’s mechanism represents a new class of potential medicines for the treatment of influenza, distinct from neuraminidase inhibitors, the current standard of care for the treatment of influenza. VX-787 is intended to provide a rapid onset of action and an expanded treatment window.

In a Phase 2a influenza challenge study, statistically significant improvements in viral and clinical measurements of influenza infection were observed after treatment with VX-787. The study met its primary endpoint and showed a statistically significant decrease in the amount of virus in nasal secretions (viral shedding) over the seven-day study period. In addition, at the highest dosing regimen evaluated in the study, there was a statistically significant reduction in the severity and duration of influenza-like symptoms. In this study, VX-787 was generally well-tolerated, with no adverse events leading to discontinuation. Those who took part in the study volunteered to be experimentally exposed to an attenuated form of live H3N2 influenza A virus. H3N2 is a common type of influenza virus and was the most common type observed in the 2012/2013 influenza season in the United States.

VX-787 was discovered by Vertex scientists.

About Influenza

Often called “the flu,” seasonal influenza is caused by influenza viruses, which infect the respiratory tract.1 The flu can result in seasonal epidemics2 and can produce severe disease and high mortality in certain populations, such as the elderly.3 Each year, on average 5 to 20 percent of the U.S. population gets the flu4 resulting in more than 200,000 flu-related hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths.5 The overall national economic burden of influenza-attributable illness for adults is $83.3 billion.5 Direct medical costs for influenza in adults totaled $8.7 billion including $4.5 billion for adult hospitalizations resulting from influenza-attributable illness.5 The treatment of the flu consists of antiviral medications that have been shown in clinical studies to shorten the disease and reduce the severity of symptoms if taken within two days of infection.6 There is a significant need for new medicines targeting flu that provide a wider treatment window, greater efficacy and faster onset of action.

About Vertex

Vertex is a global biotechnology company that aims to discover, develop and commercialize innovative medicines so people with serious diseases can lead better lives. In addition to our clinical development programs focused on cystic fibrosis, Vertex has more than a dozen ongoing research programs aimed at other serious and life-threatening diseases.

Founded in 1989 in Cambridge, Mass., Vertex today has research and development sites and commercial offices in the United States, Europe, Canada and Australia. For four years in a row, Science magazine has named Vertex one of its Top Employers in the life sciences. For additional information and the latest updates from the company, please visit www.vrtx.com.

Vertex’s press releases are available at www.vrtx.com.

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WO2003015798A1 Aug 13, 2002 Feb 27, 2003 Toyama Chemical Co Ltd Novel virus proliferation inhibition/virucidal method and novel pyradine nucleotide/pyradine nucleoside analogue
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US20100038988 Aug 12, 2008 Feb 18, 2010 Gannon Ramy Stator and Method of Making the Same

……

.

Vertex Pharmaceuticals’ Boston Campus, United States of America

Lynette Hopkinson VP Commercial Regulatory Affairs, Global Regulatory Affairs Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated, United States

swati Patel, a lead analyst, shared a toast with Mir Hussain, a systems engineer, at Vertex Pharmaceuticals during the Friday beer hour, which features beer and chips for employees.

On Fridays around 5 o’clock, after a hard week of work, Frank Holland likes to unwind with a beer. And he doesn’t have to leave work to get one.

Holland is a research scientist at Vertex Pharmaceuticals, which every Friday rings in “beer hour,” offering free adult beverages and munchies to its 1,300 Boston employees.

For Holland, the weekly ritual is a chance to escape the bubble of his chemistry lab and bump into colleagues from other departments — as well as Vertex’s top executives, who regularly attend. For those who prefer grapes to hops, there is also wine.

“Some of the other companies I worked at, you really had to go out of your way to meet people,” said Holland, 32. “At Vertex all you have to do is show up in the cafeteria on a Friday afternoon.”

Sure, free beer is common at hip tech offices; some even have their own bars. But Vertex, best known for its treatment for cystic fibrosis, was doing this way before it was cool. The beer-hour tradition goes back to the company’s founding days, in 1989. Back then, it was just two dozen people in a small office in Cambridge. Someone went to a corner store, bought a case of beer and some chips, and beer hour was born.

Virginia Carden Carnahan
Vice President, New Product Planning and Strategy, Vertex Pharmaceuticals

A scientist works in the lab at Boston-based Vertex Pharmaceuticals.

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Headquarters Lobby

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/////////PIMODIVIR , VX-787, JNJ-63623872, JNJ-872, VRT-0928787, 1629869-44-8, VX-787, JNJ-63623872, JNJ-872, VRT-0928787, VX-787, VX 787,  VX787,  JNJ-872, JNJ 872, JNJ872, VRT-0928787, VRT 0928787, VRT0928787, pimodivir, PHASE 2

O=C([C@H]1C(CC2)CCC2[C@@H]1NC3=NC(C4=CNC5=NC=C(F)C=C54)=NC=C3F)O

O.Cl.Cl.OC(=O)[C@H]1C2CCC(CC2)[C@@H]1Nc3nc(ncc3F)c4c[nH]c5ncc(F)cc45.OC(=O)[C@H]6C7CCC(CC7)[C@@H]6Nc8nc(ncc8F)c9c[nH]c%10ncc(F)cc9%10

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