New Drug Approvals

Home » 0rphan drug status

Category Archives: 0rphan drug status

DRUG APPROVALS BY DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO .....FOR BLOG HOME CLICK HERE

Blog Stats

  • 1,726,357 hits

Flag and hits

Flag Counter

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,034 other followers

Follow New Drug Approvals on WordPress.com

Categories

Flag Counter

ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

Read all about Organic Spectroscopy on ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY INTERNATIONAL 

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,034 other followers

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 29 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 29 year tenure till date Aug 2016, Around 30 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 25 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 13 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 212 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

Personal Links

Verified Services

View Full Profile →

Categories

Flag Counter

Funapide, TV 45070, XEN-402, фунапид فونابيد 呋纳匹特


Image result for TV 450702D chemical structure of 1259933-16-8

ChemSpider 2D Image | Funapide | C22H14F3NO5Funapide.png

Funapide TV 45070,  XEN-402,  Funapide, (+)-

фунапид
فونابيد
呋纳匹特
  • Molecular FormulaC22H14F3NO5
  • Average mass429.345 Da

(S)-1′-[(5-Methyl-2-furyl)methyl]spiro[6H-furo[3,2-f][1,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indoline]-2′-one

Spiro(furo(2,3-F)-1,3-benzodioxole-7(6H),3′-(3H)indol)-2′(1’H)-one, 1′-((5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-furanyl)methyl)-, (3’S)-

(3’S)-1′-((5-(Trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl)methyl)-2H,6H-spiro(furo(2,3-F)(1,3)benzodioxole-7,3′-indol)-2′(1’H)-one

Spiro[furo[2,3-f]-1,3-benzodioxole-7(6H),3′-[3H]indol]-2′(1’H)-one, 1′-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-furanyl]methyl]-, (7S)-
TV-45070
UNII-A5595LHJ2L
XEN-401-S
XEN402
(3’S)-1′-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}-2H-6H-spiro[furo[2,3-f]-1,3-benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1’H)-one
(7S)-1′-{[5-(Trifluoromethyl)-2-furyl]methyl}spiro[furo[2,3-f][1,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1’H)-one
1259933-16-8 CAS
UNII-A5595LHJ2L

Phase II clinical trials for Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN)

Treatment of Neuropathic Pain

  • Originator Xenon Pharmaceuticals
  • Developer Teva Pharmaceutical Industries; Xenon Pharmaceuticals
  • Class Benzodioxoles; Fluorobenzenes; Furans; Indoles; Non-opioid analgesics; Small molecules; Spiro compounds
  • Mechanism of Action Nav1.7-voltage-gated-sodium-channel-inhibitors; Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Erythromelalgia

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase II Erythromelalgia; Postherpetic neuralgia
  • No development reported Dental pain; Pain
  • Discontinued Musculoskeletal pain

Most Recent Events

  • 09 May 2017 Teva Pharmaceutical Industries completes a phase IIb trial for Postherpetic neuralgia in USA (Topical) (NCT02365636)
  • 26 Sep 2016 Adverse events data from a phase II trial in Musculoskeletal pain presented at the 16th World Congress on Pain (PAN – 2016)
  • 19 Aug 2015 No recent reports of development identified – Phase-I for Pain (In volunteers) in Canada (PO)

MP 100 – 102 DEG CENT EP2538919

S ROT  ALPHA 0.99 g/100ml, dimethyl sulfoxide, 14.04, US 20110087027

Funapide (INN) (former developmental code names TV-45070 and XEN402) is a novel analgesic under development by Xenon Pharmaceuticals in partnership with Teva Pharmaceutical Industries for the treatment of a variety of chronic pain conditions, including osteoarthritisneuropathic painpostherpetic neuralgia, and erythromelalgia, as well as dental pain.[1][2][3][4] It acts as a small-moleculeNav1.7 and Nav1.8 voltage-gated sodium channel blocker.[1][2][4] Funapide is being evaluated in humans in both oral and topicalformulations, and as of July 2014, has reached phase IIb clinical trials.[1][3]

Image result for TV 45070

Sodium channels play a diverse set of roles in maintaining normal and pathological states, including the long recognized role that voltage gated sodium channels play in the generation of abnormal neuronal activity and neuropathic or pathological pain. Damage to peripheral nerves following trauma or disease can result in changes to sodium channel activity and the development of abnormal afferent activity including ectopic discharges from axotomised afferents and spontaneous activity of sensitized intact nociceptors. These changes can produce long-lasting abnormal hypersensitivity to normally innocuous stimuli, or allodynia. Examples of neuropathic pain include, but are not limited to, post-herpetic neuralgia, trigeminal neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, chronic lower back pain, phantom limb pain, and pain resulting from cancer and chemotherapy, chronic pelvic pain, complex regional pain syndrome and related neuralgias.

There have been some advances in treating neuropathic pain symptoms by using medications, such as gabapentin, and more recently pregabalin, as short-term, first-line treatments. However, pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain has generally had limited success with little response to commonly used pain reducing drugs, such as NSAIDS and opiates. Consequently, there is still a considerable need to explore novel treatment modalities.

There remain a limited number of potent effective sodium channel blockers with a minimum of adverse events in the clinic. There is also an unmet medical need to treat neuropathic pain and other sodium channel associated pathological states effectively and without adverse side effects. PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2006/110917, PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2010/045251 , PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2010/045197, PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2011/047174 and PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2011/002708 discloses certain spiro-oxindole compounds. These compounds are disclosed therein as being useful for the treatment of sodium channel-mediated diseases, preferably diseases related to pain, central nervous conditions such as epilepsy, anxiety, depression and bipolar disease;

cardiovascular conditions such as arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation; neuromuscular conditions such as restless leg syndrome; neuroprotection against stroke, neural trauma and multiple sclerosis; and channelopathies such as erythromelalgia and familial rectal pain syndrome.

Methods of preparing these compounds and pharmaceutical compositions containing them are also disclosed in PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2006/110917, PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2010/045251 , PCT

Published Patent Application No. WO 2010/045197, PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2011/047174 and PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2011/002708.

Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a rare disorder that is defined as significant pain or abnormal sensation 120 days or more after the presence of the initial rash caused by shingles. This pain persists after the healing of the associated rash. Generally, this affliction occurs in older individuals and individuals suffering from immunosuppression. There are about one million cases of shingles in the US per year, of which 10–20% will result in PHN.
Topical analgesics such as lidocaine and capsaicin are traditionally used to treat this disorder. Both lidocaine and TV-45070 have a mechanism of action that involves the inhibition of voltage-gated sodium ion channels.
TV-45070 (formerly XEN-402) was in-licensed by Teva from Xenon Pharmaceuticals and is reported to be an antagonist of the Nav1.7 sodium ion channel protein.
It is currently in Phase II clinical trials for PHN. Interestingly, the loss of function of the Nav1.7 sodium ion channel was reported to result in the inability to experience pain as a hereditary trait in certain individuals.
Primary erythromelalgia is another rare disease where alterations in Nav1.7 or mutations in the corresponding encoding gene SCN9A have been reported to result in chronic burning pain that can last for hours or even days. Thus, compounds which regulate this protein have potential therapeutic value as analgesics for chronic pain.
Image result for XENON PHARMA
PATENT
US 20100331386
WO 2011106729
US 20110087027
US 20110086899
US 20130143941
US 20130210884
WO 2013154712
 US 20150216794
WO 2016127068
WO 2016109795
CN 106518886
US 20170239183
SYNTHESIS
WO 2013154712
 CONTD…….
Synthesis
CN 106518886
PATENT
US 20100331386
Preparation of the (S)-Enantiomer of the Invention
The (S)-enantiomer of the invention and the corresponding (R)-enantiomer are prepared by the resolution of the compound of formula (I), as set forth above in the Summary of the Invention, using either chiral high pressure liquid chromatography methods or by simulated moving bed chromatography methods, as described below in the following Reaction Scheme wherein “chiral HPLC” refers to chiral high pressure liquid chromatography and “SMB” refers to simulated moving bed chromatography:
Figure US20100331386A1-20101230-C00006
The compound of formula (I) can be prepared by the methods disclosed in PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2006/110917, by methods disclosed herein, or by methods known to one skilled in the art.
One of ordinary skill in the art would recognize variations in the above Reaction Scheme which are appropriate for the resolution of the individual enantiomers.
Alternatively, the (S)-enantiomer of formula (I-S) and the (R)-enantiomer of formula (I-R), can be synthesized from starting materials which are known or readily prepared using process analogous to those which are known.
Preferably, the (S)-enantiomer of the invention obtained by the resolution methods disclosed herein is substantially free of the (R)-enantiomer or contains only traces of the (R)-enantiomer.
The following Synthetic Examples serve to illustrate the resolution methods disclosed by the above Reaction Schemes and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention.
Synthetic Example 1Synthesis of 1-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}spiro[furo[2,3-f][1,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1′H)-one (Compound of formula (I))
Figure US20100331386A1-20101230-C00007
To a suspension of spiro[furo[2,3-f][1,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1′H)-one (1.0 g, 3.6 mmol), which can be prepared according to the methods disclosed in PCT Published Patent Application No. WO 2006/110917, and cesium carbonate (3.52 g, 11 mmol) in acetone (50 mL) was added 2-bromomethyl-5-trifluoromethylfuran (1.13 g, 3.9 mmol) in one portion and the reaction mixture was stirred at 55-60° C. for 16 hours. Upon cooling to ambient temperature, the reaction mixture was filtered and the filtrate was evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was subjected to column chromatography, eluting with ethyl acetate/hexane (1/9-1/1) to afford 1′-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}spiro[furo[2,3-f][1,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1 ′H)-one, i.e., the compound of formula (I), (1.17 g, 76%) as a white solid: mp 139-141° C.;
1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.32-6.97 (m, 5H), 6.72 (d, J=3.3 Hz, 1H), 6.66 (s, 1H), 6.07 (s, 1H), 5.90-5.88 (m, 2H), 5.05, 4.86 (ABq, JAB=16.1 Hz, 2H), 4.91 (d, J=9.0 Hz, 1H), 4.66 (d, J=9.0 Hz, 1H); 13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ 176.9, 155.7, 153.5, 148.8, 142.2, 141.9, 140.8, 140.2, 139.7, 139.1, 132.1, 129.2, 124.7, 124.1, 123.7, 121.1, 120.1, 117.6, 114.5, 114.4, 110.3, 109.7, 103.0, 101.9, 93.8, 80.0, 57.8, 36.9;
MS (ES+) m/z 430.2 (M+1), 452.2 (M+23); Cal’d for C22H14F3NO5: C, 61.54%; H, 3.29%; N, 3.26%; Found: C, 61.51%; H, 3.29%; N, 3.26%.
Synthetic Example 2Resolution of Compound of Formula (I) by Chiral HPLC
The compound of formula (I) was resolved into the (S)-enantiomer of the invention and the corresponding (R)-enantiomer by chiral HPLC under the following conditions:

Column: Chiralcel® OJ-RH; 20 mm I.D.×250 mm, 5 mic; Lot: OJRH CJ-EH001 (Daicel Chemical Industries, Ltd)

Eluent: Acetonitrile/Water (60/40, v/v, isocratic)

Flow rate: 10 mL/min

Run time: 60 min

Loading: 100 mg of compound of formula (I) in 1 mL of acetonitrileTemperature: Ambient

Under the above chiral HPLC conditions, the (R)-enantiomer of the compound of formula (I), i.e., (R)-1′-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}spiro[furo[2,3-f][1,3]-benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1′H)-one, was isolated as the first fraction as a white solid; ee (enantiomeric excess)>99% (analytical OJ-RH, 55% acetonitrile in water); mp 103-105° C.; 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 7.32-6.99 (m, 5H), 6.71 (d, J=3.4 Hz, 1H), 6.67 (s, 1H), 6.05 (s, 1H), 5.89 (d, J=6.2 Hz, 2H), 5.13, 5.02 (ABq, JAB=16.4 Hz, 2H), 4.82, 4.72 (ABq, JAB=9.4 Hz, 2H); 13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ 177.2, 155.9, 152.0, 149.0, 142.4, 142.0, 141.3, 132.0, 129.1, 123.9, 120.6, 119.2, 117.0, 112.6, 109.3, 108.9, 103.0, 101.6, 93.5, 80.3, 58.2, 36.9; MS (ES+) m/z 430.2 (M+1), [α]D−17.46° (c 0.99, DMSO).

The (S)-enantiomer of the compound of formula (I), i.e., (S)-1′-{[5-(trifluoromethypfuran-2-yl]methyl}spiro-[furo[2,3-f][1,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1′H)-one was isolated as the second fraction as a white solid; ee >99% (analytical OJ-RH, 55% acetonitrile in water); mp 100-102° C.; 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 7.32-6.99 (m, 5H), 6.71 (d, J=3.4 Hz, 1H), 6.67 (s, 1H), 6.05 (s, 1H), 5.89 (d, J=6.3 Hz, 2H), 5.12, 5.02 (ABq, JAB=16.4 Hz, 2H), 4.82, 4.72 (ABq, JAB=9.4 Hz, 2H); 13C NMR (75MHz, CDCl3) δ 177.2, 155.9, 152.0, 149.0, 142.4, 142.0, 141.3, 132.0, 129.1, 123.9, 120.6, 119.2, 117.0, 112.6, 109.3, 108.9, 103.0, 101.6, 93.5, 80.3, 58.2, 36.9; MS (ES+) m/z 430.2 (M+1), [α]D+14.04° (c 0.99, DMSO)

Synthetic Example 3Resolution of Compound of Formula (I) by SMB Chromatography

The compound of formula (I) was resolved into the (S)-enantiomer of the invention and the corresponding (R)-enantiomer by SMB chromatography under the following conditions:

Extract: 147.05 mL/min, Raffinate: 76.13 mL/min Eluent: 183.18 mL/min Feed: 40 mL/min Recycling: 407.88 mL/min Run Time: 0.57 min Temperature: 25° C. Pressure: 46 bar

The feed solution (25 g of compound of formula (I) in 1.0 L of mobile phase (25:75:0.1 (v:v:v) mixture of acetonitrile/methanol/trifluoroacetic acid)) was injected continuously into the SMB system (Novasep Licosep Lab Unit), which was equipped with eight identical columns in 2-2-2-2 configuration containing 110 g (per column, 9.6 cm, 4.8 cm I.D.) of ChiralPAK-AD as stationary phase. The first eluting enantiomer (the (R)-enantiomer of the compound of formula (I)) was contained in the raffinate stream and the second eluting enantiomer (the (S)-enantiomer of the compound of formula (I)) was contained in the extract stream. The characterization data of the (S)-enantiomer and the (R)-enantiomer obtained from the SMB resolution were identical to those obtained above utilizing chiral HPLC.

The compound of formula (I) was resolved into its constituent enantiomers on a Waters preparative LCMS autopurification system. The first-eluting enantiomer from the chiral column was brominated (at a site well-removed from the stereogenic centre) to give the corresponding 5′-bromo derivative, which was subsequently crystallized to generate a single crystal suitable for X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of this brominated derivative of the first-eluting enantiomer was obtained and its absolute configuration was found to be the same as the (R)-enantiomer of the invention. Hence, the second-eluting enantiomer from the chiral column is the (S)-enantiomer of the invention. Moreover, the material obtained from the extract stream of the SMB resolution had a specific optical rotation of the same sign (positive, i.e. dextrorotatory) as that of the material obtained from the aforementioned LC resolution.

Patent

WO 2013154712

EXAMPLE 8

Synthesis of (7S)-1 ‘-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2- yllmethylJspirotfurop.S-flll .Sl enzoclioxole-y.S’-indoll-Zil ‘Wi-one

Compound of formula (ia1 )

Figure imgf000095_0001

To a cooled (0 °C) solution of (3S)-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3- (hydroxymethyl)-1-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one prepared according to the procedure described in Example 7 (16.4 mmol) and 2- (diphenylphosphino)pyridine (5.2 g, 20 mmol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (170 mL) was added di-ferf-butylazodicarboxylate (4.5 g, 20 mmol). The mixture was stirred for 2 h at 0 °C, then the reaction was diluted with ethyl acetate (170 mL), washed with 3 N hydrochloric acid (7 x 50 mL) and brine (2 x 100 mL), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was dissolved in ethanol (80 mL), decolorizing charcoal (15 g) was added and the mixture was heated at reflux for 1 h. The mixture was filtered while hot through a pad of diatomaceous earth. The filtrate was concentrated in vacuo and the residue triturated in a mixture of diethyl ether/hexanes to afford (7S)-1 ‘-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}spiro- [furo[2,3-/][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3’-indol]-2′(1 ‘H)-one (1.30 g) as a colorless solid in 18% yield. The mother liquor from the trituration was concentrated in vacuo, trifluoroacetic acid (20 mL) was added and the mixture stirred for 3 h at ambient temperature. The mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate (100 mL), washed with saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (100 mL), 3 N hydrochloric acid (4 x 60 mL) and brine (2 x 100 mL), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was purified by column chromatography, eluting with a gradient of ethyl acetate in hexanes to afford further (7S)-1 ‘-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}spiro- [furo[2,3- ][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3’-indol]-2′(1 ‘H)-one (2.6 g) as a colorless solid (37% yield, overall yield 55% over 2 steps): H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) £7.29-6.96 (m, 4H), 6.73 (s, 1 H), 6.50 (s, 1 H), 6.38 (s, 1 H), 6.09 (s, 1 H), 5.85 (br s, 2H), 5.06 (d, J = 16.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.93-4.84 (m, 2H), 4.68-4.65 (m, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 429.8 (M + 1 ); ee (enantiomeric excess) >99.5% (HPLC, Chiralpak IA, 2.5% acetonitrile in methyl tert- butyl ether).

EXAMPLE 9

Synthesis of 1-(diphenylmethyl)-1 H-indole-2,3-dione

Compound of formula (15a)

Figure imgf000096_0001

A. To a suspension of hexanes-washed sodium hydride (34.0 g, 849 mmol) in anhydrous Λ/,/V-dimethylformamide (400 mL) at 0 °C was added a solution of isatin (99.8 g, 678 mmol) in anhydrous Λ/,/V-dimethylformamide (400 mL) dropwise over 30 minutes. The reaction mixture was stirred for 1 h at 0 °C and a solution of benzhydryl bromide (185 g, 745 mmol) in anhydrous N-dimethylformamide (100 mL) was added dropwise over 5 minutes. The reaction mixture was allowed to warm to ambient temperature, stirred for 16 h and heated at 60 °C for 2 h. The mixture was cooled to 0 °C and water (500 mL) was added. The mixture was poured into water (2 L), causing a precipitate to be deposited. The solid was collected by suction filtration and washed with water (2000 mL) to afford 1-(diphenylmethyl)-1H-indole-2,3- dione (164 g) as an orange solid in 77% yield.

B. Alternatively, to a mixture of isatin (40.0 g, 272 mmol), cesium carbonate (177 g, 543 mmol) and A/./V-dimethylformamide (270 mL) at 80 °C was added dropwise a solution of benzhydryl bromide (149 g, 544 mmol) in N,N- dimethyiformamide (200 mL) over 30 minutes. The reaction mixture was heated at 80 °C for 3 h, allowed to cool to ambient temperature and filtered through a pad of diatomaceous earth. The pad was rinsed with ethyl acetate (1000 mL). The filtrate was washed with saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (4 x 200 mL), 1 N

hydrochloric acid (200 mL) and brine (4 x 200 mL), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was triturated with diethyl ether to afford 1 -(diphenylmethyl)-1 H-indole-2,3-dione (59.1 g) as an orange solid in 69% yield. The mother liquor from the trituration was concentrated in vacuo and the residue triturated in diethyl ether to afford a further portion of 1-(diphenylmethyl)-1 H- indole-2,3-dione (8.2 g) in 10% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) £7.60 (d, J = 7.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.34-7.24 (m, 1 1 H), 7.05-6.97 (m, 2H), 6.48 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 313.9 (M + 1 ).

C. Alternatively, a mixture of isatin (500 g, 3.4 mol) and anhydrous N,N- dimethylformamide (3.5 L) was stirred at 15-35 °C for 0.5 h. Cesium carbonate (2.2 kg, 6.8 mol) was added and the mixture stirred at 55-60 °C for 1 h. A solution of benzhydryl bromide (1.26 kg, 5.1 mol) in anhydrous N, A/-dimethylformamide (1.5 L) was added and the resultant mixture stirred at 80-85 °C for 1 h, allowed to cool to ambient temperature and filtered. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (12.5 L). To the combined filtrate and washes was added 1 N hydrochloric acid (5 L). The phases were separated and the aqueous phase was extracted with ethyl acetate (2.5 L). The combined organic extracts were washed with 1 N hydrochloric acid (2 * 2.5 L) and brine (3 χ 2.5 L) and concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 750 mL. Methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 L) was added and the mixture was cooled to 5-15 °C, causing a solid to be deposited. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with methyl ferf- butyl ether (250 mL) and dried in vacuo at 50-55 °C for 16 h to afford 1- (diphenylmethyl)-1 H-indole-2,3-dione (715 g) as an orange solid in 67% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 7.60 (d, J = 7.4 Hz, H), 7.34-7.24 (m, 1 H), 7.05-6.97 (m, 2H), 6.48 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 313.9 (M + 1 ).

EXAMPLE 10

Synthesis of 1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-1 ,3- dihydro-2H-indol-2-one

Compound of formula (16a1 )

Figure imgf000097_0001

A. To a solution of sesamol (33.1 g, 239 mmol) in anhydrous

tetrahydrofuran (500 mL) at 0 °C was added dropwise a 2 M solution of

isopropylmagnesium chloride in tetrahydrofuran (104 mL, 208 mmol), followed by 1 – (diphenylmethyl)-1H-indole-2,3-dione (50.0 g, 160 mmol) and tetrahydrofuran (100 mL). The reaction mixture was stirred at ambient temperature for 5 h, diluted with ethyl acetate (1500 mL), washed with saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (400 mL) and brine (2 x 400 mL), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was triturated with a mixture of diethyl ether and hexanes to afford 1- (diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-in

2- one (70.7 g) as a colorless solid in 98% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) <59.12 (br s, 1 H), 7.45-7.43 (m, 1 H), 7.30-7.22 (m, 10H), 7.09-7.07 (m, 2H), 6.89 (s, 1 H), 6.56- 6.55 (m, 1 H), 6.47-6.46 (m, 1 H), 6.29-6.28 (m, 1 H), 5.86 (s, 2H), 4.52 (br s, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 433.7 (M – 17).

B. Alternatviely, a mixture of sesamol (0.99 kg, 7.2 mol) and anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (18 L) was stirred at 15-35 °C for 0.5 h and cooled to -5-0 °C.

Isopropyl magnesium chloride (2.0 M solution in tetrahydrofuran, 3.1 L, 6.2 mol) was added, followed by 1-(diphenylmethyl)-1 H-indole-2,3-dione (1.50 kg, 4.8 mol) and further anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (3 L). The mixture was stirred at 15-25 °C for 5 h. Ethyl acetate (45 L) and saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (15 L) were added. The mixture was stirred at 15-25 °C for 0.5 h and was allowed to settle for 0.5 h. The phases were separated and the organic phase was washed with brine (2.3 L) and concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 4 L. Methyl ferf-butyl ether (9 L) was added and the mixture concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 4 L. Heptane (6 L) was added and the mixture was stirred at 15-25 °C for 2 h, causing a solid to be deposited. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with methyl tert- butyl ether (0.3 L) and dried in vacuo at 50-55 °C for 7 h to afford 1-(diphenylmethyl)-3- hydroxy-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (2.12 kg) as an off-white solid in 98% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 9.12 (br s, 1 H), 7.45-7.43 (m, 1 H), 7.30-7.22 (m, 10H), 7.09-7.07 (m, 2H), 6.89 (s, 1 H), 6.56-6.55 (m, 1 H), 6.47-6.46 (m, 1 H), 6.29-6.28 (m, 1 H), 5.86 (s, 2H), 4.52 (br s, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 433.7 (M – 17).

EXAMPLE 1 1

Synthesis of 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-1 ,3- dihydro-2H-indol-2-one

Compound of formula (17a1)

Figure imgf000098_0001

A. A mixture of 1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3- benzodioxol-5-yl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (30.0 g, 66.5 mmol), benzyl bromide (8.3 mL, 70 mmol), and potassium carbonate (18.4 g, 133 mmol) in anhydrous N,N- dimeihylformamide (100 mL) was stirred at ambient temperature for 16 h. The reaction mixture was filtered and the solid was washed with /V,A/-dimethylformamide (100 mL). The filtrate was poured into water (1000 mL) and the resulting precipitate was collected by suction filtration and washed with water to afford 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol- 5-yl]-1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (32.0 g) as a beige solid in 83% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 7.42-7.28 (m, 9H), 7.22-7.14 (m, 6H), 7.10- 6.93 (m, 3H), 6.89-6.87 (m, 2H), 6.53 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.29 (br s, 1 H), 5.88 (s, 1 H), 5.85 (s, 1 H), 4.66 (d, J = 14.2 Hz, 1 H), 4.51 (d, J = 14.1 Hz, 1 H), 3.95 (s, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 542.0 (M + 1), 523.9 (M – 17).

B. Alternatively, to a solution of 1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(6- hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (2.1 kg, 4.6 mol) in anhydrous A/,A/-dimethylformamide (8.4 L) at 20-30 °C was added potassium carbonate (1.3 kg, 9.2 mol), followed by benzyl bromide (0.58 L, 4.8 mol). The mixture was stirred at 20-30 °C for 80 h and filtered. The filter cake was washed with

A/,/V-dimethylformamide (0.4 L) and the filtrate was poured into water (75 L), causing a solid to be deposited. The mixture was stirred at 15-25 °C for 7 h. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with water (2 L) and dried in vacuo at 50-60 °C for 48 h to afford 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-1 ,3- dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (2.1 1 kg) as an off-white solid in 84% yield; 1H NMR (300

MHz, CDCI3) £7.42-7.28 (m, 9H), 7.22-7.14 (m, 6H), 7.10-6.93 (m, 3H), 6.89-6.87 (m, 2H), 6.53 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.29 (br s, 1 H), 5.88 (s, 1 H), 5.85 (s, 1 H), 4.66 (d, J = 14.2 Hz, 1 H), 4.51 (d, J = 14.1 Hz, 1 H), 3.95 (s, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 542.0 (M + 1 ).

EXAMPLE 12

Synthesis of 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-1 -(diphenylmethyl)-l ,3-dihydro-2H- indol-2-one

Compound of formula (18a1 )

Figure imgf000099_0001

A. To a solution of 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-1- (diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (32.0 g, 57.7 mmol) in dichloromethane (100 mL) was added trifluoroacetic acid (50 mL) followed by triethylsilane (50 mL). The reaction mixture was stirred at ambient temperature for 2 h and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was dissolved in ethyi acetate (250 mL), washed with saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (3 x 100 mL) and brine (3 x 100 mL), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was triturated with diethyl ether to afford 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5- yl]-1-(diphenylmethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (19.0 g) as a colorless solid in 61 % yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 7.31 -7.23 (m, 15H), 7.10-6.88 (m, 4H), 6.50-6.45 (m, 3H), 5.86 (s, 2H), 4.97-4.86 (m, 3H); MS (ES+) m/z 525.9 (M + 1).

B. Alternatively, to a solution of 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-1- (diphenylmethyl)-3-hydroxy-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (2.0 kg, 3.7 mol) in

dichloromethane (7 L) at 20-30 °C was added trifluoracetic acid (2.5 L), followed by triethylsilane (3.1 L). The mixture was stirred at 15-35 °C for 4 h and concentrated in vacuo to dryness. To the residue was added ethyl acetate (16 L) and the mixture was stirred at 15-35 °C for 0.5 h, washed with saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (3 x 7 L) and brine (3 χ 7 L) and concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 7 L. Methyl ferf-butyl ether (9 L) was added and the mixture concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 9 L and stirred at 10-20 °C for 2.5 h, during which time a solid was deposited. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with methyl te/t-butyl ether (0.4 L) and dried in vacuo at 50-55 °C for 7 h to afford 3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3- benzodioxol-5-yl]-1-(diphenylmethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (1 .26 kg) as an off-white solid in 65% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) £7.31 -7.23 (m, 15H), 7.10- 6.88 (m, 4H), 6.50-6.45 (m, 3H), 5.86 (s, 2H), 4.97-4.86 (m, 3H); MS (ES+) m/z 525.9 (M + 1).

EXAMPLE 13

Synthesis of (3S)-3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-3-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-1 –

(diphenylmethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one

Compound of formula (19a1 )

Figure imgf000100_0001

A. To a nitrogen-degassed mixture of 50% w/w aqueous potassium hydroxide (69.6 mL, 619 mmol), toluene (100 mL), and (9S)-1 -(anthracen-9- ylmethyl)cinchonan-1 -ium-9-ol chloride (0.50 g, 0.95 mmol) cooled in an ice/salt bath to an internal temperature of -18 °C was added a nitrogen-degassed solution of 3-[6- (benzyloxy)-l ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-1 -(diphenylmethyl)-l ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (10.0 g, 19.0 mmol) and benzyl chloromethyl ether (2.9 mL, 21 mmol) in

toluene/tetrahydrofuran (1 :1 v/v, 80 mL) dropwise over 1 h. The reaction mixture was stirred for 3.5 h and diluted with ethyl acetate (80 mL). The organic phase was washed with 1 N hydrochloric acid (3 x 150 mL) and brine (2 x 100 mL), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo to afford (3S)-3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3- benzodioxol-5-yl]-3-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-1-(diphenylmethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2/-/-indol-2-one (12.6 g) as a colorless solid in quantitative yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 7.42 (d, 2H), 7.24-6.91 (m, 21 H), 6.69-6.67 (m, 2H), 6.46 (d, J = 7.7 Hz, 1 H), 6.15 (s, 1 H), 5.83- 5.81 (m, 2H), 4.53-4.31 (m, 3H), 4.17-4.09 (m, 3H); MS (ES+) m/z 646.0 (M + 1); ee (enantiomeric excess) 90% (HPLC, Chiralpak IA, 2.5% acetonitrile in methyl tert-butyl ether).

B. Alternatively, a mixture of 50% w/v aqueous potassium hydroxide (4.2 kg), toluene (12 L) and (9S)-1 -(anthracen-9-ylmethyl)cinchonan-1 -ium-9-ol chloride (0.06 kg, 0.1 mol) was degassed with dry nitrogen and cooled to -18 to -22 °C. To this mixture was added a cold (-18 to -22 °C), nitrogen-degassed solution of 3-[6-

(benzyloxy)-l ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-1 ~(diphenylmethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (1.2 kg, 2.3 mol) and benzyl chloromethyl ether (0.43 kg, 2.8 mol) in toluene (10 L) and tetrahydrofuran (10 L) at -18 to 22 °C over 3 h. The mixture was stirred at -18 to -22 °C for 5 h, allowed to warm to ambient temperature and diluted with ethyl acetate (10 L). The phases were separated and the organic layer was washed with 1 N

hydrochloric acid (3 χ 8 L) and brine (2 χ 12 L) and concentrated in vacuo to dryness to afford (3S)-3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-3-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-1- (diphenylmethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (1.5 kg) as a colorless solid in quantitative yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) £7.42 (d, 2H), 7.24-6.91 (m, 21 H), 6.69-6.67 (m, 2H), 6.46 (d, J = 7.7 Hz, 1 H), 6.15 (s, 1 H), 5.83-5.81 (m, 2H), 4.53-4.31 (m, 3H), 4.17- 4.09 (m, 3H); MS (ES+) m/z 646.0 (M + 1); ee (enantiomeric excess) 90% (HPLC, ChiralPak IA). EXAMPLE 14

Synthesis of (3S)-1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3- (hydroxymethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2/-/-indol-2-one

Compound of formula (20a1)

Figure imgf000102_0001

A. A mixture of (3S)-3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-3- [(benzyloxy)methyl]-1 -(diphenylmethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2/-/-indol-2-one (8.8 g, 14 mmol), 10% w/w palladium on carbon (50% wetted powder, 3.5 g, 1.6 mmol), and acetic acid (3.9 ml_, 68 mmol) in a nitrogen-degassed mixture of ethanol/tetrahydrofuran (1 : 1 v/v, 140 mL) was stirred under hydrogen gas (1 atm) at ambient temperature for 4 h. The reaction mixture was filtered through a pad of diatomaceous earth and the pad was rinsed with ethyl acetate (100 mL). The filtrate was concentrated in vacuo to afford (3S)-1-(diphenylmethyl)-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-1 ,3- dihydro-2H-indol-2-one as a colorless solid that was carried forward without further purification: H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 9.81 (br s, 1 H), 7.35-7.24 (m, 1 1 H), 7.15- 7.01 (m, 3H), 6.62 (s, 1 H), 6.54-6.47 (m, 2H), 5.86-5.84 (m, 2H), 4.76 (d, J = 1 1.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.13-4.04 (m, 1 H), 2.02 (s, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 465.9 (M + 1); ee (enantiomeric excess) 93% (HPLC, Chiralpak IA, 2.5% acetonitrile in methyl ie t-butyl ether).

B. Alternatively, a glass-lined hydrogenation reactor was charged with (3S)-3-[6-(benzyloxy)-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl]-3-[(benzyloxy)methyl]-1 -(diphenylmethyl)- 1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (0.1 kg, 0.15 mol), tetrahydrofuran (0.8 L), ethanol (0.4 L), acetic acid (0.02 L) and 20% w/w palladium (li) hydroxide on carbon (0.04 kg). The reactor was purged three times with nitrogen. The reactor was then purged three times with hydrogen and was then pressurized to 50-55 lb/in2 with hydrogen. The mixture was stirred at 20-30 °C for 5 h under a 50-55 lb/in2 atmosphere of hydrogen. The reactor was purged and the mixture was filtered. The filtrate was concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 0.2 L and methyl te/t-butyl ether (0.4 L) was added. The mixture was concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 0.2 L and methyl ie/t-butyl ether (0.2 L) was added, followed by heptane (0.25 L). The mixture was stirred at ambient temperature for 2 h, during which time a solid was deposited. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with heptane (0.05 L) and dried in vacuo at a temperature below 50 °C for 8 h to afford (3S)-1 -(diphenylmethyl)-3-(6-hydroxy- 1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (0.09 kg) as a colorless solid in 95% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 9.81 (br s, 1 H), 7.35-7.24 (m, 1 1 H), 7.15-7.01 (m, 3H), 6.62 (s, 1 H), 6.54-6.47 (m, 2H), 5.86-5.84 (m, 2H), 4.76 (d, J = 1 1.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.13-4.04 (m, 1 H), 2.02 (s, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 465.9 (M + 1); ee (enantiomeric excess) 91% (HPLC, ChiralPak IA).

EXAMPLE 15

Synthesis of (7S)-1′-(diphenylmethyl)spiro[furo[2,3-/][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-

2′(1 ‘tf)-one

Compound of formula (21 a1 )

Figure imgf000103_0001

A. To a cooled (0 °C) solution of (3S)-1 -(diphenylmethyl)-3-(6-hydroxy-1 ,3- benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one prepared according to the procedure described in Example 14 (13.6 mmol) and 2-

(diphenylphosphino)pyridine (4.3 g, 16 mmol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (140 mL) was added di-tert-butylazodicarboxylate (3.8 g, 17 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 3 h, diluted with ethyl acetate (140 mL), washed with 3 N

hydrochloric acid (6 * 50 mL) and brine (2 χ 100 mL), dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was triturated with a mixture of diethyl ether and hexanes to afford (7S)-1 ‘-(diphenylmethyl)spiro[furo[2,3- ][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3’-indol]-2′(1 ‘H)-one (4.55 g) as a colorless solid in a 75% yield over 2 steps: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 7.34-7.24 (m, 10H), 7.15-7.13 (m, 1 H), 7.04 (s, 1 H), 6.99-6.95 (m, 2H), 6.50-6.48 (m, 2H), 6.06 (s, 1 H), 5.85-5.83 (m, 2H), 4.96 (d, J = 8.9 Hz, 1 H), 4.69 (d, J = 8.9 Hz, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 447.9 (M + 1); ee

(enantiomeric excess) 93% (HPLC, Chiraipak IA, 2.5% acetonitrile in methyl te/f-butyl ether).

B. Alternativel, to a cooled (0-5 °C) solution of (3S)-1-(diphenylmethyl)-3- (6-hydroxy-1 ,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-1 ,3-dihydro-2 -/-indol-2-one (1 .0 kg, 2.1 mol) and 2-(diphenylphosphino)pyridine (0.66 kg, 2.5 mol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (20 L) was added over 2 h a solution of di-terf-butylazodicarboxylate (0.62 kg, 2.7 mmol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (5 L). The mixture was stirred for 4 h at 0-5 °C and was allowed to warm to ambient temperature. The mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate (20 L), washed with 3 N hydrochloric acid (6 * 8 L) and brine (2 x 12 L) and concentrated in vacuo to a volume of approximately 1.5 L. Methyl rert-butyl ether (4 L) was added and the mixture concentrated in vacuo to a volume of

approximately 1.5 L. Methyl terf-butyl ether (2 L) and heptane (2 L) were added and the mixture was stirred at ambient temperature for 2 h, during which time a solid was deposited. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with heptane (0.5 L) and dried in vacuo below 50 °C for 8 h to afford (7S)-1′-(diphenylmethyl)spiro[furo[2,3- f][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1’H)-one (0.76 kg) as a colorless solid in 79% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 7.34-7.24 (m, 10H), 7.15-7.13 (m, 1 H), 7.04 (s, 1 H), 6.99- 6.95 (m, 2H), 6.50-6.48 (m, 2H), 6.06 (s, 1 H), 5.85-5.83 (m, 2H), 4.96 (d, J = 8.9 Hz, 1 H), 4.69 (d, J = 8.9 Hz, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 447.9 (M + 1 ); ee (enantiomeric excess) 92% (HPLC, ChiralPak IA).

EXAMPLE 16

Synthesis of (7S)-spiro[furo[2,3-f][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1 ‘H)-one

Compound of formula (22a1)

Figure imgf000104_0001

A. To a solution of (7S)-1′-(diphenylmethyl)spiro[furo[2,3- f][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indol]-2′(1’H)-one (4.55 g, 10.2 mmol) in trifluoroacetic acid (80 ml_) was added triethylsilane (7 ml_). The reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 2.5 h, allowed to cool to ambient temperature and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was triturated with a mixture of diethyl ether and hexanes to afford

(7S)-spiro[furo[2,3-/][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3,-indol]-2′(1’W)-one (2.30 g) as a colorless solid in 80% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) £8.27 (br s, 1 H), 7.31-7.26 (m, 1 H), 7.17-7.15 (m, 1 H), 7.07-7.02 (m, 1 H), 6.96-6.94 (m, 1 H), 6.53-6.52 (m, 1 H), 6.24-6.23 (m, 1 H), 5.88-5.87 (m, 2H), 4.95 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.68 (d, J = 8.9 Hz, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 281.9 (M + 1 ); ee (enantiomeric excess) 99% (HPLC, Chiralpak IA, 2.5% acetonitrile in methyl fert-butyl ether). B. Alternatively, a mixture of (7S)-1 ‘-(diphenylmethyl)spiro[furo[2,3- /Kl^benzodioxole^-indol^ r^-one (0.70 kg, 1.6 mol), trifluoroacetic acid (12 L) and triethylsilane (1.1 L) was heated at reflux under nitrogen atmosphere for 3 h, allowed to cool to ambient temperature and concentrated in vacuo to dryness. To the residue was added ethyl acetate (0.3 L), methyl fert-butyl ether (1 L) and heptane (3.5 L), causing a solid to be deposited. The solid was collected by filtration, taken up in dichloromethane (3 L), stirred at ambient temperature for 1 h and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated in vacuo to dryness. The residue was taken up in ethyl acetate (0.3 L), methyl ferf-butyl ether (1 L) and heptane (3.5 L), causing a solid to be deposited. The solid was collected by filtration and dried in vacuo below 50 °C for 8 h to afford (7S)-spiro[furo[2,3- ][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3’-indol]-2′(1 ‘ -/)-one (0.40 kg) as a colorless solid in 91 % yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) 8.27 (br s, 1 H), 7.31-7.26 (m, 1 H), 7.17-7.15 (m, 1 H), 7.07-7.02 (m, 1 H), 6.96-6.94 (m, 1 H), 6.53-6.52 (m, 1 H), 6.24-6.23 (m, 1 H), 5.88-5.87 (m, 2H), 4.95 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.68 (d, J = 8.9 Hz, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 281.9 (M + 1); ee (enantiomeric excess) 98.6% (HPLC, ChiralPak IA).

EXAMPLE 17

Synthesis of of (7S)-1 ‘-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2- yl]methyl}spiro[furo[2,3- ][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3’-indol]-2′(rH)-one

Compound of formula (Ia1)

Figure imgf000105_0001

A. To a mixture of (7S)-6H-spiro[[1 ,3]dioxolo[4,5-f]benzofuran-7,3′-indolin]- 2′-one (1.80 g, 6.41 mmol) and 2-(bromomethyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)furan (1.47 g, 6.41 mmol) in acetone (200 mL) was added cesium carbonate (3.13 g, 9.61 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 2 h and filtered while hot through a pad of diatomaceous earth. The filtrate was concentrated in vacuo to afford (7S)-1′-{[5- (trifluoromethyOfuran^-yllmethy^spiroIfurop.S- ltl .Slbenzodioxole^.S’-indol^ rH)- one (2.71 g) as a colorless solid in quantitative yield (97% purity by HPLC). The product was crystallized from a mixture of methanol and hexanes to afford (7S)-1 ‘-{[5- (trifluoromethy furan^-yllmethylJspirotfuro^.S- lfl .Slbenzodioxole^.S’-indoll^ rH)- one (1.46 g) as colorless needles in 53% yield. The mother liquor was concentrated in vacuo and subjected to a second crystallization in methanol and hexanes to afford further (7S)-1 ‘-{[5-(trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}spiro[furo[2,3-/][1 ,3]benzodioxole- 7,3’-indol]-2′(1 ‘H)-one (0.469 g) as a colorless solid in 17% yield (total yield 70%): 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.29-6.96 (m, 4H), 6.73 (s, 1 H), 6.50 (s, 1 H), 6.38 (s, 1 H), 6.09 (s, 1 H), 5.85 (br s, 2H), 5.06 (d, J = 16.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.93-4.84 (m, 2H), 4.68-4.65 (m, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 429.8 (M + 1); ee (enantiomeric excess) >99.5% (HPLC, Chiralpak IA, 2.5% acetonitrile in methyl tert-butyl ether).

B. Alternatively, to a solution of (7S)-spiro[furoI2,3-f][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3′- indol]-2′(1’H)-one (0.40 kg, 1.4 mol) in anhydrous N, W-dimethylformamide (5 L) was added cesium carbonate (1.2 kg, 3.4 mol), followed by 2-(bromomethyl)-5- (trifluromethyl)furan (0.24 L, 1.7 mol). The mixture was heated at 80-85 °C for 3 h, allowed to cool to ambient temperature and filtered through a pad of diatomaceous earth. The pad was washed with ethyl acetate (8 L). The combined filtrate and washes were washed with water (4 L), saturated aqueous ammonium chloride (2 * 4 L) and brine (2 * 4 L) and concentrated in vacuo to dryness. The residue was purified by recrystallization from te/t-butyl methyl ether (0.4 L) and heptane (0.8 L), followed by drying of the resultant solid in vacuo at 40-50 °C for 8 h to afford (7S)-1 ‘-{[5- (trifluoromethyl)furan-2-yl]methyl}spiro[furo[2,3-f][1 ,3]benzodioxole-7,3’-indol]-2′(1 ‘H)- one (0.37 kg) as a colorless solid in 61% yield: 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.29-6.96 (m, 4H), 6.73 (s, 1 H), 6.50 (s, 1 H), 6.38 (s, 1 H), 6.09 (s, 1 H), 5.85 (br s, 2H), 5.06 (d, J = 16.0 Hz,1 H), 4.93-4.84 (m, 2H), 4.68-4.65 (m, 1 H); MS (ES+) m/z 429.8 (M + 1 ); ee (enantiomeric excess) > 99% (HPLC, Chiralpak IA).

PATENT
CadieuxJ.-J.ChafeevM.ChowdhuryS.FuJ.JiaQ.AbelS.El-SayedE.HuthmannE.IsarnoT. Synthetic Methods For Spiro-Oxindole Compounds. U.S. Patent 8,445,696, May 21, 2013.
PATENT
SunS.FuJ.ChowdhuryS.HemeonI. W.GrimwoodM. E.MansourT. S. Asymmetric Syntheses of Spiro-Oxindole Compounds Useful As Therapeutic Agents. U.S. Patent 9,487,535, Nov 08, 2016.
PAPER
Abstract Image

TV-45070 is a small-molecule lactam containing a chiral spiro-ether that has been reported as a potential topical therapy for pain associated with the Nav1.7 sodium ion channel encoded by the gene SCN9A. A pilot-scale synthesis is presented that is highlighted by an asymmetric aldol coupling at ambient temperature, used to create a quaternary chiral center. Although only a moderate ee is obtained, the removal of the undesired isomer is achieved through preferential precipitation of a near racemic mixture from the reaction, leaving the enantiopure isomer in solution. Cyclization to form the final API uses an uncommon diphenylphosphine-based leaving group which proved successful on the neopentyl system when other traditional leaving groups failed.

The First Asymmetric Pilot-Scale Synthesis of TV-45070

Chemical Process Research and Development, Analytical Research and Development, Teva Branded Pharmaceutical Products R&D Inc., 383 Phoenixville Pike, Malvern, Pennsylvania 19355, United States
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00237
Publication Date (Web): September 8, 2017
Copyright © 2017 American Chemical Society

*E-mail: jasclafan@yahoo.com.

(S)-1′-[(5-Methyl-2-furyl)methyl]spiro[6H-furo[3,2-f][1,3]benzodioxole-7,3′-indoline]-2′-one (1)

1H NMR (DMSO, 400 MHz) δ 7.32 (t, J = 7.7 Hz, 1H), 7.20 (m, 3H), 7.07 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 1H), 6.77 (d, J= 3.3 Hz, 1H), 6.72 (s, 1H), 6.10 (s, 1H), 5.94 (d, J = 9.1 Hz, 1H), 5.94 (d, J = 9.1 Hz, 1H), 5.13 (d, J = 16.5 Hz, 1H), 5.02 (d, J = 16.5 Hz, 1H), 4.82 (d, J = 9.5 Hz, 1H), 4.73 (d, J = 9.5 Hz, 1H).
13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): 176.48, 155.28, 153.02, 148.40, 141.80, 141.51, 139.54 (q, JCF = 41.9 Hz), 131.63, 128.79, 123.64, 123.29, 119.69, 118.92 (q, JCF = 266.4 Hz), 114.01 (q, JCF = 2.9 Hz) 109.86, 109.21, 102.55, 101.44, 93.31, 79.52, 57.41, 36.44.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c Bagal, Sharan K.; Chapman, Mark L.; Marron, Brian E.; Prime, Rebecca; Ian Storer, R.; Swain, Nigel A. (2014). “Recent progress in sodium channel modulators for pain”. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters24 (16): 3690–9. ISSN 0960-894XPMID 25060923doi:10.1016/j.bmcl.2014.06.038.
  2. Jump up to:a b Stephen McMahon; Martin Koltzenburg; Irene Tracey; Dennis C. Turk (1 March 2013). Wall & Melzack’s Textbook of Pain: Expert Consult – Online. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 508. ISBN 0-7020-5374-0.
  3. Jump up to:a b Xenon Pharma. “TV-45070: A Small Molecule for the Treatment of the Orphan Disease EM and Other Pain Disorders”.
  4. Jump up to:a b Xenon Pharma (2012). “Teva and Xenon Announce Teva’s World Wide License of Xenon’s Pain Drug XEN402”.

External links

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016326184 SYNTHETIC METHODS FOR SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS 2016-01-06
US2017095449 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS OF SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUND FOR TOPICAL ADMINISTRATION AND THEIR USE AS THERAPEUTIC AGENTS 2016-10-11
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2015216794 METHODS OF TREATING PAIN ASSOCIATED WITH OSTEOARTHRITIS OF A JOINT WITH A TOPICAL FORMULATION OF A SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUND 2015-02-05 2015-08-06
US9682033 METHODS OF TREATING POSTHERPETIC NEURALGIA WITH A TOPICAL FORMULATION OF A SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUND 2016-02-05 2016-08-11
US2016166541 Methods For Identifying Analgesic Agents 2016-01-27 2016-06-16
US2017066777 ASYMMETRIC SYNTHESES FOR SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS USEFUL AS THERAPEUTIC AGENTS 2016-09-14
US2017073351 ENANTIOMERS OF SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS AND THEIR USES AS THERAPEUTIC AGENTS 2016-09-28
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US8742109 Synthetic methods for spiro-oxindole compounds 2012-09-14 2014-06-03
US8883840 Enantiomers of spiro-oxindole compounds and their uses as therapeutic agents 2012-09-14 2014-11-11
US9260446 SYNTHETIC METHODS FOR SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS 2014-05-07 2014-11-13
US9278088 Methods for Identifying Analgesic Agents 2013-04-11 2013-08-15
US9480677 ENANTIOMERS OF SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS AND THEIR USES AS THERAPEUTIC AGENTS 2014-10-09 2015-01-22
Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US8450358 ENANTIOMERS OF SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS AND THEIR USES AS THERAPEUTIC AGENTS 2010-12-30
US2011086899 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS FOR ORAL ADMINISTRATION 2011-04-14
US8445696 SYNTHETIC METHODS FOR SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS 2011-04-14
US9487535 ASYMMETRIC SYNTHESES FOR SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUNDS USEFUL AS THERAPEUTIC AGENTS 2013-03-11 2013-10-17
US9504671 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS OF SPIRO-OXINDOLE COMPOUND FOR TOPICAL ADMINISTRATION AND THEIR USE AS THERAPEUTIC AGENTS 2011-02-25 2013-06-06
PATENT 
Cited Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO2006110917A2 11 Apr 2006 19 Oct 2006 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Spiro-oxindole compounds and their uses as therapeutic agents
WO2010045197A1 13 Oct 2009 22 Apr 2010 Xenon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Spiro-oxindole compounds and their use as therapeutic agents
WO2010045251A2 13 Oct 2009 22 Apr 2010 Xenon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Spiro-oxindole compounds and their use as therapeutic agents
WO2010104525A1 1 Jun 2009 16 Sep 2010 Telcordia Technologies, Inc. Scalable disruptive-resistant communication method
WO2011002708A1 28 Jun 2010 6 Jan 2011 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Enantiomers of spiro-oxindole compounds and their uses as therapeutic agents
WO2011047173A2 14 Oct 2010 21 Apr 2011 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Pharmaceutical compositions for oral administration
WO2011047174A1 14 Oct 2010 21 Apr 2011 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Synthetic methods for spiro-oxindole compounds
WO2011106729A2 25 Feb 2011 1 Sep 2011 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Pharmaceutical compositions of spiro-oxindole compound for topical administration and their use as therapeutic agents
Reference
1 * DEHMLOW E V ET AL: “Monodeazacinchona alkaloid derivatives: synthesis and preliminary applications as phase-transfer catalysts“, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY, WILEY – V C H VERLAG GMBH & CO. KGAA, DE, vol. 13, 1 January 2002 (2002-01-01), pages 2087 – 2093, XP002399953, ISSN: 1434-193X, DOI: 10.1002/1099-0690(200207)2002:13<2087::AID-EJOC2087>3.0.CO;2-Z
2 E.J. COREY; M.C. NOE, ORG. SYNTH., vol. 80, 2003, pages 38 – 45
3 GARST, J. F.; UNGVARY, F.: “Grignard Reagents”, 2000, JOHN WILEY & SONS, article “Mechanism of Grignard reagent formation“, pages: 185 – 275
4 GREENE, T.W.; P.G.M. WUTS: “Greene’s Protective Groups in Organic Synthesis, 4th Ed.,“, 2006, WILEY
5 GREENE, T.W.; WUTS, P.G.M.: “Greene’s Protective Groups in Organic Synthesis, 4th Ed.“, 2006, WILEY
6 HUGHES, D.L., ORG. PREP., vol. 28, 1996, pages 127 – 164
7 KUMARA SWAMY, K.C. ET AL.: “Mitsunobu and Related Reactions: Advances and Applications“, CHEM. REV., vol. 109, 2009, pages 2551 – 2651, XP055023394, DOI: doi:10.1021/cr800278z
8 MERSMANN, A.: “Crystallization Technology Handbook; 2nd ed.“, 2001, CRC
9 SMITH, M.; BAND J. MARCH: “Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure, 5th edition“, December 2000, WILEY
10 SMITH, M.B.; J. MARCH: “Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Structure, 5th edition“, December 2000, WILEY
11 * TAKASHI OOI ET AL: “Recent Advances in Asymmetric Phase-Transfer Catalysis“, ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE INTERNATIONAL EDITION, vol. 46, no. 23, 4 June 2007 (2007-06-04), pages 4222 – 4266, XP055060024, ISSN: 1433-7851, DOI: 10.1002/anie.200601737
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO2016109795A1 31 Dec 2015 7 Jul 2016 Concert Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Deuterated funapide and difluorofunapide
US8742109 14 Sep 2012 3 Jun 2014 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Synthetic methods for spiro-oxindole compounds
US8883840 14 Sep 2012 11 Nov 2014 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Enantiomers of spiro-oxindole compounds and their uses as therapeutic agents
US8916580 6 Mar 2013 23 Dec 2014 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Spiro-oxindole compounds and their use as therapeutic agents
US9260446 7 May 2014 16 Feb 2016 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Synthetic methods for spiro-oxindole compounds
US9458178 14 Nov 2014 4 Oct 2016 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Spiro-oxindole compounds and their use as therapeutic agents
US9480677 9 Oct 2014 1 Nov 2016 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Enantiomers of spiro-oxindole compounds and their uses as therapeutic agents
US9487535 11 Mar 2013 8 Nov 2016 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Asymmetric syntheses for spiro-oxindole compounds useful as therapeutic agents
US9504671 25 Feb 2011 29 Nov 2016 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Pharmaceutical compositions of spiro-oxindole compound for topical administration and their use as therapeutic agents
US9682033 5 Feb 2016 20 Jun 2017 Teva Pharmaceuticals International Gmbh Methods of treating postherpetic neuralgia with a topical formulation of a spiro-oxindole compound
US9695185 6 Jan 2016 4 Jul 2017 Xenon Pharmaceuticals Inc. Synthetic methods for spiro-oxindole compounds
Funapide
Funapide.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
By mouthtopical
ATC code
  • None
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
Chemical and physical data
Formula C22H14F3NO5
Molar mass 429.34547 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
//////////TV 45070,  XEN 402, TEVA, XENON, Postherpetic neuralgia, PHN, PHASE 2, Funapide, фунапид , فونابيد , 呋纳匹特 , Orphan Drug Status
C1C2(C3=CC=CC=C3N(C2=O)CC4=CC=C(O4)C(F)(F)F)C5=CC6=C(C=C5O1)OCO6
Advertisements

Enasidenib, Энасидениб , إيناسيدينيب ,伊那尼布 ,


Enasidenib.svg

ChemSpider 2D Image | Enasidenib | C19H17F6N7OEnasidenib.png

AG-221 (Enasidenib), IHD2 Inhibitor

Enasidenib

  • Molecular Formula C19H17F6N7O
  • Average mass 473.375
2-Propanol, 2-methyl-1-[[4-[6-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]-6-[[2-(trifluoromethyl)-4-pyridinyl]amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-[ACD/Index Name]
  • 2-Methyl-1-[[4-[6-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]-6-[[2-(trifluoromethyl)-4-pyridinyl]amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-2-propanol
  • 2-Methyl-1-(4-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-(2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-4-ylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-ylamino)propan-2-ol
AG-221
CC-90007
1446502-11-9[RN]
enasidenib
Enasidenib
énasidénib
enasidenibum
UNII:3T1SS4E7AG
Энасидениб[Russian]
إيناسيدينيب[Arabic]
伊那尼布[Chinese]
2-methyl-1-[(4-[6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl]-6-{[2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-4-yl]amino}-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino]propan-2-ol
2-methyl-1-[[4-[6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl]-6-[[2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-4-yl]amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]propan-2-ol
2-methyl-1-(4-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-(2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-4-ylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-ylamino)propan-2-ol
Originator Agios Pharmaceuticals
Developer Celgene Corporation
Mechanism Of Action Isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 inhibitor
Who Atc Codes L01 (Antineoplastic Agents)
Ephmra Codes L1 (Antineoplastics)
Indication Cancer

2D chemical structure of 1650550-25-6

Enasidenib mesylate [USAN]
RN: 1650550-25-6
UNII: UF6PC17XAV

Molecular Formula, C19-H17-F6-N7-O.C-H4-O3-S

Molecular Weight, 569.4849

2-Propanol, 2-methyl-1-((4-(6-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl)-6-((2-(trifluoromethyl)-4-pyridinyl)amino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)amino)-, methanesulfonate (1:1)

Enasidenib (AG-221) is an experimental drug in development for treatment of cancer. It is a small molecule inhibitor of IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 2). It was developed by Agios Pharmaceuticals and is licensed to Celgene for further development.

Image result for Enasidenib

LC MS

https://file.medchemexpress.com/batch_PDF/HY-18690/Enasidenib_LCMS_18195_MedChemExpress.pdf

NMR FROM INTERNET SOURCES

SEE http://www.medkoo.com/uploads/product/Enasidenib__AG-221_/qc/QC-Enasidenib-TZC60322Web.pdf

see also

https://file.medchemexpress.com/batch_PDF/HY-18690/Enasidenib_HNMR_18195_MedChemExpress.pdf ……….NMR CD3OD

str1

NMR FROM INTERNET SOURCES

SEE http://www.medkoo.com/uploads/product/Enasidenib__AG-221_/qc/QC-Enasidenib-TZC60322Web.pdf

Patent

http://www.google.com/patents/US20130190287

Compound 409—2-methyl-1-(4-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-(2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-4-ylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-ylamino)propan-2-ol

Figure US20130190287A1-20130725-C00709

1H NMR (METHANOL-d4) δ 8.62-8.68 (m, 2H), 847-8.50 (m, 1H), 8.18-8.21 (m, 1H), 7.96-7.98 (m, 1H), 7.82-7.84 (m, 1H), 3.56-3.63 (d, J=28 Hz, 2H), 1.30 (s, 6H). LC-MS: m/z 474.3 (M+H)+.

The FDA granted fast track designation and orphan drug status for acute myeloid leukemia in 2014.[1]

An orally available inhibitor of isocitrate dehydrogenase type 2 (IDH2), with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon administration, AG-221 specifically inhibits IDH2 in the mitochondria, which inhibits the formation of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). This may lead to both an induction of cellular differentiation and an inhibition of cellular proliferation in IDH2-expressing tumor cells. IDH2, an enzyme in the citric acid cycle, is mutated in a variety of cancers; It initiates and drives cancer growth by blocking differentiation and the production of the oncometabolite 2HG.

Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to 2-oxoglutarate (i.e., a-ketoglutarate). These enzymes belong to two distinct subclasses, one of which utilizes NAD(+) as the electron acceptor and the other NADP(+). Five isocitrate dehydrogenases have been reported: three NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases, which localize to the mitochondrial matrix, and two NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases, one of which is mitochondrial and the other predominantly cytosolic. Each NADP(+)-dependent isozyme is a homodimer.

IDH2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (NADP+), mitochondrial) is also known as IDH; IDP; IDHM; IDPM; ICD-M; or mNADP-IDH. The protein encoded by this gene is the

NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase found in the mitochondria. It plays a role in intermediary metabolism and energy production. This protein may tightly associate or interact with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Human IDH2 gene encodes a protein of 452 amino acids. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences for IDH2 can be found as GenBank entries NM_002168.2 and NP_002159.2 respectively. The nucleotide and amino acid sequence for human IDH2 are also described in, e.g., Huh et al., Submitted (NOV-1992) to the

EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases; and The MGC Project Team, Genome Res.

14:2121-2127(2004).

Non-mutant, e.g., wild type, IDH2 catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to a-ketoglutarate (a- KG) thereby reducing NAD+ (NADP+) to NADH (NADPH), e.g., in the forward reaction:

Isocitrate + NAD+ (NADP+)→ a-KG + C02 + NADH (NADPH) + H+.

It has been discovered that mutations of IDH2 present in certain cancer cells result in a new ability of the enzyme to catalyze the NAPH-dependent reduction of α-ketoglutarate to R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). 2HG is not formed by wild- type IDH2. The production of 2HG is believed to contribute to the formation and progression of cancer (Dang, L et al, Nature 2009, 462:739-44).

The inhibition of mutant IDH2 and its neoactivity is therefore a potential therapeutic treatment for cancer. Accordingly, there is an ongoing need for inhibitors of IDH2 mutants having alpha hydroxyl neoactivity.

Mechanism of action

Isocitrate dehydrogenase is a critical enzyme in the citric acid cycle. Mutated forms of IDH produce high levels of 2-hydroxyglutarate and can contribute to the growth of tumors. IDH1 catalyzes this reaction in the cytoplasm, while IDH2 catalyzes this reaction in mitochondria. Enasidenib disrupts this cycle.[1][2]

Development

The drug was discovered in 2009, and an investigational new drug application was filed in 2013. In an SEC filing, Agios announced that they and Celgene were in the process of filing a new drug application with the FDA.[3] The fast track designation allows this drug to be developed in what in markedly less than the average 14 years it takes for a drug to be developed and approved.[4]

PATENT

WO 2013102431

Image result

Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Giovanni Cianchetta
Giovanni Cianchetta
Associate Director/Principal Scientist at Agios Pharmaceuticals
Inventors Giovanni CianchettaByron DelabarreJaneta Popovici-MullerFrancesco G. SalituroJeffrey O. SaundersJeremy TravinsShunqi YanTao GuoLi Zhang
Applicant Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Compound 409 –

2-methyl-l-(4-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-(2-(trifluoromethyl)pyri^

ίαζίη-2- lamino ropan-2-ol

Figure imgf000135_0001

1H NMR (METHANOL-d4) δ 8.62-8.68 (m, 2 H), 847-8.50 (m, 1 H), 8.18-8.21 (m, 1 H), 7.96-7.98 (m, 1 H), 7.82-7.84 (m, 1 H), 3.56-3.63 (d, J = 28 Hz, 2 H), 1.30 (s, 6 H). LC-MS: m/z 474.3 (M+H)+.

WO 2017066611

WO 2017024134

WO 2016177347

PATENT

WO 2016126798

Example 1: Synthesis of compound 3

Example 1, Step 1: preparation of 6-trifluoromethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid

Diethyl ether (4.32 L) and hexanes (5.40 L) are added to the reaction vessel under N2 atmosphere, and cooled to -75 °C to -65 °C. Dropwise addition of n-Butyl lithium (3.78 L in 1.6 M hexane) under N2 atmosphere at below -65 °C is followed by dropwise addition of dimethyl amino ethanol (327.45 g, 3.67 mol) and after 10 min. dropwise addition of 2-trifluoromethyl pyridine (360 g, 2.45 mol). The reaction is stirred under N2 while maintaining the temperature below -65 °C for about 2.0-2.5 hrs. The reaction mixture is poured over crushed dry ice under N2, then brought to a temperature of 0 to 5 °C while stirring (approx. 1.0 to 1.5 h) followed by the addition of water (1.8 L). The reaction mixture is stirred for 5-10 mins and allowed to warm to 5-10 °C. 6N HC1 (900 mL) is added dropwise until the mixture reached pH 1.0 to 2.0, then the mixture is stirred for 10-20 min. at 5-10 °C. The reaction mixture is diluted with ethyl acetate at 25-35 °C, then washed with brine solution. The reaction is concentrated and rinsed with n-heptane and then dried to yield 6-trifluoromethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid.

Example 1, Step 2: preparation of 6-trifluoromethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester Methanol is added to the reaction vessel under nitrogen atmosphere. 6-trifluoromethyl- pyridine-2-carboxylic acid (150 g, 0.785 mol) is added and dissolved at ambient temperature. Acetyl chloride (67.78 g, 0.863 mol) is added dropwise at a temperature below 45 °C. The reaction mixture is maintained at 65-70 °C for about 2-2.5 h, and then concentrated at 35-45 °C under vacuum and cooled to 25-35 °C. The mixture is diluted with ethyl acetate and rinsed with saturated NaHC03 solution then rinsed with brine solution. The mixture is concentrated at temp 35-45 °C under vacuum and cooled to 25-35 °C, then rinsed with n-heptane and concentrated at temp 35-45 °C under vacuum, then degassed to obtain brown solid, which is rinsed with n-heptane and stirred for 10-15 minute at 25-35 °C. The suspension is cooled to -40 to -30 °C while stirring, and filtered and dried to provide 6-trifluoromethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester.

Example 1, Step 3: preparation of 6-(6-Trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-lH-l,3,5-triazine-2,4-dione

1 L absolute ethanol is charged to the reaction vessel under N2 atmosphere and Sodium Metal (11.2 g, 0.488 mol) is added in portions under N2 atmosphere at below 50 °C. The reaction is stirred for 5-10 minutes, then heated to 50-55 °C. Dried Biuret (12.5 g, 0.122 mol) is added to the reaction vessel under N2 atmosphere at 50-55 °C temperature, and stirred 10-15 minutes. While maintaining 50-55 °C 6-trifluoromethyl-pyridine-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (50.0 g, 0.244 mol) is added. The reaction mixture is heated to reflux (75-80 °C) and maintained for 1.5-2 hours. Then cooled to 35-40 °C, and concentrated at 45-50 °C under vacuum. Water is added and the mixture is concentrated under vacuum then cooled to 35-40 °C more water is added and the mixture cooled to 0 -5 °C. pH is adjusted to 7-8 by slow addition of 6N HC1, and solid precipitated out and is centrifuged and rinsed with water and centrifuged again. The off white to light brown solid of 6-(6-Trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-lH-l,3,5-triazine-2,4-dione is dried under vacuum for 8 to 10 hrs at 50 °C to 60 °C under 600mm/Hg pressure to provide 6-(6-Trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-lH-l,3,5-triazine-2,4-dione.

Example 1, Step 4: preparation of 2, 4-Dichloro-6-(6-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-l, 3, 5-triazine

POCI3 (175.0 mL) is charged into the reaction vessel at 20- 35 °C, and 6-(6-Trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-lH-l,3,5-triazine-2,4-dione (35.0 g, 0.1355 mol) is added in portions at below 50 °C. The reaction mixture is de-gassed 5-20 minutes by purging with N2 gas. Phosphorous pentachloride (112.86 g, 0.542 mol) is added while stirring at below 50 °C and the resulting slurry is heated to reflux (105-110 °C) and maintained for 3-4 h. The reaction mixture is cooled to 50-55 °C, and concentrated at below 55 °C then cooled to 20-30 °C. The reaction mixture is rinsed with ethyl acetate and the ethyl acetate layer is slowly added to cold water (temperature ~5 °C) while stirring and maintaining the temperature below 10 °C. The mixture is stirred 3-5 minutes at a temperature of between 10 to 20 °C and the ethyl acetate layer is collected. The reaction mixture is rinsed with sodium bicarbonate solution and dried over anhydrous sodium sulphate. The material is dried 2-3 h under vacuum at below 45 °C to provide 2, 4-Dichloro-6-(6-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-l, 3, 5-triazine. Example 1, Step 5: preparation of 4-chloro-6-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-N-(2-(trifluoro-methyl)- pyridin-4-yl)-l,3,5-triazin-2-amine

A mixture of THF (135 mL) and 2, 4-Dichloro-6-(6-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-l, 3, 5-triazine (27.0 g, 0.0915 mol) are added to the reaction vessel at 20 – 35 °C, then 4-amino-2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridine (16.31 g, 0.1006 mol) and sodium bicarbonate (11.52 g, 0.1372 mol) are added. The resulting slurry is heated to reflux (75-80 °C) for 20-24 h. The reaction is cooled to 30-40 °C and THF evaporated at below 45 °C under reduced pressure. The reaction mixture is cooled to 20-35 °C and rinsed with ethyl acetate and water, and the ethyl acetate layer collected and rinsed with 0.5 N HC1 and brine solution. The organic layer is concentrated under vacuum at below 45 °C then rinsed with dichloromethane and hexanes, filtered and washed with hexanes and dried for 5-6h at 45-50 °C under vacuum to provide 4-chloro-6-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-N-(2-(trifluoro-methyl)- pyridin-4-yl)-l,3,5-triazin-2-amine.

Example 1, Step 6: preparation of 2-methyl-l-(4-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-(2-(trifluoromethyl)- pyridin-4-ylamino)-l,3,5-triazin-2-ylamino)propan-2-ol

THF (290 mL), 4-chloro-6-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-N-(2-(trifluoro-methyl)-pyridin-4-yl)-l,3,5-triazin-2-amine (29.0 g, 0.06893 mol), sodium bicarbonate (8.68 g, 0.1033 mol), and 1, 1-dimethylaminoethanol (7.37 g, 0.08271 mol) are added to the reaction vessel at 20-35 °C. The resulting slurry is heated to reflux (75-80 °C) for 16-20 h. The reaction is cooled to 30-40 °C and THF evaporated at below 45 °C under reduced pressure. The reaction mixture is cooled to 20-35 °C and rinsed with ethyl acetate and water, and the ethyl acetate layer collected. The organic layer is concentrated under vacuum at below 45 °C then rinsed with dichlorom ethane and hexanes, filtered and washed with hexanes and dried for 8-1 Oh at 45-50 °C under vacuum to provide 2-methyl-l-(4-(6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)-6-(2-(trifluoromethyl)- pyridin-4-ylamino)-l,3,5-triazin-2-ylamino)propan-2-ol.

PATENT

US 20160089374

PATENT

WO 2015017821


References

  1. Jump up to:a b “Enasidenib”AdisInsight. Retrieved 31 January 2017.
  2. Jump up^ https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Enasidenib
  3. Jump up^ https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1439222/000119312516758835/d172494d10q.htm
  4. Jump up^ http://www.xconomy.com/boston/2016/09/07/celgene-plots-speedy-fda-filing-for-agios-blood-cancer-drug/
  5. 1 to 3 of 3
    Patent ID

    Patent Title

    Submitted Date

    Granted Date

    US2013190287 THERAPEUTICALLY ACTIVE COMPOUNDS AND THEIR METHODS OF USE 2013-01-07 2013-07-25
    US2016089374 THERAPEUTICALLY ACTIVE COMPOUNDS AND THEIR METHODS OF USE 2015-09-28 2016-03-31
    US2016194305 THERAPEUTICALLY ACTIVE COMPOUNDS AND THEIR METHODS OF USE 2014-08-01 2016-07-07
 Image result for Enasidenib
08/01/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Idhifa (enasidenib) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have a specific genetic mutation. The drug is approved for use with a companion diagnostic, the RealTime IDH2 Assay, which is used to detect specific mutations in the IDH2 gene in patients with AML.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Idhifa (enasidenib) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have a specific genetic mutation. The drug is approved for use with a companion diagnostic, the RealTime IDH2 Assay, which is used to detect specific mutations in the IDH2 gene in patients with AML.

“Idhifa is a targeted therapy that fills an unmet need for patients with relapsed or refractory AML who have an IDH2 mutation,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “The use of Idhifa was associated with a complete remission in some patients and a reduction in the need for both red cell and platelet transfusions.”

AML is a rapidly progressing cancer that forms in the bone marrow and results in an increased number of abnormal white blood cells in the bloodstream and bone marrow. The National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health estimates that approximately 21,380 people will be diagnosed with AML this year; approximately 10,590 patients with AML will die of the disease in 2017.

Idhifa is an isocitrate dehydrogenase-2 inhibitor that works by blocking several enzymes that promote cell growth. If the IDH2 mutation is detected in blood or bone marrow samples using the RealTime IDH2 Assay, the patient may be eligible for treatment with Idhifa.

The efficacy of Idhifa was studied in a single-arm trial of 199 patients with relapsed or refractory AML who had IDH2 mutations as detected by the RealTime IDH2 Assay. The trial measured the percentage of patients with no evidence of disease and full recovery of blood counts after treatment (complete remission or CR), as well as patients with no evidence of disease and partial recovery of blood counts after treatment (complete remission with partial hematologic recovery or CRh). With a minimum of six months of treatment, 19 percent of patients experienced CR for a median 8.2 months, and 4 percent of patients experienced CRh for a median 9.6 months. Of the 157 patients who required transfusions of blood or platelets due to AML at the start of the study, 34 percent no longer required transfusions after treatment with Idhifa.

Common side effects of Idhifa include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, increased levels of bilirubin (substance found in bile) and decreased appetite. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not take Idhifa because it may cause harm to a developing fetus or a newborn baby.

The prescribing information for Idhifa includes a boxed warning that an adverse reaction known as differentiation syndrome can occur and can be fatal if not treated. Sign and symptoms of differentiation syndrome may include fever, difficulty breathing (dyspnea), acute respiratory distress, inflammation in the lungs (radiographic pulmonary infiltrates), fluid around the lungs or heart (pleural or pericardial effusions), rapid weight gain, swelling (peripheral edema) or liver (hepatic), kidney (renal) or multi-organ dysfunction. At first suspicion of symptoms, doctors should treat patients with corticosteroids and monitor patients closely until symptoms go away.

Idhifa was granted Priority Review designation, under which the FDA’s goal is to take action on an application within six months where the agency determines that the drug, if approved, would significantly improve the safety or effectiveness of treating, diagnosing or preventing a serious condition. Idhifa also received Orphan Drugdesignation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted the approval of Idhifa to Celgene Corporation. The FDA granted the approval of the RealTime IDH2 Assay to Abbott Laboratories

 1H AND 13C NMR PREDICT

///////// fda 2017, Idhifa, enasidenib, Энасидениб , إيناسيدينيب ,伊那尼布 , AG 221, fast track designation,  orphan drug status ,  acute myeloid leukemiaCC-90007

CC(C)(CNC1=NC(=NC(=N1)NC2=CC(=NC=C2)C(F)(F)F)C3=NC(=CC=C3)C(F)(F)F)O

Enasidenib
Enasidenib.svg
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
Chemical and physical data
Formula C19H17F6N7O
Molar mass 473.38 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

FDA approves new treatment Endari (L-glutamine oral powder) for sickle cell disease


Image result for sickle cell disease
07/07/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Endari (L-glutamine oral powder) for patients age five years and older with sickle cell disease to reduce severe complications associated with the blood disorder.

July 7, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Endari (L-glutamine oral powder) for patients age five years and older with sickle cell disease to reduce severe complications associated with the blood disorder.

“Endari is the first treatment approved for patients with sickle cell disease in almost 20 years,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence. “Until now, only one other drug was approved for patients living with this serious, debilitating condition.”

Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder in which the red blood cells are abnormally shaped (in a crescent, or “sickle,” shape). This restricts the flow in blood vessels and limits oxygen delivery to the body’s tissues, leading to severe pain and organ damage. According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately 100,000 people in the United States have sickle cell disease. The disease occurs most often in African-Americans, Latinos and other minority groups. The average life expectancy for patients with sickle cell disease in the United States is approximately 40 to 60 years.

The safety and efficacy of Endari were studied in a randomized trial of patients ages five to 58 years old with sickle cell disease who had two or more painful crises within the 12 months prior to enrollment in the trial. Patients were assigned randomly to treatment with Endari or placebo, and the effect of treatment was evaluated over 48 weeks. Patients who were treated with Endari experienced fewer hospital visits for pain treated with a parenterally administered narcotic or ketorolac (sickle cell crises), on average, compared to patients who received a placebo (median 3 vs. median 4), fewer hospitalizations for sickle cell pain (median 2 vs. median 3), and fewer days in the hospital (median 6.5 days vs. median 11 days).  Patients who received Endari also had fewer occurrences of acute chest syndrome (a life-threatening complication of sickle cell disease) compared with patients who received a placebo (8.6 percent vs. 23.1 percent).

Common side effects of Endari include constipation, nausea, headache, abdominal pain, cough, pain in the extremities, back pain and chest pain.

Endari received Orphan Drug designation for this use, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.  In addition, development of this drug was in part supported by the FDA Orphan Products Grants Program, which provides grants for clinical studies on safety and/or effectiveness of products for use in rare diseases or conditions.

The FDA granted the approval of Endari to Emmaus Medical Inc.

Image result for Emmaus Medical Inc

Image result for sickle cell disease

/////////////FDA2017, Endari, Orphan Drug designation,  Emmaus Medical Inc., L-glutamine oral powder

FDA approves first subcutaneous C1 Esterase Inhibitor to treat rare genetic disease


06/22/2017

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Haegarda, the first C1 Esterase Inhibitor (Human) for subcutaneous (under the skin) administration to prevent Hereditary Angioedema (HAE) attacks in adolescent and adult patients. The subcutaneous route of administration allows for easier at-home self-injection by the patient or caregiver, once proper training is received.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Haegarda, the first C1 Esterase Inhibitor (Human) for subcutaneous (under the skin) administration to prevent Hereditary Angioedema (HAE) attacks in adolescent and adult patients. The subcutaneous route of administration allows for easier at-home self-injection by the patient or caregiver, once proper training is received.

HAE, which is caused by having insufficient amounts of a plasma protein called C1-esterase inhibitor (or C1-INH), affects approximately 6,000 to 10,000 people in the U.S. People with HAE can develop rapid swelling of the hands, feet, limbs, face, intestinal tract or airway. These attacks of swelling can occur spontaneously, or can be triggered by stress, surgery or infection.

“The approval of Haegarda provides a new treatment option for adolescents and adults with Hereditary Angioedema,” said Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “The subcutaneous formulation allows patients to administer the product at home to help prevent attacks.”

Haegarda is a human plasma-derived, purified, pasteurized, lyophilized (freeze-dried) concentrate prepared from large pools of human plasma from U.S. donors. Haegarda is indicated for routine prophylaxis to prevent HAE attacks, but is not indicated for treatment of acute HAE attacks.

The efficacy of Haegarda was demonstrated in a multicenter controlled clinical trial. The study included 90 subjects ranging in age from 12 to 72 years old with symptomatic HAE. Subjects were randomized to receive twice per week subcutaneous doses of either 40 IU/kg or 60 IU/kg, and the treatment effect was compared to a placebo treatment period. During the 16 week treatment period, patients in both treatment groups experienced a significantly reduced number of HAE attacks compared to their placebo treatment period.

The most common side effects included injection site reactions, hypersensitivity (allergic) reactions, nasopharyngitis (swelling of the nasal passages and throat) and dizziness. Haegarda should not be used in individuals who have experienced life-threatening hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, to a C1-INH preparation or its inactive ingredients.

Haegarda received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs to treat rare diseases or conditions.

The FDA granted approval of Haegarda to CSL Behring LLC.

///////////Haegarda, C1 Esterase inhibitor, CSL Behring LLC,  fda 2017, orphan drug

FDA approves drug to treat ALS, Radicava (Edaravone) , эдаравон, إيدارافون , 依达拉奉 ,ラジカット,


Edaravone.svg

05/05/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Radicava (edaravone) to treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

May 5, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Radicava (edaravone) to treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

“After learning about the use of edaravone to treat ALS in Japan, we rapidly engaged with the drug developer about filing a marketing application in the United States,” said Eric Bastings, M.D., deputy director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This is the first new treatment approved by the FDA for ALS in many years, and we are pleased that people with ALS will now have an additional option.”

ALS is a rare disease that attacks and kills the nerve cells that control voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles produce movements such as chewing, walking, breathing and talking. The nerves lose the ability to activate specific muscles, which causes the muscles to become weak and leads to paralysis. ALS is progressive, meaning it gets worse over time. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately 12,000-15,000 Americans have ALS. Most people with ALS die from respiratory failure, usually within three to five years from when the symptoms first appear.

Radicava is an intravenous infusion given by a health care professional. It is administered with an initial treatment cycle of daily dosing for 14 days, followed by a 14-day drug-free period. Subsequent treatment cycles consist of dosing on 10 of 14 days, followed by 14 days drug-free.

The efficacy of edaravone for the treatment of ALS was demonstrated in a six-month clinical trial conducted in Japan. In the trial, 137 participants were randomized to receive edaravone or placebo. At Week 24, individuals receiving edaravone declined less on a clinical assessment of daily functioning compared to those receiving a placebo.

The most common adverse reactions reported by clinical trial participants receiving edaravone were bruising (contusion) and gait disturbance.

Radicava is also associated with serious risks that require immediate medical care, such as hives, swelling, or shortness of breath, and allergic reactions to sodium bisulfite, an ingredient in the drug. Sodium bisulfite may cause anaphylactic symptoms that can be life-threatening in people with sulfite sensitivity.

The FDA granted this drug orphan drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted approval of Radicava to Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma America, Inc,

ChemSpider 2D Image | Edaravone | C10H10N2O

1-Phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone
3H-Pyrazol-3-one, 2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl- [ACD/Index Name]
89-25-8 [RN]
эдаравон [Russian]
إيدارافون [Arabic]
依达拉奉 [Chinese]
ラジカット,
MCI-186

Edaravone (brand name ラジカット, Radicut) is a nootropic and neuroprotective agent used for the purpose of aiding neurological recovery following acute brain ischemia and subsequent cerebral infarction.[1] It acts as a potent antioxidant and strongly scavenges free radicals, protecting against oxidative stress and neuronal apoptosis.[2][3][4] It has been marketed solely in Japan by Mitsubishi Pharma since 2001.[1] It is also marketed in India by Edinburgh Pharmaceuticals by the brand name Arone.

On June 26, 2015, Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation announced it has received approval to market Radicut for treatment of ALS in Japan. The phase III clinical trial began in 2011 in Japan. The company was awarded Orphan Drug Designation for Radicut by the FDA and EU in 2015. Radicut is an intravenous drug and administrated 14 days followed by 14 days drug holiday.

The biotech company Treeway is developing an oral formulation of edaravone (TW001) and is currently in clinical development. Treeway was awarded orphan drug designation for edaravone by the EMA in November 2014 and FDA in January 2015.

Edaravone has been shown to attenuate methamphetamine– and 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in the striatum and substantia nigra, and does not affect methamphetamine-induced dopamine release or hyperthermia.[5][6] It has also been demonstrated to protect against MPTP-mediated dopaminergic neurotoxicity to the substantia nigra, though notably not to the striatum.[7][8][9]

Image result for edaravone synthesis

Edaravone (CAS NO.: 89-25-8), with other name of 3-Methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one, could be produced through many synthetic methods.

Following is one of the synthesis routes: By direct cyclization of phenylhydrazine (I) with ethyl acetoacetate (II) in refluxing ethanol.

SYNTHESIS

Edaravone, chemical name: 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazoline-5-one, of the formula: Formula: CiciHltlN2O, molecular weight: 174.20, the formula:

 

Figure CN101830852BD00031

[0004] Edaravone is a brain-protecting agent (free radical scavenger). Clinical studies suggest that N- acetyl aspartate (NAA) is a specific sign of the survival of nerve cells, dramatically reducing the initial content of cerebral infarction. In patients with acute cerebral infarction Edaravone suppressed reduce peri-infarct regional cerebral blood flow, so that the first concept of days after the onset of brain NAA glycerol content than the control group significantly increased. Preclinical studies suggest that rats after ischemia / reperfusion of ischemic intravenous edaravone, can prevent the progress of cerebral edema and cerebral infarction, and relieve the accompanying neurological symptoms, suppress delayed neuronal death. Mechanism studies suggest that edaravone can scavenge free radicals, inhibiting lipid peroxidation, thereby inhibiting brain cells, endothelial cells, oxidative damage nerve cells.

For the synthesis of edaravone reported some use of benzene and methyl ethyl ketone amide corpus obtained, but methyl ethyl ketone amide difficult to obtain and slow reaction, which now has basically been abandoned; some use benzene corpus and ethyl acetoacetate in ethanol (see US4857542A, Synthesis Example 1) or water (Dykhanov NN Ethyl and butyl acetoacetates, Med Prom SSSR, 1961,15 (1):. 42-45) refluxing the reaction of the reaction The resulting purity edaravone poor, and the yield is not high, only about 70%.

Edaravone, chemical name: 2,4_-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl pyrazole -3H- – one, of the formula: CiciHltlN2O, molecular weight: 174.20, the formula:

Figure CN102285920BD00031

edaravone is a clear cerebral infarction harmful factors (free radicals), protection of new therapeutic agents for cerebral infarction nerve cells. Clinical studies have shown that N- acetyl aspartate (NAA) is a specific sign of the survival of nerve cells, dramatically reducing the initial content of cerebral infarction. When patients with acute cerebral infarction Edaravone, peri-infarct rCBF decrease has improved, and the first 28 days after the onset of brain NAA content was significantly higher than that in the control group glycerol. Mechanism studies suggest that edaravone can clear the brain is highly cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals, inhibiting the synthesis of lipids free radicals, which can suppress brain infarction after reperfusion edema, protecting brain from damage and improve nerve impairment symptoms, and the delayed neuronal death inhibition, to protect the brain.

 The first is by phenylhydrazine and methyl ethyl ketone amide (National API process compilation, 1980.737-739) condensation reaction in water at 50 ° C, a yield of up to 97%, but the raw material ketone amide ( CH3C0CH2C0NH2) are not readily available. Formula I

Edaravone synthetic route for the reaction:

Figure CN102285920BD00032

[0008] The second is to phenylhydrazine and ethyl acetoacetate in ethanol or water at reflux the reaction, sodium bisulfite as the preparation of the catalyst. From the perspective of the chemical reaction, acetyl ethyl ketone amide more than hydrazine reacted with benzene and ethyl acetoacetate more readily available, the price is cheaper, but lower reaction yield of about 70%. Formula 2 for the synthesis route Edaravone reaction formula:

Figure CN102285920BD00041

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/CN101830852B?cl=en

Figure CN101830852BD00041

1 Edaravone Synthesis Example [0023] Example

[0024] (1) Weigh benzene hydrochloride corpus 13. 5g (94mmol), was added to IOOml water, stirred for 0.5 hours, sodium hydroxide was added an equimolar 3. 76g, stirred for 0.5 hours; [0025] ( 2) To the reaction solution was added dropwise ethyl acetoacetate 11. 7g (90mmol), the reaction exotherm, the reaction was heated to reflux for 2.5 hours, heating was stopped, cooled to room temperature with stirring, filtered and dried to give a pale yellow granular crude 15. 5g;

[0026] (3) The crude product was added 30ml volume ratio of 2: 1 isopropanol – water, 2g of activated carbon was added and refluxed for 1 hour, filtered hot, cooled to room temperature a white solid was precipitated to give 14 a white crystalline powder. 8g, yield 90%, mpU9 ° C, with a purity of 99.9% 0

2 Edaravone Synthesis Example [0027] Example

[0028] (1) Weigh 15g of benzene hydrochloride corpus (I (Mmmol), was added to 120ml of water and stirred for 0.5 hours, sodium hydroxide was added an equimolar 4. 16g, stirred for 0.5 hours;

[0029] (2) To the reaction solution was added dropwise 13g of ethyl acetoacetate (lOOmmol), the reaction exotherm, the reaction was heated to reflux for 2.5 hours, heating was stopped, cooled to room temperature with stirring, filtered and dried to give a pale yellow granular crude 16. 7g;

(3) The crude product was added 40ml volume ratio of 2: 1 isopropanol – water, 2. 5g of activated carbon was added and refluxed for 1 hour, filtered hot, cooled to room temperature to precipitate a white solid, as a white crystalline powder 16. lg, a yield of 88.9%, mpU8 ° C, with a purity of 99.9% 0

3 Edaravone Synthesis Example [0031] Example

[0032] (1) Weigh 22g of benzene hydrochloride corpus (152mm0l), was added to 200ml of water and stirred for 0.5 hours, sodium hydroxide was added an equimolar 6. 08g, stirred for 0.5 hours;

[0033] (2) To the reaction solution was added dropwise 19g of ethyl acetoacetate (146mm0l), the reaction exotherm, the reaction was heated to reflux for 3 hours, heating was stopped, cooled to room temperature with stirring, filtered and dried to give a pale yellow granular crude 24. Sg;

[0034] (3) The crude product was added 50ml volume ratio of 2: 1 isopropanol – water, 3g of activated carbon was added and refluxed for 1 hour, filtered hot, cooled to room temperature a white solid was precipitated to give 23 a white crystalline powder. 2g, a yield of 87. 8%, mpU8 ° C, with a purity of 99.9% 0

[0035] Comparative Example

[0036] The ethyl acetoacetate 65g (0. 5mol) and 180ml of anhydrous ethanol mixed, with stirring at 50 ° C was added dropwise benzyl corpus 54g (0. 5mol) and a solution consisting of 30ml absolute ethanol, dropwise at reflux for 2 Bi hours, ethanol was distilled off 60ml, cooled, suction filtered, washed crystals with cold absolute ethanol twice, and dried in vacuo to give pale yellow crystals 70g. Recrystallized twice from absolute ethanol to give pale yellowish white crystals 56g (yield 65%).

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/CN102285920B?cl=en

Example 1: Preparation of phenylhydrazine edaravone.

[0024] a. Weigh 5.1g phenylhydrazine (47mmol), was added under stirring to water containing 45mL round-bottom flask, take appropriate concentrated hydrochloric acid solution was adjusted to pH 6.0 with PH meter.

[0025] b. To the above solution was slowly added dropwise ethyl acetoacetate 5.85g (45mmol), the reaction exotherm, was added 1.5g sodium dithionite (Na2S2O6), heated to 105 ° C to room temperature until reflux After 3h, heating was stopped, and then stirred, cooling, filtration, and dried to give a pale yellow granular edaravone crude.

[0026] c. With anhydrous ethanol recrystallization, filtration, and dried to obtain a white crystalline powder that is refined edaravone, 85% yield, 99.2% purity 0

[0027] Example 2: Preparation of phenylhydrazine hydrochloride edaravone.

[0028] a. Weigh 6.8g phenylhydrazine hydrochloride (47mmol), was added under stirring to water containing 45mL round-bottomed flask, the pH of the solution adjusted to 6.0 with aqueous ammonia.

[0029] b. To the above solution was slowly added dropwise ethyl acetoacetate 5.85g (45mmol), the reaction exotherm, 1.25g was added sodium dithionite (Na2S2O6), heated to 105 ° C to room temperature until reflux After 3h, heating was stopped, and then stirred, cooling, filtration, and dried to give a pale yellow granular edaravone crude.

[0030] c. With anhydrous ethanol recrystallization, filtration, and dried to obtain a white crystalline powder that is refined edaravone, 84% yield, with a purity of 99.2%. [0031] Comparative Example:

Under the [0032] state of agitation will phenylhydrazine 10.2g (94mmol) added to a round bottom flask equipped with IOOmL water in an appropriate amount of concentrated hydrochloric acid was dubbed the volume ratio of 1: 1 aqueous hydrochloric acid, with a PH adjusting pH of the solution was measured 6.0. After weighing Ethylacetoacetate 11.7g (90mmol) added to the reaction mixture, the reaction was exothermic and cooling to room temperature, sodium bisulfite (NaHSO3), heated to 105 ° C under reflux for 3h, the hot solution Water was added into the beaker and mechanical stirring, cooling, filtration, and dried to give the yellow edaravone crude, 73% yield, with a purity of 99.1%.

Figure CN102285920BD00042

CLIP

http://www.rsc.org/suppdata/books/184973/9781849739634/bk9781849739634-chapter%204.2.3.pdf

Edaravone:

IR (KBr) max/cm-1 : 3431, 3129, 1602, 1599, 1580;

1 H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3): δ 7.86 (d, J = 7.5 Hz, 2H, ArH), 7.40 (m, 2H, ArH), 7.18 (m, 1H, ArH), 3.41 (d, J =0.6 Hz, 2H, CH2), 2.19 (s, 3H, CH3);

13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3): 170.6, 156.4, 130.1, 128.8, 125.0, 118.9, 43.1, 17.0;

1 H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 11.5 (bs, 1H, NH), 7.71 (m, 2H, ArH), 7.40 (m, 2H, ArH), 7.22 (m, 1H, ArH), 5.36 (s, 1H, CH), 2.12 (s, 3H, CH3);

13C NMR (75 MHz, DMSO-d6):171.7, 158.9, 148.7, 139.2, 138.6, 129.3,125.4, 124.8, 118.4, 43.5, 17.1, 14.2.

These values are in accordance with the previous published in literature1 .

In the carbon spectrum in DMSO presented in Figure SM 4.2.3.1.8 is evident the presence of the two major tautomeric structures of edaravone, signals are identified by different colours in both structures in the figure. Also in the IR analysis of the solid material (Figure SM 4.2.3.1.9) is possible to see either the NH form (max/cm-1, 3129), the OH form (max/cm- 1 , 3431) and the C=O (max/cm-1, 1599) of the enol and keto tautomeric forms of edaravone.

1. S. Pal, J. Mareddy and N. S. Devi, J.  Braz. Chem. Soc., 2008, 19, 1207.

CLIP

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0103-50532008000600023

We have shown that the short reaction time, in combination with good yields can make microwave assisted reaction of hydrazines with β-ketoesters ideal for a rapid entry to pyrazolones. All the compounds synthesized are characterized by spectroscopic (1H NMR, IR and MS) data. While determination of tautomeric composition of compound 3 is quite challenging as eight possible tautomeric forms need to be considered, interestingly, two major tautomeric forms of compound 3a was observed in two different solvents. For example, it exists as 1,2-dihydro pyrazolone (T-1Figure 2) in DMSO and 2,4-dihydro form (T-2Figure 2) in chloroform as indicated by 1H NMR spectra (Figure 3). The olefinic proton of T-1 appeared at 5.36 δ whereas the methylene hydrogens appeared at 3.43 δ in case of T-2. Additionally, the NH proton of T-1 at 11.40 δ was not observed incase of T-2 confirmed the absence of NH in the 2,4-dihydro form. Existence of two major tautomeric forms was also observed in case compound 3b (see 1H NMR data in the experimental section). However, X-ray study on single crystal of 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-methyl-1,2-dihydro pyrazol-3-one (3i) indicates that 2-aryl pyrazol-3-ones e.g. 3a-b3e-f and 3i exist as 1,2-dihydro form in crystal state. 27 It is mention worthy that the aryl ring of all these 2-aryl pyrazol-3-ones remain twisted with respect to the pyrazole plane as indicated by the crystallographic data of 3i [the dihedral angle between the pyrazole and benzene ring planes was found to be 15.81 (11)º].27

 

 

 

5-Methyl-2-phenyl-1,2-dihydro pyrazol-3-one (3a)

mp 125-127 ºC (lit21 126-130 ºC); 

IR (KBr) νmax/cm-1: 3127, 1597, 1525, 1498, 1454;

 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6δ 11.40 (bs, 1H), 7.71-7.69 (m, 2H), 7.42-7.38 (m, 2H), 7.21-7.18 (m, 1H), 5.36 (s, 1H), 2.10 (s, 3H); 

13C NMR (50 MHz, DMSO-d6δ 170.6, 156.2, 138.1, 128.8 (2C), 124.9, 118.9 (2C), 43.1, 16.9; 

Mass (CI, m/z) 175 (M+1, 100).

1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3)δ 7.85 (d, J 8.3 Hz, 2H), 7.40-7.37 (m, 2H), 7.24-7.18 (m, 1H), 3.43 (s, 2H), 2.20 (s, 3H).

21. Makhija, M. T.; Kasliwal, R. T.; Kulkarni, V. M.; Neamati, N.; Bioorg. Med. Chem. 200412, 2317.         [ Links ]

CN101830852A Mar 22, 2010 Sep 15, 2010 海南美兰史克制药有限公司 Edaravone compound synthesized by new method
CN102060771A Nov 18, 2009 May 18, 2011 南京长澳制药有限公司 Edaravone crystal form and preparation method thereof
CN102180834A Mar 24, 2011 Sep 14, 2011 江苏正大丰海制药有限公司 Preparation method for edaravone

References

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Doherty, Annette M. (2002). Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry, Volume 37 (Annual Reports in Medicinal Chemistry). Boston: Academic Press. ISBN 0-12-040537-7.
  2. Jump up^ Watanabe T, Tanaka M, Watanabe K, Takamatsu Y, Tobe A (March 2004). “[Research and development of the free radical scavenger edaravone as a neuroprotectant]”. Yakugaku Zasshi (in Japanese). 124 (3): 99–111. doi:10.1248/yakushi.124.99. PMID 15049127.
  3. Jump up^ Higashi Y, Jitsuiki D, Chayama K, Yoshizumi M (January 2006). “Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a novel free radical scavenger, for treatment of cardiovascular diseases”. Recent Patents on Cardiovascular Drug Discovery. 1 (1): 85–93. doi:10.2174/157489006775244191. PMID 18221078.
  4. Jump up^ Yoshida H, Yanai H, Namiki Y, Fukatsu-Sasaki K, Furutani N, Tada N (2006). “Neuroprotective effects of edaravone: a novel free radical scavenger in cerebrovascular injury”. CNS Drug Reviews. 12 (1): 9–20. doi:10.1111/j.1527-3458.2006.00009.x. PMID 16834755.
  5. Jump up^ Yuan WJ, Yasuhara T, Shingo T, et al. (2008). “Neuroprotective effects of edaravone-administration on 6-OHDA-treated dopaminergic neurons”. BMC Neuroscience. 9: 75. doi:10.1186/1471-2202-9-75. PMC 2533664Freely accessible. PMID 18671880.
  6. Jump up^ Kawasaki T, Ishihara K, Ago Y, et al. (August 2006). “Protective effect of the radical scavenger edaravone against methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mouse striatum”. European Journal of Pharmacology. 542 (1-3): 92–9. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2006.05.012. PMID 16784740.
  7. Jump up^ Kawasaki T, Ishihara K, Ago Y, Baba A, Matsuda T (July 2007). “Edaravone (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a radical scavenger, prevents 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra but not the striatum”. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. 322 (1): 274–81. doi:10.1124/jpet.106.119206. PMID 17429058.
  8. Jump up^ Yokoyama H, Takagi S, Watanabe Y, Kato H, Araki T (June 2008). “Role of reactive nitrogen and reactive oxygen species against MPTP neurotoxicity in mice”. Journal of Neural Transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996). 115 (6): 831–42. doi:10.1007/s00702-008-0019-6. PMID 18235988.
  9. Jump up^ Yokoyama H, Yano R, Aoki E, Kato H, Araki T (September 2008). “Comparative pharmacological study of free radical scavenger, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, nitric oxide synthase activator and cyclooxygenase inhibitor against MPTP neurotoxicity in mice”. Metabolic Brain Disease. 23 (3): 335–49. doi:10.1007/s11011-008-9096-3. PMID 18648914.

External links

Edaravone
Edaravone.svg
Edaravone ball-and-stick model.png
Clinical data
Trade names Radicut
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
  • Rx-only (JP)
Identifiers
Synonyms MCI-186
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.001.719
Chemical and physical data
Formula C10H10N2O
Molar mass 174.20 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)
////////// Radicava, edaravone, fda 2017, Lou Gehrig’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,  Mitsubishi Tanabe, orphan drug designation89-25-8, эдаравон, إيدارافون , 依达拉奉 ,ラジカット,
O=C1CC(=NN1c1ccccc1)C

FDA approves new combination treatment for acute myeloid leukemia, Rydapt (midostaurin)


MIDOSTAURIN

04/28/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Rydapt (midostaurin) for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have a specific genetic mutation called FLT3, in combination with chemotherapy. The drug is approved for use with a companion diagnostic, the LeukoStrat CDx FLT3 Mutation Assay, which is used to detect the FLT3 mutation in patients with AML.

April 28, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Rydapt (midostaurin) for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have a specific genetic mutation called FLT3, in combination with chemotherapy. The drug is approved for use with a companion diagnostic, the LeukoStrat CDx FLT3 Mutation Assay, which is used to detect the FLT3 mutation in patients with AML.

AML is a rapidly progressing cancer that forms in the bone marrow and results in an increased number of white blood cells in the bloodstream. The National Cancer Institute estimated that approximately 19,930 people would be diagnosed with AML in 2016 and 10,430 were projected to die of the disease.

“Rydapt is the first targeted therapy to treat patients with AML, in combination with chemotherapy,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence. “The ability to detect the gene mutation with a diagnostic test means doctors can identify specific patients who may benefit from this treatment.”

Rydapt is a kinase inhibitor that works by blocking several enzymes that promote cell growth. If the FLT3 mutation is detected in blood or bone marrow samples using the LeukoStrat CDx FLT3 Mutation Assay, the patient may be eligible for treatment with Rydapt in combination with chemotherapy.

The safety and efficacy of Rydapt for patients with AML were studied in a randomized trial of 717 patients who had not been treated previously for AML. In the trial, patients who received Rydapt in combination with chemotherapy lived longer than patients who received chemotherapy alone, although a specific median survival rate could not be reliably estimated. In addition, patients who received Rydapt in combination with chemotherapy in the trial went longer (median 8.2 months) without certain complications (failure to achieve complete remission within 60 days of starting treatment, progression of leukemia or death) than patients who received chemotherapy alone (median three months).

Common side effects of Rydapt in patients with AML include low levels of white blood cells with fever (febrile neutropenia), nausea, inflammation of the mucous membranes (mucositis), vomiting, headache, spots on the skin due to bleeding (petechiae), musculoskeletal pain, nosebleeds (epistaxis), device-related infection, high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and upper respiratory tract infection. Rydapt should not be used in patients with hypersensitivity to midostaurin or other ingredients in Rydapt. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not take Rydapt because it may cause harm to a developing fetus or a newborn baby. Patients who experience signs or symptoms of lung damage (pulmonary toxicity) should stop using Rydapt.

Rydapt was also approved today for adults with certain types of rare blood disorders (aggressive systemic mastocytosis, systemic mastocytosis with associated hematological neoplasm or mast cell leukemia). Common side effects of Rydapt in these patients include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, swelling (edema), musculoskeletal pain, abdominal pain, fatigue, upper respiratory tract infection, constipation, fever, headache and shortness of breath.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review, Fast Track (for the mastocytosis indication) and Breakthrough Therapy (for the AML indication) designations.

The FDA granted the approval of Rydapt to Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. The FDA granted the approval of the LeukoStrat CDx FLT3 Mutation Assay to Invivoscribe Technologies Inc.

MIDOSTAURIN

(9S,10R,11R,13R)-2,3,10,11,12,13-Hexahydro-10-methoxy-9-methyl-11-(methylamino)-9,13-epoxy-1H,9H-diindolo[1,2,3-gh:3′,2′,1′-lm]pyrrolo[3,4-j][1,7]benzodiamzonine-1-one

N-[(9S,10R,11R,13R)-2,3,10,11,12,13-Hexahydro-10-methoxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,13-epoxy-1H,9H-diindolo[1,2,3-gh:3′,2′,1′-lm]pyrrolo[3,4-j][1,7]benzodiazonin-11-yl]-N-methylbenzamide

N-((9S,10R,11R,13R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-methoxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,13-epoxy-1H,9H-diindolo(1,2,3-gh:3′,2′,1′-lm)pyrrolo(3,4-j)(1,7)benzodiazonin-11-yl)-N-methyl-,

N-[(2R,4R,5R,6S)-5-methoxy-6-methyl-18-oxo-29-oxa-1,7,17-triazaoctacyclo[12.12.2.12,6.07,28.08,13.015,19.020,27.021,26]nonacosa-8,10,12,14(28),15(19),20(27),21(26),22,24-nonaen-4-yl]-N-methylbenzamide hydrate

N-benzoyl staurosporine

NOVARTIS ONCOLOGY ORIGINATOR

Chemical Formula: C35H30N4O4

Exact Mass: 570.22671

Molecular Weight: 570.63710

Elemental Analysis: C, 73.67; H, 5.30; N, 9.82; O, 11.22

Tyrosine kinase inhibitors

PKC 412。PKC412A。CGP 41251。Benzoylstaurosporine;4′-N-Benzoylstaurosporine;Cgp 41251;Cgp 41 251.

120685-11-2 CAS

PHASE 3

  • 4′-N-Benzoylstaurosporine
  • Benzoylstaurosporine
  • Cgp 41 251
  • CGP 41251
  • CGP-41251
  • Midostaurin
  • PKC 412
  • PKC412
  • UNII-ID912S5VON

Midostaurin is an inhibitor of tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, and VEGF. Midostaurin inhibits cell growth and phosphorylation of FLT3, STAT5, and ERK. It is a potent inhibitor of a spectrum of FLT3 activation loop mutations.

it  is prepared by acylation of the alkaloid staurosporine (I) with benzoyl chloride (II) in the presence of diisopropylethylamine in chloroform.Production Route of Midostaurin

Midostaurin is a synthetic indolocarbazole multikinase inhibitor with potential antiangiogenic and antineoplastic activities. Midostaurin inhibits protein kinase C alpha (PKCalpha), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), c-kit, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) tyrosine kinases, which may result in disruption of the cell cycle, inhibition of proliferation, apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis in susceptible tumors.

MIDOSTAURIN

Derivative of staurosporin, orally active, potent inhibitor of FLT3 tyrosine kinase (fetal liver tyrosine kinase 3). In addition Midostaurin inhibits further molecular targets such as VEGFR-1 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1), c-kit (stem cell factor receptor), H-and K-RAS (Rat Sarcoma Viral homologue) and MDR (multidrug resistance protein).

Midostaurin inhibits both wild-type FLT3 and FLT3 mutant, wherein the internal tandem duplication mutations (FLT3-ITD), and the point mutation to be inhibited in the tyrosine kinase domain of the molecule at positions 835 and 836.Midostaurin is tested in patients with AML.

Midostaurin, a protein kinase C (PKC) and Flt3 (FLK2/STK1) inhibitor, is in phase III clinical development at originator Novartis for the oral treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

Novartis is conducting phase III clinical trials for the treatment of aggressive systemic mastocytosis or mast cell leukemia. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is conducting phase I/II trials with the drug for the treatment of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

Massachusetts General Hospital is conducting phase I clinical trials for the treatment of adenocarcinoma of the rectum in combination with radiation and standard chemotherapy.

MIDOSTAURIN

Midostaurin (PKC412) is a multi-target protein kinase inhibitor being investigated for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It is a semi-synthetic derivative of staurosporine, an alkaloid from the bacterium Streptomyces staurosporeus, and is active in patients with mutations of CD135 (FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 receptor).[1]

After successful Phase II clinical trials, a Phase III trial for AML has started in 2008. It is testing midostaurin in combination with daunorubicin and cytarabine.[2] In another trial, the substance has proven ineffective in metastatic melanoma.[3]

Midostaurin has also been studied at Johns Hopkins University for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but no recent progress reports for this indication have been made available. Trials in macular edema of diabetic origin were discontinued at Novartis.

In 2004, orphan drug designation was received in the E.U. for the treatment of AML. In 2009 and 2010, orphan drug designation was assigned for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia and for the treatment of mastocytosis, respectively, in the U.S. In 2010, orphan drug designation was assigned in the E.U. for the latter indication.

MIDOSTAURIN

References

  1.  Fischer, T.; Stone, R. M.; Deangelo, D. J.; Galinsky, I.; Estey, E.; Lanza, C.; Fox, E.; Ehninger, G.; Feldman, E. J.; Schiller, G. J.; Klimek, V. M.; Nimer, S. D.; Gilliland, D. G.; Dutreix, C.; Huntsman-Labed, A.; Virkus, J.; Giles, F. J. (2010). “Phase IIB Trial of Oral Midostaurin (PKC412), the FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 Receptor (FLT3) and Multi-Targeted Kinase Inhibitor, in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Either Wild-Type or Mutated FLT3”. Journal of Clinical Oncology 28 (28): 4339–4345. doi:10.1200/JCO.2010.28.9678PMID 20733134edit
  2.  ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00651261 Daunorubicin, Cytarabine, and Midostaurin in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia
  3.  Millward, M. J.; House, C.; Bowtell, D.; Webster, L.; Olver, I. N.; Gore, M.; Copeman, M.; Lynch, K.; Yap, A.; Wang, Y.; Cohen, P. S.; Zalcberg, J. (2006). “The multikinase inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412A) lacks activity in metastatic melanoma: a phase IIA clinical and biologic study”British Journal of Cancer 95 (7): 829–834. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6603331PMC 2360547PMID 16969355.
    1. Midostaurin product page, Fermentek
    2.  Wang, Y; Yin, OQ; Graf, P; Kisicki, JC; Schran, H (2008). “Dose- and Time-Dependent Pharmacokinetics of Midostaurin in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus”. J Clin Pharmacol 48 (6): 763–775. doi:10.1177/0091270008318006PMID 18508951.
    3.  Ryan KS (2008). “Structural studies of rebeccamycin, staurosporine, and violacein biosynthetic enzymes”Ph.D. Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 1994, 4(3): 399

US 5093330

EP 0657164

EP 0711556

EP 0733358

WO 1998007415

WO 2002076432

WO 2003024420

WO 2003037347

WO 2004112794

WO 2005027910

WO 2005040415

WO 2006024494

WO 2006048296

WO 2006061199

WO 2007017497

WO 2013086133

WO 2012016050

WO 2011000811

8-1-2013
Identification of potent Yes1 kinase inhibitors using a library screening approach.
Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters
 
3-1-2013
Evaluation of potential Myt1 kinase inhibitors by TR-FRET based binding assay.
European journal of medicinal chemistry
2-23-2012
Testing the promiscuity of commercial kinase inhibitors against the AGC kinase group using a split-luciferase screen.
Journal of medicinal chemistry
 
1-26-2012
VX-322: a novel dual receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia.
Journal of medicinal chemistry
1-1-2012
H2O2 production downstream of FLT3 is mediated by p22phox in the endoplasmic reticulum and is required for STAT5 signalling.
PloS one
10-27-2011
Discovery of 3-(2,6-dichloro-3,5-dimethoxy-phenyl)-1-{6-[4-(4-ethyl-piperazin-1-yl)-phenylamino]-pyrimidin-4-yl}-1-methyl-urea (NVP-BGJ398), a potent and selective inhibitor of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinase.
Journal of medicinal chemistry
 
6-1-2011
Discovery, synthesis, and investigation of the antitumor activity of novel piperazinylpyrimidine derivatives.
European journal of medicinal chemistry
3-1-2010
Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor as a target for small molecule inhibitors.
Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry
7-18-2012
Staurosporine Derivatives as Inhibitors of FLT3 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activity
6-13-2012
Crystal form of N-benzoyl-staurosporine
12-14-2011
COMPOSITIONS FOR TREATMENT OF SYSTEMIC MASTOCYTOSIS
7-6-2011
Staurosporine derivatives as inhibitors of flt3 receptor tyrosine kinase activity
7-6-2011
Staurosporine Derivatives for Use in Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma
12-10-2010
Pharmaceutical Compositions for treating wouds and related methods
11-5-2010
COMBINATIONS OF JAK INHIBITORS
7-23-2010
COMBINATIONS COMPRISING STAUROSPORINES
3-5-2010
COMBINATION OF IAP INHIBITORS AND FLT3 INHIBITORS
1-29-2010
ANTI-CANCER PHOSPHONATE ANALOGS
1-13-2010
Therapeutic phosphonate compounds
11-20-2009
Use of Staurosporine Derivatives for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma
7-17-2009
KINASE INHIBITORY PHOSPHONATE ANALOGS
6-19-2009
Organic Compounds
3-20-2009
Use of Midostaurin for Treating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
11-21-2008
PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS COMPRISING A POORLY WATER-SOLUBLE ACTIVE INGREDIENT, A SURFACTANT AND A WATER-SOLUBLE POLYMER
11-19-2008
Anti-cancer phosphonate analogs
9-12-2008
Multi-Functional Small Molecules as Anti-Proliferative Agents
9-5-2008
Sensitization of Drug-Resistant Lung Caners to Protein Kinase Inhibitors
8-29-2008
Organic Compounds
8-27-2008
Kinase inhibitory phosphonate analogs
4-25-2008
Treatment Of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors With Imatinib And Midostaurin
12-28-2007
Pharmaceutical Uses of Staurosporine Derivatives
12-7-2007
Kinase Inhibitor Phosphonate Conjugates
8-17-2007
Combinations comprising staurosporines
10-13-2006
Staurosporine derivatives for hypereosinophilic syndrome
7-15-2005
Phosphonate substituted kinase inhibitors
10-20-2004
Staurosporin derivatives

MIDOSTAURIN HYDRATE

Midostaurin according to the invention is N-[(9S,10R,11R,13R)-2,3,10,11,12,13-hexahydro-10-methoxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,13-epoxy-1H,9H-diindolo[1,2,3-gh:3′,2′,1′-lm]pyrrolo[3,4-j][1,7]benzodiazonin-11-yl]-N-methylbenzamide of the formula (II):

Figure US20090075972A1-20090319-C00002

or a salt thereof, hereinafter: “Compound of formula II or midostaurin”.

Compound of formula II or midostaurin [International Nonproprietary Name] is also known as PKC412.

Midostaurin is a derivative of the naturally occurring alkaloid staurosporine, and has been specifically described in the European patent No. 0 296 110 published on Dec. 21, 1988, as well as in U.S. Pat. No.  5093330 published on Mar. 3, 1992, and Japanese Patent No. 2 708 047.

………………….

https://www.google.co.in/patents/EP0296110B1

The nomenclature of the products is, on the complete structure of staurosporine ([storage]-NH-CH ₃derived, and which is designated by N-substituent on the nitrogen of the methylamino group

Figure imgb0028

Example 18:

     N-Benzoyl-staurospor

  • A solution of 116.5 mg (0.25 mmol) of staurosporine and 0.065 ml (0.38 mmol) of N, N-diisopropylethylamine in 2 ml of chloroform is added at room temperature with 0.035 ml (0.3 mmol) of benzoyl chloride and 10 stirred minutes.The reaction mixture is diluted with chloroform, washed with sodium bicarbonate, dried over magnesium sulfate and evaporated. The crude product is chromatographed on silica gel (eluent methylene chloride / ethanol 30:1), mp 235-247 ° with brown coloration.
  • cut paste may not be ok below

Staurosporine the formula [storage]-NH-CH ₃ (II) (for the meaning of the rest of [storage] see above) as the basic material of the novel compounds was already in 1977, from the cultures of Streptomyces staurosporeus AWAYA, and TAKAHASHI

O ¯

Figure imgb0003

MURA, sp. nov. AM 2282, see Omura, S., Iwai, Y., Hirano, A., Nakagawa, A.; awayâ, J., Tsuchiya, H., Takahashi, Y., and Masuma, R. J. Antibiot. 30, 275-281 (1977) isolated and tested for antimicrobial activity. It was also found here that the compound against yeast-like fungi and microorganisms is effective (MIC of about 3-25 mcg / ml), taking as the hydrochloride = having a LD ₅ ₀ 6.6 mg / kg (mouse, intraperitoneal). Stagnated recently it has been shown in extensive screening, see Tamaoki, T., Nomoto, H., Takahashi, I., Kato, Y, Morimoto, M. and Tomita, F.: Biochem. and Biophys. Research Commun. 135 (No. 2), 397-402 (1986) that the compound exerts a potent inhibitory effect on protein kinase C (rat brain)

…………………

https://www.google.co.in/patents/US5093330

EXAMPLE 18 N-benzoyl-staurosporine

0.035 ml (0.3 mmol) of benzoyl chloride is added at room temperature to a solution of 116.5 mg (0.25 mmol) of staurosporine and 0.065 ml (0.38 mmol) of N,N-diisopropylethylamine in 2 ml of chloroform and the whole is stirred for 10 minutes. The reaction mixture is diluted with chloroform, washed with sodium bicarbonate solution, dried over magnesium sulphate and concentrated by evaporation. The crude product is chromatographed on silica gel (eluant:methylene chloride/ethanol 30:1); m.p. 235

…………………….

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 1994, 4(3): 399

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0960894X94800049

Full-size image (2 K)

……………………

http://www.google.com/patents/WO1998007415A2

A variety of PKC inhibitors are available in the art for use in the invention. These include bryostatin (U.S. Patent 4,560,774), safinogel (WO 9617603), fasudil (EP 187371), 7- hydoxystaurosporin (EP 137632B), various diones described in EP 657458, EP 657411 and WO9535294, phenylmethyl hexanamides as described in WO9517888, various indane containing benzamides as described in WO9530640, various pyrrolo [3,4-c]carbazoles as described in EP 695755, LY 333531 (IMSworld R & D Focus 960722, July 22, 1996 and Pharmaprojects Accession No. 24174), SPC-104065 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 22568), P-10050 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 22643), No. 4432 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 23031), No. 4503 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 23252), No. 4721 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 23890), No. 4755 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 24035), balanol (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 20376), K-7259 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 16649), Protein kinase C inhib, Lilly (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 18006), and UCN-01 (Pharmaprojects Accession No. 11915). Also see, for example, Tamaoki and Nakano (1990) Biotechnology 8:732-735; Posada et al. (1989) Cancer Commun. 1:285-292; Sato et al. (1990) Biochem Biophys. Res. Commun. 173:1252-1257; Utz et al. (1994) Int. J. Cancer 57:104-110; Schwartz et al. (1993) J. Na . Cancer lnst. 85:402-407; Meyer et al. (1989) Int. J. Cancer 43:851-856; Akinaga et al. (1991) Cancer Res. 51:4888-4892, which disclosures are herein incorporated by reference. Additionally, antisense molecules can be used as PKC inhibitors. Although such antisense molecules inhibit mRNA translation into the PKC protein, such antisense molecules are considered PKC inhibitors for purposes of this invention. Such antisense molecules against PKC inhibitors include those described in published PCT patent applications WO 93/19203, WO 95/03833 and WO 95/02069, herein incorporated by reference. Such inhibitors can be used in formulations for local delivery to prevent cellular proliferation. Such inhibitors find particular use in local delivery for preventing rumor growth and restenosis.

N-benzoyl staurosporine is a benzoyl derivative of the naturally occurring alkaloid staurosporine. It is chiral compound ([a]D=+148.0+-2.0°) with the formula C35H30R1O4 (molecular weight 570.65). It is a pale yellow amorphous powder which remains unchanged up to 220°C. The compound is very lipophilic (log P>5.48) and almost insoluble in water (0.068 mg/1) but dissolves readily in DMSO.

……………………….

staurosporine

Staurosporine (antibiotic AM-2282 or STS) is a natural product originally isolated in 1977 from the bacterium Streptomyces staurosporeus. It was the first of over 50 alkaloids to be isolated with this type of bis-indole chemical structure. The chemical structure of staurosporine was elucidated by X-ray analysis of a single crystal and the absolute stereochemical configuration by the same method in 1994.

Staurosporine was discovered to have biological activities ranging from anti-fungal to anti-hypertensive. The interest in these activities resulted in a large investigative effort in chemistry and biology and the discovery of the potential for anti-cancer treatment

Synthesis of Staurosporine

Staurosporine is the precursor of the novel protein kinase inhibitor midostaurin(PKC412). Besides midostaurin, staurosporine is also used as a starting material in the commercial synthesis of K252c (also called staurosporine aglycone). In the natural biosynthetic pathway, K252c is a precursor of staurosporine.

Indolocarbazoles belong to the alkaloid sub-class of bisindoles. Of these carbazoles the Indolo(2,3-a)carbazoles are the most frequently isolated; the most common subgroup of the Indolo(2,3-a)carbazoles are the Indolo(2,3-a)pyrrole(3,4-c)carbazoles which can be divided into two major classes – halogenated (chlorinated) with a fully oxidized C-7 carbon with only one indole nitrogen containing a β-glycosidic bond and the second class consists of both indole nitrogen glycosilated, non-halogenated, and a fully reduced C-7 carbon. Staurosporine is part of the second non-halogenated class.

The biosynthesis of staurosporine starts with the amino acid L-tryptophan in its zwitterionic form. Tryptophan is converted to an imineby enzyme StaO which is an L-amino acid oxidase (that may be FAD dependent). The imine is acted upon by StaD to form an uncharacterized intermediate proposed to be the dimerization product between 2 imine molecules. Chromopyrrolic acid is the molecule formed from this intermediate after the loss of VioE (used in the biosynthesis of violacein – a natural product formed from a branch point in this pathway that also diverges to form rebeccamycin. An aryl aryl coupling thought to be catalyzed by a cytochrome P450enzyme to form an aromatic ring system occurs

Staurosporine 2

This is followed by a nucleophilic attack between the indole nitrogens resulting in cyclization and then decarboxylation assisted by StaC exclusively forming staurosporine aglycone or K252c. Glucose is transformed to NTP-L-ristoamine by StaA/B/E/J/I/K which is then added on to the staurosporine aglycone at 1 indole N by StaG. The StaN enzyme reorients the sugar by attaching it to the 2nd indole nitrogen into an unfavored conformation to form intermediated O-demethyl-N-demethyl-staurosporine. Lastly, O-methylation of the 4’amine by StaMA and N-methylation of the 3′-hydroxy by StaMB leads to the formation of staurosporine

US4107297 * 28 Nov 1977 15 Aug 1978 The Kitasato Institute Antibiotic compound
US4735939 * 27 Feb 1987 5 Apr 1988 The Dow Chemical Company Insecticidal activity of staurosporine
ZA884238A * Title not available
////////FDA 2017, acute myeloid leukemia, Rydapt, midostaurin, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, LeukoStrat CDx FLT3 Mutation Assay,  Invivoscribe Technologies Inc, Priority Review, Fast Track, (for the mastocytosis indication, Breakthrough Therapy

FDA approves first treatment for a form of Batten disease, Brineura (cerliponase alfa)


Image result
04/27/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Brineura (cerliponase alfa) as a treatment for a specific form of Batten disease. Brineura is the first FDA-approved treatment to slow loss of walking ability (ambulation) in symptomatic pediatric patients 3 years of age and older with late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2), also known as tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1) deficiency.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Brineura (cerliponase alfa) as a treatment for a specific form of Batten disease. Brineura is the first FDA-approved treatment to slow loss of walking ability (ambulation) in symptomatic pediatric patients 3 years of age and older with late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2), also known as tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1) deficiency.

“The FDA is committed to approving new and innovative therapies for patients with rare diseases, particularly where there are no approved treatment options,” said Julie Beitz, M.D., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Approving the first drug for the treatment of this form of Batten disease is an important advance for patients suffering with this condition.”

CLN2 disease is one of a group of disorders known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), collectively referred to as Batten disease. CLN2 disease is a rare inherited disorder that primarily affects the nervous system. In the late infantile form of the disease, signs and symptoms typically begin between ages 2 and 4. The initial symptoms usually include language delay, recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and difficulty coordinating movements (ataxia). Affected children also develop muscle twitches (myoclonus) and vision loss. CLN2 disease affects essential motor skills, such as sitting and walking. Individuals with this condition often require the use of a wheelchair by late childhood and typically do not survive past their teens. Batten disease is relatively rare, occurring in an estimated two to four of every 100,000 live births in the United States.

Brineura is an enzyme replacement therapy. Its active ingredient (cerliponase alfa) is a recombinant form of human TPP1, the enzyme deficient in patients with CLN2 disease. Brineura is administered into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by infusion via a specific surgically implanted reservoir and catheter in the head (intraventricular access device). Brineura must be administered under sterile conditions to reduce the risk of infections, and treatment should be managed by a health care professional knowledgeable in intraventricular administration. The recommended dose of Brineura in pediatric patients 3 years of age and older is 300 mg administered once every other week by intraventricular infusion, followed by an infusion of electrolytes. The complete Brineura infusion, including the required infusion of intraventricular electrolytes, lasts approximately 4.5 hours. Pre-treatment of patients with antihistamines with or without antipyretics (drugs for prevention or treatment of fever) or corticosteroids is recommended 30 to 60 minutes prior to the start of the infusion.

The efficacy of Brineura was established in a non-randomized, single-arm dose escalation clinical study in 22 symptomatic pediatric patients with CLN2 disease and compared to 42 untreated patients with CLN2 disease from a natural history cohort (an independent historical control group) who were at least 3 years old and had motor or language symptoms. Taking into account age, baseline walking ability and genotype, Brineura-treated patients demonstrated fewer declines in walking ability compared to untreated patients in the natural history cohort.

The safety of Brineura was evaluated in 24 patients with CLN2 disease aged 3 to 8 years who received at least one dose of Brineura in clinical studies. The safety and effectiveness of Brineura have not been established in patients less than 3 years of age.

The most common adverse reactions in patients treated with Brineura include fever, ECG abnormalities including slow heart rate (bradycardia), hypersensitivity, decrease or increase in CSF protein, vomiting, seizures, hematoma (abnormal collection of blood outside of a blood vessel), headache, irritability, increased CSF white blood cell count (pleocytosis), device-related infection, feeling jittery and low blood pressure.

Brineura should not be administered to patients if there are signs of acute intraventricular access device-related complications (e.g., leakage, device failure or signs of device-related infection such as swelling, erythema of the scalp, extravasation of fluid, or bulging of the scalp around or above the intraventricular access device). In case of intraventricular access device complications, health care providers should discontinue infusion of Brineura and refer to the device manufacturer’s labeling for further instructions. Additionally, health care providers should routinely test patient CSF samples to detect device infections. Brineura should also not be used in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts (medical devices that relieve pressure on the brain caused by fluid accumulation).

Health care providers should also monitor vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, etc.) before the infusion starts, periodically during infusion and post-infusion in a health care setting. Health care providers should perform electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring during infusion in patients with a history of slow heart rate (bradycardia), conduction disorder (impaired progression of electrical impulses through the heart) or structural heart disease (defect or abnormality of the heart), as some patients with CLN2 disease can develop conduction disorders or heart disease. Hypersensitivity reactions have also been reported in Brineura-treated patients. Due to the potential for anaphylaxis, appropriate medical support should be readily available when Brineura is administered. If anaphylaxis occurs, infusion should be immediately discontinued and appropriate treatment should be initiated.

The FDA will require the Brineura manufacturer to further evaluate the safety of Brineura in CLN2 patients below the age of 2 years, including device related adverse events and complications with routine use. In addition, a long-term safety study will assess Brineura treated CLN2 patients for a minimum of 10 years.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapydesignations. Brineura also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The sponsor is also receiving a Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucherunder a program intended to encourage development of new drugs and biologics for the prevention and treatment of rare pediatric diseases. A voucher can be redeemed by a sponsor at a later date to receive Priority Review of a subsequent marketing application for a different product. This is the tenth rare pediatric disease priority review voucher issued by the FDA since the program began.

The FDA granted approval of Brineura to BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc.

////////Brineura, cerliponase alfa, fda 2017, Batten disease, BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc, Priority Review,  Breakthrough Therapy designations, Orphan Drug designation,

BLU 285


BLU-285

CAS 1703793-34-3

  • Molecular FormulaC26H27FN10
  • Average mass498.558 Da
(1S)-1-(4-Fluorophenyl)-1-(2-{4-[6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl]-1-piperazinyl}-5-pyrimidinyl)ethanamine
5-Pyrimidinemethanamine, α-(4-fluorophenyl)-α-methyl-2-[4-[6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl]-1-piperazinyl]-, (αS)-
  • 5-Pyrimidinemethanamine, α-(4-fluorophenyl)-α-methyl-2-[4-[6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl]-1-piperazinyl]-, (αS)-
  • Originator Blueprint Medicines
  • Class Antineoplastics; Skin disorder therapies; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Platelet-derived growth factor alpha receptor modulators; Proto oncogene protein c-kit inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Systemic mastocytosis; Gastrointestinal stromal tumours
  • Phase I Gastrointestinal stromal tumours; Solid tumours; Systemic mastocytosis
  • 04 Dec 2016 Proof-of-concept data from phase I trial in Systemic mastocytosis presented at the 58thAnnual Meeting and Exposition of the American Society of Hematology (ASH Hem-2016)
  • 03 Dec 2016 Pharmacodynamics data from preclinical studies in Systemic mastocytosis presented at the 58th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Society of Hematology (ASH-Hem-2016)
  • 03 Dec 2016 Preliminary pharmacokinetic data from a phase I trial in Systemic mastocytosis presented at the 58th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Society of Hematology (ASH Hem-2016)

Image result for BLU 285

BLU 285

(S)- 1 – (4- fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (Compounds 44) WO2015057873

Inventors Yulian Zhang, Brian L. Hodous, Joseph L. Kim, Kevin J. Wilson, Douglas Wilson
Applicant Blueprint Medicines Corporation

Image result for BLU 285

Yulian Zhang,

Yulian Zhang,

Blueprint Medicines Corporation

ΚΓΓ and PDGFR.

The enzyme KIT (also called CD117) is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed on a wide variety of cell types. The KIT molecule contains a long extracellular domain, a transmembrane segment, and an intracellular portion. The ligand for KIT is stem cell factor (SCF), whose binding to the extracellular domain of KIT induces receptor dimerization and activation of downstream signaling pathways. KIT mutations generally occur in the DNA encoding the juxtumembrane domain (exon 11). They also occur, with less frequency, in exons 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 17, and 18. Mutations make KIT function independent of activation by SCF, leading to a high cell division rate and possibly genomic instability. Mutant KIT has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several disorders and conditions including systemic mastocytosis, GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors), AML (acute myeloid leukemia), melanoma, and seminoma. As such, there is a need for therapeutic agents that inhibit ΚΓΓ, and especially agents that inhibit mutant ΚΓΓ.Platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGF-R) are cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors for members of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) family. PDGF subunits -A and -B are important factors regulating cell proliferation, cellular differentiation, cell growth, development and many diseases including cancer. A PDGFRA D842V mutation has been found in a distinct subset of GIST, typically from the stomach. The D842V mutation is known to be associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance. As such, there is a need for agents that target this mutation.

CONTD………..

PATENT

WO 2015057873

Example 7: Synthesis of (R)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, 1 -f\ [ 1 ,2,4] triazin-4-yl)piperazin- 1 -yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine and (S)- 1 – (4- fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (Compounds 43 and 44)

Step 1 : Synthesis of (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l-f] [ 1 ,2,4] triazin-4-yl)piperazin- 1 -yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methanone:

4-Chloro-6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l-/] [l,2,4]triazine (180 mg, 0.770 mmol), (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methanone, HC1 (265 mg, 0.821 mmol) and DIPEA (0.40 mL, 2.290 mmol) were stirred in 1,4-dioxane (4 mL) at room temperature for 18 hours. Saturated ammonium chloride was added and the products extracted into DCM (x2). The combined organic extracts were dried over Na2S04, filtered through Celite eluting with DCM, and the filtrate concentrated in vacuo. Purification of the residue by MPLC (25- 100% EtOAc-DCM) gave (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methanone (160 mg, 0.331 mmol, 43 % yield) as an off-white solid. MS (ES+) C25H22FN90 requires: 483, found: 484 [M + H]+.

Step 2: Synthesis of (5,Z)-N-((4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-p razol-4-yl)p rrolo[2, l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4- l)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methylene)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide:

(S)-2-Methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (110 mg, 0.908 mmol), (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l-/][l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methanone (158 mg, 0.327 mmol) and ethyl orthotitanate (0.15 mL, 0.715 mmol) were stirred in THF (3.2 mL) at 70 °C for 18 hours. Room temperature was attained, water was added, and the products extracted into EtOAc (x2). The combined organic extracts were washed with brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo while loading onto Celite. Purification of the residue by MPLC (0- 10% MeOH-EtOAc) gave (5,Z)-N-((4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methylene)-2- methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (192 mg, 0.327 mmol, 100 % yield) as an orange solid. MS (ES+) C29H3iFN10OS requires: 586, found: 587 [M + H]+.

Step 3: Synthesis of (lS’)-N-(l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4- l)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethyl)-2-methylpropane-2-

(lS’,Z)-N-((4-Fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methylene)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (190 mg, 0.324 mmol) was taken up in THF (3 mL) and cooled to 0 °C. Methylmagnesium bromide (3 M solution in diethyl ether, 0.50 mL, 1.500 mmol) was added and the resulting mixture stirred at 0 °C for 45 minutes. Additional methylmagnesium bromide (3 M solution in diethyl ether, 0.10 mL, 0.300 mmol) was added and stirring at 0 °C continued for 20 minutes. Saturated ammonium chloride was added and the products extracted into EtOAc (x2). The combined organic extracts were washed with brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo while loading onto Celite. Purification of the residue by MPLC (0-10% MeOH-EtOAc) gave (lS’)-N-(l-(4-fluorophenyl)-l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethyl)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (120 mg, 0.199 mmol, 61.5 % yield) as a yellow solid (mixture of diastereoisomers). MS (ES+) C3oH35FN10OS requires: 602, found: 603 [M + H]+.

Step 4: Synthesis of l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l-f\ [ 1 ,2,4] triazin-4- l)piperazin- 1 -yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine:

(S)-N- ( 1 – (4-Fluorophenyl)- 1 -(2- (4- (6-( 1 -methyl- 1 H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo [2,1-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethyl)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (120 mg, 0.199 mmol) was stirred in 4 M HCl in 1,4-dioxane (1.5 mL)/MeOH (1.5 mL) at room temperature for 1 hour. The solvent was removed in vacuo and the residue triturated in EtOAc to give l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l -methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/][l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine, HCl (110 mg, 0.206 mmol, 103 % yield) as a pale yellow solid. MS (ES+) C26H27FN10 requires: 498, found: 482 [M- 17 + H]+, 499 [M + H]+.

Step 5: Chiral separation of (R)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine and (5)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-1 -yl)pyrimidin- -yl)ethanamine:

The enantiomers of racemic l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (94 mg, 0.189 mmol) were separated by chiral SFC to give (R)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-

pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/][l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (34.4 mg, 0.069 mmol, 73.2 % yield) and (lS,)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (32.1 mg, 0.064 mmol, 68.3 % yield). The absolute stereochemistry was assigned randomly. MS (ES+)

C26H27FN10 requires: 498, found: 499 [M + H]+.

str1

/////////BLU-285,  1703793-34-3, PHASE 1,  Brian Hodous, BlueprintMeds,  KIT & PDGFRalpha inhibitors, Orphan Drug Status

Fc1ccc(cc1)[C@](C)(N)c2cnc(nc2)N3CCN(CC3)c4ncnn5cc(cc45)c6cn(C)nc6

Next in 1st time disclosures Brian Hodous of @BlueprintMeds will talk about KIT & PDGFRalpha inhibitors

str0

TRIENTINE HYDROCHLORIDE, 塩酸トリエンチン , 曲恩汀


Skeletal formula of triethylenetetramine

TRIENTINE

  • Molecular Formula C6H18N4
  • Average mass 146.234 Da

112-24-3 CAS

曲恩汀, KD-034, MK-0681, MK-681, TECZA, TETA, TJA-250

1,2-Ethanediamine, N1,N2-bis(2-aminoethyl)-
1,8-diamino-3,6-diazaoctane
Image result for TRIENTINE

TRIENTINE HYDROCHLORIDE

  • Molecular Formula C6H19ClN4
  • Average mass 182.695 Da

38260-01-4 CAS

Launched – 1986 VALEANT, WILSONS DISEASE

Image result for MSD

Image result for VALEANT

塩酸トリエンチン
Trientine Hydrochloride

C6H18N4▪2HCl : 219.16
[38260-01-4]

Aton Pharma, a subsidiary of Valeant Pharmaceuticals, has developed and launched Syprine, a capsule formulation of trientine hydrochloride, for treating Wilson disease.

Image result for TRIENTINE

Triethylenetetramine, abbreviated TETA and trien and also called trientine (INN), is an organic compound with the formula [CH2NHCH2CH2NH2]2. This oily liquid is colorless but, like many amines, assumes a yellowish color due to impurities resulting from air-oxidation. It is soluble in polar solvents. The branched isomer tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and piperazine derivatives may also be present in commercial samples of TETA.[1]

Trientine hydrochloride is a metal antagonist that was first launched by Merck, Sharp & Dohme in the U.S. in 1986 under the brand name Syprine for the oral treatment of Wilson’s disease.

Orphan drug designation has also been assigned in the U.S. for the treatment of patients with Wilson’s disease who are intolerant or inadequately responsive to penicillamine and in the E.U. by Univar for the treatment of Wilson’s disease

 Trientine hydrochloride pk_prod_list.xml_prod_list_card_pr?p_tsearch=A&p_id=90373

By condensation of ethylenediamine (I) with 1,2-dichloroethane (II)

Trientine hydrochloride is N,N’-bis (2-aminoethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine dihydrochloride. It is a white to pale yellow crystalline hygroscopic powder. It is freely soluble in water, soluble in methanol, slightly soluble in ethanol, and insoluble in chloroform and ether.

The empirical formula is C6H18N4·2HCI with a molecular weight of 219.2. The structural formula is:

NH2(CH2)2NH(CH2)2NH(CH2)2NH2•2HCI

Trientine hydrochloride is a chelating compound for removal of excess copper from the body. SYPRINE (Trientine Hydrochloride) is available as 250 mg capsules for oral administration. Capsules SYPRINE contain gelatin, iron oxides, stearic acid, and titanium dioxide as inactive ingredients.

Image result for TRIENTINE

Production

TETA is prepared by heating ethylenediamine or ethanolamine/ammonia mixtures over an oxide catalyst. This process gives a variety of amines, which are separated by distillation and sublimation.[2]

Uses

The reactivity and uses of TETA are similar to those for the related polyamines ethylenediamine and diethylenetriamine. It was primarily used as a crosslinker (“hardener”) in epoxy curing.[2]

The hydrochloride salt of TETA, referred to as trientine hydrochloride, is a chelating agent that is used to bind and remove copper in the body to treat Wilson’s disease, particularly in those who are intolerant to penicillamine. Some recommend trientine as first-line treatment, but experience with penicillamine is more extensive.[3]

Coordination chemistry

TETA is a tetradentate ligand in coordination chemistry, where it is referred to as trien.[4] Octahedral complexes of the type M(trien)Cl3 can adopt several diastereomeric structures, most of which are chiral.[5]

Trientine, chemically known as triethylenetetramine or N,N’-bis(2-aminoethyl)-l,2-ethanediamine belongs to the class of polyethylene polyamines. Trientine dihydrochloride is a chelating agent which is used to bind and remove copper in the body in the treatment of Wilson’s disease.

Image result for TRIENTINE

Trientine dihydrochloride (1)

Trientine dihydrochloride formulation, developed by Aton with the proprietary name SYPRINE, was approved by USFDA on November 8, 1985 for the treatment of patients with Wilson’s disease, who are intolerant to penicillamine. Trientine dihydrochloride, due to its activity on copper homeostasis, is being studied for various potential applications in the treatment of internal organs damage in diabetics, Alzheimer’s disease and cancer.

Various synthetic methods for preparation of triethylenetetramine (TETA) and the corresponding dihydrochloride salt have been disclosed in the prior art.

U.S. 4,806,517 discloses the synthesis of triethylenetetramine from ethylenediamine and monoethanolamine using Titania supported phosphorous catalyst while U.S. 4,550,209 and U.S. 5,225,599 disclose catalytic condensation of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol for the synthesis of linear triethylenetetramine using catalysts like zirconium trimethylene diphosphonate, or metatungstate composites of titanium dioxide and zirconium dioxide.

U.S. 4,503,253 discloses the preparation of triethylenetetramine by reaction of an alkanolamine compound with ammonia and an alkyleneamine having two primary amino groups in the presence of a catalyst, such as supported phosphoric acid wherein the support is comprised of silica, alumina or carbon.

The methods described above for preparation of triethylenetetramine require high temperatures and pressure. Further, due to the various possible side reactions and consequent associated impurities, it is difficult to control the purity of the desired amine.

CN 102924289 discloses a process for trientine dihydrochloride comprising reduction of Ν,Ν’-dibenzyl-,N,N’-bis[2-(l,3-dioxo-2H-isoindolyl)ethyl]ethanediamine using hydrazine hydrate to give N,N’-dibenzyl-,N,N’-bis(2-aminoethyl)ethanediamine, which, upon condensation with benzyl chloroformate gave N,N’-dibenzyl-,N,N’-bis[2-(Cbz-amino)ethyl]ethanediamine, and further reductive deprotection to give the desired compound.

CS 197,093 discloses a process comprising reaction of triethylenetetramine with concentrated hydrochloric acid to obtain the crystalline tetrahydrochlonde salt. Further reaction of the salt with sodium ethoxide in solvent ethanol, filtration of the solid sodium chloride which is generated in the process, followed by slow cooling and crystallization of the filtrate provided the dihydrochloride salt. Optionally, aqueous solution of the tetrahydrochloride salt was passed through a column of an anion exchanger and the eluate containing free base was treated with a calculated amount of the tetrahydrochloride, evaporated, and the residue was crystallized from aqueous ethanol to yield the dihydrochloride salt.

The process is quite circuitous and cumbersome, requiring use of strong bases, filtration of sodium chloride and results in yields as low as 60%.

US 8,394,992 discloses a method for preparation of triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride wherein tertiary butoxycarbonyl (boc) protected triethylenetetramine is first converted to its tetrahydrochloride salt using large excess of hydrochloric acid in solvent isopropanol, followed by treatment of the resulting tetrahydrochloride salt with a strong base like sodium alkoxide to produce the amine free base (TETA) and sodium chloride salt in anhydrous conditions. The free amine is extracted with tertiary butyl methyl ether (TBME), followed by removal of sodium chloride salt and finally the amine free base TETA is treated with hydrochloric acid in solvent ethanol to give trientine hydrochloride salt.

PATENT

WO-2017046695

str1

EXAMPLES

Example 1: Preparation of 2-([2-[cyanomethyl]-t-butyloxycarbonylamino]ethyl- 1-butyloxy carbonylamino)acetonitrile (5)

Potassium carbonate (481.9 g) was added to a stirred mixture of ethylenediamine (100.0 g) in acetonitrile (800 ml) and cooled to around 10°C. Chloroacetonitrile (263.8 g) was gradually added at same temperature and stirred at 25-30°C, till completion of the reaction, as monitored by HPLC. The mixture was cooled to 5-15°C and Boc-anhydride (762. lg) was added to it, followed by stirring at the same temperature. The temperature was raised to 25-30°C and the mass was stirred till completion of the reaction, as monitored by HPLC.

The reaction mass was filtered and the filtrate was concentrated. Toluene was added to the residue, and the mixture was heated to around 70°C followed by cooling and filtration to give 2-([2-[cyanomethyl)-t-butyloxycarbonylamino]ethyl-t-butyloxycarbonylamino) acetonitrile (5).

Yield: 506.8 g

% Yield: 89.9 %

Example 2: Preparation of t-butyl( N-2-aminoethyl)N-([2-[(2-aminoethyl)t-butyloxy)carbonylamino] ethyl) carbamate (6)

Raney nickel (120.0 g) in isopropanol (100 ml) was charged into an autoclave, followed by a mixture of Compound 5 (200 g) in isopropanol (400 ml). Cooled ammonia solution prepared by purging ammonia gas in 1400 ml isopropanol, equivalent to 125 g ammonia was gradually charged to the autoclave and the reaction was carried out around 15-25°C under hydrogen pressure of 2-5 Kg/cm2.

After completion of the reaction, as monitored by HPLC, the mass was filtered, concentrated, and methyl tertiary butyl ether was added to the residue. The mixture was heated to around 50°C, followed by cooling of the mass, stirring, optional seeding with compound 6 and filtration to give tertiary butyl-(N-2-aminoethyl)N-([2-[(2-aminoethyl)-(tert-butyloxy) carbonylamino] ethyl) carbamate.

Yield: 174 g

%Yield: 85 %

Example 3: Preparation of triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride (1)

Concentrated hydrochloric acid (121.5 g) was gradually added to a stirred mixture of tertiary-butyl-N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-2-[(2-aminoethyl)-(tert-butoxy) carbonyl] amino] ethyl} carbamate (Compound 6, 200.0 g) and water (1400 ml) at 20-30°C. The reaction mixture was heated in the temperature range of 100-105°C till completion of the reaction, as monitored by HPLC, with optionally distilling out water, if so required.

The reaction mass was concentrated and ethanol (600 ml) was added to the residue, followed by heating till a clear solution was obtained. The reaction mixture was gradually cooled with stirring, filtered and dried to provide triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride (1).

Yield: 88.9 g, (70 %)

Purity : > 99%

Patent

https://www.google.com/patents/US8394992

Trientine was said to be used in the synthesis of benzylidene-(2-{3-[2-(benzylidene-amino)-ethyl]-2-phenyl-imidazolidin-1-yl}-ethyl)-amine in French Patent No. FR2810035 to Guilard et al. Cetinkaya, E., et al., “Synthesis and characterization of unusual tetraminoalkenes,” J. Chem. Soc. 5:561-7 (1992), is said to be directed to synthesis of benzylidene-(2-{3-[2-(benzylidene-amino)-ethyl]-2-phenyl-imidazolidin-1-yl}-ethyl)-amine from trientine, as is Araki T., et al., “Site-selective derivatization of oligoethyleneimines using five-membered-ring protection method,” Macromol., 21:1995-2001 (1988). Triethylenetetramine may reportedly also be used in the synthesis of N-methylated triethylenetetramine, as reported in U.S. Pat. No. 2,390,766, to Zellhoefer et al.

Synthesis of polyethylenepolyamines, including triethylenetetramines, from ethylenediamine and monoethanolamine using pelleted group IVb metal oxide-phosphate type catalysts was reported by Vanderpool et al. in U.S. Pat. No. 4,806,517. Synthesis of triethylenetetramine from ethylenediamine and ethanolamine was also proposed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,550,209, to Unvert et al. U.S. Pat. No. 5,225,599, to King et al. is said to be directed to the synthesis of linear triethylene tetramine by condensation of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol in the presence of a catalyst. Joint production of triethylenetetramine and 1-(2-aminoethyl)-aminoethyl-piperazine was proposed by Borisenko et al. in U.S.S.R. Patent No. SU1541204. U.S. Pat. No. 4,766,247 and European Patent No. EP262562, both to Ford et al., reported the preparation of triethylenetetramine by reaction of an alkanolamine compound, an alkaline amine and optionally either a primary or secondary amine in the presence of a phosphorous containing catalyst, for example phosphoric acid on silica-alumina or Group IIIB metal acid phosphate, at a temperature from about 175° C. to 400° C. under pressure. These patents indicate that the synthetic method used therein was as set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 4,463,193, to Johnson. The Ford et al. ‘247 patent is also said to be directed to color reduction of polyamines by reaction at elevated temperature and pressure in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst and a hydrogen atmosphere. European Patent No. EP450709 to King et al. is said to be directed to a process for the preparation of triethylenetetramine and N-(2-aminoethyl)ethanolamine by condensation of an alkylenamine and an alkylene glycol in the presence of a condensation catalyst and a catalyst promoter at a temperature in excess of 260° C.

Russian Patent No. RU2186761, to Zagidullin, proposed synthesis of diethylenetriamine by reaction of dichloroethane with ethylenediamine. Ethylenediamine has previously been said to have been used in the synthesis of N-carboxylic acid esters as reported in U.S. Pat. No. 1,527,868, to Hartmann et al.

Japanese Patent No. 06065161 to Hara et al. is said to be directed to the synthesis of polyethylenepolyamines by reacting ethylenediamine with ethanolamine in the presence of silica-treated Nb205 supported on a carrier. Japanese Patent No. JP03047154 to Watanabe et al., is said to be directed to production of noncyclic polyethylenepolyamines by reaction of ammonia with monoethanolamine and ethylenediamine. Production of non-cyclic polyethylenepolyamines by reaction of ethylenediamine and monoethanolamine in the presence of hydrogen or a phosphorous-containing substance was said to be reported in Japanese Patent No. JP03048644. Regenerative preparation of linear polyethylenepolyamines using a phosphorous-bonded catalyst was proposed in European Patent No. EP115,138, to Larkin et al.

A process for preparation of alkyleneamines in the presence of a niobium catalyst was said to be provided in European Patent No. 256,516, to Tsutsumi et al. U.S. Pat. No. 4,584,405, to Vanderpool, reported the continuous synthesis of essentially noncyclic polyethylenepolyamines by reaction of monoethanolamine with ethylenediamine in the presence of an activated carbon catalyst under a pressure between about 500 to about 3000 psig., and at a temperature of between about 200° C. to about 400° C. Templeton, et al., reported on the preparation of linear polyethylenepolyamides asserted to result from reactions employing silica-alumina catalysts in European Patent No. EP150,558.

Production of triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride was said to have been reported in Kuhr et al., Czech Patent No. 197,093, via conversion of triethylenetetramine to crystalline tetrahydrochloride and subsequently to triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride. “A study of efficient preparation of triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride for the treatment of Wilson’s disease and hygroscopicity of its capsule,” Fujito, et al., Yakuzaigaku, 50:402-8 (1990), is also said to be directed to production of triethylenetetramine.

Preparation of triethylenetetramine salts used for the treatment of Wilson’s disease was said to be reported in “Treatment of Wilson’s Disease with Triethylene Tetramine Hydrochloride (Trientine),” Dubois, et al., J. Pediatric Gastro. & Nutrition, 10:77-81 (1990); “Preparation of Triethylenetetramine Dihydrochloride for the Treatment of Wilson’s Disease,” Dixon, et al., Lancet, 1(1775):853 (1972); “Determination of Triethylenetetramine in Plasma of Patients by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography,” Miyazaki, et al., Chem. Pharm. Bull., 38(4):1035-1038 (1990); “Preparation of and Clinical Experiences with Trien for the Treatment of Wilson’s Disease in Absolute Intolerance of D-penicillamine,” Harders, et al., Proc. Roy. Soc. Med., 70:10-12 (1977); “Tetramine cupruretic agents: A comparison in dogs,” Allen, et al., Am. J. Vet. Res., 48(1):28-30 (1987); and “Potentiometric and Spectroscopic Study of the Equilibria in the Aqueous Copper(II)-3,6-Diazaoctane-1,8-diamine System,” Laurie, et al., J.C.S. Dalton, 1882 (1976).

Preparation of Triethylenetetramine Salts by Reaction of Alcohol Solutions of Amines and acids was said to be reported in Polish Patent No. 105793, to Witek. Preparation of triethylenetetramine salts was also asserted in “Polycondensation of polyethylene polyamines with aliphatic dicarboxylic acids,” Witek, et al., Polimery, 20(3):118-119 (1975).

Baganz, H., and Peissker, H., Chem. Ber., 1957; 90:2944-2949; Haydock, D. B., and Mulholland, T. P. C., J. Chem. Soc., 1971; 2389-2395; and Rehse, K., et al., Arch. Pharm., 1994; 393-398, report on Strecker syntheses. Use of Boc and other protecting groups has been described. See, for example, Spicer, J. A. et al., Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 2002; 10: 19-29; Klenke, B. and Gilbert, I. H., J. Org. Chem., 2001; 66: 2480-2483.

FIG. 6 shows an 1H-NMR spectrum of a triethylenetetramine hydrochloride salt in D2O, as synthesized in Example 3. NMR values include a frequency of 400.13 Mhz, a 1H nucleus, number of transients is 16, points count of 32768, pulse sequence of zg30, and sweep width of 8278.15 H

Image result for TRIENTINE

CLIP

http://jpdb.nihs.go.jp/jp17e/JP17e_1.pdf

Method of purification: Dissolve Trientine Hydrochloride in water while warming, and recrystallize by addition of ethanol (99.5). Or dissolve Trientine Hydrochloride in water while warming, allow to stand after addition of activated charcoal in a cool and dark place for one night, and filter. To the filtrate add ethanol (99.5), allow to stand in a cool and dark place, and recrystallize. Dry the crystals under reduced pressure not exceeding 0.67 kPa at 409C until ethanol odor disappears.

References

  1.  “Ethyleneamines” (PDF). Huntsman. 2007.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b Eller, K.; Henkes, E.; Rossbacher, R.; Höke, H. (2005). “Amines, Aliphatic”. Ullmann’s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a02_001.
  3. Jump up^ Roberts, E. A.; Schilsky, M. L. (2003). “A practice guideline on Wilson disease” (pdf). Hepatology. 37 (6): 1475–1492. doi:10.1053/jhep.2003.50252. PMID 12774027.
  4. Jump up^ von Zelewsky, A. (1995). Stereochemistry of Coordination Compounds. Chichester: John Wiley. ISBN 047195599X.
  5.  Utsuno, S.; Sakai, Y.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Yamatera, H. (1985). “Three Isomers of the Trans-Diammine-[N,N′-bis(2-Aminoethyl)-1,2-Ethanediamine]-Cobalt(III) Complex Cation”. Inorganic Syntheses. 23: 79–82. doi:10.1002/9780470132548.ch16.
Triethylenetetramine
Skeletal formula of triethylenetetramine
Ball and stick model of triethylenetetramine
Spacefill model of triethylenetetramine
Names
Other names

N,N’-Bis(2-aminoethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine; TETA; Trien; Trientine (INN); Syprine (brand name)
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
605448
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.591
EC Number 203-950-6
27008
KEGG
MeSH Trientine
RTECS number YE6650000
UNII
UN number 2259
Properties
C6H18N4
Molar mass 146.24 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Odor Fishy, ammoniacal
Density 982 mg mL−1
Melting point −34.6 °C; −30.4 °F; 238.5 K
Boiling point 266.6 °C; 511.8 °F; 539.7 K
Miscible
log P 1.985
Vapor pressure <1 Pa (at 20 °C)
1.496
Thermochemistry
376 J K−1 mol−1 (at 60 °C)
Pharmacology
A16AX12 (WHO)
Hazards
GHS pictograms The corrosion pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) The exclamation-mark pictogram in the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)
GHS signal word DANGER
H312, H314, H317, H412
P273, P280, P305+351+338, P310
Corrosive C
R-phrases R21, R34, R43, R52/53
S-phrases (S1/2), S26, S36/37/39, S45
Flash point 129 °C (264 °F; 402 K)
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
  • 550 mg kg−1 (dermal, rabbit)
  • 2.5 g kg−1 (oral, rat)
Related compounds
Related amines
Related compounds
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

///////////////TRIENTINE, 112-24-3, 曲恩汀 , KD-034 , MK-0681, MK-681, TECZA, TETA, TJA-250, Orphan drug

NCCNCCNCCN

FDA approves first treatment Bavencio (avelumab)for rare form of skin cancer


 Image result for avelumab
str1
03/23/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Bavencio (avelumab) for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), including those who have not received prior chemotherapy. This is the first FDA-approved treatment for metastatic MCC, a rare, aggressive form of skin cancer.

March 23, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Bavencio (avelumab) for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), including those who have not received prior chemotherapy. This is the first FDA-approved treatment for metastatic MCC, a rare, aggressive form of skin cancer.

“While skin cancer is one of the most common cancers, patients with a rare form called Merkel cell cancer have not had an approved treatment option until now,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence. “The scientific community continues to make advances targeting the body’s immune system mechanisms for the treatment of various types of cancer. These advancements are leading to new therapies—even in rare forms of cancer where treatment options are limited or non-existent.”

According to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 1,600 people in the United States are diagnosed with MCC every year. While the majority of patients present with localized tumors that can be treated with surgical resection, approximately half of all patients will experience recurrence, and more than 30 percent will eventually develop metastatic disease. In patients with metastatic MCC, the cancer has spread beyond the skin into other parts of the body.

Bavencio targets the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway (proteins found on the body’s immune cells and some cancer cells). By blocking these interactions, Bavencio may help the body’s immune system attack cancer cells.

Bavencio received an Accelerated Approval, which enables the FDA to approve drugs for serious conditions to fill an unmet medical need using clinical trial data that is thought to predict a clinical benefit to patients. Further clinical trials are required to confirm Bavencio’s clinical benefit and the sponsor is currently conducting these studies.

Today’s approval of Bavencio was based on data from a single-arm trial of 88 patients with metastatic MCC who had been previously treated with at least one prior chemotherapy regimen. The trial measured the percentage of patients who experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors (overall response rate) and, for patients with a response, the length of time the tumor was controlled (duration of response). Of the 88 patients who received Bavencio in the trial, 33 percent experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors. The response lasted for more than six months in 86 percent of responding patients and more than 12 months in 45 percent of responding patients.

Common side effects of Bavencio include fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, diarrhea, nausea, infusion-related reactions, rash, decreased appetite and swelling of the limbs (peripheral edema). The most common serious risks of Bavencio are immune-mediated, where the body’s immune system attacks healthy cells or organs, such as the lungs (pneumonitis), liver (hepatitis), colon (colitis), hormone-producing glands (endocrinopathies) and kidneys (nephritis). In addition, there is a risk of serious infusion-related reactions. Patients who experience severe or life-threatening infusion-related reactions should stop using Bavencio. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not take Bavencio because it may cause harm to a developing fetus or a newborn baby.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapydesignation. Bavencio also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted accelerated approval of Bavencio to EMD Serono Inc.

Image result for avelumab

Image result for avelumab

Avelumab
Monoclonal antibody
Type ?
Source Human
Legal status
Legal status
  • Investigational
Identifiers
CAS Number
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
KEGG

Avelumab (MSB0010718C) is a fully human monoclonal PD-L1 antibody of isotype IgG1, currently in development by Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany & Pfizer for use in immunotherapy, especially for treatment of Non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) .[1]

Mechanism of action

Avelumab binds to the PD ligand 1 and therefore inhibits binding to its receptor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1). Formation of a PD-1/PD-L1 receptor/ligand complex leads to inhibition of CD8+ T cells, and therefore inhibition of an immune reaction. Immunotherapy aims at ceasing this immune blockage by blocking those receptor ligand pairs. In the case of avelumab, the formation of PD-1/PDL1 ligand pairs is blocked and CD8+ T cell immune response should be increased. PD-1 itself has also been a target for immunotherapy.[2] Therefore, avelumab belongs to the group of Immune checkpoint blockade cancer therapies.

Clinical trials

As of May 2015, according to Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany & Pfizer, avelumab has been in Phase I clinical trials for bladder cancer, gastric cancer, head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, NSCLC, ovarian cancer and renal cancer. For Merkel-cell carcinoma, Phase II has been reached and for NSCLC there is also a study already in Phase III.[1]

Merkel-cell carcinoma

On March 23, 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to avelumab (BAVENCIO, EMD Serono, Inc.) for the treatment of adults and pediatric patients 12 years and older with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC).

Approval was based on data from an open-label, single-arm, multi-center clinical trial (JAVELIN Merkel 200 trial) demonstrating a clinically meaningful and durable overall response rate (ORR). All patients had histologically confirmed metastatic MCC with disease progression on or after chemotherapy administered for metastatic disease.

ORR was assessed by an independent review committee according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1. The ORR was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.3, 43.8), with 11% complete and 22% partial response rates. Among the 29 responding patients, the response duration ranged from 2.8 to 23.3+ months with 86% of responses durable for 6 months or longer. Responses were observed in patients regardless of PD-L1 tumor expression or presence of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

Safety data were evaluated in 1738 patients who received avelumab, 10 mg/kg, every 2 weeks. The most common serious adverse reactions to avelumab are immune-mediated adverse reactions (pneumonitis, hepatitis, colitis, adrenal insufficiency, hypo- and hyperthyroidism, diabetes mellitus, and nephritis) and life-threatening infusion reactions. Among the 88 patients enrolled in the JAVELIN Merkel 200 trial, the most common adverse reactions were fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, diarrhea, nausea, infusion-related reaction, rash, decreased appetite, and peripheral edema. Serious adverse reactions that occurred in more than one patient in the trial were acute kidney injury, anemia, abdominal pain, ileus, asthenia, and cellulitis.

The recommended dose and schedule of avelumab is 10 mg/kg as an intravenous infusion over 60 minutes every 2 weeks. All patients should receive premedication with an antihistamine and acetaminophen prior to the first four infusions of avelumab.

Full prescribing information for avelumab is available at: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2017/761049s000lbl.pdf

References

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Merck-Pfizer Alliance. “Merck-Pfizer Alliance Avelumab Fact Sheet” (PDF). Retrieved 2 December 2015.
  2. Jump up^ Hamid, O; Robert, C; Daud, A; Hodi, F. S.; Hwu, W. J.; Kefford, R; Wolchok, J. D.; Hersey, P; Joseph, R. W.; Weber, J. S.; Dronca, R; Gangadhar, T. C.; Patnaik, A; Zarour, H; Joshua, A. M.; Gergich, K; Elassaiss-Schaap, J; Algazi, A; Mateus, C; Boasberg, P; Tumeh, P. C.; Chmielowski, B; Ebbinghaus, S. W.; Li, X. N.; Kang, S. P.; Ribas, A (2013). “Safety and tumor responses with lambrolizumab (anti-PD-1) in melanoma”. New England Journal of Medicine. 369 (2): 134–44. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1305133. PMC 4126516Freely accessible. PMID 23724846.

//////////fda 2017, Bavencio, avelumab, EMD Serono Inc., Priority Review,  Breakthrough Therapy designation.  Orphan Drug designation, skin cancer

%d bloggers like this: