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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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NASTORAZEPIDE


imgNastorazepide.png

Nastorazepide (Z-360)
CAS: 209219-38-5
Chemical Formula: C29H36N4O5
Molecular Weight: 520.61994

UNII-R22TMY97SG; 209219-38-5;

Phase II, treatment of pancreatic cancer.

(R)-3-(3-(5-cyclohexyl-1-(3,3-dimethyl-2-oxobutyl)-2-oxo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzo[b][1,4]diazepin-3-yl)ureido)benzoic acid

Image result

Nastorazepide, also known as Z-360, is a selective, orally available, 1,5-benzodiazepine-derivative gastrin/cholecystokinin 2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist with potential antineoplastic activity. Z-360 binds to the gastrin/CCK-2 receptor, thereby preventing receptor activation by gastrin, a peptide hormone frequently associated with the proliferation of gastrointestinal and pancreatic tumor cells.

In January 2018, Zeria is developing nastorazepide calcium (phase II clinical trial), a CCK2 receptor antagonist, for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Zeria is developing nastorazepide calcium (Z-360), an oral CCK2 receptor (gastrin receptor) antagonist, for the potential treatment of pancreatic cancer. In September 2005, a phase Ib/IIa trial began in the UK for pancreatic cancer ,  in February 2008, the trial was completed ; in June 2008, data were presented . In March 2010, the drug was listed as being in phase II preparation in Europe ; in August 2011, this was still the case . In April 2014, a phase II trial began in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma in Japan, Korea and Taiwan. In November 2015, the drug was listed as being in phase II development

343326-69-2

Nastorazepide (calcium salt)

CAS No. : 343326-69-2

M.Wt:540.62Formula:C29H36N4O5Ca0.5

Cholecystokinin (CK) is a digestive hormone produced and released in the duodenum, jejunal membrane and is known to have actions such as secretion of secretion, constriction of the gallbladder, stimulation of insulin secretion and the like. C CK is also known to exist in high concentrations in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus and hippocampus, and it is also known that it has actions such as suppression of food intake, memory enhancement, anxiety action and the like. On the other hand, gastrin is a gastrointestinal hormone produced and released in G cells distributed in the pyloric region of the stomach, and it is known that it has gastric acid secretion action, contraction action of the gastric pyloric part and gallbladder, and the like. These C CK and gastrin have the same 5 amino acids at the C-terminus, and all express the action through the receptor. C CK receptors are classified into peripheral type C CK – A distributed in the ile, gall bladder and intestinal tract and central type C CK – B distributed in the brain. The gastrin receptor and the CKK – B receptor show similar properties in receptor binding experiments and sometimes called C CK 1 B / gastrin receptor due to high homology. These receptors, such as gastrin or a CCK-B receptor antagonist compound, are useful in the treatment of gastric ulcers, duodenal ulcers, gastritis, reflux esophagitis, splenitis, Zollinger-EUison syndrome, cavitary G cell hyperplasia, basal hyperplasia, Choleditis, gallstone stroke, gastrointestinal motility disorder, sensitive bowel syndrome, certain tumors, eating disorders, anxiety, panic disorder, depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, late onset dyskinesia, It is expected to be useful for treatment and prevention of La Tourette’s syndrome, addiction due to drug ingestion, and withdrawal symptoms. It is also expected that the induction of analgesia or the enhancement of induction of analgesia by opioid drugs is expected (Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 106, 171-180 (1995), Drugs of the Future, Vol. 18, 919-931 (1993), American Journal of Physiology, Vol.

As a gastrin receptor antagonist already, prolumide is known as a therapeutic agent for gastric ulcer and gastritis. However, proglumide has considerably low affinity for gastrin or CKK-B receptor and its therapeutic effect is weak. In addition, L – 3 6 4, 7 1 8 (Dibazepide, Japanese Unexamined Patent Publication No. 616366), L -3 6 5, 2 6 0 (Japanese Patent Laid-Open No. 6 3- 9), and the like, have been reported to exhibit either CKK-A receptor antagonism or CKK-B receptor antagonism. Furthermore, it is disclosed that a compound having a strong C 4 C – – B receptor antagonistic effect suppresses gastric acid secretion by pentagastrin stimulation (International Patent Publication WO 94/438, International Patent Publication WO 95/18110) , It is not always satisfactory and clinically applicable gastrin or CKK-B receptor antagonist has not yet been provided.

Compounds capable of strongly binding to gastrin or cholecystokinin receptors are expected for the prevention and treatment of diseases involving their respective receptors in the digestive tract and the central nervous system.

PRODUCT PATENT WO1998025911

Inventors Katsuo ShinozakiTomoyuki YonetaMasakazu MurataNaoyoshi MiuraKiyoto MaedaLess «
Applicant Zeria Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.

SYNTHESIS WO 2017030859

PATENT

WO 9825911

https://www.google.co.in/patents/WO1998025911A1?cl=und

PATENT

WO2017175854

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017175854&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=FullText

Compound A ((R) – (-) – 3- [3- (1-tert-butylcarbonylmethyl-2-oxo-5-cyclohexyl- 1,3,4,5-tetrahydro- 2H- 1,5-benzodiazepine -3-yl) ureido] benzoate) has the following structural formula and can be produced by the method described in Patent Document 1.
[Chemical formula 1]
Example 1
Compound A 20.0 g of amorphous substance was suspended in 253 mL of methanol. After dissolving by heating, it was cooled and the precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and washed with methanol. The obtained wet crystals were dried under reduced pressure.
1 H-NMR (DMSO-d 6 ) δ: 1.18 (18H, s), 1.10-2.03 (20H, m), 3.17 (12H, d), 3.19-3.29 (4H, m), 3.37-3.44 (2H, (2H, m), 7.07-7.12 (2H, m), 4.07-4.16 (4H, br)
IR (KBr) cm -1 : 2935 (2H, m), 7.15 (2H, t), 7.22-7.29 (4H, m), 7.50-7.56 (4H, m), 7.88 , 2361, 1648, 1553, 1497, 1388, 1219, 776
 The powder X-ray diffraction spectrum of the obtained crystal is shown in FIG. 2. From NMR, IR and FIG. 2, the obtained crystals were Compound AI type crystals.
Example 5
Compound A 50.0 g of amorphous material was suspended in 380 mL of isopropanol (IPA). After dissolving by heating, it was cooled and precipitated. Precipitated crystals were collected by filtration and washed with IPA to obtain wet crystals. This was dried under reduced pressure. The powder X-ray diffraction spectrum of the obtained crystal is shown in FIG.
1 H-NMR (DMSO-d 6 ) [delta]: 1.04 (24H, d), 1.18 (18H, s), 1.10-2.03 (20H, m), 3.16-3.28 (4H, m), 3.37-3.45 (2H, (2H, m), 7.07-7.12 (2H, m), 3.72-3.83 (4H, m), 4.33-4.43 (8H, m), 5.13 (2H, d), 6.71
IR (KBr) cm -1 : 2933 (2H, m), 7.15 (2H, t), 7.21-7.30 (4H, m), 7.48-7.54 (4H, m), 7.84 , 2361, 1653, 1553, 1498, 1394, 1219, 769
 From NMR, IR and FIG. 4, the obtained crystals were Compound AIII type crystals.

PATENT

WO-2018008569

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2018008569&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=FullText

Process for producing a calcium salt of a 1,5-benzodiazepine compound – nastorazepide calcium – a cholecystokinin CCK2 receptor antagonist. Useful for the treatment of gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Example 1
(1) (R) – (-) – 2-Oxo-3-tert-butoxycarbonylamino-5-cyclohexyl-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2H-1,5-benzodiazepine (compound 2)), 139.3 g of 1-chloropinacolone and 8.3 g of tetrabutylammonium bromide in 1432 ml of toluene was added dropwise 461 g of 30% sodium hydroxide aqueous solution at 10 ° C. or lower. After stirring for 1 hour, the aqueous layer was removed. To the toluene layer, 620 ml of water was added and the liquid was separated, and the toluene layer was used for the next step.
(2) 628.9 g of hydrochloric acid was added dropwise to the toluene layer obtained in the previous step at 30 ° C. or lower. After stirring for 30 minutes, liquid separation was carried out, and the aqueous layer was separated. It was neutralized with 908.5 g of 30% sodium hydroxide aqueous solution and extracted with 1432 ml of toluene. The toluene layer was separated with 620 g of a 20% sodium chloride aqueous solution, and toluene was distilled off under reduced pressure. (R) – (-) – 1 -tert-butylcarbonylmethyl-2-oxo-3-amino-5- cyclohexyl-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2H-1,5-benzodiazepine (Compound (6) ) Was obtained.
(3) The (R) – (-) – 1-tert-butylcarbonylmethyl-2-oxo-3-amino-5-cyclohexyl-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2H-1 , 5-benzodiazepine (Compound (6)), 221.8 g of 3-phenyloxycarbonylaminobenzoic acid, 174.5 g of triethylamine and 77.7 g of water were added and the mixture was stirred at 45 to 50 ° C. for 2 hours. To the reaction solution were added 1375 ml of ethanol and 930 ml of water, and 62.9 g of hydrochloric acid was added dropwise at 30 ° C. or lower. The precipitated crystals were centrifuged.
The obtained crystals were heated to dissolve in 4714 ml of ethanol at 60 ° C., and 2790 ml of water was added dropwise to precipitate crystals. The precipitated crystals were separated by centrifugation and dried under reduced pressure to give (R) – (-) – 3- [3- (1-tert-butylcarbonylmethyl-2-oxo-5-cyclohexyl- 5-tetrahydro-2H-1,5-benzodiazepin-3-yl) ureido] benzoic acid (Compound (5)) 0.5 ethanolate monohydrate 430.2 g.
(4) (R) – (-) – 3- [3- (1-tert-Butylcarbonylmethyl-2-oxo-5-cyclohexyl-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2H- 1,5-benzodiazepine -3-yl) ureido] benzoic acid (Compound (5)) 0.5 Ethanol solvate monohydrate 430.3 g was suspended in 1645 ml of isopropyl alcohol (IPA), sodium hydroxide 31.6 g / A solution of 934 ml of water was added dropwise to dissolve (a).
112.7 g of calcium chloride dihydrate was dissolved in 3012 ml of water. Here, the solution of (a) was added dropwise at 10 ° C. or lower. After dropping, the temperature was raised to 50 ° C., after stirring for 2 hours, it was cooled to 10 ° C. or lower. The precipitated powder was centrifuged and washed with a mixed solution of IPA 658 ml / water 2065 ml, followed by 4303 ml of water and dried under reduced pressure to give (R) – (-) – 3- [3- (1-tert- Oxo-5-cyclohexyl-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2H-1,5-benzodiazepin-3-yl) ureido] benzoate (compound (1)). The powder X-ray diffraction spectrum was measured (as 7% water content), and the obtained compound (1) was amorphous.
Example 2 In
step (4) of Example 1, investigation was carried out by changing the amount of the solvent and sodium hydroxide.
First, when the IPA / water ratio is 1 / 2.5 to 1/10, preferably 1 / 2.75 to 1/8, more preferably 1 / 2.75 to 1/5, the compound (1 ) Amorphous can be stably obtained.
Next, when the amount of sodium hydroxide is 1.0 to 1.10 mol with respect to the compound (1) and the amount of calcium chloride is 0.5 to 1.5 mol with respect to the compound (1), the amount of the compound 1) can be obtained in high yield.
Further, it was found that impurities are not produced when the reaction temperature of the compound (1) and sodium hydroxide in the step (4) is 20 ° C. or less, more preferably 10 ° C. or less, further preferably 0 to 10 ° C.
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2008161293 Antitumor Agent
2008-07-03
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2015038495 THERAPEUTIC AGENT FOR PAIN
2014-09-24
2015-02-05
US2011059956 THERAPEUTIC AGENT FOR PAIN
2011-03-10
US2017151256 ANTITUMOR AGENT
2017-02-10
US2010143366 ANTITUMOR AGENT
2010-06-10
US2010086553 ANTITUMOR AGENT
2010-04-08
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US6747022 Calcium salts of 1, 5-benzodiazepine derivatives, process for producing the salts and drugs containing the same
2003-05-22
2004-06-08
US6239131 1, 5 Benzodiazepine derivatives
2001-05-29
EP0945445 1, 5-BENZODIAZEPINE DERIVATIVES 1, 5-BENZODIAZEPINE DERIVATIVES
1999-09-29
2005-12-28
US2015050212 CHOLECYSTOKININ B RECEPTOR TARGETING FOR IMAGING AND THERAPY
2013-02-22
2015-02-19
US2012010401 METHOD FOR MANUFACTURING 1, 5-BENZODIAZEPINE DERIVATIVE
2012-01-12

1: Kato H, Seto K, Kobayashi N, Yoshinaga K, Meyer T, Takei M. CCK-2/gastrin receptor signaling pathway is significant for gemcitabine-induced gene expression of VEGF in pancreatic carcinoma cells. Life Sci. 2011 Oct 24;89(17-18):603-8. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2011.07.019. Epub 2011 Aug 3. PubMed PMID: 21839751.

////////////NASTORAZEPIDE, phase II, treatment of pancreatic cancer,

O=C(O)C1=CC=CC(NC(N[C@@H]2CN(C3CCCCC3)C4=CC=CC=C4N(CC(C(C)(C)C)=O)C2=O)=O)=C1

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TRILACICLIB, G1T28


ChemSpider 2D Image | Trilaciclib | C24H30N8OTrilaciclib.png

Trilaciclib

  • Molecular FormulaC24H30N8O
  • Average mass446.548 Da
  • G1T 28
CAS 1374743-00-6
2′-{[5-(4-Methyl-1-piperazinyl)-2-pyridinyl]amino}-7′,8′-dihydro-6’H-spiro[cyclohexane-1,9′-pyrazino[1′,2′:1,5]pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin]-6′-one
G1T28, SHR 6390
Spiro[cyclohexane-1,9′(6’H)-pyrazino[1′,2′:1,5]pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin]-6′-one, 7′,8′-dihydro-2′-[[5-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-2-pyridinyl]amino]-
  • 7′,8′-Dihydro-2′-[[5-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-2-pyridinyl]amino]spiro[cyclohexane-1,9′(6’H)-pyrazino[1′,2′:1,5]pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin]-6′-one
  • 2′-[[5-(4-Methylpiperazin-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl]amino}-7′,8′-dihydro-6’H-spiro[cyclohexane-1,9′-pyrazino[1′,2′:1,5]pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin]-6′-one
UNII:U6072DO9XG

Reduction of Chemotherapy-Induced Myelosuppression

Trilaciclib dihydrochloride
1977495-97-8

2D chemical structure of 1977495-97-8

In phase II clinical development as a chemoprotectant at G1 Therapeutics for first- or second-line treatment in patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer, in combination with gemcitabine and carboplatin

logo

PATENT, WO 2014144326Compound 89 (also referred to as Compound T)

WO2014144847A3
Inventors Norman E. SharplessJay Copeland StrumJohn Emerson BisiPatrick Joseph RobertsFrancis Xavier Tavares
Applicant G1 Therapeutics, Inc.
Norman Sharpless
Norman Sharpless official photo.jpg
Born Norman Edward Sharpless
September 20, 1966 (age 51)
Greensboro, North Carolina
Nationality American
Other names Ned Sharpless
Occupation Director, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center Founder, G1 Therapeutics ($GTHX)
Notable work Wellcome Distinguished Professor, American Society of Clinical Investigation Member, Association of American Cancer Institute board of directors,

NCI Director Dr. Norman E. SharplessPinterest

NCI Director Dr. Norman E. Sharpless, Credit: National Institutes of Health

Norman E. “Ned” Sharpless, M.D., was officially sworn in as the 15th director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on October 17, 2017. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Sharpless served as the director of the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a position he held since January 2014.

Dr. Sharpless was a Morehead Scholar at UNC–Chapel Hill and received his undergraduate degree in mathematics. He went on to pursue his medical degree from the UNC School of Medicine, graduating with honors and distinction in 1993. He then completed his internal medicine residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and a hematology/oncology fellowship at Dana-Farber/Partners Cancer Care, both of Harvard Medical School in Boston.

After 2 years on the faculty at Harvard Medical School, he joined the faculty of the UNC School of Medicine in the Departments of Medicine and Genetics in 2002. He became the Wellcome Professor of Cancer Research at UNC in 2012.

Dr. Sharpless is a member of the Association of American Physicians as well as the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI), the nation’s oldest honor society for physician–scientists, and served on the ASCI council from 2011 to 2014. Dr. Sharpless was an associate editor of Aging Cell and deputy editor of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has authored more than 150 original scientific papers, reviews, and book chapters, and is an inventor on 10 patents. He cofounded two clinical-stage biotechnology companies: G1 Therapeutics and HealthSpan Diagnostics.

In addition to serving as director of NCI, Dr. Sharpless continues his research in understanding the biology of the aging process that promotes the conversion of normal self-renewing cells into dysfunctional cancer cells. Dr. Sharpless has made seminal contributions to the understanding of the relationship between aging and cancer, and in the preclinical development of novel therapeutics for melanoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer.

Record ID Title Status Phase
NCT03041311 CarboplatinEtoposide, and Atezolizumab With or Without Trilaciclib (G1T28), a CDK 4/6 Inhibitor, in Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Recruiting 2
NCT02978716 Trilaciclib (G1T28), a CDK 4/6 Inhibitor, in Combination With Gemcitabineand Carboplatin in Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer (mTNBC) Recruiting 2
NCT02514447 Trilaciclib (G1T28), a CDK 4/6 Inhibitor, in Patients With Previously Treated Extensive Stage SCLC Receiving Topotecan Chemotherapy Recruiting 2
NCT02499770 Trilaciclib (G1T28), a CDK 4/6 Inhibitor, in Combination With Etoposide and Carboplatin in Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Active, not recruiting 2

Synthesis

WO  2016040858

Trilaciclib (G1T28)

Trilaciclib is a potential first-in-class short-acting CDK4/6 inhibitor in development to preserve hematopoietic stem cells and enhance immune system function during chemotherapy. Trilaciclib is administered intravenously prior to chemotherapy and has the potential to significantly improve treatment outcomes.

G1 is currently evaluating trilaciclib in four Phase 2 clinical trials: three studies in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), and one study in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Preliminary data from the SCLC trials were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2017 Annual Meeting and at the 2016 World Conference on Lung Cancer.

Data from a Phase 1 trial in healthy volunteers were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology 2015 Annual Meeting and published in Science Translational Medicine. Trilacicilib has been extensively studied in animals; these preclinical data have been presented at several scientific meetings and published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics, Science Translational Medicine, and Cancer Discovery.

Trilaciclib is a small molecule, competitive inhibitor of cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6), with potential antineoplastic and chemoprotective activities. Upon intravenous administration, trilaciclib binds to and inhibits the activity of CDK4/6, thereby blocking the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) in early G1. This prevents G1/S phase transition, causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, induces apoptosis, and inhibits the proliferation of CDK4/6-overexpressing tumor cells. In patients with CDK4/6-independent tumor cells, G1T28 may protect against multi-lineage chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression (CIM) by transiently and reversibly inducing G1 cell cycle arrest in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and preventing transition to the S phase. This protects all hematopoietic lineages, including red blood cells, platelets, neutrophils and lymphocytes, from the DNA-damaging effects of certain chemotherapeutics and preserves the function of the bone marrow and the immune system. CDKs are serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of the cell cycle and may be overexpressed in certain cancer cell types. HSPCs are dependent upon CDK4/6 for proliferation.

Trilaciclib (G1T28) is a CDK4/6 inhibitor in phase II clinical development as a chemoprotectant at G1 Therapeutics for first- or second-line treatment in patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer, in combination with gemcitabine and carboplatin. Also, phase II trials are ongoing in newly diagnosed, treatment-naive small-cell lung cancer patients, in combination with carboplatin, etoposide, and atezolizumab and phase I trials in previously treated small-cell lung cancer patients, in combination with topotecan.

U.S. Patent Nos. 8,822,683; 8,598,197; 8,598,186, 8,691,830, 8,829,102, 8,822,683, 9, 102,682, 9,499,564, 9,481,591, and 9,260,442, filed by Tavares and Strum and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describe a class of N-(heteroaryl)-pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidin-2-amine cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors including those of the formula with variables as defined therein):

U.S. Patent Nos. 9,464,092, 9,487,530, and 9,527,857 which are also assigned to Gl Therapeutics describe the use of the above pyrimidine-based agents in the treatment of cancer.

These patents provide a general synthesis of the compounds that is based on a coupling reaction of a fused chloropyrimidine with a heteroaryl amine to form the central disubstituted amine. Such coupling reactions are sometimes referred to as Buchwald coupling (see WO Ί56 paragraph 127; reference WO 2010/020675). The lactam of the fused chloropyrimidine, for example, a 2-chloro-spirocyclo-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-one such as Intermediate K as shown below can be prepared by dehydration of the corresponding carboxylic acid. The reported process to prepare intermediate IK requires seven steps.


(Intermediate IK; page 60, paragraph 215 of WO Ί56)

WO 2013/148748 (U.S. S.N. 61/617,657) entitled “Lactam Kinase Inhibitors” filed by Tavares, and also assigned to Gl Therapeutics likewise describes the synthesis of N-(heteroaryl)-pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidin-2-amines via the coupling reaction of a fused chloropyrimidine with a heteroaryl amine to form the central disubstituted amine.

WO 2013/163239 (U.S. S.N. 61/638,491) “Synthesis of Lactams” describes a method for the synthesis of this class of compounds with the variation that in the lactam preparation step, a carboxylic acid can be cyclized with a protected amine in the presence of a strong acid and a dehydrating agent, which can be together in one moiety as a strong acid anhydride. The purported improvement is that cyclization can occur without losing the protecting group on the amine before cyclization. The typical leaving group is “tBOC” (t-butoxycarbonyl). The application teaches (page 2 of WO 2013/163239) that the strong acid is, for example, trifluoroacetic acid anhydride, tribromoacetic acid anhydride, trichloroacetic acid anhydride or mixed anhydrides. An additional step may be necessary to take off the N-protecting group. The dehydrating agent can be a carbodiimide-based compound such as DCC (Ν,Ν-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide), EDC (l-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide, or DIC (Ν,Ν-diisopropylcarbodiimide). DCC and DIC are in the same class of reagents-carbodiimides. DIC is sometimes considered better because it is a liquid at room temperature, which facilitates reactions.

WO 2015/061407 filed by Tavares and licensed to Gl Therapeutics also describes the synthesis of these compounds via the coupling of a fused chloropyrimidine with a heteroaryl amine to form the central disubstituted amine. WO ‘407 focuses on the lactam production step and in particular describes that the fused lactams of these compounds can be prepared by treating the carboxylic acid with an acid and a dehydrating agent in a manner that a leaving group on the amine is not removed during the amide-forming ring closing step.

Other publications that describe compounds of this general class include the following. WO 2014/144326 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes compounds and methods for protection of normal cells during chemotherapy using pyrimidine based CDK4/6 inhibitors. WO 2014/144596 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes compounds and methods for protection of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells against ionizing radiation using pyrimidine based CDK4/6 inhibitors. WO 2014/144847 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes HSPC-sparing treatments of abnormal cellular proliferation using pyrimidine based CDK4/6 inhibitors. WO2014/144740 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes highly active anti -neoplastic and anti-proliferative pyrimidine based CDK 4/6 inhibitors. WO 2015/161285 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes tricyclic pyrimidine based CDK inhibitors for use in radioprotection. WO 2015/161287 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes analogous tricyclic pyrimidine based CDK inhibitors for the protection of cells during chemotherapy. WO 2015/161283 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes analogous tricyclic pyrimidine based CDK inhibitors for use in HSPC-sparing treatments of RB-positive abnormal cellular proliferation. WO 2015/161288 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes analogous tricyclic pyrimidine based CDK inhibitors for use as anti -neoplastic and anti-proliferative agents. WO 2016/040858 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes the use of combinations of pyrimidine based CDK4/6 inhibitors with other anti-neoplastic agents. WO 2016/040848 filed by Strum et al. and assigned to Gl Therapeutics describes compounds and methods for treating certain Rb-negative cancers with CDK4/6 inhibitors and topoisomerase inhibitors.

Other biologically active fused spirolactams and their syntheses are described, for example, in the following publications. Griffith, D. A., et al. (2013). “Spirolactam-Based Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitors: Toward Improved Metabolic Stability of a Chromanone Lead Structure.” Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 56(17): 7110-7119, describes metabolically stable spirolactams wherein the lactam resides on the fused ring for the inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. WO 2013/169574 filed by Bell et al. describes aliphatic spirolactams as CGRP receptor antagonists wherein the lactam resides on the spiro ring. WO 2007/061677 filed by Bell et al. describes aryl spirolactams as CGRP receptor antagonists wherein the lactam resides on the spiro ring. WO 2008/073251 filed by Bell et al. describes constrained spirolactam compounds wherein the lactam resides on the spiro ring as CGRP receptor antagonists. WO 2006/031606 filed by Bell et al. describes carboxamide spirolactam compounds wherein the spirolactam resides on the spiro ring as CGRP receptor antagonists. WO 2006/031610, WO 2006/031491, and WO 2006/029153 filed by Bell et al. describe anilide spirolactam compounds wherein the spirolactam resides on the spiro ring; WO 2008/109464 filed by Bhunai et al. describes spirolactam compounds wherein the lactam resides on the spiro ring which is optionally further fused.

Given the therapeutic activity of selected N-(heteroaryl)-pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidin-2-amines, it would be useful to have additional methods for their preparation. It would also be useful to have new intermediates that can be used to prepare this class of compounds.

PATENT

WO 2014144596

PATENT

WO 2014144326

Compound 89 (also referred to as Compound T)

WO2014144847A3
Inventors Norman E. SharplessJay Copeland StrumJohn Emerson BisiPatrick Joseph RobertsFrancis Xavier Tavares
Applicant G1 Therapeutics, Inc.

EXAMPLES

Intermediates B, E, K, L, 1A, IF and 1CA were synthesized according to US 8,598,186 entitled CDK Inhibitors to Tavares, F.X. and Strum, J.C..

The patents WO 2013/148748 entitled Lactam Kinase Inhibitors to Tavares, F.X., WO 2013/163239 entitled Synthesis of Lactams to Tavares, F.X., and US 8,598,186 entitled CDK Inhibitors to Tavares, F.X. and Strum, J.C. are incorporated by reference herein in their entirety. Example 1

Synthesis of tert-butyl N- [2- [(5-bromo-2-chloro-pyrimidin-4yl)amino] ethyl] carbamate, Compound 1

Figure imgf000106_0001

To a solution of 5-bromo-2,4-dichloropyrimidine (3.2 g, 0.0135 mol) in ethanol (80 mL) was added Hunig’s base (3.0 mL) followed by the addition of a solution of N-(tert- butoxycarbonyl)-l,2-diaminoethane (2.5 g, 0.0156 mole) in ethanol (20 mL). The contents were stirred overnight for 20 hrs. The solvent was evaporated under vacuum. Ethyl acetate (200 mL) and water (100 mL) were added and the layers separated. The organic layer was dried with magnesium sulfate and then concentrated under vacuum. Column chromatography on silica gel using hexane/ethyl acetate (0- 60%) afforded tert-butyl N-[2-[(5-bromo-2-chloro-pyrimidin-4- yl)amino]ethyl]carbamate. 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 8.21 (s, 1H), 7.62 (brs, 1H), 7.27 (brs, 1H), 3.39 (m, 2H), 3.12 (m, 2H), 1.34 (s, 9H). LCMS (ESI) 351 (M + H).

Example 2

Synthesis of tert-butyl N-[2-[[2-chloro-5-(3,3-diethoxyprop-l-ynyl)pyrimidin-4- yl] amino] ethyl] carbamate, Compound 2

Figure imgf000106_0002

To tert-butyl N-[2-[(5-bromo-2-chloro-pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]ethyl]carbamate (1.265 g, 6 mmol) in THF (10 mL) was added the acetal (0.778 mL, 5.43 mmol), Pd(dppf)CH2Cl2 (148 g), and triethylamine (0.757 mL, 5.43 mmol). The contents were degassed and then purged with nitrogen. To this was then added Cul (29 mg). The reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 48 hrs. After cooling, the contents were filtered over CELITE™ and concentrated. Column chromatography of the resulting residue using hexane/ethyl acetate (0- 30%) afforded tert-butyl N- [2- [ [2-chloro-5 -(3 ,3 -diethoxyprop- 1 -ynyl)pyrimidin-4-yl]amino] ethyl] carbamate. 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 8.18 (s, 1H), 7.63 (brs, 1H), 7.40 (brs, 1H), 5.55 (s, 1H), 3.70 (m, 2H), 3.60 (m, 2H), 3.42 (m, 2H), 3.15 (m, 2H), 1.19 – 1.16 (m, 15H). LCMS (ESI) 399 (M + H).

Example 3

Synthesis of tert-butyl N-[2-[2-chloro-6-(diethoxymethyl)pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7- yl] ethyl] carbamate, Compound 3

Figure imgf000107_0001

To a solution of the coupled product (2.1 g, 0.00526 mole) in THF (30 mL) was added TBAF solid (7.0 g). The contents were heated to and maintained at 65 degrees for 2 hrs. Concentration followed by column chromatography using ethyl acetate/hexane (0-50%) afforded tert-butyl N-[2-[2-chloro-6-(diethoxymethyl)pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]ethyl]carbamate as a pale brown liquid (1.1 g). 1FiNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 8.88 (s, 1H), 6.95 (brs, 1H), 6.69 (s, 1H), 5.79 (s, 1H), 4.29 (m, 2H), 3.59 (m, 4H), 3.34 (m, 1H), 3.18 (m, 1H), 1.19 (m, 9H), 1.17 (m, 6H). LCMS (ESI) 399 (M + H).

Example 4

Synthesis of tert-buty\ N-[2-(2-chloro-6-formyl-pyrrolo [2,3-d] pyrimidin-7- yl)ethyl] carbamate, Compound 4

Figure imgf000108_0001

To the acetal (900 mg) from the preceeding step was added AcOH (8.0 mL) and water

(1.0 mL). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 16 hrs. Cone, and column chromatography over silica gel using ethyl acetate/hexanes (0- 60%) afforded tert-butyl N-[2-(2- chloro-6-formyl-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)ethyl]carbamate as a foam (0.510 g). 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 9.98 (s, 1H), 9.18 (s, 1H), 7.66 (s, 1H), 6.80 (brs, 1H), 4.52 (m, 2H), 4.36 (m, 2H), 1.14 (s, 9H). LCMS (ESI) 325 (M + H).

Example 5

Synthesis of 7- [2-(teri-butoxycarbonylamino)ethyl] -2-chloro-pyrrolo [2,3-d] pyrimidine-6- carboxylic acid, Compound 5

Figure imgf000108_0002

To the aldehyde (0.940 g) from the preceeding step in DMF (4 mL) was added oxone (1.95 g, 1.1 eq). The contents were stirred at room temp for 7 hrs. Silica gel column chromatography using hexane/ethyl acetate (0- 100%) afforded l-\2-(tert- butoxycarbonylamino)ethyl]-2-chloro-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid (0.545 g). 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 9.11 (s, 1H), 7.39 (s, 1H), 4.38 (m, 2H), 4.15 (m, 2H), 1.48 (m, 9H). LCMS (ESI) 341(M + H).

Example 6

Synthesis of methyl 7-[2-(teri-butoxycarbonylamino)ethyl]-2-chloro-pyrrolo[2,3- d]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate, Compound 6

Figure imgf000109_0001

To a solution of 2-chloro-7-propyl-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-6-carboxylic acid (0.545 g, 0.00156 mole) from the preceeding step in toluene (3.5 mL) and MeOH (1 mL) was added TMS- diazomethane (1.2 mL). After stirring overnight at room temperature, the excess of TMS- diazomethane was quenched with acetic acid (3 mL) and the reaction was concentrated under vacuum. The residue was purified by silica gel column chromatography with hexane/ethyl acetate (0- 70%) to afford methyl 7-[2-(tert-butoxycarbonylamino)ethyl]-2-chloro-pyrrolo[2,3- d]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate as an off white solid (0.52 g). 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 9.10 (s, 1H), 7.45 (s, 1H), 6.81 (brs, 1H) 4.60 (m, 2H), 3.91 (s, 3H), 3.29 (m, 2H), 1.18 (m, 9H) LCMS (ESI) 355 (M + H).

Example 7

Synthesis of Chloro tricyclic amide, Compound 7

Figure imgf000109_0002

To methyl 7- [2-(tert-butoxycarbonylamino)ethyl] -2-chloro-pyrrolo [2,3 -d]pyrimidine-6- carboxylate (0.50 g, 0.0014 mole) from the preceeding step in dichloromethane (2.0 mL) was added TFA (0.830 mL). The contents were stirred at room temperature for 1 hr. Concentration under vacuum afforded the crude amino ester which was suspended in toluene (5 mL) and Hunig’s base (0.5 mL). The contents were heated at reflux for 2 hrs. Concentration followed by silica gel column chromatography using hexane/ethyl acetate (0- 50%) afforded the desired chloro tricyclic amide (0.260 g). 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 9.08 (s, 1H), 8.48 (brs, 1H), 7.21 (s, 1H) 4.33 (m, 2H), 3.64 (m, 2H). LCMS (ESI) 223 (M + H).

Example 8

Synthesis of chloro-N-methyltricyclic amide, Compound 8

Figure imgf000110_0001

To a solution of the chloro tricycliclactam, Compound 7, (185 mg, 0.00083 mole) in DMF (2.0 mL) was added sodium hydride (55% dispersion in oil, 52 mg). After stirring for 15 mins, methyl iodide (62 μί, 1.2 eq). The contents were stirred at room temperature for 30 mins. After the addition of methanol (5 mL), sat NaHCOs was added followed by the addition of ethyl acetate. Separation of the organic layer followed by drying with magnesium sulfate and concentration under vacuum afforded the N-methylated amide in quantitative yield. 1FiNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 9.05 (s, 1H), 7.17 (s, 1H) 4.38 (m, 2H), 3.80 (m, 2H), 3.05 (s, 3H). LCMS (ESI) 237 (M + H). Example 9

Synthesis of l-methyl-4-(6-nitro-3-pyridyl)piperazine, Compound 9

Figure imgf000110_0002

To 5-bromo-2-nitropyridine (4.93 g, 24.3 mmole) in DMF (20 mL) was added N- methylpiperazine (2.96 g, 1.1 eq) followed by the addition of DIPEA (4.65 mL, 26.7 mmole). The contents were heated at 90 degrees for 24 hrs. After addition of ethyl acetate (200 mL), water (100 mL) was added and the layers separated. Drying followed by concentration afforded the crude product which was purified by silica gel column chromatography using (0-10%) DCM/Methanol. 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 8.26 (s, 1H), 8.15 (1H, d, J = 9.3 Hz), 7.49 (1H, d, J = 9.4 Hz), 3.50 (m, 4H), 2.49 (m, 4H), 2.22 (s, 3H).

Example 10

Synthesis of 5-(4-methylpiperazin-l-yl)pyridin-2-amine, Compound 10

Figure imgf000111_0001

To l-methyl-4-(6-nitro-3-pyridyl)piperazine (3.4 g) in ethyl acetate (100 mL) and ethanol (100 mL) was added 10%> Pd/C (400 mg) and then the reaction was stirred under hydrogen (10 psi) overnight. After filtration through CELITE™, the solvents were evaporated and the crude product was purified by silica gel column chromatography using DCM/ 7N ammonia in MeOH (0- 5%) to afford 5-(4-methylpiperazin-l-yl)pyridin-2-amine (2.2 g). 1HNMR (d6-DMSO) δ ppm 7.56 (1H, d, J = 3 Hz), 7.13 (1H, m), 6.36 (1H, d, J = 8.8 Hz), 5.33 (brs, 2H), 2.88 (m, 4H), 2.47 (m, 4H), 2.16 (s, 3H).

Example 11

Synthesis of tert-butyl 4-(6-amino-3-pyridyl)piperazine-l-carboxylate, Compound 11

Figure imgf000111_0002

This compound was prepared as described in WO 2010/020675 Al .

Synthesis of Compound 89 (also referred to as Compound T)

Figure imgf000169_0002

Compound 89 was synthesized in a similar manner to that described for compound 78 and was converted to an HCl salt. 1HNMR (600 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ ppm 1.47 (br. s., 6 H) 1.72 (br. s., 2 H) 1.92 (br. s., 2 H) 2.77 (br. s., 3 H) 3.18 (br. s., 2 H) 3.46 (br. s., 2 H) 3.63 (br. s., 2 H) 3.66 (d, J=6.15 Hz, 2 H) 3.80 (br. s., 2 H) 7.25 (s, 1 H) 7.63 (br. s., 2 H) 7.94 (br. s., 1 H) 8.10 (br. s., 1 H) 8.39 (br. s., 1 H) 9.08 (br. s., 1 H) 11.59 (br. s., 1 H). LCMS (ESI) 447 (M + H)

PATENT

WO 2014144740

PATENT

WO 2016040858

Preparation of Active Compounds

Syntheses

The disclosed compounds can be made by the following general schemes:

Scheme 1

In Scheme 1, Ref-1 is WO 2010/020675 Al; Ref-2 is White, J. D.; et al. J. Org. Chem. 1995, 60, 3600; and Ref-3 Presser, A. and Hufher, A. Monatshefte fir Chemie 2004, 135, 1015.

Scheme 2

In Scheme 2, Ref-1 is WO 2010/020675 Al; Ref-4 is WO 2005/040166 Al; and Ref-5 is Schoenauer, K and Zbiral, E. Tetrahedron Letters 1983, 24, 573.

92

93 

3) Pd/C/H2 

Scheme 6

Scheme 7

NHfOH

Scheme 8

In Scheme 8, Ref-1 is WO 2010/020675 Al; Ref-2 is WO 2005/040166 Al; and Ref-3 is Schoenauer, K and Zbiral, E. Tetrahedron Letters 1983, 24, 573.

Alternatively, the lactam can be generated by reacting the carboxylic acid with a protected amine in the presence of a strong acid and a dehydrating agent, which can be together in one moiety as a strong acid anhydride. Examples of strong acid anhydrides include, but are not limited to, trifluoroacetic acid anhydride, tribromoacetic acid anhydride, trichloroacetic acid anhydride, or mixed anhydrides. The dehydrating agent can be a carbodiimide based compound such as but not limited to DCC (Ν,Ν-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide), EDC (l-ethyl-3-(3-

dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide or DIC (Ν,Ν-diisopropylcarbodiimide). An additional step may be necessary to take off the N-protecting group and the methodologies are known to those skilled in the art.

Alternatively, the halogen moiety bonded to the pyrimidine ring can be substituted with any leaving group that can be displaced by a primary amine, for example to create an intermediate for a final product such as Br, I, F, SMe, SO2Me, SOalkyl, SO2alkyl. See, for Exmaple PCT /US2013/037878 to Tavares.

Other amine intermediates and final amine compounds can be synthesized by those skilled in the art. It will be appreciated that the chemistry can employ reagents that comprise reactive functionalities that can be protected and de-protected and will be known to those skilled in the art at the time of the invention. See for example, Greene, T.W. and Wuts, P.G.M., Greene’s Protective Groups in Organic Synthesis, 4th edition, John Wiley and Sons.

Scheme 9

CDK4/6 Inhibitors of the present invention can be synthesized according to the generalized Scheme 9. Specific synthesis and characterization of the Substituted 2-aminopyrmidines can be found in, for instance, WO2012/061156.

Compounds T, Q, GG, and U were prepared as above and were characterized by mass spectrometry and NMR as shown below:

Compound T

1H NMR (600 MHz, DMSO- d6) ppm 1.47 (br. s., 6 H) 1.72 (br. s., 2 H) 1.92 (br. s., 2 H) 2.77 (br. s., 3 H) 3.18 (br. s., 2 H) 3.46 (br. s., 2 H) 3.63 (br. s., 2 H) 3.66 (d, J=6.15 Hz, 2 H) 3.80 (br. s., 2 H) 7.25 (s, 1 H) 7.63 (br. s., 2 H) 7.94 (br. s., 1 H) 8.10 (br. s., 1 H) 8.39 (br. s., 1 H) 9.08 (br. s., 1 H) 11.59 (br. s., 1 H). LCMS ESI (M + H) 447.

PATENT

WO-2018005865

Synthesis of N-(heteroaryl)-pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidin-2-amines. The application appears to be particularly focused on methods for the preparation of trilaciclib and an analog of it. Trilaciclib is the company’s lead CDK4/6 inhibitor presently in phase II trials against small-cell lung cancer and triple negative breast cancer. Interestingly, the company is working on a second CDK4/6 inhibitor, G1T38 , which is in a phase II trial against breast cancer.

GENERAL METHODS

The structure of starting materials, intermediates, and final products was confirmed by standard analytical techniques, including NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Unless otherwise noted, reagents and solvents were used as received from commercial suppliers. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained on a Bruker AVANCE 500 at 500 MHz in DMSO-dis. HPLC analyses were performed on a Waters HPLC using the below HPLC method.

HPLC Method

Column: Atlantis T3 (150 χ 4.6, 3 μιη)

Column Temperature: 40°C

Flow Rate: 1 mL/min

Detection: UV @ 275 nm

Analysis Time: 36 min

Mobile Phase A: Water (with 0.1% Trifluoroacetic Acid)

Mobile Phase B : Acetonitrile (with 0.1% Trifluoroacetic Acid)

Sample preparation: dissolve PC sample, wet or dry solid (~1 mg of active compound) in acetonitrile/water (1/1) to achieve complete dissolution.

HPLC Method Gradient

Example 1. General Routes of Synthesis

Scheme 1-1 : Starting from an appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine, compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 the appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine is subjected to l,4-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-3-one in the presence of base and heat to afford a substituted spirolactam. In Step 2 the appropriately substituted spirolactam is protected with a group selected from R2. In Step 3 the protected spirolactam is cyclized in the presence of base to afford a fused spirolactam. The fused spirolactam can be optionally oxidized to a sulfoxide or sulfone after Step 3, Step 4, Step 5, or Step 6. Oxidation prior to Step 3 results in undesired byproducts. In Step 4 the hydroxyl group of the fused spirolactam is converted to a leaving group.

In Step 5 the leaving group is dehydrated to afford a compound of Formula IV. In Step 6 the compound of Formula IV is optionally deprotected.

Scheme 1-2: Starting from an appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 the appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine is subjected to l,4-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-3-one in the presence of base and heat to afford a substituted spirolactam. In Step 2 the appropriately substituted spirolactam is protected with a group selected from R2. In Step 3 the protected spirolactam is cyclized in the presence of base to afford a fused spirolactam of Formula IV. The fused spirolactam can be optionally oxidized to a sulfoxide or sulfone after Step 3 or Step 4. Oxidation prior to Step 3 results in undesired byproducts. In Step 4 the compound of Formula IV is optionally deprotected.

Scheme 1-3 : Starting from an appropriately substituted alkyl glycinate, compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 the appropriately substituted alkyl glycinate is subjected to cyclohexanone and TMSCN in the presence of base to afford a cyano species. In Step 2 the appropriately substituted cyanospecies is reduced and subsequently cyclized to afford a compound of Formula I.

Scheme 1-4

Scheme 1-4: Starting from an appropriately substituted l-(aminomethyl)cyclohexan-l-amine, compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 the appropriately substituted l-(aminomethyl)cyclohexan-l -amine is reductively aminated with an aldehyde. In Step 2 the appropriately substituted cyclohexane amine is optionally deprotected (i.e.: the group selected from R2 if not H is optionally replaced by H). In Step 3 the cyclohexane amine is cyclized to afford a compound of Formula I. In Step 4 the compound of Formula I is optionally protected.

1-5

Conversion

Scheme 1-5: Starting from an appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine, compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 the appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine is subjected to l,4-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-3-one in the presence of base and heat to afford a

substituted spirolactam. In Step 2 the protected spirolactam is cyclized in the presence of base to afford a fused spirolactam. The fused spirolactam can be optionally oxidized to a sulfoxide or sulfone after Step 2, Step 3, Step 4, or Step 5. Oxidation prior to Step 2 results in undesired byproducts. In Step 3 the hydroxyl group of the fused spirolactam is converted to a leaving group. In Step 4 the leaving group is dehydrated to afford a compound of Formula IV. In Step 5 the compound of Formula IV is optionally deprotected.

S

Scheme 1-6: Starting from an appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 the appropriately substituted halo pyrimidine is subjected to l,4-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-3-one in the presence of base and heat to afford a substituted spirolactam. In Step 2 the protected spirolactam is cyclized in the presence of base to afford a fused spirolactam of Formula IV. The fused spirolactam can be optionally oxidized to a sulfoxide or sulfone after Step 2 or Step 3. Oxidation prior to Step 2 results in undesired byproducts. In Step 3 the compound of Formula IV is optionally deprotected.

Scheme 1-7: Starting from compound of Formula IV a CDK4/6 inhibitor can be prepared. In Step 1 a heteroaryl amine is subjected to a base and a compound of Formula IV is added slowly under chilled conditions to afford a nucleophilic substitution reaction. The compound of Formula IV can previously be prepared as described in the schemes herein.

Example 2. Representative Routes of Synthesis

Scheme 2-1

quant, yield 2 steps

isolated

70% yield 2 steps 75% yield 95% yield

isolated isolated isolated

Scheme 2-1 : An ester route is one embodiment, of the present invention. Ideally, the best synthesis scheme would afford crystalline intermediates to provide material of consistent purity without column chromatography, and high yielding steps while using safe and cost effective reagents when possible.

The first step in the ester route is a SNAr nucleophilic substitution of CI group in commercially available ester 3 using spirolactam 4. Due to low reactivity of 4, a reaction temperature of 85-95 °C was required. Because of the temperature requirements, DIPEA and dimethylacetamide were selected as the base and solvent, respectively. The reaction follows second-order kinetics and usually stalls after -85% conversion. Therefore, the reaction was typically stopped after 60 hours by first cooling it to room temperature at which point solid formation was observed. The mixture was then partitioned between MTBE and water and product was filtered with excellent purity with -53% yield of the desired product 5. The obtained

compound 5 was protected with a Boc group using Boc anhydride and DMAP as the catalyst and dichloromethane as the solvent. The intermediate 6 was obtained in a quantitative yield. Due to the semi-solid nature of compound 6, the material was taken to the next step without further purification. The Dieckmann condensation was initially performed with strong bases such as LiHMDS and tBuOK. A similar result to the aldehyde route (Scheme 2-2) was obtained: a partial deprotection of Boc group was observed that required column chromatography. However, the best results were obtained when DBU was used as base and THF as solvent. The reaction outcome was complete, clean conversion of 6 to 7. Moreover, the product crystallized from the reaction mixture upon seeding, and a quantitative yield was obtained for the two steps.

The hydroxyl group of 7 was removed via a two-step procedure. First, compound 7 was converted completely into triflate 8 using triflic anhydride and triethylamine in dichloromethane. The reaction was found to proceed well at 0°C. Due to the potential instability of the triflate intermediate, it was not isolated. It was immediately taken to the next step and reduced with triethylsilane and palladium tetrakis to afford the product 9 after ethyl acetate crystallization in -70% yield. The Boc group of 9 was removed using trifluoroacetic acid in dichloromethane to afford 10. Intermediate 10 was converted into the final sulfone 11 using Oxone™ in acetonitrile/water solvent system.

The obtained sulfone 11 was use-tested in the coupling step and was found to perform well. In conclusion, the route to sulfone 11 was developed which eliminated the use of column chromatography with good to excellent yields on all steps.

Scheme 2-2


Molecular Weight: 421 

Scheme 2-2: The first step of Scheme 2-2 consistently afforded product 13 contaminated with one major impurity found in substantial amount. Thorough evaluation of the reaction impurity profile by LC-MS and 2D MR was performed, which showed the impurity was structurally the condensation of two aldehyde 12 molecules and one molecule of lactam 4. Therefore, column chromatography was required to purify compound 13, which consistently resulted in a modest 30% yield. A solvent screen revealed that sec-butanol, amyl alcohol, dioxane, and tert-butanol can all be used in the reaction but a similar conversion was observed in each case. However, tert-butanol provided the cleanest reaction profile, so it was selected as a solvent for the reaction. Assessing the impact of varying the stoichiometric ratio of 4 and 12 on the reaction outcome was also investigated. The reaction was performed with 4 equivalents of amine 4 in an attempt to disrupt the 2: 1 aldehyde/amine composition of the impurity. The result was only a marginal increase in product 13 formation. The temperature impact on the reaction outcome was evaluated next. The coupling of aldehyde 12 and 4 was investigated at two different temperatures: 50 °C and 40 °C with 1 : 1 ratio of aldehyde/amine. Reactions were checked at 2 and 4 hours and then every 12 hours. The reaction progress was slow at 50°C and was accompanied by growth of other impurities. The reaction at 40°C was much cleaner; however the conversion was lower in the same time period. The mode of addition of the reagents was investigated as well at 80°C with a slow addition (over 6 hours) of either aldehyde 12 or amine 4 to the reaction mixture. The product distribution did not change and an about 1 to 1 ratio was observed between product and impurity when amine 4 was added slowly to the reaction mixture containing aldehyde 12 and

DIPEA at reflux. The product distribution did change when aldehyde 12 was added slowly to the mixture of amine 4 and DIPEA. However, the major product of the reaction was the undesired impurity. Other organic bases were tried as well as different ratios of DIPEA. No product was observed when potassium carbonate was used as a base. The results of the experiments are presented in Table 1 below.

Table 1

Compound 13 was successfully formed in three cases: triethylamine, 2,6-lutidine and DIPEA, with the DIPEA result being the best. The use of Boc protected spirolactam 4 had no effect on the impurity formation as well. Its utilization was speculated to be beneficial in performing the coupling step together with the following step, preparation of compound 14.

The major impurity formed during Step 1 of Scheme 2-2 is:

Chemical Formula:€2)Η(¾ 62ί>2

Molecular Weight: 527.4903

The second step (Boc protection of the free lactam) proceeded well using DMAP as a catalyst in dichloromethane at room temperature. The product 14 is a thick oil, and, therefore, cannot be purified by crystallization. The Boc protected intermediate 14 was cyclized successfully into the desired pentacyclic structure 10 upon treatment with a strong base such as LiHMDS or tBuOK. Surprisingly, the Boc group was partially removed during the reaction. The level of deprotection was independent from the internal reaction temperature and was positively correlated with excess of base used. Therefore the mixture of the desired product 10 and 10-Boc compound was treated with acid to completely deprotect Boc group. The conversion of methyl sulfide into the final sulfone 11 was carried out with Oxone™. Initially a mixture of methanol and water was used for the reaction. As the result, a partial displacement of sulfone by methoxy group was detected. The methanol was replaced with acetonitrile and the sulfone displacement was eliminated.

In summary, the ester route (Scheme 2-1) is preferred because:

1. Formation of the impurity during the first step of Scheme 2-2 was unavoidable and resulted in yields of < 35%.

2. Column purification was required to isolate intermediate 14.

3. The aldehyde starting material was not commercially available and required two synthetic steps from the corresponding ester.

Scheme 2-3 : Starting with cyclohexanone, compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 the methyl glycinate is subjected to cyclohexanone and TMSCN in the presence of tri ethyl amine in DCM to afford 15. In Step 2 15 hydrogenated with hydrogen gas in the presence of catalytic platinum oxide and subsequently undergoes an intramolecular cyclization to afford compound 16 which is used in the schemes above.

Scheme 2-4: Starting with compound 17, compounds of the present invention can be prepared. In Step 1 compound 17 is subjected to ethyl 2-oxoacetate in the presence platinum on carbon and hydrogen gas to afford compound 18. In Step 2 compound 18 is Boc-deprotected with hydrochloric acid. In Step 3 compound 18 is cyclized to afford compound 16 which is used in the schemes above.

Scheme 2-5

11 19

Scheme 2-5: Starting from compound 11 the CDK 4/6 inhibitor 19 can be prepared. In Step 1 5-(4-methylpiperazin-l-yl)pyridin-2-amine is subjected to LiHMDS and compound 11 is added slowly under chilled conditions to afford a nucleophilic substitution reaction and compound 19. Compound 11 can be prepared as described in the schemes herein.

Scheme 2-6: Starting from compound 11 the CDK 4/6 inhibitor 20 can be prepared. In Step 1 5-(4-isopropylpiperazin-l-yl)pyridin-2-amine is subjected to LiHMDS and compound 11 is added slowly under chilled conditions to afford a nucleophilic substitution reaction and compound 20. Compound 11 can be prepared as described in the schemes herein.

Preparation of Compound 5:

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet, and reflux condenser was charged with ethyl 4-chloro-2-(methylthio)pyrimidine-5-carboxylate 3 (49.2 g, 0.21 mol, 1.00 equiv.), spirolactam 4 (39.2 g, 0.23 mol, 1.10 equiv.), DIPEA (54.7 g, 0.42 mol, 2.00 equiv.), and DMAc (147.6 mL, 3 vol). The batch was heated to 90-95 °C, and after 60 h, IPC confirmed -14% (AUC) of ethyl 4-chloro-2-(methylthio)pyrimidine-5-carboxylate remained. The batch was cooled to RT, and precipitate formation was observed. The suspension was diluted with MTBE (100 mL, 2 vol) and water (442 mL, 9 vol) and stirred for 2 h at RT. The product was isolated by vacuum filtration and washed with MTBE (49 mL, 1 vol). The solid cake was conditioned for 1 h and dried under vacuum at 40 °C for 16 h to afford compound 5 [41.0 g, 53% yield] as an off-white solid with a purity of >99% AUC. ¾ MR (CDCh): δ 8.76 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 1H), 6.51-6.29 (br, 1H), 4.33 (q, J = 7.0 Hz, 2H), 3.78 (s, 2H), 3.58 (s, 2H), 2.92 (s, 2H), 2.53 (s, 3H), 1.63-1.37 (m, 12H). LCMS (ESI, m/z = 365.3 [M+H]).

Preparation of Compound 6:

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged with 5 [41.0 g, 0.11 mol, 1.00 equiv.], Boc-anhydride (36.8 g, 0.17 mol, 1.50 equiv.), DMAP (1.37 g, 0.01 mol, 0.10 equiv.), and dichloromethane (287 mL, 7 vol). The batch was stirred for 3 h at RT. IPC confirmed no starting material remained (AUC). The batch was concentrated into a residue under reduced pressure and taken to the next step (a quantitative yield is assumed for this step). An aliquot (200 mg) was purified by column chromatography (heptanes/ethyl acetate 0 to 100%) to afford compound 6. 1H MR (CDCh): δ 8.64 (s, 1H), 4.31 (q, J = 7.0 Hz, 2H), 4.07 (s, 2H), 3.83 (S, 2H), 3.15 (m, 2H), 2.56 (s, 3H), 172 (m, 3H), 1.59 (m, 15H), 1.42 (t, J= 7.0 Hz, 3H). LCMS (ESI, m/z = 465.2 [M+H]).

Preparation of Compound 7:

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged with compound 6 [residue from a previous step, quantitative yield assumed, 52.2 g, 0.11 mol, 1.00 equiv.], and THF (261 mL, 5 vol). The batch was cooled to 0°C and 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]un-dec-7-ene (17.1 g, 0.11 mmol, 1.00 equiv.) was added keeping the internal temperature in 0-10°C range. After the addition was complete, the cooling bath was removed and the reaction mixture was allowed to warm up to RT and after 2 h, IPC confirmed no starting material remained. The batch was seeded with the product (1.0 g) and was cooled to 0°C. The slurry was stirred at 0°C for 2 h. The product was isolated by vacuum filtration and washed with cold (0°C) THF (50 mL, 1 vol). The solid cake was conditioned for 1 h and dried under vacuum at 40°C for 16 h to afford 7 [47 g, quantitative yield] as a light orange solid with a purity of >99% AUC. The color of the product changed into yellow once the batch was exposed to air for an extended period of time (~ 1 day). Material was isolated with substantial amount DBU, according to proton NMR. However, it did not interfere with the next step. 1H MR (CDCh): δ 8.71 (s, 1H), 4.03 (s, 2H), 2.57 (s, 3H), 1.85 (m, 10H), 1.51 (s, 9H). LCMS (ESI, m/z = 419.2 [M+H]).

Preparation of Compound 8:

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged with 7 [40.8 g, 0.10 mol, 1.00 equiv.], triethylamine (31.5 g, 0.31 mol, 3.20 equiv.), and dichloromethane (408 mL, 10 vol). The batch was purged with N2 for 15 min and was cooled to 0°C. Triflic anhydride (44.0 g, 0.16 mol, 1.60 equiv.) was added keeping the

internal temperature in 0-10°C range. The batch was stirred at 0°C and after 3 h, IPC confirmed -7.0% (AUC) of 7 remained. [It was speculated that the product was hydrolyzing back into starting material during the analysis.] Once the reaction was deemed complete, the batch was transferred to a 1 L, separatory funnel and was washed with 50% saturated sodium bicarbonate (200 mL, 5 vol). [It was prepared by mixing saturated sodium bicarbonate (100 mL) with water (100 mL)).] The aqueous layer was separated and was extracted with DCM (2×40 mL, 1 vol). The organic layers were combined and concentrated into a residue under reduced pressure and taken to the next step. LCMS (ESI, m/z = 551.6 [M+H]).

Preparation of Compound 9:

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged with compound 8 [residue from a previous step, quantitative yield assumed, 53.7 g, 0.10 mol, 1.00 equiv.], and THF (110 mL, 2 vol). The solvent was removed under vacuum distillation and the procedure was repeated two times. The flask was charged with triethylsilane (22.7 g, 0.20 mol, 2.00 equiv.), and DMF (268 mL, 5 vol). The batch was degassed by five cycles of evacuation, followed by backfilling with nitrogen. The flask was charged with tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) (11.3 g, 0.01 mol, 0.1 equiv.). The batch was heated to 45-50°C, and after 14 h, IPC confirmed no starting material remained. The batch was transferred to a 500 mL, separatory funnel while still warm. The reaction was partitioned between water (5 vol) and ethyl acetate (5 vol). The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x3 vol). The organic layers were combined and concentrated down to 2 volumes. The precipitate was filtered and washed with ethyl acetate (2x 1 vol). The solid cake was conditioned for 1 h and dried under vacuum at 40°C for 16 h to afford 9 [27.5 g, 70% yield] as a yellow solid with a purity of -98% AUC. Proton NMR showed some triphenylphosphine oxide present. ¾ NMR (DMSO-i¾):5 9.01 (s, 1H), 7.40 (s, 1H), 4.30 (s, 2H), 2.58 (m, 2H), 2.58 (s, 3H), 1.81 (m, 5H), 1.51 (s, 9H). LCMS (ESI, m/z = 403.4 [M+H]).

Preparation of Compound 10 from the Scheme 2-1 route:

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged 9 (12.8 g, 31.8 mmol, 1.00 equiv.) and dichloromethane (64 mL, 5 vol). Trifluoroacetic acid (18.2 g, 159 mmol, 5.00 equiv.) was added over 20 min and the solution was stirred for 2 h at RT. IPC confirmed reaction was complete. The batch was transferred to a 500 mL, separatory funnel and washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate (200 mL). The aqueous layer was extracted with dichlorom ethane (3 x3 vol). The organic layers were combined and concentrated down to 1 volume. The precipitate was filtered and conditioned for 1 h and dried under vacuum at 40 °C for 16 h to afford 9 [6.72 g, 70% yield] as an off-white solid with a purity of 99.1% AUC. ¾ NMR (DMSO-dis): δ 8.95 (s, 1H), 8.32 (s, 1H), 7.15 (s, 1H), 3.68 (d, J = 1.0 Hz, 2H), 2.86 (m, 2H), 2.57 (s, 3H), 1.92 (m, 2H), 1.73 (m, 3H), 1.39 (m, 3H). LCMS, ESI, m/z = 303.2 [M+H]).

Preparation of Compound 10 from Scheme 2-2 route:

A 50 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a magnetic stirring bar, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged 14 (680 mg, 1.62 mmol, 1.00 equiv.) and THF (6.8 mL, 10 vol). A I M solution of potassium tert-butoxide (3.2 mL, 3.24 mmol, 2.00 equiv.) in THF was added over 10 min and the solution was stirred for 2 h at RT. IPC confirmed reaction was complete. The batch was acidified with 4 N hydrogen chloride solution in dioxane (2.4 mL, 9.72 mmol, 6.00 equiv.) and stirred for additional 1 h. The batch was transferred to a 500 mL, separatory funnel and washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate (100 mL). The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x20 vol). The organic layers were combined and concentrated down to 3volumes and product precipitated. The precipitate was filtered and conditioned for 1 h and dried under vacuum at 40 °C for 16 h to afford 9 [489 mg, quantitative yield] as an off-white solid.

Preparation of Compound 11 :

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged with 10 (9.00 g, 29.8 mmol, 1.00 equiv.), and acetonitrile (180 mL, 20 vol). A solution of Oxone™ (45.9 g, 0.15 mol, 5.00 equiv.) in water (180 mL, 20 vol) was added to the batch over 20 min. The batch was stirred for 2 h and IPC confirmed the reaction was complete. The batch was concentrated down to ½ of the original volume and was extracted with dichloromethane DCM (4x 10 vol). The organic layers were combined; polish filtered and concentrated down to -10 vol of DCM. The product was slowly crystallized out by addition of heptanes (-30 vol). The mixture was cooled to 0°C and the product was filtered and dried under vacuum at 40 °C for 16 h to afford 11 [9.45 g, 95% yield] as an off-white solid with a purity of >99% AUC. ¾ NMR (CDCb): 5 9.24 (s, 1H), 7.78 (s, 1H), 7.46 (s, 1H), 3.89 (d, J= 2.0 Hz, 2H), 3.43 (s, 3H), 2.98 (m, 2H), 2.10 (m, 2H), 1.86 (m, 3H), 1.50 (m, 3H). LCMS (ESI, m/z = 335.2 [M+H]).

Preparation of Compound 13:

A 250 mL, single-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet, and reflux condenser was charged with 4-chloro-2-(methylthio)pyrimidine-5-carbaldehyde (2.00 g, 10.6 mmol, 1.00 equiv.), spirolactam 4 (1.96 g, 11.7 mmol, 1.10 equiv.), DIPEA (2.74 g, 21.2 mmol, 2.00 equiv.), and fert-butanol (20 mL, 10 vol). The batch was heated to 80-85 °C, and after 24 h, IPC confirmed no aldehyde 12 remained. The batch was cool to RT and concentrated into a residue, which was loaded on silica gel column. The product was eluted with ethyl acetate/heptanes (0% to 100%). The product containing fractions were pulled out and concentrated to afford 13 [0.98 g, 29% yield] as an off-white solid.

Preparation of Compound 14:

A 500 mL, three-neck flask equipped with a mechanical overhead stirrer, thermocouple, N2 inlet was charged with 13 [0.98 g, 3.00 mmol, 1.00 equiv.], Boc-anhydride (4.90 g, 21.5 mmol, 7.00 equiv.), DMAP (36 mg, 0.30 mmol, 0.10 equiv.), and dichloromethane (7 mL, 7 vol). The batch was stirred for 3 h at RT. IPC confirmed no starting material remained. The batch was cool to RT and concentrated into a residue, which was loaded on silica gel column. The product was eluted with ethyl acetate/heptanes (0% to 100%). The product containing fractions were pulled out and concentrated to afford 14 [0.98 g, 29% yield] as an off-white solid.

Preparation of Compound 15:

To a suspension of methyl glycinate (500 g, 3.98 mol, 1 eq) in DCM (10 L) was added

TEA dropwise at rt under nitrogen atmosphere, followed by the addition of cyclohexanone (781 g, 7.96 mol, 2 eq) dropwise over 15 min. To the resulting mixture was added TMSCN (591 g, 5.97 mol, 1.5 eq) dropwise over 1 hour while maintaining the internal reaction temperature below 35

°C. After stirred at rt for 2 hrs, the suspension became a clear solution. The progress of the reaction was monitored by H- MR.

When the methyl glycinate was consumed completely as indicated by H-NMR analysis, the reaction was quenched by water (5 L). The layers were separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with DCM (1 L). The combined organic phase was washed with water (5 L X 2) and

dried over Na2S04 (1.5 Kg). After filtration and concentration, 1.24 Kg of crude 15 was obtained as oil.

The crude 15 was dissolved in IPA (4 L). The solution was treated with HC1/IPA solution (4.4 mol/L, 1.1L) at RT. A large amount of solid was precipitated during the addition. The resulting suspension was stirred for 2 hrs. The solid product was collected by vacuum filtration and rinsed with MTBE (800 mL). 819 g of pure 15 was obtained as a white solid. The yield was 88.4%. ¾- MR (300 MHz, CD3OD) 4.20 (s, 2H), 3.88 (s, 3H), 2.30-2.40 (d, J = 12 Hz, 2H), 1.95-2.02 (d, J = 12 Hz, 2H), 1.55-1.85 (m, 5H), 1.20-1.40 (m, 1H).

Preparation of Compound 16:

To a solution of 15 (10 g, 43 mmol) in MeOH (100 mL) was added methanolic hydrochloride solution (2 .44 mol/L, 35.3 mL, 2 eq) and Pt02 (0.5 g, 5 wt %). The reaction suspension was stirred with hydrogen bubble at 40 °C for 6 hours. H- MR analysis showed consumption of 15. To the reaction mixture was added K2CO3 (15 g, 108 mmol, 2.5 eq) and the mixture was stirred for 3 hrs. The suspension was filtered and the filtrate was concentrated to dryness. The residual oil was diluted with DCM (100 mL) and resulting suspension was stirred for 3 hrs. After filtration, the filtrate was concentrated to provide crude 16 (6.6 g) as an oil. The crude 16 was diluted with EtOAc/hexane (1 : 1, 18 mL) at rt for 2 hrs. After filtration, 16 (4 g) was isolated. The obtained 16 was dissolved in DCM (16.7 mL) and hexane (100 mL) was added dropwise to precipitate the product. After further stirred for 1 h, 2.8 g of the pure 16 was isolated as a white solid. The yield was 39%. HPLC purity was 98.3%; MS (ESI): 169.2 (MH+); 1 H-NMR (300 MHz, D2O) 3.23 (s, 3H), 3.07 (s, 3H), 1.37-1.49 (m, 10H).

Preparation of compound 19:

5-(4-methylpiperazin-l-yl)pyridin-2-amine (803.1 g; 3.0 equivalents based on sulfone 11) was charged to a 22 L flask. The flask was blanketed with N2 and anhydrous THF added (12.4 kg). The resulting black-purple solution was cooled in an ice bath to < 5°C. 1M LiHMDS (4.7 L; 1.2 equivalents based on sulfone 11) was added via an addition funnel in three equal additions to keep the temperature below 10°C. Upon the completion of the addition, the reaction mixture was warmed to 16°C. The sulfone 11 (455.1 g; 1.00 equivalents) was added in five additions. Reaction proceeded until HPLC analysis of an IPC sample indicated less than 3% of sulfone 11 remained.

To quench the reaction, the contents of the 22L flask were transferred to a 100 L flask containing water. After stirring for 30 minutes at <30°C, the crude product was collected by filtration, washed with water and dried to afford 19 (387 g, 99.1% purity, 63.7% yield).

Preparation of compound 20:

5-(4-isopropylpiperazin-l-yl)pyridin-2-amine (1976.2 g; 3.0 equivalents based on sulfone 11) was charged to a 50 L flask. The flask was blanketed with N2 and anhydrous THF added (10.7 kg). The resulting black-purple solution was cooled in an ice bath to < 5°C. 1M LiHMDS (9.6 kg; 3.6 equivalents based on sulfone) was added via an addition funnel at a rate to keep the temperature below 10°C. Upon the completion of the addition, the reaction mixture was warmed to 16°C over 120 minutes by removing the ice bath. The sulfone (1000 g; 1.00 mol) was added in five additions. The reaction proceeded until HPLC analysis of an IPC sample indicated less than 1% of sulfone 11 remained. After completion of the reaction, ammonium chloride was added to the reaction mixture. The mixture stirred at < 32°C for at least 30 minutes and the solids collected by filtration to afford 20 (900 g, 99.1% purity, 64.2% yield).

Alternate Route to Spirolactam via cyclohexanone:

Scheme 2-7

26

In one embodiment the spirolactam is made via the synthetic scheme above. By reducing the nitrile group before addition of the glycinate group the reaction sequence proceeds in higher yield. The chemistry used in Step 1 is described in the literature (J. Org. Chem. 2005, 70,8027-8034), and was performed on a kilogram scale. The chemistry to convert Compound 24 into the

spirolactam was also demonstrated on kilogram scale. The Boc protection of Compound 23, is carried out at -70°C in order to limit formation of the di-Boc protected product. Experimental details of a 200 g pilot run are described below.

Step 1

200 g of cyclohexanone 21 was converted to 22 using Ti(Oi-Pr)4 /TMSCN/NH3. After work-up, 213 g of 22 was obtained. The H- MR was clean. The yield was 84%. The titanium salts were removed by vacuum filtration. In one embodiment, the titanium salts are removed by centrifugation or Celite filtration.

Step 2

190 g of 22 was mixed with LAH (2 eq) in MTBE for 30 minutes at 45°C. After work-up, 148 g of crude 23 was obtained.

Step 3

136 g of the crude 23 from step 2 was converted to 24 with 0.9 eq of B0C2O at -70°C. The reaction was completed and worked up. After concentration, 188 g of 24 was obtained. The yield was 86%. The H-NMR and C-NMR spectra confirmed that the compound was pure.

Step 4

188 g of 24 was subjected to methyl 2-bromoacetate and K2CO3 in acetonitrile to afford 25. 247 g of crude 25 was obtained.

Step 5

247 g of 25 was subjected to TFA in DCE heated to reflux to afford 26. After work-up, 112 g of 6 as TFA salt was obtained. H- MR was clean.

Step 6

26 27

Compound 26 was stirred in EtOH in the presence at room temperature overnight to afford 27. In one embodiment DCM is used as the solvent instead of EtOH.

Example 3. Purge of residual palladium from Step 5 Scheme 2-1:

Since palladium was used in Step 5 of Scheme 2-1, the levels of residual Pd present in the subsequent synthetic steps was determined. Table 2 below and Figure 3 show the palladium levels in the isolated solids.

Table 2

The material after Step 5 was isolated containing 1.47% (14700 ppm) of residual palladium. This data represents the highest level of palladium in the worst case scenario. The workup conditions of the latter steps purged nearly all of the palladium and the final product, 19 bis HC1 salt, contained 14 ppm of Pd, which is below the standard 20 ppm guidline. The Pd levels will likely be even lower once the catal st loading is optimized in Step 5.

19

The process developed in this route was a significant improvement over the one used for the first generation synthesis. Overall, the scheme consists of seven steps with five isolations, all by crystallization. No silica column chromatography is employed in the synthesis, which makes the process highly scalable. The process workup conditions can successfully purge the 1.47% of residual palladium after step 5 of Scheme 2-1.

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US8829012 CDK inhibitors
2014-01-23
2014-09-09
US8598197 CDK inhibitors
2013-04-24
2013-12-03
US8598186 CDK inhibitors
2013-04-24
2013-12-03
US8691830 CDK inhibitors
2013-04-24
2014-04-08
US2014274896 Transient Protection of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Against Ionizing Radiation
2014-03-14
2014-09-18
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2015297607 Tricyclic Lactams for Use in the Protection of Normal Cells During Chemotherapy
2015-04-17
2015-10-22
US2015297608 Tricyclic Lactams for Use as Anti-Neoplastic and Anti-Proliferative Agents
2015-04-17
2015-10-22
US9487530 Transient Protection of Normal Cells During Chemotherapy
2014-03-14
2014-09-18
US2017057971 CDK Inhibitors
2016-11-10
US2017037051 TRANSIENT PROTECTION OF NORMAL CELLS DURING CHEMOTHERAPY
2016-10-07
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017100405 HSPC-Sparing Treatments for RB-Positive Abnormal Cellular Proliferation
2016-12-21
US2017065597 Transient Protection of Normal Cells During Chemotherapy
2016-11-03
US2016310499 Highly Active Anti-Neoplastic and Anti-Proliferative Agents
2016-07-01
US2016220569 CDK4/6 Inhibitor Dosage Formulations For The Protection Of Hematopoietic Stem And Progenitor Cells During Chemotherapy
2016-02-03
2016-08-04
US2015297606 Tricyclic Lactams for Use in the Protection of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Against Ionizing Radiation
2015-04-17
2015-10-22
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9717735 Tricyclic Lactams for Use in HSPC-Sparing Treatments for RB-Positive Abnormal Cellular Proliferation
2015-04-17
2015-10-22
US9527857 HSPC-Sparing Treatments for RB-Positive Abnormal Cellular Proliferation
2014-03-14
2014-09-18
US2014271460 Highly Active Anti-Neoplastic and Anti-Proliferative Agents
2014-03-14
2014-09-18
US2017182043 Anti-Neoplastic Combinations and Dosing Regimens using CDK4/6 Inhibitor Compounds to Treat RB-Positive Tumors
2017-03-13
US2017246171 Treatment Of RB-Negative Tumors Using Topoisomerase Inhibitors In Combination With Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors
2017-03-13

///////////////TRILACICLIB, G1T28, G1T 28, SHR 6390, PHASE 2, G1 Therapeutics, Inc.

CN1CCN(CC1)C2=CN=C(C=C2)NC3=NC=C4C=C5C(=O)NCC6(N5C4=N3)CCCCC6

Biocon Launches KRABEVA® in India, A Biosimilar Bevacizumab for Treating Several Types of Cancer


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Biocon Launches KRABEVA® in India,  A Biosimilar Bevacizumab for Treating Several Types of Cancer

On November 23, 2017, Biocon India’s premier Biopharmaceuticals Company announced that it has launched KRABEVA®, a biosimilar Bevacizumab for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and other types of lung, kidney, cervical, ovarian and brain cancers, in India 1.
KRABEVA®, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed by Biocon, will help expand access to a world-class, high quality biosimilar Bevacizumab for cancer patients in India. It is the world´s first and only Bevacizumab with a unique ´QualCheck ´ mechanism, which ensures that patients get a quality-ascertained product right up to infusion.
Bevacizumab is indicated as a first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), and is accepted as a standard treatment option in combination with chemotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSLC), metastatic renal cell carcinoma or recurrent ovarian cancer.
KRABEVA® is the second key oncologic biosimilar product, from Biocon´s global biosimilars portfolio to be launched in India. It is being offered to patients at an MRP of Rs 24,000 for 100 mg / 4 ml vials and Rs 39,990 for 400 mg / 16 ml vials, making it a high quality affordable alternative to the innovator brand. In comparison, the Innovator brand for Bevacizumab marketed as Avastin® by Roche India Private Limited costs over Rs 10, 7065 for 400mg / 16ml vial.
Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor- A (VEGF-A), a cell protein that induces growth of blood vessels that feed tumors. By blocking this protein, Bevacizumab cuts the  supply of food and oxygen to the tumor, thus starving it.

Bevacizumab is prescribed in the treatment of several cancers including metastatic colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, recurrent glioblastoma, cervical cancer and renal cancer. Bevacizumab was first approved by the United States Food and
Drug Administration (USFDA), in February 2004 2.

It also features in the World Health Organization’s (WHO) list of essential medicines 3. The WHO list of essential medicines contains the medications considered to be most effective and safe to meet the most important needs in a health system. The list is frequently used by countries to help develop their own local lists of essential medicine.

1 https://www.biocon.com/biocon_press_releases_231117.asp
2 https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/daf/index.cfm?event=overview.process&ApplNo=125085
http://www.who.int/medicines/publications/essentialmedicines/EML_2015_FINAL_amended_NOV2015.pdf?ua=1
Approval and launch of a Bevacizumab biosimilar in India would provide an affordable therapy option for patients of various types of cancer.

//////////Biocon, KRABEVA®, India,  Biosimilar,  Bevacizumab, Cancer

FDA approves first biosimilar Herceptin (trastuzumab) for the treatment of certain breast and stomach cancers


FDA approves first biosimilar for the treatment of certain breast and stomach cancers

Ogivri, a biosimilar to the cancer drug Herceptin, is approved for HER2+ breast cancer and metastatic stomach cancers

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Ogivri (trastuzumab-dkst) as a biosimilar to Herceptin (trastuzumab) for the treatment of patients with breast or metastatic stomach cancer (gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma) whose tumors overexpress the HER2 gene (HER2+). Ogivri is the first biosimilar approved in the U.S. for the treatment of breast cancer or stomach cancer and the second biosimilar approved in the U.S. for the treatment of cancer. Continue reading.

December 1, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Ogivri (trastuzumab-dkst) as a biosimilar to Herceptin (trastuzumab) for the treatment of patients with breast or metastatic stomach cancer (gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma) whose tumors overexpress the HER2 gene (HER2+). Ogivri is the first biosimilar approved in the U.S. for the treatment of breast cancer or stomach cancer and the second biosimilar approved in the U.S. for the treatment of cancer.

As with any treatment, health care professionals should review the prescribing information in the labeling for detailed information about the approved uses.

“The FDA continues to grow the number of biosimilar approvals, helping to promote competition that can lower health care costs. This is especially important when it comes to diseases like cancer, that have a high cost burden for patients,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “We’re committed to taking new policy steps to advance our biosimilar pathway and promote more competition for biological drugs.”

Biological products are generally derived from a living organism and can come from many sources, such as humans, animals, microorganisms or yeast. A biosimilar is a biological product that is approved based on data showing that it is highly similar to a biological product already approved by the FDA (reference product) and has no clinically meaningful differences in terms of safety, purity and potency (i.e., safety and effectiveness) from the reference product, in addition to meeting other criteria specified by law.

The FDA’s approval of Ogivri is based on review of evidence that included extensive structural and functional characterization, animal study data, human pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data, clinical immunogenicity data and other clinical safety and effectiveness data that demonstrates Ogivri is biosimilar to Herceptin. Ogivri has been approved as a biosimilar, not as an interchangeable product.

Common expected side effects of Ogivri for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer include headache, diarrhea, nausea, chills, fever, infection, congestive heart failure, difficulty sleeping (insomnia), cough and rash. Common expected side effects of Ogivri for the treatment of HER2+ metastatic stomach cancer include low levels of certain white blood cells (neutropenia), diarrhea, fatigue, low levels of red blood cells (anemia), inflammation of the mouth (stomatitis), weight loss, upper respiratory tract infections, fever, low levels of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia), swelling of the mucous membranes (mucosal inflammation), common cold (nasopharyngitis) and unusual taste sensation (dysgeusia). Serious expected side effects of Ogivri include worsening of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia.

Like Herceptin, the labeling for Ogivri contains a Boxed Warning to alert health care professionals and patients about increased risks of heart disease (cardiomyopathy), infusions reactions, lung damage (pulmonary toxicity) and harm to a developing fetus (embryo-fetal toxicity). Patients should stop taking Ogivri if cardiomyopathy, life-threatening allergic reactions (anaphylaxis), swelling below the skin (angioedema), inflammation of the lungs (interstitial pneumonitis) or fluid in the lungs (acute respiratory distress syndrome) occur. Patients should be advised of the potential risk to a developing fetus and to use effective contraception.

The FDA granted approval of Ogivri to Mylan GmbH. Herceptin was approved in September 1998 and is manufactured by Genentech, Inc.

/////////////Ogivri, biosimilar , cancer, Herceptin, Trastuzumab, FDA 2017

FDA approves new treatment for certain advanced or metastatic breast cancers


FDA approves new treatment for certain advanced or metastatic breast cancers

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Verzenio (abemaciclib) to treat adult patients who have hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer that has progressed after taking therapy that alters a patient’s hormones (endocrine therapy). Verzenio is approved to be given in combination with an endocrine therapy, called fulvestrant, after the cancer had grown on endocrine therapy. It is also approved to be given on its own, if patients were previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy after the cancer had spread (metastasized). Continue reading

https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm578071.htm

Abemaciclib.svg

(abemaciclib)

September 28, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Verzenio (abemaciclib) to treat adult patients who have hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer that has progressed after taking therapy that alters a patient’s hormones (endocrine therapy). Verzenio is approved to be given in combination with an endocrine therapy, called fulvestrant, after the cancer had grown on endocrine therapy. It is also approved to be given on its own, if patients were previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy after the cancer had spread (metastasized).

“Verzenio provides a new targeted treatment option for certain patients with breast cancer who are not responding to treatment, and unlike other drugs in the class, it can be given as a stand-alone treatment to patients who were previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

Verzenio works by blocking certain molecules (known as cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6), involved in promoting the growth of cancer cells. There are two other drugs in this class that are approved for certain patients with breast cancer, palbociclib approved in February 2015 and ribociclib approved in March 2017.

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health estimates approximately 252,710 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and 40,610 will die of the disease. Approximately 72 percent of patients with breast cancer have tumors that are HR-positive and HER2-negative.

The safety and efficacy of Verzenio in combination with fulvestrant were studied in a randomized trial of 669 patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that had progressed after treatment with endocrine therapy and who had not received chemotherapy once the cancer had metastasized. The study measured the length of time tumors did not grow after treatment (progression-free survival). The median progression-free survival for patients taking Verzenio with fulvestrant was 16.4 months compared to 9.3 months for patients taking a placebo with fulvestrant.

The safety and efficacy of Verzenio as a stand-alone treatment were studied in a single-arm trial of 132 patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that had progressed after treatment with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy after the cancer metastasized. The study measured the percent of patients whose tumors completely or partially shrank after treatment (objective response rate). In the study, 19.7 percent of patients taking Verzenio experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors for a median 8.6 months.

Common side effects of Verzenio include diarrhea, low levels of certain white blood cells (neutropenia and leukopenia), nausea, abdominal pain, infections, fatigue, low levels of red blood cells (anemia), decreased appetite, vomiting and headache.

Serious side effects of Verzenio include diarrhea, neutropenia, elevated liver blood tests and blood clots (deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism). Women who are pregnant should not take Verzenio because it may cause harm to a developing fetus.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapydesignations.

The FDA granted the approval of Verzenio to Eli Lilly and Company.

//////////Verzenio, abemaciclib, fda 2017, metastatic breast cancers, Eli Lilly ,  Priority Review,  Breakthrough Therapy designations, antibodies

Prexasertib , прексасертиб , بريكساسيرتيب , 普瑞色替 ,


Prexasertib.svg

Prexasertib

Captisol® enabled prexasertib; CHK1 Inhibitor II; LY 2606368; LY2606368 MsOH H2O

5-(5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-ylamino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile

2-Pyrazinecarbonitrile, 5-[[5-[2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl]-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]amino]-

Name Prexasertib
Lab Codes LY-2606368
Chemical Name 5-({5-[2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl]-1H-pyrazol-3-yl}amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile
Chemical Structure ChemSpider 2D Image | prexasertib | C18H19N7O2
Molecular Formula C18H19N7O2
UNII UNII:820NH671E6
Cas Registry Number 1234015-52-1
OTHER NAMES
прексасертиб [Russian] [INN]
بريكساسيرتيب [Arabic] [INN]
普瑞色替 [Chinese] [INN]
Originator Array BioPharma
Developer Eli Lilly, National Cancer Institute
Mechanism Of Action Checkpoint kinase inhibitors, Chk-1 inhibitors
Who Atc Codes L01X-E (Protein kinase inhibitors)
Ephmra Codes L1H (Protein Kinase Inhibitor Antineoplastics)
Indication Breast cancer, Ovarian cancer, Solid tumor, Head and neck cancer, Leukemia, Neoplasm Metastasis, Colorectal Neoplasms, Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Image result for Array BioPharma

Image result for ELI LILLY

Image result for Prexasertib2100300-72-7 CAS

Image result for Prexasertib

Prexasertib mesylate hydrate
CAS#: 1234015-57-6 (mesylate hydrate)
Chemical Formula: C19H25N7O6S
Molecular Weight: 479.512, CODE LY-2940930
LY-2606368 (free base)

Image result for Prexasertib

Prexasertib mesylate ANHYDROUS
CAS#: 1234015-55-4 (mesylate)
Chemical Formula: C19H23N7O5S
Molecular Weight: 461.497

2D chemical structure of 1234015-54-3

Prexasertib dihydrochloride
1234015-54-3. MW: 438.3169


LY2606368 is a small-molecule Chk-1 inhibitors invented by Array and being developed by Eli Lilly and Company. Lilly is responsible for all clinical development and commercialization activities. Chk-1 is a protein kinase that regulates the tumor cell’s response to DNA damage often caused by treatment with chemotherapy. In response to DNA damage, Chk-1 blocks cell cycle progression in order to allow for repair of damaged DNA, thereby limiting the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. Inhibiting Chk-1 in combination with chemotherapy can enhance tumor cell death by preventing these cells from recovering from DNA damage.

Originator Array BioPharma; Eli Lilly

Developer Eli Lilly; National Cancer Institute (USA)

Class Antineoplastics; Nitriles; Pyrazines; Pyrazoles; Small molecules

Mechanism of Action Checkpoint kinase 1 inhibitors; Checkpoint kinase 2 inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase II Breast cancer; Ovarian cancer; Small cell lung cancer; Solid tumours
  • Phase I Acute myeloid leukaemia; Colorectal cancer; Head and neck cancer; Myelodysplastic syndromes; Non-small cell lung cancer

Most Recent Events

  • 10 Apr 2017 Eli Lilly completes a phase I trial for Solid tumours (Late-stage disease, Second-line therapy or greater) in Japan (NCT02514603)
  • 10 Mar 2017 Phase-I clinical trials in Solid tumours (Combination therapy, Metastatic disease, Inoperable/Unresectable) in USA (IV) (NCT03057145)
  • 22 Feb 2017 Khanh Do and AstraZeneca plan a phase H trial for Solid tumour (Combination therapy, Metastatic disease, Inoperable/Unresectable) in USA (NCT03057145)

Prexasertib (LY2606368) is a small molecule checkpoint kinase inhibitor, mainly active against CHEK1, with minor activity against CHEK2. This causes induction of DNA double-strand breaks resulting in apoptosis. It is in development by Eli Lilly[1]

A phase II clinical trial for the treatment of small cell lung cancer is expected to be complete in December 2017.[2]

an aminopyrazole compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof or a solvate of the salt, that inhibits Chkl and is useful for treating cancers characterized by defects in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication, chromosome segregation, or cell division.

Chkl is a protein kinase that lies downstream from Atm and/or Atr in the DNA damage checkpoint signal transduction pathway. In mammalian cells, Chkl is phosphorylated in response to agents that cause DNA damage including ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet (UV) light, and hydroxyurea. This phosphorylation which activates Chkl in mammalian cells is dependent on Atr. Chkl plays a role in the Atr dependent DNA damage checkpoint leading to arrest in S phase and at G2M. Chkl phosphorylates and inactivates Cdc25A, the dual-specificity phosphatase that normally dephosphorylates cyclin E/Cdk2, halting progression through S-phase. Chkl also phosphorylates and inactivates Cdc25C, the dual specificity phosphatase that dephosphorylates cyclin B/Cdc2 (also known as Cdkl) arresting cell cycle progression at the boundary of G2 and mitosis (Fernery et al, Science, 277: 1495-1, 1997). In both cases, regulation of Cdk activity induces a cell cycle arrest to prevent cells from entering mitosis in the presence of DNA damage or unreplicated DNA. Various inhibitors of Chkl have been reported. See for example, WO 05/066163,

WO 04/063198, WO 03/093297 and WO 02/070494. In addition, a series of aminopyrazole Chkl inhibitors is disclosed in WO 05/009435.

However, there is still a need for Chkl inhibitors that are potent inhibitors of the cell cycle checkpoints that can act effectively as potentiators of DNA damaging agents. The present invention provides a novel aminopyrazole compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof or solvate of the salt, that is a potent inhibitor of Chkl . The compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof or a solvate of the salt, potently abrogates a Chkl mediated cell cycle arrest induced by treatment with DNA damaging agents in tissue culture and in vivo. Furthermore, the compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof or a solvate of the salt, of the present invention also provides inhibition of Chk2, which may be beneficial for the treatment of cancer. Additionally, the lack of inhibition of certain other protein kinases, such as CDKl, may provide a -2- therapeutic benefit by minimizing undesired effects. Furthermore, the compound, or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof or a solvate of the salt, of the present invention inhibits cell proliferation of cancer cells by a mechanism dependent on Chkl inhibition.

Inventors Francine S. FarouzRyan Coatsworth HolcombRamesh KasarSteven Scott Myers
Applicant Eli Lilly And Company

WO 2010077758

Preparation 8

tert-Butyl 3-(2-(3-(5-cyanopyrazin-2-ylamino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3- methoxyphenoxy)propylcarbamate

Figure imgf000025_0002

A solution of tert-butyl 3-(2-(3-(5-bromopyrazin-2-ylamino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3- methoxyphenoxy)propylcarbamate (0.378 g, 0.730 mmol) and zinc cyanide (0.10 g, 0.870 mmol) in DMF (10 mL) is degassed with a stream of nitrogen for one hour and then -25- heated to 80 0C. To the reaction is added Pd(Ph3P)4 (0.080 g, 0.070 mmol), and the mixture is heated overnight. The reaction is cooled to room temperature and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue is purified by silica gel chromatography (CH2Cl2/Me0H) to give 0.251 g (73%) of the title compound.

Preparation 12 tert-Butyl 3-(2-(3-(5-cyanopyrazin-2-ylamino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3- methoxyphenoxy)propylcarbamate

Figure imgf000028_0001

A 5 L flange-neck round-bottom flask equipped with an air stirrer rod and paddle, thermometer, pressure-equalizing dropping funnel, and nitrogen bubbler is charged with 5-(5-(2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-phenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylamino)-pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (47.0 g, 152 mmol) and anhydrous THF (1.2 L). The stirred suspension, under nitrogen, is cooled to 0 0C. A separate 2 L 3 -necked round-bottom flask equipped with a large -28- magnetic stirring bar, thermometer, and nitrogen bubbler is charged with triphenylphosphine (44.0 g; 168 mmol) and anhydrous THF (600 mL). The stirred solution, under nitrogen, is cooled to 0 0C and diisopropylazodicarboxylate (34.2 g; 169 mmol) is added and a milky solution is formed. After 3-4 min, a solution of7-butyl-N-(3- hydroxypropyl)-carbamate (30.3 g, 173 mmol) in anhydrous THF (100 mL) is added and the mixture is stirred for 3-4 min. This mixture is then added over 5 min to the stirred suspension of starting material at 0 0C. The reaction mixture quickly becomes a dark solution and is allowed to slowly warm up to room temperature. After 6.5 h, more reagents are prepared as above using PPh3 (8 g), DIAD (6.2 g) and carbamate (5.4 g) in anhydrous THF (150 mL). The mixture is added to the reaction mixture, cooled to -5 0C and left to warm up to room temperature overnight. The solvent is removed in vacuo. The resulting viscous solution is loaded onto a pad of silica and product is eluted with ethyl acetate. The concentrated fractions are separately triturated with methanol and resulting solids are collected by filtration. The combined solids are triturated again with methanol (400 mL) and then isolated by filtration and dried in vacuo at 50 0C overnight to give 31.3 g of desired product. LC-ES/MS m/z 466.2 [M+ 1]+.

Example 2

5 -(5 -(2-(3 -Aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)- 1 H-pyrazol-3 -ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile dihydrogen chloride salt

Figure imgf000029_0001

A 5 L flange-neck, round-bottom flask equipped with an air stirrer rod and paddle, thermometer, and air condenser with bubbler attached, is charged with tert-bvXyl 3-(2-(3- (5-cyanopyrazin-2-ylamino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-methoxyphenoxy)propylcarbamate (30.9 g, 66.3 mmol) and ethyl acetate (3 L). The mechanically stirred yellow suspension is cooled to just below 10 0C. Then hydrogen chloride from a lecture bottle is bubbled in -29- vigorously through a gas inlet tube for 15 min with the ice-bath still in place. After 5 h the mixture is noticeably thickened in appearance. The solid is collected by filtration, washed with ethyl acetate, and then dried in vacuo at 60 0C overnight to give 30.0 g. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 2.05 (m, 2H), 2.96 (m, 2H), 3.81 (s, 3H), 4.12 (t, J = 5.8 Hz, 2H), 6.08 (br s, 3H), 6.777 (d, J = 8.2 Hz, IH), 6.782 (d, J = 8.2 Hz, IH), 6.88 (br s, IH), 7.34 (t, J = 8.2 Hz, IH), 8.09 (br s, IH), 8.55 (br s, IH), 8.71 (s, IH), 10.83 (s, IH), 12.43 (br s, IH). LC-ES/MS m/z 366.2 [M+lf.

Example 3 5 -(5 -(2-(3 -Aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)- 1 H-pyrazol-3 -ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile

Figure imgf000030_0001

5-(5-(2-(3-Aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile dihydrogen chloride salt (3.0 g, 6.84 mmol) is suspended in 200 mL of CH2Cl2. 1 N NaOH is added (200 mL, 200 mmol). The mixture is magnetically stirred under nitrogen at room temperature for 5 h. The solid is collected by filtration and washed thoroughly with water. The filter cake is dried in vacuo at 50 0C overnight to give 2.26 g (90%) of the free base as a yellow solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1.81 (m, 2H), 2.73 (t, J = 6.2 Hz, 2H), 3.82 (s, 3H), 4.09 (t, J = 6.2 Hz, 2H), 6.76 (t, J = 8.2 Hz, 2H), 6.93 (br s, IH), 7.31 (t, J = 8.2 Hz, IH), 8.52 (br s, IH), 8.67 (s, IH). LC- MS /ES m/z 366.2 [M+ 1]+.

Example 4

5 -(5 -(2-(3 -Aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)- 1 H-pyrazol-3 -ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile methanesulfonic acid salt -30-

Figure imgf000031_0001

5-(5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile (1.0 g, 2.74 mmol) is suspended in MeOH (100 mL). A I M solution of methanesulfonic acid in MeOH (2.74 mL, 2.74 mmol) is added to the mixture dropwise with stirring. The solid nearly completely dissolves and is sonicated and stirred for 15 min, filtered, and concentrated to 50 mL. The solution is cooled overnight at -15 0C and the solid that forms is collected by filtration. The solid is dried in a vacuum oven overnight to give 0.938 g (74%) of a yellow solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1.97 (m, 2H), 2.28 (s, 3H), 2.95 (m, 2H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 4.09 (t, J = 5.9 Hz, 2H), 6.753 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, IH), 6.766 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, IH), 6.85 (br s, IH), 7.33 (t, J = 8.4 Hz, IH), 7.67 (br s, 3H), 8.49 (br s, IH), 8.64 (s, IH), 10.70 (s, IH), 12.31 (s, IH). LC-ES/MS m/z 366.2 [M+l]+.

Preparation 18 tert-Butyl 3-(2-(3-(5-cyanopyrazin-2-ylamino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3- methoxyphenoxy)propylcarbamate

Figure imgf000035_0001

5-(5-(2-Hydroxy-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile (618 g, 1.62 mol) is slurried in tetrahydrofuran (6.18 L, 10 volumes) and chilled to -5 to 0 0C with an acetone/ice bath. Triethylamine (330 g, 3.25 mol) is added through an addition funnel over 30 – 40 min at -5 to 5 0C. The resulting slurry is stirred at -5 to 5 0C for 60 – 90 min. The insoluble triethylamine hydrochloride is filtered and the solution of the phenol ((5-(2-hydroxy-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3- ylamino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile) collected in an appropriate reaction vessel. The cake is rinsed with THF (1.24 L). The THF solution of the phenol is held at 15 to 20 0C until needed.

Triphenylphosphine (1074 g, 4.05 mol) is dissolved at room temperature in THF (4.33 L). The clear colorless solution is cooled with an acetone/ice bath to -5 to 5 0C. Diisopropylazodicarboxylate (795 g, 3.89 mol) is added dropwise through an addition funnel over 40 – 60 min, keeping the temperature below 10 0C. The resulting thick white slurry is cooled back to -5 to 0 0C. tert-Butyl 3-hydroxypropylcarbamate (717g, 4.05 moles) is dissolved in a minimum of THF (800 mL). The tert-butyl 3- hydroxypropylcarbamate/THF solution is added, through an addition funnel, over 20 – 30 -35- min at -5 to 5 0C to the reagent slurry. The prepared reagent is stirred in the ice bath at -5 to 0 0C until ready for use.

The prepared reagent slurry (20%) is added to the substrate solution at 15 to 20 0C. The remaining reagent is returned to the ice bath. The substrate solution is stirred at ambient for 30 min, then sampled for HPLC. A second approximately 20% portion of the reagent is added to the substrate, stirred at ambient and sampled as before. Addition of the reagent is continued with monitoring for reaction completion by HPLC. The completed reaction is concentrated and triturated with warm methanol (4.33 L, 50 – 60 0C) followed by cooling in an ice bath. The resulting yellow precipitate is filtered, rinsed with cold MeOH (2 L), and dried to constant weight to provide 544 g (72%) of the title compound, mp 214 – 216 0C; ES/MS m/z 466.2 [M+l]+.

Example 5

2-Pyrazinecarbonitrile, 5-[[5-[-[2-(3-aminopropyl)-6-methoxyphenyl]-lH-pyrazol-3- yl]amino] monomesylate monohydrate (Chemical Abstracts nomenclature)

Figure imgf000036_0001

tert-Butyl 3-(2-(3-(5-cyanopyrazin-2-ylamino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3- methoxyphenoxy)propylcarbamate (1430 g, 3.07 mol) is slurried with acetone (21.5 L) in a 30 L reactor. Methanesulfonic acid (1484 g, 15.36 mol) is added through an addition funnel in a moderate stream. The slurry is warmed to reflux at about 52 0C for 1 to 3 h and monitored for reaction completion by HPLC analysis. The completed reaction is cooled from reflux to 15 to 20 0C over 4.5 h. The yellow slurry of 2-pyrazinecarbonitrile, 5-[[5-[-[2-(3-aminopropyl)-6-methoxyphenyl]-lH-pyrazol-3-yl]amino] dimesylate salt is filtered, rinsed with acetone (7 L) and dried in a vacuum oven. The dimesylate salt, (1608 g, 2.88 mol) is slurried in water (16 L). Sodium hydroxide (aqueous 50%, 228 g, 2.85 mol) is slowly poured into the slurry. The slurry is -36- heated to 60 0C and stirred for one hour. It is then cooled to 16 0C over 4 h and filtered. The wet filter cake is rinsed with acetone (4 L) and dried to constant weight in a vacuum oven at 40 0C to provide 833 g (94%) of 2-pyrazinecarbonitrile, 5-[[5-[-[2-(3- aminopropyl)-6-methoxyphenyl]-lH-pyrazol-3-yl]amino] monomesylate monohydrate. mp 222.6 0C; ES/MS m/z 366.2 [M+l]+.

Example 5a

2-Pyrazinecarbonitrile, 5-[[5-[-[2-(3-aminopropyl)-6-methoxyphenyl]-lH-pyrazol-3- yl] amino] monomesylate monohydrate (Chemical Abstracts nomenclature)

Crude 2-pyrazinecarbonitrile, 5 -[ [5 – [- [2-(3 -aminopropyl)-6-methoxyphenyl]- IH- pyrazol-3-yl] amino] monomesylate monohydrate is purified using the following procedure. The technical grade 2-pyrazinecarbonitrile, 5-[[5-[-[2-(3-aminopropyl)-6- methoxyphenyl]-lH-pyrazol-3-yl] amino] mono mesylate mono hydrate (1221 g, 2.55 mol) is slurried in a solvent mixture of 1: 1 acetone/water (14.7 L). The solid is dissolved by warming the mixture to 50 – 55 0C. The solution is polish filtrated while at 50 – 55 0C through a 0.22μ cartridge filter. The solution is slowly cooled to the seeding temperature of about 42 – 45 0C and seeded. Slow cooling is continued over the next 30 – 60 min to confirm nucleation. The thin slurry is cooled from 38 to 15 0C over 3 h. A vacuum distillation is set up and the acetone removed at 110 – 90 mm and 20 – 30 0C. The mixture is cooled from 30 to 15 0C over 14 h, held at 15 0C for 2 h, and then filtered. The recrystallized material is rinsed with 19: 1 water/acetone (2 L) and then water (6 L) and dried to constant weight in a vacuum oven at 40 0C to provide 1024 g (83.9%) of the title compound, mp 222.6 0C; ES/MS m/z 366.2 [M+l]+. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) patterns may be obtained on a Bruker D8

Advance powder diffractometer, equipped with a CuKa source (λ=l.54056 angstrom) operating at 40 kV and 40 mA with a position-sensitive detector. Each sample is scanned between 4° and 35° in °2Θ ± 0.02 using a step size of 0.026° in 2Θ ± 0.02 and a step time of 0.3 seconds, with a 0.6 mm divergence slit and a 10.39 mm detector slit. Primary and secondary Soller slits are each at 2°; antiscattering slit is 6.17 mm; the air scatter sink is in place. -37-

Characteristic peak positions and relative intensities:

Figure imgf000038_0001

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses may be carried out on a Mettler- Toledo DSC unit (Model DSC822e). Samples are heated in closed aluminum pans with pinhole from 25 to 350 0C at 10 °C/min with a nitrogen purge of 50 mL/min. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) may be carried out on a Mettler Toledo TGA unit (Model TGA/SDTA 85Ie). Samples are heated in sealed aluminum pans with a pinhole from 25 to 350 0C at 10 0C /min with a nitrogen purge of 50 mL/min.

The thermal profile from DSC shows a weak, broad endotherm form 80 – 1400C followed by a sharp melting endotherm at 222 0C, onset (225 0C, peak). A mass loss of 4% is seen by the TGA from 25 – 140 0C.

PATENT

US 20110144126

WO 2017015124

WO 2017100071

WO 2017105982

WO 2016051409

PATENT

WO 2017100071

Preparation 1

tert-Butyl (E)-(3-(2-(3-(dimethylamino)ac^’loyl)-3-me1hoxyphenox50propyl)carbamate

L _l H

Combine l-(2-hydroxy-6-methox>’phenyl)e1han-l-one (79.6 kg, 479 mol) and 1,1-<iimethoxy-N,N-dimemylmethanamino (71.7 kg, 603.54 mol) with DMF (126 kg). Heat to 85-90 °C for 12 hours. Cool the reaction mixture containing intermediate (E)-3-(dimethylamino)-l-(2-hydroxy-6-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-l-one (mp 84.74 °C) to ambient temperature and add anhydrous potassium phosphate (136 kg, 637.07 mol) and tert-butyl (3-bromopropyl)carbamate (145 kg, 608.33 mol). Stir the reaction for 15 hours at ambient temperature. Filter the mixture and wash the filter cake with ΜΓΒΕ (3 χ , 433 kg, 300 kg, and 350 kg). Add water (136 kg) and aqueous sodium chloride (25% solution, 552 kg) to the combined MTBE organic solutions. Separate the organic and aqueous phases. Back-extract the resulting aqueous phase with MTBE (309 kg) and add the MTBE layer to the organic solution. Add an aqueous sodium chloride solution (25% solution, 660 kg) to the combined organic extracts and separate the layers. Concentrate the organic extracts to 1,040 kg – 1,200 kg and add water (400 kg) at 30-35 °C to the residue. Cool to ambient temperature and collect material by filtration as a wet cake to give the title product (228.35 kg, 90%). ES/MS (m/z): 379.22275 (M+l).

Preparation 2

tert-Butyl (3-(2-(2-cyanoacetyl)-3-methoxyphenoxy)propyl)carbamate

“9 o


 

Combine ethanol (1044 kg), hydroxyl amino hydrochloride (30 kg, 431.7 mol), and terr-butyl (E)-(3-(2-(3-(^me%lamino)acryloyl)-3-

methoxyphenoxy)propyl)carbamate (228.35 kg, 72% as a wet water solid, 434.9 mol) to form a solution. Heat the solution to 35 – 40 °C for 4-6 hours. Cool the reaction to ambient temperature and concentrate to a residue. Add MTBE (300 kg) to the residue and concentrate the solution to 160 kg – 240 kg. Add MTBE (270 kg) and concentrate the solution. Add MTBE (630 kg), water (358 kg), and sodium chloride solution (80 kg, 25% aqueous) and stir for 20 minutes at ambient temperature. Let the mixture stand for 30 minutes. Separate the aqueous layer. Add water (360 kg) and sodium chloride solution (82 kg, 25% sodium chloride) to the organic phase. Stir for 20 minutes at ambient temperature. Let the mixture stand for 30 minutes. Separate the aqueous portion. Add sodium chloride solution (400 kg, 25 % aqueous) to the organic portion. Stir for 20 minutes at ambient temperature. Let the mixture stand for 30 minutes at ambient temperature. Separate the aqueous portion. Concentrate the organic portion to 160 kg – 240 kg at 40 °C. Add ethanol (296 kg) to the organic portion. Concentrate the solution to 160 kg to 240 kg at 40 °C to provide an intermediate of tert-butyl (3-(2-(isoxazol-5-yl)-3-methox>’phenoxy)propyl)carbamate. Add ethanol (143 kg) and water (160 kg) to the concentrated solution. Add potassium hydroxide (31.8 kg) at 40 °C. Add ethanol (80 kg) and adjust the temperature to 45-50 °C. Stir for 4-6 hours at 45-50 °C and concentrate to 160 kg – 240 kg at 40 °C. Add water to the concentrate (160 kg) and acetic acid (9.0 kg) drop-wise to adjust the pH to 10-12 while mamtaining the temperature of the solution at 25 to 35 °C. Add ethyl acetate (771 kg) and acetic acid drop-wise to adjust the pH to 5-7 while maintaining the temperature of the solution at 25-35 °C. Add sodium chloride solution (118 kg, 25% aqueous solution). Stir the mixture for 20 minutes at ambient temperature. Let the solution stand for 30 minutes at ambient temperature. Separate Ihe aqueous portion. Heat the organic portion to 30-35 °C. Add water (358 kg) drop-wise. Stir the solution for 20 minutes while maintaining the temperature at 30 to 35 °C. Let the mixture stand for 30 minutes and separate the aqueous portion. Wash the organic portion with sodium chloride solution (588 kg, 25% aqueous) and concentrate the organic portion to 400 kg – 480 kg at 40-50 °C. Heat the concentrated solution to 50 °C to form a solution. Maintain the solution at 50 °C and add M-heptane (469 kg) drop-wise. Stir the solution for 3 hours at 50 °C before slowly cooling to ambient temperature to crystallize the product. Stir at ambient temperature for 15 hours and filter the crystals. Wash the crystals with ethanol/«-heptane (1 :2, 250 kg) and dry at 45 °C for 24 hours to provide the title compound (133.4 kg, 79.9%), rap. 104.22 °C,

Example 1

5-(5-(2-(3-Ammopropoxy)-6-memoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylammo)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile (S)-lactate monohydrate

Combine a THJF solution (22%) of fcrt-butyl (3-(2-(2-cyanoacetyl)-3-memoxyphenoxy)propyl)carbamate (1.0 eqv, this is define as one volume) with hydrazine (35%, 1.5 eqv), acetic acid (glacial, 1.0 eqv), water (1 volume based on the THF solution) and methanol (2 volumes based on the THF solution). This is a continuous operation. Heat the resulting mixture to 130 °C and 1379 kPa with a rate of V/Q = 70 minutes, tau = 60. Extract the solution with toluene (4 volumes), water (1 volume), and sodium carbonate (10% aqueous, 1 eqv). Isolate Ihe toluene layer and add to DMSO (0.5 volumes). Collect a solution of the intermediate compound tert-butyl (3-(2-(3-amino-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-methoxyphenoxy) propyl)carbamate (26.59 kg, 91%) in 10 days, mp = 247.17 °C as a DMSO solution (3 volumes of product). N-Eftylmorpholine (1.2 eqv) and 5-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile (1.15 eqv) in 2 volumes of DMSO is combined in a tube reactor at 80 °C, V/Q = 3 and tau = 170 minutes at ambient pressure. Add the product stream to methanol (20 vol). As a continuous process, filter the mixture and wash with methanol followed by MTBE. Air dry the material on the filter to give tert-butyl (3-(2-(3-((5-cyanopyrazm-2-yl)arnino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-methox>’phenoxy) propyl)carbamate in a continuous fashion (22.2 kg, 88.7%, 8 days). Dissolve a solution of fcrt-butyl (3-(2-(3-((5-cyanopyrazin-2-yl)amino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-methoxyphenoxy) propyl)carbamate in formic acid (99%, 142 kg) at ambient temperature and agitate for 4 hours to provide an intermediate of 5-((5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-yl)amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile formate. Dilute the solution with water (55 kg), (S)-lactic acid (30%, 176 kg) and distill the resulting mixture until < 22 kg formic acid remains. Crystallize the resulting residue from THF and wash with a THF -water (0.5% in THF) solution. Dry the wet cake at 30 °C at >10% relative humidity to give the title product as a white to yellow solid (24.04 kg, 85-90%), mp. 157 °C.

Alternate Preparation Example 1

5-(5-(2-(3-Ammopropoxy)-6-memoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylammo)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile (S)-lactate monohydrate

Add 5-({3-[2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl]-lH-pyrazol-5-yl}ammo)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (4.984 g, 13.33 mmol, 97.7 wt%) to n-PrOH (15.41 g, 19.21 mL) to form a slurry. Heat the slurry to 60 °C. Add (S)-lactic acid (1.329 g, 14.75 mmol) to water (19.744 mL) and add this solution to the slurry at 58 °C. Heat the solution to 60 °C and add n-PrOH (21.07 g, 26.27 mL). Seed the solution with 5-((5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-yl)ammo)pyrazme-2-carbom^ (S)-lactate monohydrate (48.8 mg, 0.1 mmol) and cool the solution to 40 °C over 35 minutes. Add H-PrOH (60.5 mL) to the slurry at 40 °C via a syringe pump over 2 hours and maintain the temperature at 40 °C. Once complete, air cool the slurry to ambient temperature for 2 hours, the cool the mixture in ice-water for 2 hours. Filter the product, wash the wet cake with 6:1 (v/v) rc-PrOH : H20 (15 mL), followed by n-PrOH (15 mL) and dry the wet cake for 20 minutes. Dry the solid overnight at 40 °C in vacuo to give the title compound as a white to yellow solid (5.621 g, 89.1%), m.p. 157 °C.

Crystalline Example 1

Crystalline 5-(5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3- ylamino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (S)-lactate monohydrate Prepare a slurry having 5-(5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3 -y lamino)py razine-2-carbonitrile (368 mg, 1.0 mmol) in a 10:1 THF-water (5 mL) solution and stir at 55 °C. Add (S)-lactic acid (110 mg, 1.22 mmol) dissolved in THF (1 mL). A clear solution forms. Stir for one hour. Reduce Ihe temperature to 44 °C and stir until an off-white precipitate forms. Filter the material under vacuum, rinse with THF, and air dry to give the title compound (296 mg, 80%).

X-Ray Powder Diffraction, Crystalline Example 1 Obtain the XRPD patterns of the crystalline solids on a Bruker D4 Endeavor X-ray powder diffractometer, equipped with a CuKa source (λ = 1.54060 A) and a Vantec detector, operating at 35 kV and 50 mA. Scan the sample between 4 and 40° in 2Θ, with a step size of 0.0087° in 2Θ and a scan rate of 0.5 seconds/step, and with 0.6 mm divergence, 5.28mm fixed anti-scatter, and 9.5 mm detector slits. Pack the dry powder on a quartz sample holder and obtain a smooth surface using a glass slide. It is well known in the crystallography art that, for any given crystal form, the relative intensities of the diffraction peaks may vary due to preferred orientation resulting from factors such as crystal morphology and habit. Where the effects of preferred orientation are present, peak intensities are altered, but the characteristic peak positions of the polymorph are unchanged. See, e.g. The U. S. Pharmacopeia 35 – National Formulary 30 Chapter <941> Characterization of crystalline and partially crystalline solids by XRPD Official December 1, 2012-May 1, 2013. Furthermore, it is also well known in the

crystallography art that for any given crystal form the angular peak positions may vary slightly. For example, peak positions can shift due to a variation in the temperature or humidity at which a sample is analyzed, sample displacement, or the presence or absence of an internal standard. In the present case, a peak position variability of ± 0.2 in 2Θ will take into account these potential variations without hindering the unequivocal identification of the indicated crystal form Confirmation of a crystal form may be made based on any unique combination of distinguishing peaks (in units of ° 2Θ), typically the more prominent peaks. The crystal form diffraction patterns, collected at ambient temperature and relative humidity, were adjusted based on NIST 675 standard peaks at 8.85 and 26.77 degrees 2-theta,

Characterize a prepared sample of crystalline 5-(5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)- lH-pyrazol-3-ylamino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (S)-lactate monohydrate by an XPRD pattern using CuKa radiation as having diffraction peaks (2-theta values) as described in Table 1 below. Specifically the pattern contains a peak at 12.6 in

combination with one or more of the peaks selected from the group consisting of 24.8, 25.5, 8.1, 6.6, 12.3, and 16.3 with a tolerance for the diffraction angles of 0.2 degrees.

PATENT

WO 2017105982

Example 1

5-(5-(2-(3-Aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile S)-lactate monohydrate

Combine a THF solution (22%) of i<?ri-butyl (3-(2-(2-cyanoacetyl)-3-methoxyphenoxy)propyl)carbamate (1.0 eqv, this is define as one volume) with hydrazine (35%, 1.5 eqv), acetic acid (glacial, 1.0 eqv), water (1 volume based on the THF solution) and methanol (2 volumes based on the THF solution). As this is a continuous operation, grams or kg is irrelevant in this processing methodology. Heat the resulting mixture to 130 °C and 1379 kPa with a rate of V/Q = 70 minutes (where V refers to the volume of the reactor and Q refers to flow rate), tau = 60. Extract the solution with toluene (4 volumes), water (1 volume), and sodium carbonate (10% aqueous, 1 eqv). Isolate the toluene layer and add to DMSO (0.5 volumes). Collect a solution of the intermediate compound i<?ri-butyl (3-(2-(3-amino- lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-methoxyphenoxy)

propyl)carbamate (26.59 kg, 91%) in 10 days, mp = 247.17 °C as a DMSO solution (3 volumes of product). N-ethylmorpholine (1.2 eqv) and 5-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile (1.15 eqv) in 2 volumes of DMSO is combined in a tube reactor at 80 °C, V/Q = 3 and tau = 170 minutes at ambient pressure. Add the product stream to methanol (20 vol). As a continuous process, filter the mixture and wash with methanol followed by MTBE. Air dry the material on the filter to give i<?ri-butyl (3-(2-(3-((5-cyanopyrazin-2-yl)amino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-methoxyphenoxy) propyl)carbamate in a continuous fashion (22.2 kg, 88.7%, 8 days). Dissolve a solution of i<?ri-butyl (3-(2-(3-((5-cyanopyrazin-2-yl)amino)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-methoxyphenoxy) propyl)carbamate in formic acid (99%, 142 kg) at ambient temperature and agitate for 4 hours to provide an intermediate of 5-((5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-yl)amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile formate. Dilute the solution with water (55 kg), (S)-lactic acid (30%, 176 kg) and distill the resulting mixture until < 22 kg formic acid remains. Crystallize the resulting residue from THF and wash with a THF -water (0.5% in THF) solution. Dry the wet cake at 30 °C at >10% relative humidity to give the title product as a white to yellow solid (24.04 kg, 85-90%), m.p. 157 °C.

Alternate Preparation Example 1

5-(5-(2-(3-Aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-ylamino)pyrazine-2- carbonitrile (S)-lactate monohydrate

Add 5-({3-[2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl]-lH-pyrazol-5-yl}amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (4.984 g, 13.33 mmol, 97.7 wt%) to n-PrOH (15.41 g, 19.21 mL) to form a slurry. Heat the slurry to 60 °C. Add (S)-lactic acid (1.329 g, 14.75 mmol) to water (19.744 mL) and add this solution to the slurry at 58 °C. Heat the solution to 60 °C and add n-PrOH (21.07 g, 26.27 mL). Seed the solution with 5-((5-(2-(3-aminopropoxy)-6-methoxyphenyl)-lH-pyrazol-3-yl)amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (S)-lactate monohydrate (48.8 mg, 0.1 mmol) and cool the solution to 40 °C over 35 minutes. Add ft-PrOH (60.5 mL) to the slurry at 40 °C via a syringe pump over 2 hours and maintain the temperature at 40 °C. Once complete, air cool the slurry to ambient temperature for 2 hours, then cool the mixture in ice-water for 2 hours. Filter the product, wash the wet cake with 6:1 (v/v) n-PrOH : H20 (15 mL), followed by n-PrOH (15 mL)

and dry the wet cake for 20 minutes. Dry the solid overnight at 40 °C in vacuo to give the title compound as a white to yellow solid (5.621 g, 89.1%), m.p. 157 °C.

Clip

Kilogram-scale prexasertib monolactate monohydrate synthesis under continuous-flow CGMP conditions

Science  16 Jun 2017:
Vol. 356, Issue 6343, pp. 1144-1150
DOI: 10.1126/science.aan0745

science 20173561144

Kilogram-Scale Prexasertib Monolactate Monohydrate Synthesis under Continuous-Flow CGMP Conditions


A multidisciplinary team from Eli Lilly reports the development and implementation of eight continuous unit operations for the synthesis of ca. 3 kg API per day under CGMP conditions (K. P. Cole et al., Science 20173561144). The recent drive toward more potent APIs that have a low annual demand (<100 kg) has made continuous synthesis a viable alternative to traditional batch processes with advantages which include reducing equipment footprint and worker exposure. In this report the authors describe the enablement of three continuous synthetic steps followed by a salt formation, using surge tanks between steps to allow each step to be taken offline if online PAT detects a loss in reaction performance. A combination of MSMPRs (mixed-suspension, mixed-product removal) vessels, plug-flow reactors, and dissolve-off filters were used to perform the chemistry, with an automated 20 L rotary evaporator used to concentrate process streams and perform solvents swaps. This paper gives an excellent account of the potential solutions to continuous API synthesis and is well worth a read for anyone contemplating such methodology.
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Integrated flow synthesis and purification process for prexasertib meets high industry standards

Photograph of continuous crystallizers during processing

Source: © Eli Lilly and Company

Continuous crystallisation, shown here, and subsequent filtration have been the most difficult-to-develop part of the prexasertib production process

Eli Lilly has taken an important step away from traditional batch process drug manufacturing by using an industry-first continuous process to make a compound for phase I and II clinical trials. Workers at Lilly’s Kinsale site in Ireland, did three steps involved in producing cancer drug candidate prexasertib continuously, under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) standards that ensure safety for human consumption.

Continuous processing relies on chemical and physical changes happening as substances flow through pipes. Isolated steps of this type are already well-established in the pharmaceutical industry. However, Lilly ‎principal research scientist Kevin Cole stresses that a series including reaction and purification steps like this has not been demonstrated before. And the company wants to go much further.

‘We envision entire synthetic routes consisting of many reaction and separation unit operations being executed simultaneously in flow, with heavy reliance on design space understanding, process analytical technologies and process modelling to ensure quality,’ Cole says. ‘We think this will drastically change the environment for pharmaceutical manufacturing.’

A scheme showing a continuous manufacturing production route for prexasertib monolactate monohydrate

Source: © Science / AAAS

The complex synthesis of prexasertib even requires the use of toxic hydrazine – used as a rocket fuel. As a result, and because of prexasertib’s toxicity, the drug was a good candidate to test out a comprehensive flow chemistry setup

In batch processes different chemical reaction and purification steps are typically done in large, costly vessels. However, this can be uneconomical when small amounts of drug molecules are needed for early stage clinical trials and, because drugs are getting more potent, increasingly in mainstream production.

By contrast, small volume continuous flow processing runs in more compact equipment in fume hoods. Flow systems can adapt to different processes, with cheap parts that can either be dedicated to specific drugs or readily replaced. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also been promoting continuous manufacturing because it integrates well with advanced process analytical technology. This helps pharmaceutical companies make high quality drugs with less FDA oversight.

Lilly chose prexasertib as its test case for such a process because it’s challenging to make. It is a chain of three aromatic rings, and one challenge comes because its central ring is formed using hydrazine. Hydrazine is used as a component in rocket fuel, and is also highly toxic. A second challenge comes from prexasertib itself, which, as a potent kinase inhibitor, is toxic to healthy cells, as well as cancerous ones, even at low doses. Lilly therefore wants to minimise its workers’ exposure.

Feeding the plant

Cole and his colleagues at Lilly’s labs in Indianapolis, US, have developed flow processes for three of the seven steps involved in prexasertib production. They start with the hydrazine step, which they could safely speed up by super-heating in the continuous process. After aqueous workup purification the solution of the two-ring intermediate solution runs into a ‘surge tank’. From there the solution flows intermittently into a rotary evaporator that removes solvents to concentrate it.

The second continuous flow step adds the third of prexasertib’s rings. In this case, the Lilly team purified the intermediate by crystallising it and filtering it out, washing away impurities. They could then redissolve the pure intermediate in formic acid, which also removes a protecting group, giving the desired prexasertib molecule. Automating this was probably the hardest part, Cole says. ‘Development of a predictive filtration model, equipment design and identification of formic acid as the solvent were keys to success,’ he explains. The final flow step then starts converting prexasertib to its final lactate salt form.

Photograph of deprotection gas/liquid reactor during processing

Source: © Eli Lilly and Company

This coil of tubes forms a low-cost deprotection gas/liquid reactor Eli Lilly uses during continuous processing of prexasertib

After developing the processes and systems in Indianapolis, Lilly shipped them to be equipped in an existing facility at its Kinsale manufacturing site at the cost of €1 million (£870,000). Once the prexasertib system was installed, the company was able to make 3kg of raw material per day for clinical trials. Cole describes the level of manual intervention needed as ‘moderate’.

Klavs Jensen from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology calls the paper describing the work ‘terrific’. ‘This work marks an important milestone in the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceuticals by demonstrating the feasibility of producing a modern kinase inhibitor under CGMP conditions,’ he says.

Likewise, Brahim Benyahia from Loughborough University, UK, calls this achievement ‘very interesting’. ‘The paper is another example that demonstrates the benefits and feasibility of the integrated continuous approach in pharma,’ he says.

Cole adds that Lilly has several other similar projects in advanced stages of development intended for the €35 million small-volume continuous plant it recently built in Kinsale. ‘We are committed to continuous manufacturing as well as full utilisation of our new facility,’ he says.

Correction: This article was updated on 16 June 2017 to clarify the chronology of the completion of the Kinsale, Ireland plant

References

REFERENCES

1: Lowery CD, VanWye AB, Dowless M, Blosser W, Falcon BL, Stewart J, Stephens J, Beckmann RP, Bence Lin A, Stancato LF. The Checkpoint Kinase 1 Inhibitor Prexasertib Induces Regression of Preclinical Models of Human Neuroblastoma. Clin Cancer Res. 2017 Mar 7. pii: clincanres.2876.2016. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-16-2876. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28270495.

2: Zeng L, Beggs RR, Cooper TS, Weaver AN, Yang ES. Combining Chk1/2 inhibition with cetuximab and radiation enhances in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Mol Cancer Ther. 2017 Jan 30. pii: molcanther.0352.2016. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0352. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28138028.

3: Ghelli Luserna Di Rorà A, Iacobucci I, Imbrogno E, Papayannidis C, Derenzini E, Ferrari A, Guadagnuolo V, Robustelli V, Parisi S, Sartor C, Abbenante MC, Paolini S, Martinelli G. Prexasertib, a Chk1/Chk2 inhibitor, increases the effectiveness of conventional therapy in B-/T- cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Oncotarget. 2016 Aug 16;7(33):53377-53391. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.10535. PubMed PMID: 27438145; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5288194.

REFERENCES

1: Zeng L, Beggs RR, Cooper TS, Weaver AN, Yang ES. Combining Chk1/2 inhibition with cetuximab and radiation enhances in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Mol Cancer Ther. 2017 Jan 30. pii: molcanther.0352.2016. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-16-0352. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28138028.

2: Ghelli Luserna Di Rorà A, Iacobucci I, Imbrogno E, Papayannidis C, Derenzini E, Ferrari A, Guadagnuolo V, Robustelli V, Parisi S, Sartor C, Abbenante MC, Paolini S, Martinelli G. Prexasertib, a Chk1/Chk2 inhibitor, increases the effectiveness of conventional therapy in B-/T- cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Oncotarget. 2016 Aug 16;7(33):53377-53391. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.10535. PubMed PMID: 27438145; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5288194.

3: King C, Diaz HB, McNeely S, Barnard D, Dempsey J, Blosser W, Beckmann R, Barda D, Marshall MS. LY2606368 Causes Replication Catastrophe and Antitumor Effects through CHK1-Dependent Mechanisms. Mol Cancer Ther. 2015 Sep;14(9):2004-13. doi: 10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-14-1037. PubMed PMID: 26141948.
4: Hong D, Infante J, Janku F, Jones S, Nguyen LM, Burris H, Naing A, Bauer TM, Piha-Paul S, Johnson FM, Kurzrock R, Golden L, Hynes S, Lin J, Lin AB, Bendell J. Phase I Study of LY2606368, a Checkpoint Kinase 1 Inhibitor, in Patients With Advanced Cancer. J Clin Oncol. 2016 May 20;34(15):1764-71. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2015.64.5788. PubMed PMID: 27044938.

Prexasertib
Prexasertib.svg
Clinical data
Pregnancy
category
  • IV
ATC code
  • none
Identifiers
CAS Number
ChemSpider
UNII
Chemical and physical data
Formula C18H19N7O2
Molar mass 365.40 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

////////////Prexasertib, прексасертиб , بريكساسيرتيب , 普瑞色替 , PHASE 2, LY-2606368, LY 2606368

N#CC1=NC=C(NC2=NNC(C3=C(OC)C=CC=C3OCCCN)=C2)N=C1

An insight into the therapeutic potential of quinazoline derivatives as anticancer agents


The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several quinazoline derivatives for clinical use as anticancer drugs. These include gefitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, afatinib, and vandetanib (Fig.1) [43]. Gefitinib (Iressa®) was approved by the FDA in 2003 for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients after failure of both platinum-based and/or docetaxel chemotherapies. In 2004, erlotinib (Tarceva®) was approved by the FDA for treating NSCLC. Furthermore, in 2005, the FDA approved erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine for treatment of locally advanced, unrespectable, or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Erlotinib acts as a reversible tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Lapatinib (Tykreb®) was approved by the FDA in 2012 for breast cancer treatment. It inhibits the activity of both human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways. Vandetanib (Caprelsa®) was approved by the FDA in 2011 for the treatment of metastatic medullary thyroid cancer. It acts as a kinase inhibitor of a number of cell receptors, mainly the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), EGFR, and rearranged during transfection (RET)-tyrosine kinase (TK). Afatinib (Gilotrif®) was approved by the FDA in 2013 for NSCLC treatment. It acts as an irreversible covalent inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) for EGFR and erbB-2 (HER2).

An insight into the therapeutic potential of quinazoline derivatives as anticancer agents

*Corresponding authors

Abstract

Cancer is one of the major causes of worldwide human mortality. A wide range of cytotoxic drugs are available on the market, and several compounds are in different phases of clinical trials. Many studies suggest that these cytotoxic molecules are also associated with different types of adverse side effects; therefore researchers around the globe are involved in the development of more efficient and safer anticancer drugs. In recent years, quinazoline and its derivatives have been considered as a novel class of cancer chemotherapeutic agents that show promising activity against different tumors. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review and highlight the recent developments concerning the anticancer activity of quinazoline derivatives as well as offer perspectives on the development of novel quinazoline derivatives as anticancer agents in the near future.

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2017/MD/C7MD00097A?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2FMD+%28RSC+-+Med.+Chem.+Commun.+latest+articles%29#!divAbstract

An insight into the therapeutic potential of quinazoline derivatives as anticancer agents

Med. Chem. Commun., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7MD00097A, Review Article
Shagufta, Irshad Ahmad
This article reviews the recent advances in the development of quinazoline derivatives as anticancer agents.
American University of Ras Al Khaimah UAE

Dr. Shagufta Waseem

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR – CHEMISTRY

Office No.: C42
Phone: Tel. Ext. 1331
str1
Biography

Dr. Shagufta joined the American University of Ras Al Khaimah as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry in the School of Arts and Sciences in August 2014. Prior to joining AURAK, Dr. Shagufta worked as an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of Modern Sciences, Dubai and American University of Ras Al Khaimah, UAE.

Dr. Shagufta also worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher Associate at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Oklahoma University, USA. She developed the noble drug delivery system for breast cancer drugs using carbon nanotubes and acquired the significant experience in nanotechnology and synthetic organic chemistry. She was appointed as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Visiting Scientist at Leiden/Amsterdam Centre for Drug Research (LACDR), Leiden, The Netherlands. Her research interest was In silico prediction and clinical evaluation of the cardiotoxicity of drug candidates. She was focused to identify chemical substructures as ‘chemical alerts’ that interact with this hERG channel.  Dr. Shagufta received a Ph.D. under the prestigious CSIR-JRF and SRF research fellowship in Chemistry from Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI)/Lucknow University, India in 2008, her PhD research work was in the field of estrogens and antiestrogens, design and synthesis of steroidal and non-steroidal tissue selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) for breast cancer, 3D-QSAR CoMFA and CoMSIA studies and analysis of pharmaceutical important molecules.

Dr. Shagufta has published 20 articles in peer-reviewed International journals of Royal Society of Chemistry, Elsevier, Wiley and Springer. Dr. Shagufta teaches courses such as General chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Chemistry in Everyday Life, and Spectroscopy along with laboratory courses.

Research and Publication

Research Interest-Dr. Shagufta 

Organic Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry focused on Breast Cancer and Osteoporosis, Heterogeneous catalysis and Nanotechnology.

Publications- Dr. Shagufta 

  1. Irshad Ahmad and Shagufta. 2015. Recent developments in steroidal and nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors for the chemoprevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancer. European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 102, 375-386.
  1. Irshad Ahmad and Shagufta. 2015. Sulfones: An important class of organic compounds with diverse biological activities. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 7 (3), 19-27.
  1. Priyanka Singh, Subal Kumar Dinda, Shagufta, Gautam Panda. 2013. Synthetic approach towards trisubstituted methanes and a chiral tertiary α-hydroxyaldehyde, possible intermediate for tetrasubstituted methanes. RSC Adv.(Royal Society of Chemistry) 3, 12100-12103. [ISSN: 2046-2069] 
  1. Donna J. Nelson, Shagufta, Ravi Kumar. 2012. Characterization of a tamoxifen-tethered single-walled carbon nanotube conjugate by using NMR spectroscopy. Anal. Bioanal. Chem.[Springer] 404:771–776. [ISSN: 1618-2642]
  1. Donna J. Nelson, Ravi Kumar, Shagufta. 2012. Regiochemical reversals in nitrosobenzene reactions with carbonyl compounds – α-aminooxy ketone versus α-hydroxyamino ketone products. Eur. J. Org. Chem.(Wiley-VCH) 6013-6020. [ISSN: 1099-0690]
  1. Munikumar R. Reddy, Elisabeth Klaasse, Shagufta, Adriaan P. IJzerman, Andreas Bender. 2010. Validation of an in silico hERG model and its applications to the virtual screening of commercial compound databases. Chem. Med. Chem. (Wiley-VCH)5: 716-729. [ISSN: 1860-7187] 
  1. Shagufta, Dong Guo, Elisabeth Klaasse, Henk de Vries, Johannes Brussee, Lukas Nalos, Martin B Rook, Marc A Vos, Marcel AG van der Heyden and Adriaan P. IJzerman. 2009. Exploring the chemical substructures essential for hERG K+ channel blockade by synthesis and biological evaluation of dofetilide analogues. Chem. Med. Chem.(Wiley-VCH) 4:1722-1732. [ISSN: 1860-7187]
  1. Shagufta, Ritesh Singh and Gautam Panda. 2009, Synthetic studies towards steroid-amino acid hybrids. Indian Journal of Chemistry.(Indian Science) 48B: 989-995. [ISSN: 0975-0983]
  1. Maloy K. Parai, Shagufta, Ajay K. Srivastava, Matthias Kassack, Gautam Panda. 2008. An unexpected reaction of phosphorous tribromide on chromanone, thiochromanone, 3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b]thiepin-5-one, 3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b]oxepin-5-one and tetralone derived allylic alcohols: a case study. Tetrahedron (Elsevier)64: 9962-9976. [ISSN: 0040-4020]
  1. Gautam Panda, Maloy Kumar Parai, Sajal Kumar Das, Shagufta, Manish Sinha, Vinita Chaturvedi, Anil K. Srivastava, Anil N. Gaikwad, Sudhir Sinha. 2007. Effect of substituents on diarymethanes for antitubercular activity. European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (Elsevier) 42: 410-419. [ISSN: 0223-5234]
  1. Shagufta and Gautam Panda. 2007. A new example of a steroid-amino acid hybrid: Construction of constrained nine membered D-ring steroids. Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry (Royal Society of Chemistry) 5 : 360- 366. [ISSN 1477-0539]
  1. Shagufta, Ashutosh Kumar, Gautam Panda and Mohammad Imran Siddiqi. 2007. CoMFA and CoMSIA 3D-QSAR analysis of diaryloxy methano phenanthrene derivatives as anti- tubercular agents. Journal of Molecular Modeling (Springer) 13: 99-107. [ISSN:0948-5023]
  1. Shagufta, Ajay Kumar Srivastava, Ramesh Sharma, Rajeev Mishra, Anil K. Balapure, Puvvada S. R. Murthy and Gautam Panda. 2006. Substituted phenanthrenes with basic amino side chains: A new series of anti-breast cancer agents. Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry (Elsevier) 14: 1497-1505. [ISSN: 0968-0896]
  1. Shagufta, Ajay Kumar Srivastava and Gautam Panda. 2006. Isomerization of allylic alcohols into saturated carbonyls using phosphorus tribromide. Tetrahedron Letters (Elsevier) 47: 1065-1070. [ISSN: 0040-4039]
  1. Gautam Panda, Jitendra K. Mishra, Shagufta, T. C. Dinadayalane and G. Narahari Sastry & Devendra S Negi. 2006. Hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) principle and difference in d-orbital configurations of metals explain the regioselectivity of nucleophilic attack to a carbinol in Friedel-Crafts reaction catalyzed by Lewis and protonic acids. Indian Journal of Chemistry (Indian Science)45B: 276-287. [ISSN: 0975-0983]
  1. Shagufta, Maloy Kumar Parai and Gautam Panda. 2005. A new strategy for the synthesis of aryl- and heteroaryl-substituted exocyclic olefins from allyl alcohols using PBr3. Terahedron Letters (Elsevier) 46: 8849-8852. [ISSN: 0040-4039]
  1. Shagufta, Resmi Raghunandan, Prakash R. Maulik and Gautam Panda. 2005. Convenient phosphorus tribromide induced syntheses of substituted 1-arylmethylnaphthalenes from 1-tetralone derivatives. Tetrahedron Letters (Elsevier) 46: 5337-5341. [ISSN: 0040-4039]
  1. Gautam Panda, Shagufta, Anil K. Srivastava and Sudhir Sinha. 2005. Synthesis and antitubercular activity of 2-hydroxy-aminoalkyl derivatives of diaryloxy methano phenanthrenes. Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters (Elsevier) 15: 5222-5225. [ISSN: 0960-894X]
  1. Sajal Kumar Das, Shagufta, and Gautam Panda. 2005. An easy access to unsymmetric trisubstituted methane derivatives (TRSMs). Tetrahedron Letters (Elsevier) 46: 3097-3102. [ISSN: 0040-4039]
  1. Shagufta, Jitendra Kumar Mishra, Vinita Chaturvedi, Anil K. Srivastava, Ranjana Srivastava and Brahm S. Srivastava. 2004. Diaryloxy methano phenanthrenes: a new class of antituberculosis agents. Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry (Elsevier) 12: 5269-5276. [ISSN: 0968-0896]

Dr. Irshad Ahmad

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR – CHEMISTRY

Office No.: C21
Phone: Tel. Ext. 1270
Biography

Dr. Irshad Ahmad joined the American University of Ras Al Khaimah in spring 2011 as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry. He received the master’s degree in chemistry from Jiwaji University in 1999. Subsequently acquired significant pharmaceutical industrial experience and developed cardio-selective beta-blocker drug molecule. He joined Central Salt and Marine Chemical Research Institute and Bhavnagar University under the sponsored project of DST and CSIR as a senior research fellow and received his PhD degree in chemistry in 2006. Subsequently, he accepted an invited scientist position in Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, South Korea and contributed his expertise in the field of Nanotechnology. Dr. Irshad is a recipient of prestigious European fellowships (NWO-Rubicon & FCT) and he joined Van’t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands as a NWO Rubicon fellow (Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, the Dutch Science Foundation), he acquired expertise in the field of supramolecular chemistry.

Afterward, he moved to the Leibniz Institute for Surface Modification, Leipzig, Germany under the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Grant. Dr. Irshad developed “Novel ultra-fast metathesis catalyst” for the production of high quality alternating copolymers. Subsequently Dr. Irshad, joined Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephenson Life Science Research Center, University of Oklahoma, USA as a postdoctoral research associate.  He developed strategies for the novel environmentally friendly reactions for the production of value added chemicals from biomass.

Dr. Irshad specialized in the area of chemistry, bridging the traditional disciplines of inorganic, organic and bio-organic chemistry. He contributed US and European patent for green and clean technology development. He has published peer-reviewed international research articles in the American Chemical Society (ACS), Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Cambridge, Elsevier Science, Wiley, and Springer journals. He has presented his research at several scientific conferences worldwide and received awards.

Research and Publication

Research Interest:

Asymmetric catalysis, Biotechnology, Metathesis, Material science, Nanotechnology, Pharmaceutical, Renewable energy and Supramolecular chemistry

Book:

Asymmetric Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysts: An Approach to the Synthesis of Chiral Drug Intermediates by Scholars Press, Germany. 2013, ISBN: 978-3-639-51138-3

Membership:   

  • American Chemical Society (ACS), USA
  • The Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK

Patents:

  • United States Patent 7,235,676, H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, S. Singh, I. Ahmad, R. V. Jasra, P. K. Ghosh, ‘Catalytic process for the preparation of epoxides from alkenes.
  • Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) WO/2005/095370, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, S. Singh, I. Ahmad, R. V. Jasra, P. K. Ghosh. An improved catalytic process for the preparation of epoxides from alkenes.
  • European Patent EP 1732910 A1, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, S. SinghA, I. Ahmad, R. V. Jasra, P. K. Ghosh, An improved catalytic process for the preparation of epoxides from alkenes. 

Publications:

  • Pramoda, U. Gupta, I. Ahmad, R. Kumar, C.N.R. Rao, Assemblies of Covalently Cross-linked Nanosheets of MoS2 and of MoS2-RGO: Synthesis and Novel Properties, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 4, 2016, 8989.
  • Shagufta, I. Ahmad, Recent insight into the biological activities of synthetic xanthone derivatives, European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 116, 2016, 267.
  • Ahmad, Shagufta, Recent Development in Steroidal and Non-steroidal Aromatase Inhibitors for the Chemoprevention of Estrogen dependent Breast Cancer, European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 102, 2015, 375.
  • Ahmad, Shagufta, Sulfones: An important class of organic compounds with diverse biological activities, International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 7, 3, 2015, 19.
  • Kumar, K. Gopalakrishnan, I. Ahmad, and C. N. R. Rao, BN-Graphene Composites Generated by Covalent Cross-Linking with Organic Linkers, Advanced Functional Materials, 25, 37, 2015, 5910.
  • Kumar, D. Raut, I. Ahmad,   U. Ramamurty,   T. K. Maji and   C. N. R. Rao. Functionality preservation with enhanced mechanical integrity in the nanocomposites of the metal–organic framework, ZIF-8, with BN nanosheets, Materials Horizons, 1, 2014, 513.
  • R. Buchmeiser, I. Ahmad, V. Gurram and P. S. Kumar, Pseudo-Halide and Nitrate Derivatives of Grubbs and Grubbs_Hoveyda Initiators: Some Structural Features Related to the Alternating Ring-Opening Metathesis Copolymerization of Norborn-2-ene with Cyclic Olefins, Macromolecule, 44 (11), 2011, 4098.
  • Ahmad, G. Chapman and K. M. Nicholas, Sulfite-Driven, Oxorhenium-Catalyzed Deoxydehydration of Glycols, Organometallics, 30 (10), 2011, 2810.
  • Vkuturi, G. Chapman, I. Ahmad, K. M. Nicholas, Rhenium-Catalyzed Deoxydehydration of Glycols by Sulfite, Inorganic Chemistry, 49, 2010, 4744.
  • I. Kureshy, I. Ahmad, K. Pathak, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, H. C. Bajaj, Solvent- free microwave synthesis of aryloxypropanolamines by ring opening of aryloxy epoxides, Research Letters in Organic Chemistry, 2009, Article ID 109717, doi:10.1155/2009/109717.
  • I. Kureshy, I. Ahmad, K. Pathak, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, R. V. Jasra, Sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous SBA-15 as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for the synthesis of chromenes from chromanols, Catalysis Communications 10, 2009, 572.
  • Pathak, I. Ahmad, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, R. V. Jasra, The synthesis of silica-supported chiral BINOL: Application in Ti-catalyzed asymmetric addition of diethylzinc to aldehydes, Journal of Molecular Catalysis A-Chemical 280, 2008, 106.
  • Kluwer, I. Ahmad, J. N. H. Reek, Improved synthesis of monodentate and bidentate 2- and 3-pyridylphosphines, Tetrahedron Letter 48, 2007, 2999.
  • Pathak, I. Ahmad, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, R. V. Jasra, Oxidative Kinetic Resolution of racemic Secondary Alcohols catalyzed by recyclable Dimeric Mn(III) salen catalysts, Journal of Molecular Catalysis A-Chemical 274, 2007, 120.
  • I. Kureshy, I. Ahmad, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, K. Pathak, R. V. Jasra, Easily Recyclable Chiral Polymeric Mn (salen) Complex for Oxidative Kinetic resolution of Racemic Secondary Alcohols, Chirality, 19, 2007, 352.
  • Pathak, A. P. Bhatt, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, I. Ahmad, R. V. Jasra, Enantioselective phenylacetylene addition to aromatic aldehydes and ketones catalyzed by recyclable polymeric Zn(II) salen complex, Chirality, 19, 2007, 1.
  • I. Kureshy, I. Ahmad, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, K. Pathak, R. V. Jasra, Chiral Mn (III) salen complexes covalently bonded on modified MCM-41 and SBA-15 as efficient catalysts for enantioselective epoxidation of non- functionalized alkenes, Journal of Catalysis A-Chemical, 238, 2006, 134.
  • Pathak, A. P. Bhatt, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, I. Ahmad, R. V. Jasra Enantioselective addition of diethylzinc to aldehydes using immobilized chiral BINOL-Ti complex on ordered mesoporous silicas, Tetrahedron: Asymmetry,17, 2006, 1506.
  • I. Kureshy, I. Ahmad, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, K. Pathak, R. V. Jasra, Encapsulation of chiral MnIII (salen) complex in ordered mesoporous silicas: An approach Towards heterogenizing asymmetric Epoxidation catalysts for non-Functionalized alkenes, Tetrahedron: Asymmetry 16, 2005, 3562.
  • I. Kureshy, I. Ahmad, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, S. Singh, P. H. Pandia, R. V. Jasra, New immobilized chiral Mn(III) salen complexes on pyridine N-Oxide Modified MCM-41as effective catalysts for epoxidation of nonfunctionalized Alkenes, Journal of Catalysis A- Chemical 235 , 2005, 28.
  • Pathak, A. P. Bhatt, S. H. R. Abdi, R. I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, I. Ahmad, R. V. Jasra Enantioselective addition of diethylzinc to aldehydes using immobilized chiral BINOL-Ti complex on ordered mesoporous silicas, Tetrahedron: Asymmetry,17, 2006, 1506.
  • I. Kureshy, S. Singh, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, I. Ahmad, A. Bhatt, R. V. Jasra, Improved catalytic activity of homochiral dimeric cobalt salen hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal racemic epoxides, Chirality, 17, 2005, 1.
  • I. Kureshy, S. Singh, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi , I. Ahmad, .Bhatt, R. V. Jasra, Environment friendly protocol for enantioselective epoxidation of non-functionalized Alkenes catalyzed by recyclable homochiral dimeric Mn(III)salen complexes with hydrogen peroxide and UHP adduct as Oxidants, Catalysis Letters, 107, 2005, 127.
  • I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, I. Ahmad, S. Singh, and R. V. Jasra, Dicationic chiral Mn (III) Salen complex exchange in the interlayers of Montmorillonite clay: a heterogeneous enantioselective catalyst for epoxidation of non-functionalised alkenes, Journal of Catalysis, 221, 2004, 234.
  • I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, S. Singh, I. Ahmad, R. V. Jasra, Catalytic asymmetric epoxidation of non-functionalised alkenes using polymeric Mn(III)Salen as catalysts and NaOCl as oxidant, Journal of Molecular Catalysis A-Chemical, 218, 2004, 141.
  • I. Kureshy, N.H. Khan, S.H. R. Abdi, A. P. Vyas, I. Ahmad, S. Singh, R. V. Jasra, Enantioselective Epoxidation of Non-Functionalised Alkenes catalysed by recyclable new Homo Chiral Dimeric Mn(III) Salen complexes, Journal of Catalysis, 224, 2004, 229.
  • I. Kureshy, N. H. Khan, S. H. R. Abdi, I. Ahmad, S. Singh, and R. V. Jasra, Immobilization of dicationic Mn(III) salen in the interlayers of montmorrillonite Clay for enantioselective epoxidation of non-functionalised alkenes, Catalysis Letters, 91, 2003, 207.

Selected International Events:

  • Applied Nanotechnology and Nanoscience International Conference (ANNIC), November 9-11, 2016, Barcelona, SPAIN.
  • 2nd International Conference on Smart Material Research (ICSMR), September 22-24, 2016, Istanbul, TURKEY.
  • Emirates Foundation’s Think Science Competition, April 17-19, 2016, World Trade Center, Dubai, UAE.
  • SSL Visiting Fellow 2013-15 at the International Centre for Materials Science, JNCASR, SSL, Bangalore, INDIA.
  • Global Conference on Materials Sciences (GC-MAS-2014), November 13-15, 2014, Antalya, TURKEY.
  • 5th Annual International Workshop on Advanced Material (IWAM 2013), organized by Ras Al Khaimah Center for Advance Materials (RAK CAM), Feb. 24-26, 2013 at Al Hamra Fort Hotel, Ras Al Khaimah, UAE.
  • Internal Quality Assurance in Higher Education Institutions workshop organized by the Commission for Academic Accreditation (CAA)- 2nd May 2011, Alghurair University campus, Dubai, UAE.
  • 45th American Chemical Society (ACS) Midwest Regional meeting, Oct. 27-30, 2010, Wichita, Kansas, USA.
  • 55th Annual American Chemical Society (ACS) PentaSectional Meeting- Biofuel, April 10, 2010, organized by American Chemical Society (ACS), Norman, Oklahoma, USA.
  • 18th International Symposium on Olefin Metathesis and Related Chemistry (ISOM XVIII), Organized by the Leibniz-Institute for Surface modification (IOM), August 2-7, 2009, Leipzig, GERMANY.
  • 16th International Symposium on Homogeneous Catalysis (ISHC-XVI), July 6-11, 2008, Organized by the Institute of Chemistry of Organometallic Compounds (ICCOM) of the Italian Research Council (CNR) held in Florence, ITALY.
  • European IDECAT Summer School on Computational Methods for Catalysis and Materials Science, 15-22 September 2007, Porquerolles, FRANCE.
  • 8th Netherland’s Catalysis and Chemistry Conference (NCCC), March 5-7, 2007, Noordwijkerhout, The NETHERLANDS.
  • 7th International Symposium on Catalysis Applied to Fine Chemicals organized by German Catalysis Society and Dechema. Oct 23-27, 2005, Bingen -Mainz, GERMANY.
  • 1st Indo- German Conference on Catalysis-A Cross Disciplinary Vision, February 6-8, 2003, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad, INDIA.

Novartis Kisqali® (ribociclib, LEE011) receives FDA approval as first-line treatment for HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer in combination with any aromatase inhibitor


Novartis logo: a global healthcare company

  • Approved based on a first-line Phase III trial that met its primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS) at interim analysis due to superior efficacy compared to letrozole alone[1]
  • At this interim analysis, Kisqali plus letrozole reduced risk of disease progression or death by 44% over letrozole alone, and demonstrated tumor burden reduction with a 53% overall response rate[1]
  • Kisqali plus letrozole showed treatment benefit across all patient subgroups regardless of disease burden or tumor location[1]
  • At a subsequent analysis with additional follow-up and progression events, a median PFS of 25.3 months for Kisqali plus letrozole and 16.0 months for letrozole alone was observed[2]

Basel, March 13, 2017 The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Kisqali®(ribociclib, formerly known as LEE011) in combination with an aromatase inhibitor as initial endocrine-based therapy for treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HR+/HER2-) advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

Kisqali is a CDK4/6 inhibitor approved based on a first-line Phase III trial that met its primary endpoint early, demonstrating statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) compared to letrozole alone at the first pre-planned interim analysis[1]. Kisqali was reviewed and approved under the FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation and Priority Review programs.

“Kisqali is emblematic of the innovation that Novartis continues to bring forward for people with HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer,” said Bruno Strigini, CEO, Novartis Oncology. “We at Novartis are proud of the comprehensive clinical program for Kisqali that has led to today’s approval and the new hope this medicine represents for patients and their families.”

The FDA approval is based on the superior efficacy and demonstrated safety of Kisqali plus letrozole versus letrozole alone in the pivotal Phase III MONALEESA-2 trial. The trial, which enrolled 668 postmenopausal women with HR+/HER2- advanced or metastatic breast cancer who received no prior systemic therapy for their advanced breast cancer, showed that Kisqali plus an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, reduced the risk of progression or death by 44 percent over letrozole alone (median PFS not reached (95% CI: 19.3 months-not reached) vs. 14.7 months (95% CI: 13.0-16.5 months); HR=0.556 (95% CI: 0.429-0.720); p<0.0001)[1].

More than half of patients taking Kisqali plus letrozole remained alive and progression free at the time of interim analysis, therefore median PFS could not be determined[1]. At a subsequent analysis with additional 11-month follow-up and progression events, a median PFS of 25.3 months for Kisqali plus letrozole and 16.0 months for letrozole alone was observed[2]. Overall survival data is not yet mature and will be available at a later date.

“In the MONALEESA-2 trial, ribociclib plus letrozole reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 44 percent over letrozole alone, and more than half of patients (53%) with measurable disease taking ribociclib plus letrozole experienced a tumor burden reduction of at least 30 percent. This is a significant result for women with this serious form of breast cancer,” said Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, MD, Professor of Medicine, Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and MONALEESA-2 Principal Investigator. “These results affirm that combination therapy with a CDK4/6 inhibitor like ribociclib and an aromatase inhibitor should be a new standard of care for initial treatment of HR+ advanced breast cancer.”

Kisqali is taken with or without food as a once-daily oral dose of 600 mg (three 200 mg tablets) for three weeks, followed by one week off treatment. Kisqali is taken in combination with four weeks of any aromatase inhibitor[1].

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in American women[3]. The American Cancer Society estimates more than 250,000 women will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in 2017[3]. Up to one-third of patients with early-stage breast cancer will subsequently develop metastatic disease[4].

Novartis is committed to providing patients with access to medicines, as well as resources and support to address a range of needs. The Kisqali patient support program is available to help guide eligible patients through the various aspects of getting started on treatment, from providing educational information to helping them understand their insurance coverage and identify potential financial assistance options. For more information, patients and healthcare professionals can call 1-800-282-7630.

The full prescribing information for Kisqali can be found at https://www.pharma.us.novartis.com/sites/www.pharma.us.novartis.com/files/kisqali.pdf(link is external).

About Kisqali® (ribociclib)
Kisqali (ribociclib) is a selective cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, a class of drugs that help slow the progression of cancer by inhibiting two proteins called cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6 (CDK4/6). These proteins, when over-activated, can enable cancer cells to grow and divide too quickly. Targeting CDK4/6 with enhanced precision may play a role in ensuring that cancer cells do not continue to replicate uncontrollably.

Kisqali was developed by the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR) under a research collaboration with Astex Pharmaceuticals.

About the MONALEESA Clinical Trial Program
Novartis is continuing to assess Kisqali through the robust MONALEESA clinical trial program, which includes two additional Phase III trials, MONALEESA-3 and MONALEESA-7, that are evaluating Kisqali in multiple endocrine therapy combinations across a broad range of patients, including premenopausal women. MONALEESA-3 is evaluating Kisqali in combination with fulvestrant compared to fulvestrant alone in postmenopausal women with HR+/HER2- advanced breast cancer who have received no or a maximum of one prior endocrine therapy. MONALEESA-7 is investigating Kisqali in combination with endocrine therapy and goserelin compared to endocrine therapy and goserelin alone in premenopausal women with HR+/HER2- advanced breast cancer who have not previously received endocrine therapy.

About Novartis in Advanced Breast Cancer
For more than 25 years, Novartis has been at the forefront of driving scientific advancements for breast cancer patients and improving clinical practice in collaboration with the global community. With one of the most diverse breast cancer pipelines and the largest number of breast cancer compounds in development, Novartis leads the industry in discovery of new therapies and combinations, especially in HR+ advanced breast cancer, the most common form of the disease.

Kisqali® (ribociclib) Important Safety Information
Kisqali® (ribociclib) can cause a heart problem known as QT prolongation. This condition can cause an abnormal heartbeat and may lead to death. Patients should tell their healthcare provider right away if they have a change in their heartbeat (a fast or irregular heartbeat), or if they feel dizzy or faint. Kisqali can cause serious liver problems. Patients should tell their healthcare provider right away if they get any of the following signs and symptoms of liver problems: yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes (jaundice), dark or brown (tea-colored) urine, feeling very tired, loss of appetite, pain on the upper right side of the stomach area (abdomen), and bleeding or bruising more easily than normal. Low white blood cell counts are very common when taking Kisqali and may result in infections that may be severe. Patients should tell their healthcare provider right away if they have signs and symptoms of low white blood cell counts or infections such as fever and chills. Before taking Kisqali, patients should tell their healthcare provider if they are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant as Kisqali can harm an unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant and who take Kisqali should use effective birth control during treatment and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose of Kisqali. Do not breastfeed during treatment with Kisqali and for at least 3 weeks after the last dose of Kisqali. Patients should tell their healthcare provider about all of the medicines they take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements since they may interact with Kisqali. Patients should avoid pomegranate or pomegranate juice, and grapefruit or grapefruit juice while taking Kisqali. The most common side effects (incidence >=20%) of Kisqali when used with letrozole include white blood cell count decreases, nausea, tiredness, diarrhea, hair thinning or hair loss, vomiting, constipation, headache, and back pain. The most common grade 3/4 side effects in the Kisqali + letrozole arm (incidence >2%) were low neutrophils, low leukocytes, abnormal liver function tests, low lymphocytes, and vomiting. Abnormalities were observed in hematology and clinical chemistry laboratory tests.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information for Kisqali, available at https://www.pharma.us.novartis.com/sites/www.pharma.us.novartis.com/files/kisqali.pdf(link is external).

About Novartis
Novartis provides innovative healthcare solutions that address the evolving needs of patients and societies. Headquartered in Basel, Switzerland, Novartis offers a diversified portfolio to best meet these needs: innovative medicines, cost-saving generic and biosimilar pharmaceuticals and eye care. Novartis has leading positions globally in each of these areas. In 2016, the Group achieved net sales of USD 48.5 billion, while R&D throughout the Group amounted to approximately USD 9.0 billion. Novartis Group companies employ approximately 118,000 full-time-equivalent associates. Novartis products are sold in approximately 155 countries around the world. For more information, please visit http://www.novartis.com.

Novartis is on Twitter. Sign up to follow @Novartis and @NovartisCancer at http://twitter.com/novartis(link is external) and http://twitter.com/novartiscancer (link is external)
For Novartis multimedia content, please visit www.novartis.com/news/media-library
For questions about the site or required registration, please contact media.relations@novartis.com

References
[1] Kisqali (ribociclib) Prescribing information. East Hanover, New Jersey, USA: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; March 2016.
[2] Novartis Data on File
[3] American Cancer Society. How Common Is Breast Cancer? Available at https://www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/about/how-common-is-breast-cancer.html(link is external). Accessed January 23, 2017.
[4] O’Shaughnessy J. Extending survival with chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. The Oncologist. 2005;10(Suppl 3):20-29.

Ribociclib skeletal.svg

рибоциклиб ريبوسيكليب 瑞波西利

Ribociclib « New Drug Approvals

////////////////Novartis,  Kisqali®, ribociclib, LEE011,  FDA 2017, HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer, рибоциклиб ريبوسيكليب 瑞波西利

FDA grants accelerated approval to new treatment for advanced ovarian cancer , Rubraca(rucaparib)


 

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. Rubraca is approved for women with advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies and whose tumors have a specific gene mutation (deleterious BRCA) as identified by an FDA-approved companion diagnostic test.

Read more.

For Immediate Release

December 19, 2016

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. Rubraca is approved for women with advanced ovarian cancer who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies and whose tumors have a specific gene mutation (deleterious BRCA) as identified by an FDA-approved companion diagnostic test.

“Today’s approval is another example of the trend we are seeing in developing targeted agents to treat cancers caused by specific mutations in a patient’s genes,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research and acting director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence. “Women with these gene abnormalities who have tried at least two chemotherapy treatments for their ovarian cancer now have an additional treatment option.”

The National Cancer Institute estimates that 22,280 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2016 and an estimated 14,240 will die of this disease. Approximately 15 to 20 percent of patients with ovarian cancer have a BRCA gene mutation.

BRCA genes are involved with repairing damaged DNA and normally work to prevent tumor development. However, mutations of these genes may lead to certain cancers, including ovarian cancers. Rubraca is a poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor that blocks an enzyme involved in repairing damaged DNA. By blocking this enzyme, DNA inside the cancerous cells with damaged BRCA genes may be less likely to be repaired, leading to cell death and possibly a slow-down or stoppage of tumor growth.

Today, the FDA also approved the FoundationFocus CDxBRCA companion diagnostic for use with Rubraca, which is the first next-generation-sequencing (NGS)-based companion diagnostic approved by the agency. The NGS test detects the presence of deleterious BRCA gene mutations in the tumor tissue of ovarian cancer patients. If one or more of the mutations are detected, the patient may be eligible for treatment with Rubraca.

The safety and efficacy of Rubraca were studied in two, single-arm clinical trials involving 106 participants with BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian cancer who had been treated with two or more chemotherapy regimens. BRCA gene mutations were confirmed in 96 percent of tested trial participants with available tumor tissue using the FoundationFocus CDxBRCA companion diagnostic. The trials measured the percentage of participants who experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors (overall response rate). Fifty-four percent of the participants who received Rubraca in the trials experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors lasting a median of 9.2 months.

Common side effects of Rubraca include nausea, fatigue, vomiting, low levels of red blood cells (anemia), abdominal pain, unusual taste sensation (dysgeusia), constipation, decreased appetite, diarrhea, low levels of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia) and trouble breathing (dyspnea).  Rubraca is associated with serious risks, such as bone marrow problems (myelodysplastic syndrome), a type of cancer of the blood called acute myeloid leukemia and fetal harm.

The agency approved Rubraca under its accelerated approval program, which allows approval of a drug to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition based on clinical data showing the drug has an effect on a surrogate (substitute) endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit. The sponsor is continuing to study this drug in patients with advanced ovarian cancer who have BRCA gene mutations and in patients with other types of ovarian cancer. The FDA also granted the Rubraca application breakthrough therapy designation and priority review status. Rubraca also received orphan drug designation, which provides incentives such as tax credits, user fee waivers and eligibility for exclusivity to assist and encourage the development of drugs intended to treat rare diseases.

Rubraca is marketed by Clovis Oncology, Inc. based in Boulder, Colorado. The FoundationFocus CDxBRCA companion diagnostic is marketed by Foundation Medicine, Inc. of Cambridge, Massachusetts.

////////////Rubraca, rucaparib, Clovis Oncology, Boulder, Colorado, fda 2016, cancer, ovarian

Consumption of a bioactive compound from Neem plant could significantly suppress development of prostate cancer


(From left to right) Principal Investigator Associate Professor Gautam Sethi and NUS PhD candidate Ms Zhang Jingwen from the Department of Pharmacology at the NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine led a research which found that a bioactive compound from the neem plant could significantly suppress development of prostate cancer.

Credit: National University of Singapore

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Image result for nimbolideImage result for nimbolide

Date:September 29, 2016Source:National University of SingaporeSummary:Oral administration of nimbolide, over 12 weeks shows reduction of prostate tumor size by up to 70 per cent and decrease in tumor metastasis by up to 50 per cent, report investigators.

Nimbolide.png

Nimbolide; NSC309909; NSC 309909; Methyl[8-(furan-3-yl)-2a,5a,6a,7-tetramethyl-2,5-dioxo-2a,5a,6,6a,8,9,9a,10a,10b,10c-decahydro-2h,5h-cyclopenta[d]naphtho[2,3-b:1,8-b’c’]difuran-6-yl]acetate; CCRIS 5723;

CAS 25990-37-8;
Molecular Formula: C27H30O7
Molecular Weight: 466.5229 g/mol

Oral administration of nimbolide, over 12 weeks shows reduction of prostate tumor size by up to 70 per cent and decrease in tumor metastasis by up to 50 per cent

A team of international researchers led by Associate Professor Gautam Sethi from the Department of Pharmacology at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that nimbolide, a bioactive terpenoid compound derived from Azadirachta indica or more commonly known as the neem plant, could reduce the size of prostate tumor by up to 70 per cent and suppress its spread or metastasis by half.

Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. However, currently available therapies for metastatic prostate cancer are only marginally effective. Hence, there is a need for more novel treatment alternatives and options.

“Although the diverse anti-cancer effects of nimbolide have been reported in different cancer types, its potential effects on prostate cancer initiation and progression have not been demonstrated in scientific studies. In this research, we have demonstrated that nimbolide can inhibit tumor cell viability — a cellular process that directly affects the ability of a cell to proliferate, grow, divide, or repair damaged cell components — and induce programmed cell death in prostate cancer cells,” said Assoc Prof Sethi.

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Nimbolide: promising effects on prostate cancer

Cell invasion and migration are key steps during tumor metastasis. The NUS-led study revealed that nimbolide can significantly suppress cell invasion and migration of prostate cancer cells, suggesting its ability to reduce tumor metastasis.

The researchers observed that upon the 12 weeks of administering nimbolide, the size of prostate cancer tumor was reduced by as much as 70 per cent and its metastasis decreased by about 50 per cent, without exhibiting any significant adverse effects.

“This is possible because a direct target of nimbolide in prostate cancer is glutathione reductase, an enzyme which is responsible for maintaining the antioxidant system that regulates the STAT3 gene in the body. The activation of the STAT3 gene has been reported to contribute to prostate tumor growth and metastasis,” explained Assoc Prof Sethi. “We have found that nimbolide can substantially inhibit STAT3 activation and thereby abrogating the growth and metastasis of prostate tumor,” he added.

The findings of the study were published in the April 2016 issue of the scientific journal Antioxidants & Redox Signaling. This work was carried out in collaboration with Professor Goh Boon Cher of Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at NUS, Professor Hui Kam Man of National Cancer Centre Singapore and Professor Ahn Kwang Seok of Kyung Hee University.

Neem — The medicinal plant

The neem plant belongs to the mahogany tree family that is originally native to India and the Indian sub-continent. It has been part of traditional Asian medicine for centuries and is typically used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Today, neem leaves and bark have been incorporated into many personal care products such as soaps, toothpaste, skincare and even dietary supplements.

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Future Research

The team is looking to embark on a genome-wide screening or to perform a large-scale study of proteins to analyse the side-effects and determine other potential molecular targets of nimbolide. They are also keen to investigate the efficacy of combinatory regimen of nimbolide and approved drugs such as docetaxel and enzalutamide for future prostate cancer therapy.



Journal Reference:

  1. Jingwen Zhang, Kwang Seok Ahn, Chulwon Kim, Muthu K. Shanmugam, Kodappully Sivaraman Siveen, Frank Arfuso, Ramar Perumal Samym, Amudha Deivasigamanim, Lina Hsiu Kim Lim, Lingzhi Wang, Boon Cher Goh, Alan Prem Kumar, Kam Man Hui, Gautam Sethi. Nimbolide-Induced Oxidative Stress Abrogates STAT3 Signaling Cascade and Inhibits Tumor Growth in Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Model. Antioxidants & Redox Signaling, 2016; 24 (11): 575 DOI:10.1089/ars.2015.6418

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A PAPER

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NIMBOLIDE 1

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2015/ra/c5ra16071e#!divAbstract

Nimbolide (1): Pale yellow crystals; C27H30O7;

FT-IR (KBr, υmax, cm -1): 2978, 1778, 1730, 1672, 1433, 1296, 1238, 1192, 1153, 1069, 951, 827, 750;

1H NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3) δH: 7.32 (t, J = 1.5 Hz, 1H), 7.28 (d, J = 9.5 Hz, 1H), 7.22 (s, 1H), 6.25 (m, 1H), 5.93 (d, J = 10.0 Hz, 1H), 5.53 (m, 1H), 4.62 (dd, J = 3.67 Hz, 12 .5 Hz, 1H), 4.27 (d, J = 3.5 Hz, 1H), 3.67 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 1H), 3.54 (s, 3H), 3.25 (dd, J = 5.0 Hz, 16.25 Hz, 1H), 3.19 (d, J = 12.5 Hz, 1H), 2.73 (t, J = 5.5 Hz, 1H), 2.38 (dd, J = 5.5 Hz, 16.25 Hz, 1H), 2.22 (dd, J = 6.5 Hz, 12.0 Hz, 1H), 2.10 (m, 1H), 1.70 (s, 3H), 1.47 (s, 3H), 1.37 (s, 3H), 1.22 (s, 3H);

13C NMR (125 MHz, CDCl3) δC: 200.8 (CO), 175.0 (COO), 173.0 (COO), 149.6 (CH), 144.8 (C), 143.2 (CH), 138.9 (CH), 136.4 (C), 131.0 (CH), 126.5 (C), 110.3 (CH), 88.5 (CH), 82.9 (CH), 73.4 (CH), 51.8 (OCH3), 50.3 (C), 49.5 (CH), 47.7 (CH), 45.3 (C), 43.7 (C), 41.2 (CH2), 41.1 (CH), 32.1 (CH2), 18.5 (CH3), 17.2 (CH3), 15.2 (CH3), 12.9 (CH3);

HR-MS (m/z): 467.20795 [(M+H)+ ].

Content Page No 1 1H NMR spectrum of nimbolide S1 2 13C NMR spectrum of nimbolide S2 3 Mass spectrum of nimbolide

Dr Gautam Sethi

phcgs@nus.edu.sg
Tel.: (65)6516 3267
Fax: (65)6873 7690

Academic Qualifications
BSc. Chem. (Hons) 1998 Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India.
MSc. Biochemistry 2000 Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India.
Ph.D. Biotechnology 2004 Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India.
Appointments to Date
Assistant
Professor
2008-date Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Postdoctoral Fellow 2004-2007 Department of Experimental Therapeutics,
The University of Texas.
MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston TX USA.
Senior Research Fellow 2002-2004 (CSIR-NET) at School of Biotechnology,
Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India.
Junior Research Fellow 2000-2002 (CSIR-NET) at School of Biotechnology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India.
Honours and Awards
2007 Ramalingaswamy fellowship from Department of Biotechnology, Government of India for outstanding research contributions in the field of Cancer Biology.
2002 Senior Research Fellowship award, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi, India.
2000 Junior Research Fellowship award, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi, India.
Research Interests
Selected Publications
Reviews and Book Chapters

 

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/////////NIMBOLIDE, CANCER, NEEM, PROSTRATE, National University of Singapore, Gautam Sethi

CC1=C2C(CC1C3=COC=C3)OC4C2(C(C5(C6C4OC(=O)C6(C=CC5=O)C)C)CC(=O)OC)C

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