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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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Lurbinectedin


Lurbinectedin.png

Lurbinectedin

(1’R,6R,6aR,7R,13S,14S,16R)-5-(Acetyloxy)-2′,3′,4′,6,6a,7,9′-decahydro-8,14-dihydroxy-6′,9-dimethoxy-4,10,23-trimethyl-spiro(6,16-(epithiopropaneoxymethano)-7.13-imino-12H-1,3-dioxolo[7,8]soquino[3,2-b][3]benzazocine-20,1′-[1H]pyrido[3,4-b]indol]-19-one

Molecular Weight784.87
FormulaC41H44N4O10S
CAS No.497871-47-3 (Lurbinectedin);
Chemical NameSpiro[6,16-(epithiopropanoxymethano)-7,13-imino-12H-1,3-dioxolo[7,8]isoquino[3,2-b][3]benzazocine-20,1′-[1H]pyrido[3,4-b]indol]-19-one, 5-(acetyloxy)-2′,3′,4′,6,6a,7,9′,13,14,16-decahydro-8,14-dihydroxy-6′,9-dimethoxy-4,10,23-trimethyl-, (1’R,6R,6aR,7R,13S,14S,16R)- (9CI)

fda approved , 6/15/2020 , ZEPZELCA, Pharma Mar S.A.

To treat metastatic small cell lung cancer
Drug Trials Snapshot

Research Code:PM-01183; PM-1183

MOA:RNA polymerase inhibitor

Indication:Ovarian cancer; Breast cancer; Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)лурбинектединلوربينيكتيدين芦比替定(1R,1’R,2’R,3’R,11’S,12’S,14’R)-5′,12′-Dihydroxy-6,6′-dimethoxy-7′,21′,30′-trimethyl-27′-oxo-2,3,4,9-tetrahydrospiro[β-carboline-1,26′-[17,19,28]trioxa[24]thia[13,30]diazaheptacyclo[12.9.6.13,11. 02,13.04,9.015,23.016,20]triaconta[4,6,8,15,20,22]hexaen]-22′-yl acetate [ACD/IUPAC Name]2CN60TN6ZS497871-47-3[RN]9397

Lurbinectedin is in phase III clinical development for the treatment of platinum refractory/resistant ovarian cancer.

Phase II clinical trials are also ongoing for several oncology indications: non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, small cell lung cancer, head and neck carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, biliary tract carcinoma, endometrial carcinoma, germ cell tumors and Ewing’s family of tumors.

Lurbinectedin, sold under the brand name Zepzelca, is a medication for the treatment of adults with metastatic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.[1][2][3]

The most common side effects include leukopenia, lymphopenia, fatigue, anemia, neutropenia, increased creatinine, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased glucose, thrombocytopenia, nausea, decreased appetite, musculoskeletal pain, decreased albumin, constipation, dyspnea, decreased sodium, increased aspartate aminotransferase, vomiting, cough, decreased magnesium and diarrhea.[1][2][3]

Lurbinectedin is a synthetic tetrahydropyrrolo [4, 3, 2-de]quinolin-8(1H)-one alkaloid analogue with potential antineoplastic activity.[4] Lurbinectedin covalently binds to residues lying in the minor groove of DNA, which may result in delayed progression through S phase, cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell death.[4]

Lurbinectedin was approved for medical use in the United States in June 2020.[5][1][2][3][6]

Structure

Lurbinectedin is structurally similar to trabectedin, although the tetrahydroisoquinoline present in trabectedin is replaced with a tetrahydro β-carboline which enables lurbinectedin to exhibit increased antitumor activity compared with trabectedin.[7]

Biosynthesis

Lurbinectedin a marine agent isolated from the sea squirt species Ecteinascidia turbinata. Synthetic production is necessary because very small amounts can be obtained from sea organisms. For example, one ton (1000 kg) of sea squirts are required to produce one gram of trabectedin, which is analogue of lurbinectedin. Complex synthesis of lurbinectedin starts from small, common starting materials that require twenty-six individual steps to produce the drug with overall yield of 1.6%.[8][9]

Mechanism of action

According to PharmaMar,[10] lurbinectedin inhibits the active transcription of the encoding genes. This has two consequences. On one hand, it promotes tumor cell death, and on the other it normalizes tumor microenvironment. Active transcription is the process by which there are specific signal where information contained in the DNA sequence is transferred to an RNA molecule. This activity depends on the activity of an enzyme called RNA polymerase II. Lurbinectedin inhibits transcription through a very precise mechanism. Firstly, lurbinectedin binds to specific DNA sequences. It is at these precise spots that slides down the DNA to produce RNA polymerase II that is blocked and degraded by lurbinectedin. Lurbinectedin also has important role in tumor microenvironment. The tumor cells act upon macrophages to avoid them from behaving like an activator of the immune system. Literally, macrophages work in any tumor’s favor. Macrophages can contribute to tumor growth and progression by promoting tumor cell proliferation and invasion, fostering tumor angiogenesis and suppressing antitumor immune cells.[11][12] Attracted to oxygen-starved (hypoxic) and necrotic tumor cells they promote chronic inflammation. So, not only that macrophages inhibit immune system avoiding the destruction of tumor cells, but they also create tumor tissue that allows tumor growth. However, macrophages associated with tumors are cells that are addicted to the transcription process. Lurbinectedin acts specifically on the macrophages associated with tumors in two ways: firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of macrophages that leads to cell death and secondly, inhibiting the production of tumor growth factors. In this way, lurbinectedin normalizes the tumor microenvironment.

History

Lurbinectedin was approved for medical use in the United States in June 2020.[5][1][2][3][6]

Efficacy was demonstrated in the PM1183-B-005-14 trial (Study B-005; NCT02454972), a multicenter open-label, multi-cohort study enrolling 105 participants with metastatic SCLC who had disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.[3][6] Participants received lurbinectedin 3.2 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion every 21 days until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.[3] The trial was conducted at 26 sites in the United States, Great Britain, Belgium, France, Italy, Spain and Czech Republic.[6]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted the application for lurbinectedin priority review and orphan drug designations and granted the approval of Zepzelca to Pharma Mar S.A.[3][13]

Research

Clinical Trials

Lurbinectedin can be used as monotherapy in the treatment of SCLC.  Lurbinectedin monotherapy demonstrated the following clinical results in relapsed extensive stage SCLC:

  • For sensitive disease (chemotherapy-free interval of ≥ 90 days) overall response rate (ORR) was 46.6% with 79.3% disease control rate and median overall survival (OS) being increased to 15.2 months.[14]
  • For resistant disease (chemotherapy-free interval of < 90 days) overall response rate (ORR) was 21.3% with 46.8% disease control rate and 5.1 months median overall survival (OS).[14]

Lurbinectedin is also being investigated in combination with doxorubicin as second-line therapy in a randomized Phase III trial.[medical citation needed] While overall survival in this trial is not yet known, response rates at second line were

  • 91.7% in sensitive disease with median progression-free survival of 5.8 months, and
  • 33.3% in resistant disease with median progression-free of 3.5 months.[15]

Lurbinectedin is available in the U.S. under Expanded Access Program (EAP).[15][16]

SYN

SYN

WO2011/147828

Ecteinascidins is a group of naturally occurring marine compounds and analogs thereof, which are well identified and structurally characterized, and are disclosed to have antibacterial and cytotoxic properties. See for example, European Patent 309.477; WO 03/66638; WO 03/08423; WO 01 /771 15; WO 03/014127; R. Sakai et al., 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, pages 1 1456- 1 1460; R. Menchaca et al., 2003, J. Org. Chem. 68(23), pages 8859-8866; and I. Manzanares et al., 2001 , Curr. Med. Chem. Anti-Cancer Agents, 1 , pages 257-276; and references therein. Examples of ecteinascidins are provided by ET-743, ET-729, ET-745, ET-759A, ET-759B, ET-759C, ET-770, ET-815, ET-731 , ET-745B, ET-722, ET-736, ET-738, ET-808, ET-752, ET-594, ET-552, ET-637, ET-652, ET-583, ET-597, ET-596, ET-639, ET-641 , and derivatives thereof, such as acetylated forms, formylated forms, methylated forms, and oxide forms.

The structural characterizations of such ecteinascidins are not given again explicitly herein because from the detailed description provided in such references and citations any person of ordinary skill in this technology is capable of obtaining such information directly from the sources cited here and related sources.

At least one of the ecteinascidin compounds, ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743), has been extensively studied, and it will be referred to

specifically herein to illustrate features of this invention. ET-743 is being employed as an anticancer medicament, under the international nonproprietary name (INN) trabectedin, for the treatment of patients with advanced and metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS), after failure of anthracyclines and ifosfamide, or who are unsuited to receive such agents, and for the treatment of relapsed platinum- sensitive ovarian cancer in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin.

ET-743 has a complex tris(tetrahydroisoquinoline) structure of formula

It was originally prepared by isolation from extracts of the marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata. The yield was low, and alternative preparative processes had been sought.

The first synthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in US Patent 5,721 ,362. This process employed sesamol as starting material and yielded ET-743 after a long and complicated sequence of 38 examples each describing one or more steps in the synthetic sequence.

An improvement in the preparation of one intermediate used in such process was disclosed in US Patent 6,815,544. Even with this improvement, the total synthesis was not suitable for manufacturing ET-743 at an industrial scale.

A hemisynthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in EP 1.185.536. This process employs cyanosafracin B as starting material to provide ET-743. Cyanosafracin B is a pentacyclic antibiotic obtained by fermentation from the bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens.

Cyanosafracin B

An improvement in such hemisynthetic process was disclosed in

EP 1.287.004.

To date four additional synthetic process (2 total and 2 formal synthesis) have been disclosed in patent applications JP 2003221395, WO 2007/045686, and WO 2007/087220 and in J. Org. Chem. 2008, 73, pages 9594-9600.

WO 2007/045686 also relates to the synthesis of Ecteinascidins-583 and 597 using intermediate compounds of formula:

Total synthesis strategies for the synthesis of the pentacyclic core -743 are overviewed in Figure I.

X = OH or CI

R = Protecting Group

WO2007087220 JOC 2008, 73, 9594-9600

EXAMPLE 3: SYNTHESIS OF COMPOUND 17.

Scheme X above provides an example of the synthesis of compound 17 from intermediate 10.

Compounds 16 and 17 are obtainable from intermediate 15 using the same procedures than those previously described in WO03/014127.

SYN

Reference:

1. WO2003014127A1.

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2003014127A1/en

The ecteinascidins are exceedingly potent antitumour agents isolated from the marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata. Several ecteinascidins have been reported previously in the patent and scientific literature. See, for example:

U.S. Patent No 5.256.663, which describes pharmaceutical compositions comprising matter extracted from the tropical marine invertebrate, Ecteinascidia turbinata, and designated therein as ecteinascidins, and the use of such compositions as antibacterial, antiviral, and/ or antitumour agents in mammals.

U.S. Patent No 5.089.273, which describes novel compositions of matter extracted from the tropical marine invertebrate, Ecteinascidia turbinata, and designated therein as ecteinascidins 729, 743, 745, 759A, 759B and 770. These compounds are useful as antibacterial and/or antitumour agents in mammals.

U.S. Patent No 5.149.804 which describes Ecteinascidins 722 and 736 (Et’s 722 and 736) isolated from the Caribbean tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata and their structures. Et’s 722 and 736 protect mice in vivo at very low concentrations against P388 lymphoma, B 16 melanoma, and Lewis lung carcinoma.

U.S. Patent No 5.478.932, which describes ecteinascidins isolated from the Caribbean tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata, which provide in vivo protection against P388 lymphoma, B 16 melanoma, M5076 ovarian sarcoma, Lewis lung carcinoma, and the LX- 1 human lung and MX- 1 human mammary carcinoma xenografts.

U.S. Patent No 5.654.426, which describes several ecteinascidins isolated from the Caribbean tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata, which provide in vivo protection against P388 lymphoma, B 16 melanoma, M5076 ovarian sarcoma, Lewis lung carcinoma, and the LX-1 human lung and MX- 1 human mammary carcinoma xenografts.

U.S. Patent No 5.721.362 which describes a synthetic process for the formation of ecteinascidin compounds and related structures.

U.S. Patent No 6.124.292 which describes a series of new ecteinascidin- like compounds.

WO 0177115, WO 0187894 and WO 0187895, which describe new synthetic compounds of the ecteinascidin series, their synthesis and biological properties.

See also: Corey, E.J., J. Am. Chem. Soc, 1996, 118 pp. 9202-9203; Rinehart, et al., Journal of Natural Products, 1990, “Bioactive Compounds from Aquatic and Terrestrial Sources”, vol. 53, pp. 771- 792; Rinehart et al., Pure and Appl. Chem., 1990, “Biologically active natural products”, vol 62, pp. 1277- 1280; Rinehart, et al., J. Org. Chem., 1990, “Ecteinascidins 729, 743, 745, 759A, 759B, and 770: potent Antitumour Agents from the Caribbean Tunicate Ecteinascidia tuminata”, vol. 55, pp. 4512-4515; Wright et al., J. Org. Chem., 1990, “Antitumour Tetrahydroisoquinoline Alkaloids from the Colonial ascidian Ecteinascidia turbinata”, vol. 55, pp. 4508-4512; Sakai et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1992, “Additional anitumor ecteinascidins from a Caribbean tunicate: Crystal structures and activities in vivo”, vol. 89, 1 1456- 1 1460; Science 1994, “Chemical Prospectors Scour the Seas for Promising Drugs”, vol. 266, pp.1324; Koenig, K.E., “Asymmetric Synthesis”, ed. Morrison, Academic Press, Inc., Orlando, FL, vol. 5, 1985, p. 71; Barton, et al., J. Chem Soc. Perkin Trans., 1 , 1982, “Synthesis and Properties of a Series of Sterically Hindered Guanidine bases”, pp. 2085; Fukuyama et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc, 1982, “Stereocontrolled Total Synthesis of (+)-Saframycin B”, vol. 104, pp. 4957; Fukuyama et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc, 1990, “Total Synthesis of (+) – Saframycin A”, vol. 112, p. 3712; Saito, et al., J. Org. Chem., 1989, “Synthesis of Saframycins. Preparation of a Key tricyclic Lactam Intermediate to Saframycin A”, vol. 54, 5391; Still, et al., J Org. Chem., 1978, “Rapid Chromatographic Technique for Preparative Separations with Moderate Resolution”, vol. 43, p. 2923; Kofron, W.G.; Baclawski, L.M., J. Org. Chem., 1976, vol. 41, 1879; Guan et al., J. Biomolec Struc & Dynam., vol. 10, pp. 793-817 (1993); Shamma et al., “Carbon- 13 NMR Shift Assignments of Amines and Alkaloids”, p. 206 (1979); Lown et al., Biochemistry, 21, 419-428 (1982); Zmijewski et al., Chem. Biol. Interactions, 52, 361-375 (1985); Ito, CRC Crit. Rev. Anal. Chem., 17, 65- 143 (1986); Rinehart et al., “Topics in Pharmaceutical Sciences 1989”, pp. 613-626, D. D. Breimer, D. J. A. Cromwelin, K. K. Midha, Eds., Amsterdam Medical Press B. V., Noordwijk, The Netherlands (1989); Rinehart et al., “Biological Mass Spectrometry”, 233-258 eds. Burlingame et al., Elsevier Amsterdam (1990); Guan et al., Jour. Biomolec. Struct. & Dynam., vol. 10 pp. 793-817 (1993); Nakagawa et al., J. Amer. Chem. Soc, 11 1 : 2721-2722 (1989);; Lichter et al., “Food and Drugs from the Sea Proceedings” (1972), Marine Technology Society, Washington, D.C. 1973, 117- 127; Sakai et al., J. Amer. Chem. Soc, 1996, 1 18, 9017; Garcϊa-Rocha et al., Brit. J. Cancer, 1996, 73: 875-883; and pommier et al., Biochemistry, 1996, 35: 13303- 13309;

In 2000, a hemisynthetic process for the formation of ecteinascidin compounds and related structures such as phthalascidin starting from natural bis(tetrahydroisoquinoline) alkaloids such as the saframycin and safracin antibiotics available from different culture broths was reported; See Manzanares et al., Org. Lett., 2000, “Synthesis of Ecteinascidin ET-743 and Phthalascidin Pt-650 from Cyanosafracin B”, Vol. 2, No 16, pp. 2545-2548; and International Patent Application WO 00 69862.

Ecteinascidin 736 was first discovered by Rinehart and features a tetrahydro-β-carboline unit in place of the tetrahydroisoquinoline unit more usually found in the ecteinascidin compounds isolated from natural sources; See for example Sakai et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1992, “Additional antitumor ecteinascidins from a Caribbean tunicate: Crystal structures and activities in vivo”, vol. 89, 11456-11460.

Figure imgf000005_0001

Et-736

WO 9209607 claims ecteinascidin 736, as well as ecteinascidin 722 with hydrogen in place of methyl on the nitrogen common to rings C and D of ecteinascidin 736 and O-methylecteinascidin 736 with methoxy in place of hydroxy on ring C of ecteinascidin 736.

Despite the positive results obtained in clinical applications in chemotherapy, the search in the field of ecteinascidin compounds is still open to the identification of new compounds with optimal features of cytotoxicity and selectivity toward the tumour and with a reduced systemic toxicity and improved pharmacokinetic properties.

PATENT

WO2001087894A1.

PATENT

 US 20130066067

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20130066067A1/en

  • Ecteinascidins is a group of naturally occurring marine compounds and analogs thereof, which are well identified and structurally characterized, and are disclosed to have antibacterial and cytotoxic properties. See for example, European Patent 309.477; WO 03/66638; WO 03/08423; WO 01/77115; WO 03/014127; R. Sakai et al., 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, pages 11456-11460; R. Menchaca et al., 2003, J. Org. Chem. 68(23), pages 8859-8866; and I. Manzanares et al., 2001, Curr. Med. Chem. AntiCancer Agents, 1, pages 257-276; and references therein. Examples of ecteinascidins are provided by ET-743, ET-729, ET-745, ET-759A, ET-759B, ET-759C, ET-770, ET-815, ET-731, ET-745B, ET-722, ET-736, ET-738, ET-808, ET-752, ET-594, ET-552, ET-637, ET-652, ET-583, ET-597, ET-596, ET-639, ET-641, and derivatives thereof, such as acetylated forms, formylated forms, methylated forms, and oxide forms.
  • [0003]
    The structural characterizations of such ecteinascidins are not given again explicitly herein because from the detailed description provided in such references and citations any person of ordinary skill in this technology is capable of obtaining such information directly from the sources cited here and related sources.
  • [0004]
    At least one of the ecteinascidin compounds, ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743), has been extensively studied, and it will be referred to specifically herein to illustrate features of this invention. ET-743 is being employed as an anticancer medicament, under the international nonproprietary name (INN) trabectedin, for the treatment of patients with advanced and metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS), after failure of anthracyclines and ifosfamide, or who are unsuited to receive such agents, and for the treatment of relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin.
  • [0005]
    ET-743 has a complex tris(tetrahydroisoquinoline) structure of formula
  • [0006]
    It was originally prepared by isolation from extracts of the marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata. The yield was low, and alternative preparative processes had been sought.
  • [0007]
    The first synthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,721,362. This process employed sesamol as starting material and yielded ET-743 after a long and complicated sequence of 38 examples each describing one or more steps in the synthetic sequence.
  • [0008]
    An improvement in the preparation of one intermediate used in such process was disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,815,544. Even with this improvement, the total synthesis was not suitable for manufacturing ET-743 at an industrial scale.
  • [0009]
    A hemisynthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in EP 1.185.536. This process employs cyanosafracin B as starting material to provide ET-743. Cyanosafracin B is a pentacyclic antibiotic obtained by fermentation from the bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens.
  • [0010]
    An improvement in such hemisynthetic process was disclosed in EP 1.287.004.
  • [0011]
    To date four additional synthetic process (2 total and 2 formal synthesis) have been disclosed in patent applications JP 2003221395, WO 2007/045686, and WO 2007/087220 and in J. Org. Chem. 2008, 73, pages 9594-9600.
  • [0012]
    WO 2007/045686 also relates to the synthesis of Ecteinascidins-583 and 597 using intermediate compounds of formula:
  • [0013]
    Total synthesis strategies for the synthesis of the pentacyclic core of ET-743 are overviewed in FIG. 1.

PAPER

Angewandte Chemie, International Edition (2019), 58(12), 3972-3975.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/anie.201900035

An efficient and scalable approach is described for the total synthesis of the marine natural product Et‐743 and its derivative lubinectedin, which are valuable antitumor compounds. The method delivers 1.6 % overall yield in 26 total steps from Cbz‐protected (S)‐tyrosine. It features the use of a common advanced intermediate to create the right and left parts of these compounds, and a light‐mediated remote C−H bond activation to assemble a benzo[1,3]dioxole‐containing intermediate.

Synthesis of lactone SI-5. A mixture of 19 (98.0 mg, 0.16 mmol, 1.0 equiv), 2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl) ethanamine hydrochloride salt (357.8 mg, 1.58 mmol, 10.0 equiv) and NaOAc (144 mg, 1.74 mmol, 11.0 equiv) in anhydrous EtOH (5.0 mL) was stirred at 60 oC for 5 h. The cooled mixture was extracted with ethyl acetate, and the organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated. The residue was purified by flash column chromatography (eluting with DCM/MeOH = 20:1) to afford compound SI-5 (109 mg, 87%). [α]𝐷 20 = -27.7 (c = 1.0, CHCl3). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.13 (d, J = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 6.82 (d, J = 2.2 Hz, 1H), 6.75 (dd, J = 8.8, 2.4 Hz, 1H), 6.66 (s, 1H), 6.22 (d, J = 1.0 Hz, 1H), 6.02 (d, J = 1.0 Hz, 1H), 5.78 (s, 1H), 5.08 (d, J = 11.7 Hz, 1H), 4.55 (s, 1H), 4.32 (s, 1H), 4.27 (d, J = 3.8 Hz, 1H), 4.23–4.15 (m, 2H), 3.81 (s, 3H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 3.47–3.39 (m, 2H), 3.20–3.10 (m, 1H), 3.06 (d, J = 18.1 Hz, 1H), 2.93 (dd, J = 18.2, 9.1 Hz, 1H), 2.86–2.76 (m, 1H), 2.62 (dt, J = 14.9, 4.8 Hz, 1H), 2.56–2.47 (m, 2H), 2.37 (s, 3H), 2.30–2.27 (m, 1H), 2.26 (s, 3H), 2.22 (s, 3H), 2.06 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 171.6, 168.8, 154.0, 148.2, 145.8, 143.1, 141.3, 140.5, 131.4, 130.8, 130.7, 129.4, 127.3, 120.9, 120.8, 118.4, 118.4, 113.9, 113.8, 112.2, 111.8, 110.2, 102.2, 100.5, 62.6, 61.4, 60.7, 60.5, 59.6, 59.6, 55.9, 54.9, 54.8, 42.1, 41.6, 39.9, 39.5, 29.5, 24.0, 20.8, 16.0, 9.9; HRMS (ESI) m/z calcd. for C42H43N5O9S [M + H]+ 794.2860, found 794.2858

Lurbinectedin: To a solution of SI-5 (80 mg, 0.1 mmol, 1.0 equiv) in acetonitrile and water (3:2, v/v, 10 mL) was added silver nitrate (514 mg, 3 mmol, 30.0 equiv). The suspension was stirred at 25 oC for 24 h before a mixture of saturated brine (5.0 mL) and saturated sodium hydrogen carbonate (5 mL) were added. The resultant mixture was stirred at 25 oC for 15 min before it was filtered through celite and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 × 20 mL). The combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated, and the residue was purified by flash column chromatography (eluting with DCM/MeOH = 20:1) to afford Lurbinectedin (71 mg, 89%). [α]𝐷 20 = -45.0 (c = 1.0, CHCl3) 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.13 (d, J = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 6.82 (d, J = 2.2 Hz, 1H), 6.74 (dd, J = 8.8, 2.4 Hz, 1H), 6.67 (s, 1H), 6.19 (d, J = 1.1 Hz, 1H), 5.99 (d, J = 1.1 Hz, 1H), 5.77 (br s, 1H), 5.20 (d, J = 11.3 Hz, 1H), 4.82 (s, 1H), 4.53–4.40 (m, 2H), 4.18–4.08 (m, 2H), 3.81 (s, 3H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 3.49 (d, J = 4.2 Hz, 1H), 3.24–3.13 (m, 2H), 3.01 (d, J = 17.9 Hz, 1H), 2.88–2.79 (m, 2H), 2.63 (dt, J = 15.0, 4.9 Hz, 1H), 2.56–2.47 (m, 2H), 2.37 (s, 3H), 2.32–2.27 (m, 1H), 2.26 (s, 3H), 2.19 (s, 3H), 2.05 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 171.4, 168.8, 153.8, 147.9, 145.5, 142.9, 141.1, 140.7, 131.8, 131.3, 130.7, 129.1, 127.3, 121.4, 121.0, 118.2, 115.6, 112.9, 111.9, 111.7, 110.0, 101.8, 100.4, 82.0, 62.4, 61.9, 60.4, 57.8, 57.5, 56.0, 55.8, 55.0, 42.2, 41.3, 39.8, 39.3, 29.3, 23.6, 20.6, 15.9, 9.7; HRMS (ESI) m/z calcd. for C41H44N4O10S [M – OH]+ 767.2745, found 767.2742.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e “Zepzelca- lurbinectedin injection, powder, lyophilized, for solution”DailyMed. 15 June 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d “Jazz Pharmaceuticals Announces U.S. FDA Accelerated Approval of Zepzelca (lurbinectedin) for the Treatment of Metastatic Small Cell Lung Cancer” (Press release). Jazz Pharmaceuticals. 15 June 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020 – via PR Newswire.
  3. Jump up to:a b c d e f g “FDA grants accelerated approval to lurbinectedin for metastatic small”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 15 June 2020. Retrieved 16 June 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. Jump up to:a b “Lurbinectedin”National Cancer Institute. Retrieved 15 June 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  5. Jump up to:a b “Zepzelca: FDA-Approved Drugs”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  6. Jump up to:a b c d “Drug Trials Snapshots: Zepzelca”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 15 June 2020. Retrieved 28 June 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. ^ Takahashi, Ryoko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawano, Mahiru; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yuri; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kimura, Tadashi (17 March 2016). “Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary”PLOS ONE11 (3): e0151050. Bibcode:2016PLoSO..1151050Tdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0151050PMC 4795692PMID 26986199.
  8. ^ Total synthesis of marine antitumor agents trabectedin and lurbinectedin | https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190219111659.htm
  9. ^ A Scalable Total Synthesis of the Antitumor Agents Et‐743 and Lurbinectedin | https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/anie.201900035
  10. ^ PharmaMar presentation of Lurbinectedin’s Mechanism of Action Lurbinectedin Mechanisim of Action | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8daELhxAXcQ
  11. ^ Qian BZ, Pollard JW (April 2010). “Macrophage diversity enhances tumor progression and metastasis”Cell141 (1): 39–51. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2010.03.014PMC 4994190PMID 20371344.
  12. ^ Engblom C, Pfirschke C, Pittet MJ (July 2016). “The role of myeloid cells in cancer therapies”. Nature Reviews. Cancer16 (7): 447–62. doi:10.1038/nrc.2016.54PMID 27339708S2CID 21924175.
  13. ^ “Lurbinectedin Orphan Drug Designation and Approval”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 1 August 2018. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  14. Jump up to:a b Paz-Ares, Luis G.; Trigo Perez, Jose Manuel; Besse, Benjamin; Moreno, Victor; Lopez, Rafael; Sala, Maria Angeles; Ponce Aix, Santiago; Fernandez, Cristian Marcelo; Siguero, Mariano; Kahatt, Carmen Maria; Zeaiter, Ali Hassan; Zaman, Khalil; Boni, Valentina; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Martinez Aguillo, Maite; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Awada, Ahmad; Kristeleit, Rebecca Sophie; Olmedo Garcia, Maria Eugenia; Subbiah, Vivek (20 May 2019). “Efficacy and safety profile of lurbinectedin in second-line SCLC patients: Results from a phase II single-agent trial”. Journal of Clinical Oncology37 (15_suppl): 8506. doi:10.1200/JCO.2019.37.15_suppl.8506.
  15. Jump up to:a b Calvo, E.; Moreno, V.; Flynn, M.; Holgado, E.; Olmedo, M.E.; Lopez Criado, M.P.; Kahatt, C.; Lopez-Vilariño, J.A.; Siguero, M.; Fernandez-Teruel, C.; Cullell-Young, M.; Soto Matos-Pita, A.; Forster, M. (October 2017). “Antitumor activity of lurbinectedin (PM01183) and doxorubicin in relapsed small-cell lung cancer: results from a phase I study”Annals of Oncology28 (10): 2559–2566. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdx357PMC 5834091PMID 28961837Lay summary.
  16. ^ Farago, Anna F; Drapkin, Benjamin J; Lopez-Vilarino de Ramos, Jose Antonio; Galmarini, Carlos M; Núñez, Rafael; Kahatt, Carmen; Paz-Ares, Luis (January 2019). “ATLANTIS: a Phase III study of lurbinectedin/doxorubicin versus topotecan or cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine in patients with small-cell lung cancer who have failed one prior platinum-containing line”Future Oncology15 (3): 231–239. doi:10.2217/fon-2018-0597PMC 6331752PMID 30362375.

External links

FDA grants accelerated approval to lurbinectedin for metastatic small cell lung cancer

On June 15, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to lurbinectedin(ZEPZELCA, Pharma Mar S.A.) for adult patients with metastatic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.

Efficacy was demonstrated in the PM1183-B-005-14 trial (Study B-005; NCT02454972), a multicenter open-label, multi-cohort study enrolling 105 patients with metastatic SCLC who had disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients received lurbinectedin 3.2 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion every 21 days until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

The main efficacy outcome measures were confirmed overall response rate (ORR) determined by investigator assessment using RECIST 1.1 and response duration. Among the 105 patients, the ORR was 35% (95% CI: 26%, 45%), with a median response duration of 5.3 months (95% CI: 4.1, 6.4). The ORR as per independent review committee was 30% (95% CI: 22%, 40%) with a median response duration of 5.1 months (95% CI: 4.9, 6.4).

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%), including laboratory abnormalities, were myelosuppression, fatigue, increased creatinine, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased glucose, nausea, decreased appetite, musculoskeletal pain, decreased albumin, constipation, dyspnea, decreased sodium, increased aspartate aminotransferase, vomiting, cough, decreased magnesium and diarrhea.

The recommended lurbinectedin dose is 3.2 mg/m2 every 21 days.

View full prescribing information for ZEPZELCA.

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

This review was conducted under Project Orbis, an initiative of the FDA Oncology Center of Excellence. Project Orbis provides a framework for concurrent submission and review of oncology drugs among international partners. For this application, a modified Project Orbis was undertaken because of the timing of submission to other regulatory agencies. FDA is collaborating with the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). FDA approved this application 2 months ahead of the goal date. The review is ongoing for the Australian TGA.

FDA granted lurbinectedin orphan drug  designation for the treatment of SCLC and priority review to this application. A description of FDA expedited programs is in the Guidance for Industry: Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions-Drugs and Biologics.

REFERENCES

1: Calvo E, Moreno V, Flynn M, Holgado E, Olmedo ME, Lopez Criado MP, Kahatt C, Lopez-Vilariño JA, Siguero M, Fernandez-Teruel C, Cullell-Young M, Soto Matos-Pita A, Forster M. Antitumor activity of lurbinectedin (PM01183) and doxorubicin in relapsed small-cell lung cancer: results from a phase I study. Ann Oncol. 2017 Oct 1;28(10):2559-2566. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdx357. PubMed PMID: 28961837.

2: Erba E, Romano M, Gobbi M, Zucchetti M, Ferrari M, Matteo C, Panini N, Colmegna B, Caratti G, Porcu L, Fruscio R, Perlangeli MV, Mezzanzanica D, Lorusso D, Raspagliesi F, D’Incalci M. Ascites interferes with the activity of lurbinectedin and trabectedin: Potential role of their binding to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. Biochem Pharmacol. 2017 Nov 15;144:52-62. doi: 10.1016/j.bcp.2017.08.001. Epub 2017 Aug 4. PubMed PMID: 28782526.

3: Belgiovine C, Bello E, Liguori M, Craparotta I, Mannarino L, Paracchini L, Beltrame L, Marchini S, Galmarini CM, Mantovani A, Frapolli R, Allavena P, D’Incalci M. Lurbinectedin reduces tumour-associated macrophages and the inflammatory tumour microenvironment in preclinical models. Br J Cancer. 2017 Aug 22;117(5):628-638. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2017.205. Epub 2017 Jul 6. PubMed PMID: 28683469; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5572168.

4: Jimeno A, Sharma MR, Szyldergemajn S, Gore L, Geary D, Diamond JR, Fernandez Teruel C, Soto Matos-Pita A, Iglesias JL, Cullell-Young M, Ratain MJ. Phase I study of lurbinectedin, a synthetic tetrahydroisoquinoline that inhibits activated transcription, induces DNA single- and double-strand breaks, on a weekly × 2 every-3-week schedule. Invest New Drugs. 2017 Aug;35(4):471-477. doi: 10.1007/s10637-017-0427-2. Epub 2017 Jan 20. PubMed PMID: 28105566.

5: Paz-Ares L, Forster M, Boni V, Szyldergemajn S, Corral J, Turnbull S, Cubillo A, Teruel CF, Calderero IL, Siguero M, Bohan P, Calvo E. Phase I clinical and pharmacokinetic study of PM01183 (a tetrahydroisoquinoline, Lurbinectedin) in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors. Invest New Drugs. 2017 Apr;35(2):198-206. doi: 10.1007/s10637-016-0410-3. Epub 2016 Nov 21. PubMed PMID: 27873130.

6: Harlow ML, Maloney N, Roland J, Guillen Navarro MJ, Easton MK, Kitchen-Goosen SM, Boguslawski EA, Madaj ZB, Johnson BK, Bowman MJ, D’Incalci M, Winn ME, Turner L, Hostetter G, Galmarini CM, Aviles PM, Grohar PJ. Lurbinectedin Inactivates the Ewing Sarcoma Oncoprotein EWS-FLI1 by Redistributing It within the Nucleus. Cancer Res. 2016 Nov 15;76(22):6657-6668. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-0568. Epub 2016 Oct 3. PubMed PMID: 27697767; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5567825.

7: Céspedes MV, Guillén MJ, López-Casas PP, Sarno F, Gallardo A, Álamo P, Cuevas C, Hidalgo M, Galmarini CM, Allavena P, Avilés P, Mangues R. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models. Dis Model Mech. 2016 Dec 1;9(12):1461-1471. Epub 2016 Oct 20. PubMed PMID: 27780828; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5200894.

8: Santamaría Nuñez G, Robles CM, Giraudon C, Martínez-Leal JF, Compe E, Coin F, Aviles P, Galmarini CM, Egly JM. Lurbinectedin Specifically Triggers the Degradation of Phosphorylated RNA Polymerase II and the Formation of DNA Breaks in Cancer Cells. Mol Cancer Ther. 2016 Oct;15(10):2399-2412. Epub 2016 Sep 14. PubMed PMID: 27630271.

9: Metaxas Y, Cathomas R, Mark M, von Moos R. Combination of cisplatin and lurbinectedin as palliative chemotherapy in progressive malignant pleural mesothelioma: Report of two cases. Lung Cancer. 2016 Dec;102:136-138. doi: 10.1016/j.lungcan.2016.07.012. Epub 2016 Jul 14. PubMed PMID: 27440191.

10: Lima M, Bouzid H, Soares DG, Selle F, Morel C, Galmarini CM, Henriques JA, Larsen AK, Escargueil AE. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair. Oncotarget. 2016 May 3;7(18):25885-901. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.8292. PubMed PMID: 27029031; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5041952.

11: Takahashi R, Mabuchi S, Kawano M, Sasano T, Matsumoto Y, Kuroda H, Kozasa K, Hashimoto K, Sawada K, Kimura T. Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary. PLoS One. 2016 Mar 17;11(3):e0151050. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151050. eCollection 2016. PubMed PMID: 26986199; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4795692.

12: Pernice T, Bishop AG, Guillen MJ, Cuevas C, Aviles P. Development of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of PM01183 (lurbinectedin), a novel antineoplastic agent, in mouse, rat, dog, Cynomolgus monkey and mini-pig plasma. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2016 May 10;123:37-41. doi: 10.1016/j.jpba.2016.01.043. Epub 2016 Jan 21. PubMed PMID: 26871278.

13: Elez ME, Tabernero J, Geary D, Macarulla T, Kang SP, Kahatt C, Pita AS, Teruel CF, Siguero M, Cullell-Young M, Szyldergemajn S, Ratain MJ. First-in-human phase I study of Lurbinectedin (PM01183) in patients with advanced solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Apr 15;20(8):2205-14. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-1880. Epub 2014 Feb 21. PubMed PMID: 24563480.

14: Romano M, Frapolli R, Zangarini M, Bello E, Porcu L, Galmarini CM, García-Fernández LF, Cuevas C, Allavena P, Erba E, D’Incalci M. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo biological effects of trabectedin, lurbinectedin (PM01183) and Zalypsis® (PM00104). Int J Cancer. 2013 Nov;133(9):2024-33. doi: 10.1002/ijc.28213. Epub 2013 May 25. PubMed PMID: 23588839.

15: Vidal A, Muñoz C, Guillén MJ, Moretó J, Puertas S, Martínez-Iniesta M, Figueras A, Padullés L, García-Rodriguez FJ, Berdiel-Acer M, Pujana MA, Salazar R, Gil-Martin M, Martí L, Ponce J, Molleví DG, Capella G, Condom E, Viñals F, Huertas D, Cuevas C, Esteller M, Avilés P, Villanueva A. Lurbinectedin (PM01183), a new DNA minor groove binder, inhibits growth of orthotopic primary graft of cisplatin-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 2012 Oct 1;18(19):5399-411. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-1513. Epub 2012 Aug 15. PubMed PMID: 22896654.

Clinical data
PronunciationLOOR-bih-NEK-teh-din
Trade namesZepzelca
Other namesPM-01183
AHFS/Drugs.comProfessional Drug Facts
MedlinePlusa620049
License dataUS DailyMedLurbinectedin
Pregnancy
category
US: N (Not classified yet)
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
Drug classAntineoplastic agent
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusUS: ℞-only [1]
Identifiers
IUPAC name[show]
CAS Number497871-47-3
PubChem CID57327016
DrugBank12674
ChemSpider32701856
UNII2CN60TN6ZS
KEGGD11644
ChEMBLChEMBL4297516
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)DTXSID30198065 
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC41H44N4O10S
Molar mass784.88 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)Interactive image
SMILES[hide]CC1=CC2=C([C@@H]3[C@@H]4[C@H]5C6=C(C(=C7C(=C6[C@@H](N4[C@H]([C@H](C2)N3C)O)COC(=O)[C@@]8(CS5)C9=C(CCN8)C2=C(N9)C=CC(=C2)OC)OCO7)C)OC(=O)C)C(=C1OC)O
InChI[hide]InChI=1S/C41H44N4O10S/c1-17-11-20-12-25-39(48)45-26-14-52-40(49)41(38-22(9-10-42-41)23-13-21(50-5)7-8-24(23)43-38)15-56-37(31(45)30(44(25)4)27(20)32(47)33(17)51-6)29-28(26)36-35(53-16-54-36)18(2)34(29)55-19(3)46/h7-8,11,13,25-26,30-31,37,39,42-43,47-48H,9-10,12,14-16H2,1-6H3/t25-,26-,30+,31+,37+,39-,41+/m0/s1Key:YDDMIZRDDREKEP-HWTBNCOESA-N

//////////lurbinectedin,  FDA 2020, 2020 APPROVALS, ORPHAN, priority review , ZEPZELCA, Pharma Mar, PM-1183, PM 1183, PM 01183, лурбинектедин , لوربينيكتيدين  , 芦比替定

Cc1cc2c(c(c1OC)O)[C@@H]3[C@@H]4[C@H]5c6c(c7c(c(c6OC(=O)C)C)OCO7)[C@@H](N4[C@H]([C@H](C2)N3C)O)COC(=O)[C@@]8(CS5)c9c(c1cc(ccc1[nH]9)OC)CCN8

Naxitamab


Danyelza (naxitamab) Cancer Medication - Cancer Health

(Heavy chain)
QVQLVESGPG VVQPGRSLRI SCAVSGFSVT NYGVHWVRQP PGKGLEWLGV IWAGGITNYN
SAFMSRLTIS KDNSKNTVYL QMNSLRAEDT AMYYCASRGG HYGYALDYWG QGTLVTVSSA
STKGPSVFPL APSSKSTSGG TAALGCLVKD YFPEPVTVSW NSGALTSGVH TFPAVLQSSG
LYSLSSVVTV PSSSLGTQTY ICNVNHKPSN TKVDKRVEPK SCDKTHTCPP CPAPELLGGP
SVFLFPPKPK DTLMISRTPE VTCVVVDVSH EDPEVKFNWY VDGVEVHNAK TKPREEQYNS
TYRVVSVLTV LHQDWLNGKE YKCKVSNKAL PAPIEKTISK AKGQPREPQV YTLPPSRDEL
TKNQVSLTCL VKGFYPSDIA VEWESNGQPE NNYKTTPPVL DSDGSFFLYS KLTVDKSRWQ
QGNVFSCSVM HEALHNHYTQ KSLSLSPGK
(Light chain)
EIVMTQTPAT LSVSAGERVT ITCKASQSVS NDVTWYQQKP GQAPRLLIYS ASNRYSGVPA
RFSGSGYGTE FTFTISSVQS EDFAVYFCQQ DYSSFGQGTK LEIKRTVAAP SVFIFPPSDE
QLKSGTASVV CLLNNFYPRE AKVQWKVDNA LQSGNSQESV TEQDSKDSTY SLSSTLTLSK
ADYEKHKVYA CEVTHQGLSS PVTKSFNRGE C
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H95, H146-H202, H222-L211, H228-H’228, H231-H’231, H263-H323, H369-H427, H’22-H’95, H’146-H’202, H’222-L’211, H’263-H’323, H’369-H’427, L23-L88, L131-L191, L’23-L’88, L’131-L’191)

Naxitamab

ナキシタマブ;

Antineoplastic, Anti-GD2 antibody

FormulaC6414H9910N1718O1996S44
CAS1879925-92-4
Mol weight144434.4882

FDA APPROVED 2020/11/25, Danyelza

FDA grants accelerated approval to naxitamab for high-risk neuroblastoma in bone or bone marrow

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-approvals-and-databases/fda-grants-accelerated-approval-naxitamab-high-risk-neuroblastoma-bone-or-bone-marrow

On November 25, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to naxitamab (DANYELZA, Y-mAbs Therapeutics, Inc.) in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for pediatric patients one year of age and older and adult patients with relapsed or refractory high-risk neuroblastoma in the bone or bone marrow demonstrating a partial response, minor response, or stable disease to prior therapy.

Efficacy was evaluated in patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma in the bone or bone marrow enrolled in two single-arm, open-label trials: Study 201 (NCT 03363373) and Study 12-230 (NCT 01757626). Patients with progressive disease following their most recent therapy were excluded. Patients received 3 mg/kg naxitamab administered as an intravenous infusion on days 1, 3, and 5 of each 4-week cycle in combination with GM-CSF subcutaneously at 250 µg/m2/day on days -4 to 0 and at 500 µg/m2/day on days 1 to 5. At the investigator’s discretion, patients were permitted to receive pre-planned radiation to the primary disease site in Study 201 and radiation therapy to non-target bony lesions or soft tissue disease in Study 12-230.

The main efficacy outcome measures were confirmed overall response rate (ORR) per the revised International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria (INRC) and duration of response (DOR). Among 22 patients treated in the multicenter Study 201, the ORR was 45% (95% CI: 24%, 68%) and 30% of responders had a DOR greater or equal to 6 months. Among 38 patients treated in the single-center Study 12-230, the ORR was 34% (95% CI: 20%, 51%) with 23% of patients having a DOR greater or equal to 6 months. For both trials, responses were observed in either the bone, bone marrow or both.

The prescribing information contains a Boxed Warning stating that naxitamab can cause serious infusion-related reactions and neurotoxicity, including severe neuropathic pain, transverse myelitis and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). To mitigate these risks, patients should receive premedication prior to each naxitamab infusion and be closely monitored during and for at least two hours following completion of each infusion.

The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥25% in either trial) in patients receiving naxitamab were infusion-related reactions, pain, tachycardia, vomiting, cough, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, hypertension, fatigue, erythema multiforme, peripheral neuropathy, urticaria, pyrexia, headache, injection site reaction, edema, anxiety, localized edema, and irritability. The most common Grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities (≥5% in either trial) were decreased lymphocytes, decreased neutrophils, decreased hemoglobin, decreased platelet count, decreased potassium, increased alanine aminotransferase, decreased glucose, decreased calcium, decreased albumin, decreased sodium and decreased phosphate.

The recommended naxitamab dose is 3 mg/kg/day (up to 150 mg/day) on days 1, 3, and 5 of each treatment cycle, administered after dilution as an intravenous infusion in combination with GM-CSF, subcutaneously at 250 µg/m2/day on days -4 to 0 and at 500 µg/m2/day on days 1 to 5. Treatment cycles are repeated every 4 to 8 weeks.

View full prescribing information for DANYELZA. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2020/761171lbl.pdf

This review used the Real-Time Oncology Review (RTOR) pilot program and the Assessment Aid, a voluntary submission from the applicant to facilitate the FDA’s assessment.

This application was granted accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

This application was granted priority review, breakthrough therapy, and orphan drug designation. A priority review voucher was issued for this rare pediatric disease product application. A description of FDA expedited programs is in the Guidance for Industry: Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions-Drugs and Biologics.

////////////Naxitamab, priority review, breakthrough therapy, orphan drug, FDA 2020, 2020 APPROVALS, Danyelza, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, PEPTIDE, ナキシタマブ, 

Lumasiran


OXLUMO (lumasiran) Structural Formula - Illustration

The molecular formula of lumasiran sodium is C530H669F10N173O320P43S6Na43 and the molecular weight is 17,286 Da.

lumasiran

CAS 1834610-13-7

FDA APPROVED, 11/23/2020, Oxlumo

To treat hyperoxaluria type 1
Press Release
Drug Trials Snapshot

RNA, (Gm-​sp-​Am-​sp-​Cm-​Um-​Um-​Um-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​C-​Am-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​U-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​C-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​C-​Um-​Gm-​Gm-​Am-​Am-​Am-​Um-​Am-​Um-​Am)​, 3′-​[[(2S,​4R)​-​1-​[29-​[[2-​(acetylamino)​-​2-​deoxy-​β-​D-​galactopyranosyl]​oxy]​-​14,​14-​bis[[3-​[[3-​[[5-​[[2-​(acetylamino)​-​2-​deoxy-​β-​D-​galactopyranosyl]​oxy]​-​1-​oxopentyl]​amino]​propyl]​amino]​-​3-​oxopropoxy]​methyl]​-​1,​12,​19,​25-​tetraoxo-​16-​oxa-​13,​20,​24-​triazanonacos-​1-​yl]​-​4-​hydroxy-​2-​pyrrolidinyl]​methyl hydrogen phosphate]​, complex with RNA (Um-​sp-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​A-​sp-​Um-​Am-​Um-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​U-​Um-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​C-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​C-​Am-​Gm-​Gm-​Am-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​U-​Gm-​(2′-​deoxy-​2′-​fluoro)​A-​Am-​Am-​Gm-​Um-​Cm-​sp-​Cm-​sp-​Am) (1:1)

Nucleic Acid Sequence

Sequence Length: 44, 23, 2115 a 8 c 7 g 14 umultistranded (2); modified

OXLUMO is supplied as a sterile, preservative-free, clear, colorless-to-yellow solution for subcutaneous administration containing the equivalent of 94.5 mg of lumasiran (provided as lumasiran sodium) in 0.5 Ml of water for injection and sodium hydroxide and/or phosphoric acid to adjust the pH to ~7.0.

Lumasiran An investigational RNAi Therapeutic for Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 (PH1)

Overview • Lumasiran (ALN-GO1) is an investigational, subcutaneously administered (under the skin) RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutic targeting glycolate oxidase (GO) in development for the treatment of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1).

• PH1 is a rare, life-threatening disease that can cause serious damage to kidneys and progressively to other organs.1

• PH1 is characterized by the pathologic overproduction of oxalate by the liver. Oxalate is an end product of metabolism that, when in excess, is toxic and accumulates in the kidneys forming calcium oxalate crystals.1,2

• Symptoms of PH1 are often associated with recurrent kidney stones and include flank pain, urinary tract infections, painful urination, and blood in the urine.2,3

• Currently, the only curative treatment is a liver transplant, to correct the metabolic defect, combined with a kidney transplant, to replace the terminally damaged kidneys.1,3 Clinical Development

• The safety and efficacy of lumasiran are being evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, global, multicenter Phase 3 study of approximately 30 PH1 patients, called ILLUMINATE-A (NCT03681184).

• The primary endpoint is percent change in 24-hour urinary oxalate excretion from baseline to Month 6.

• Key secondary and exploratory endpoints in ILLUMINATE-A will evaluate additional measures of urinary oxalate, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), safety, and tolerability. 

Regulatory Designations • Breakthrough Therapy Designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) • Priority Medicines (PRIME) Designation from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) • Orphan Drug Designations in both the U.S. and the European Union

Alnylam Announces U.S. Food and Drug Administration Has Granted Priority  Review of the Lumasiran New Drug Application for the Treatment of Primary  Hyperoxaluria Type 1 | Business Wire

/////////lumasiran, fda 2020, 2020 approvals, Oxlumo, Breakthrough Therapy Designation, Orphan Drug, Priority Medicines (PRIME) Designation

Teprotumumab-trbw


Image result for teprotumumab-trbw

Tepezza (teprotumumab-trbw)

Company: Horizon Therapeutics plc
Date of Approval: January 21, 2020
Treatment for: Thyroid Eye Disease

UNIIY64GQ0KC0A

CAS number1036734-93-6

R-1507 / R1507 / RG-1507 / RG1507 / RO-4858696 / RO-4858696-000 / RO-4858696000 / RO4858696 / RO4858696-000 / RV-001 / RV001

Tepezza (teprotumumab-trbw) is a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) and a targeted inhibitor of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) for the treatment of active thyroid eye disease (TED).

FDA Approves Tepezza (teprotumumab-trbw) for the Treatment of Thyroid Eye Disease (TED) – January 21, 2020

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Tepezza (teprotumumab-trbw) for the treatment of adults with thyroid eye disease, a rare condition where the muscles and fatty tissues behind the eye become inflamed, causing the eyes to be pushed forward and bulge outwards (proptosis). Today’s approval represents the first drug approved for the treatment of thyroid eye disease.

“Today’s approval marks an important milestone for the treatment of thyroid eye disease. Currently, there are very limited treatment options for this potentially debilitating disease. This treatment has the potential to alter the course of the disease, potentially sparing patients from needing multiple invasive surgeries by providing an alternative, non surgical treatment option,” said Wiley Chambers, M.D., deputy director of the Division of Transplant and Ophthalmology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Additionally, thyroid eye disease is a rare disease that impacts a small percentage of the population, and for a variety of reasons, treatments for rare diseases are often unavailable. This approval represents important progress in the approval of effective treatments for rare diseases, such as thyroid eye disease.”

Thyroid eye disease is associated with the outward bulging of the eye that can cause a variety of symptoms such as eye pain, double vision, light sensitivity or difficulty closing the eye. This disease impacts a relatively small number of Americans, with more women than men affected. Although this condition impacts relatively few individuals, thyroid eye disease can be incapacitating. For example, the troubling ocular symptoms can lead to the progressive inability of people with thyroid eye disease to perform important daily activities, such as driving or working.

Tepezza was approved based on the results of two studies (Study 1 and 2) consisting of a total of 170 patients with active thyroid eye disease who were randomized to either receive Tepezza or a placebo. Of the patients who were administered Tepezza, 71% in Study 1 and 83% in Study 2 demonstrated a greater than 2 millimeter reduction in proptosis (eye protrusion) as compared to 20% and 10% of subjects who received placebo, respectively.

The most common adverse reactions observed in patients treated with Tepezza are muscle spasm, nausea, alopecia (hair loss), diarrhea, fatigue, hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), hearing loss, dry skin, dysgeusia (altered sense of taste) and headache. Tepezza should not be used if pregnant, and women of child-bearing potential should have their pregnancy status verified prior to beginning treatment and should be counseled on pregnancy prevention during treatment and for 6 months following the last dose of Tepezza.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review, in addition to Fast Track and Breakthrough Therapy Designation. Additionally, Tepezza received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases or conditions. Development of this product was also in part supported by the FDA Orphan Products Grants Program, which provides grants for clinical studies on safety and efficacy of products for use in rare diseases or conditions.

The FDA granted the approval of Tepezza to Horizon Therapeutics Ireland DAC.

Teprotumumab (RG-1507), sold under the brand name Tepezza, is a medication used for the treatment of adults with thyroid eye disease, a rare condition where the muscles and fatty tissues behind the eye become inflamed, causing the eyes to be pushed forward and bulge outwards (proptosis).[1]

The most common adverse reactions observed in people treated with teprotumumab-trbw are muscle spasm, nausea, alopecia (hair loss), diarrhea, fatigue, hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), hearing loss, dry skin, dysgeusia (altered sense of taste) and headache.[1] Teprotumumab-trbw should not be used if pregnant, and women of child-bearing potential should have their pregnancy status verified prior to beginning treatment and should be counseled on pregnancy prevention during treatment and for six months following the last dose of teprotumumab-trbw.[1]

It is a human monoclonal antibody developed by Genmab and Roche. It binds to IGF-1R.

Teprotumumab was first investigated for the treatment of solid and hematologic tumors, including breast cancer, Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomanon-small cell lung cancer and sarcoma.[2][3] Although results of phase I and early phase II trials showed promise, research for these indications were discontinued in 2009 by Roche. Phase II trials still in progress were allowed to complete, as the development was halted due to business prioritization rather than safety concerns.

Teprotumumab was subsequently licensed to River Vision Development Corporation in 2012 for research in the treatment of ophthalmic conditions. Horizon Pharma (now Horizon Therapeutics, from hereon Horizon) acquired RVDC in 2017, and will continue clinical trials.[4] It is in phase III trials for Graves’ ophthalmopathy (also known as thyroid eye disease (TED)) and phase I for diabetic macular edema.[5] It was granted Breakthrough TherapyOrphan Drug Status and Fast Track designations by the FDA for Graves’ ophthalmopathy.[6]

In a multicenter randomized trial in patients with active Graves’ ophthalmopathy Teprotumumab was more effective than placebo in reducing the clinical activity score and proptosis.[7] In February 2019 Horizon announced results from a phase 3 confirmatory trial evaluating teprotumumab for the treatment of active thyroid eye disease (TED). The study met its primary endpoint, showing more patients treated with teprotumumab compared with placebo had a meaningful improvement in proptosis, or bulging of the eye: 82.9 percent of teprotumumab patients compared to 9.5 percent of placebo patients achieved the primary endpoint of a 2 mm or more reduction in proptosis (p<0.001). Proptosis is the main cause of morbidity in TED. All secondary endpoints were also met and the safety profile was consistent with the phase 2 study of teprotumumab in TED.[8] On 10th of July 2019 Horizon submitted a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the FDA for teprotumumab for the Treatment of Active Thyroid Eye Disease (TED). Horizon requested priority review for the application – if so granted (FDA has a 60-day review period to decide) it would result in a max. 6 month review process.[9]

History[edit]

Teprotumumab-trbw was approved for use in the United States in January 2020, for the treatment of adults with thyroid eye disease.[1]

Teprotumumab-trbw was approved based on the results of two studies (Study 1 and 2) consisting of a total of 170 patients with active thyroid eye disease who were randomized to either receive teprotumumab-trbw or a placebo.[1] Of the subjects who were administered Tepezza, 71% in Study 1 and 83% in Study 2 demonstrated a greater than two millimeter reduction in proptosis (eye protrusion) as compared to 20% and 10% of subjects who received placebo, respectively.[1]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted the application for teprotumumab-trbw fast track designation, breakthrough therapy designation, priority review designation, and orphan drug designation.[1] The FDA granted the approval of Tepezza to Horizon Therapeutics Ireland DAC.[1]

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h “FDA approves first treatment for thyroid eye disease”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Press release). 21 January 2020. Retrieved 21 January 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01868997
  3. ^ http://adisinsight.springer.com/drugs/800015801
  4. ^ http://www.genmab.com/product-pipeline/products-in-development/teprotumumab
  5. ^ http://adisinsight.springer.com/drugs/800015801
  6. ^ http://www.genmab.com/product-pipeline/products-in-development/teprotumumab
  7. ^ Smith, TJ; Kahaly, GJ; Ezra, DG; Fleming, JC; Dailey, RA; Tang, RA; Harris, GJ; Antonelli, A; Salvi, M; Goldberg, RA; Gigantelli, JW; Couch, SM; Shriver, EM; Hayek, BR; Hink, EM; Woodward, RM; Gabriel, K; Magni, G; Douglas, RS (4 May 2017). “Teprotumumab for Thyroid-Associated Ophthalmopathy”The New England Journal of Medicine376 (18): 1748–1761. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1614949PMC 5718164PMID 28467880.
  8. ^ “Horizon Pharma plc Announces Phase 3 Confirmatory Trial Evaluating Teprotumumab (OPTIC) for the Treatment of Active Thyroid Eye Disease (TED) Met Primary and All Secondary Endpoints”Horizon Pharma plc. Retrieved 22 March 2019.
  9. ^ “Horizon Therapeutics plc Submits Teprotumumab Biologics License Application (BLA) for the Treatment of Active Thyroid Eye Disease (TED)”Horizon Therapeutics plc. Retrieved 27 August 2019.

External links

Teprotumumab
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Human
Target IGF-1R
Clinical data
Other names teprotumumab-trbw, RG-1507
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
DrugBank
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.081.384 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
Formula C6476H10012N1748O2000S40
Molar mass 145.6 kg/mol g·mol−1

/////////Teprotumumab-trbw, APPROVALS 2020, FDA 2020, ORPHAN, BLA, fast track designation, breakthrough therapy designation, priority review designation, and orphan drug designation, Tepezza,  Horizon Therapeutics, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, 2020 APPROVALS,  active thyroid eye disease, Teprotumumab

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-first-treatment-thyroid-eye-disease

Brilliant blue G , ブリリアントブルーG ,


Brilliant Blue G.png

2D chemical structure of 6104-58-1

Brilliant blue G

FDA 2019, 12/20/2019, TISSUEBLUE, New Drug Application (NDA): 209569
Company: DUTCH OPHTHALMIC, PRIORITY; Orphan

OPQ recommends APPROVAL of NDA 209569 for commercialization of TissueBlue (Brilliant Blue G Ophthalmic Solution), 0.025%

Neuroprotectant

sodium;3-[[4-[[4-(4-ethoxyanilino)phenyl]-[4-[ethyl-[(3-sulfonatophenyl)methyl]azaniumylidene]-2-methylcyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-ylidene]methyl]-N-ethyl-3-methylanilino]methyl]benzenesulfonate

Formula
C47H48N3O7S2. Na
CAS
6104-58-1
Mol weight
854.0197

ブリリアントブルーG, C.I. Acid Blue 90

UNII-M1ZRX790SI

M1ZRX790SI

6104-58-1

Brilliant Blue G

Derma Cyanine G

SYN

////////////Brilliant blue G , ブリリアントブルーG , C.I. Acid Blue 90, FDA 2019, PRIORITY,  Orphan

CCN(CC1=CC(=CC=C1)S(=O)(=O)[O-])C2=CC(=C(C=C2)C(=C3C=CC(=[N+](CC)CC4=CC(=CC=C4)S(=O)(=O)[O-])C=C3C)C5=CC=C(C=C5)NC6=CC=C(C=C6)OCC)C.[Na+]

  • Benzenemethanaminium, N-[4-[[4-[(4-ethoxyphenyl)amino]phenyl][4-[ethyl[(3-sulfophenyl)methyl]amino]-2-methylphenyl]methylene]-3-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]-N-ethyl-3-sulfo-, hydroxide, inner salt, monosodium salt
  • Benzenemethanaminium, N-[4-[[4-[(4-ethoxyphenyl)amino]phenyl][4-[ethyl[(3-sulfophenyl)methyl]amino]-2-methylphenyl]methylene]-3-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-ylidene]-N-ethyl-3-sulfo-, inner salt, monosodium salt (9CI)
  • Brilliant Indocyanine G (6CI)
  • C.I. Acid Blue 90 (7CI)
  • C.I. Acid Blue 90, monosodium salt (8CI)
  • Acid Blue 90
  • Acid Blue G 4061
  • Acid Blue PG
  • Acid Bright Blue G
  • Acid Brilliant Blue G
  • Acid Brilliant Cyanine G
  • Acidine Sky Blue G
  • Amacid Brilliant Cyanine G
  • Anadurm Cyanine A-G
  • BBG
  • Benzyl Cyanine G
  • Biosafe Coomassie Stain
  • Boomassie blue silver
  • Brilliant Acid Blue G
  • Brilliant Acid Blue GI
  • Brilliant Acid Blue J
  • Brilliant Acid Cyanine G
  • Brilliant Blue G
  • Brilliant Blue G 250
  • Brilliant Blue J
  • Brilliant Indocyanine GA-CF
  • Bucacid Brilliant Indocyanine G
  • C.I. 42655
  • CBB-G 250
  • Colocid Brilliant Blue EG
  • Coomassie Blue G
  • Coomassie Blue G 250
  • Coomassie Brilliant Blue G
  • Coomassie Brilliant Blue G 250
  • Coomassie G 250
  • Cyanine G
  • Daiwa Acid Blue 300
  • Derma Cyanine G
  • Derma Cyanine GN 360
  • Dycosweak Acid Brilliant Blue G
  • Eriosin Brilliant Cyanine G
  • Fenazo Blue XXFG
  • Impero Azure G
  • Kayanol Cyanine G
  • Lerui Acid Brilliant Blue G
  • Milling Brilliant Blue 2J
  • NSC 328382
  • Optanol Cyanine G
  • Orient Water Blue 105
  • Orient Water Blue 105S
  • Polar Blue G
  • Polar Blue G 01
  • Polycor Blue G
  • Sandolan Cyanine N-G
  • Sellaset Blue B
  • Serva Blue G
  • Serva Blue G 250
  • Silk Fast Cyanine G
  • Simacid Blue G 350
  • Sumitomo Brilliant Indocyanine G
  • Supranol Cyanin G
  • Supranol Cyanine G
  • TissueBlue
  • Triacid Fast Cyanine G
  • Water Blue 105
  • Water Blue 105S
  • Water Blue 150
  • Xylene Brilliant Cyanine G

Avapritinib, アバプリチニブ , авапритиниб , أفابريتينيب ,


Image result for Avapritinib

Avapritinib.png

ChemSpider 2D Image | avapritinib | C26H27FN10

Avapritinib

BLU-285, BLU285

Antineoplastic, Tyrosine kinase inhibitor

アバプリチニブ

авапритиниб [Russian] [INN]
أفابريتينيب [Arabic] [INN]

(1S)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-[2-[4-[6-(1-methylpyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl]piperazin-1-yl]pyrimidin-5-yl]ethanamine

(1S)-1-(4-Fluorophenyl)-1-(2-{4-[6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl]-1-piperazinyl}-5-pyrimidinyl)ethanamine
10613
1703793-34-3 [RN]
513P80B4YJ
5-Pyrimidinemethanamine, α-(4-fluorophenyl)-α-methyl-2-[4-[6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl]-1-piperazinyl]-, (αS)-
(S)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(2-(4-(6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethan-1-amine
(αS)-(4-fluorophenyl)-α-methyl-2-[4-[6-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazin-4-yl]-1-piperazinyl]-5-pyrimidinemethanamine
Formula
C26H27FN10
CAS
1703793-34-3
Mol weight
498.558
No. Drug Name Active Ingredient Approval Date FDA-approved use on approval date*
1. Ayvakit avapritinib 1/9/2020 To treat adults with unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)

PRIORITY; Orphan, 

Avapritinib, sold under the brand name Ayvakit, is a medication used for the treatment of tumors due to one specific rare mutation: It is specifically intended for adults with unresectable or metastatic ( y) gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) that harbor a platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) exon 18 mutation.[1]

Common side effects are edema (swelling), nauseafatigue/asthenia (abnormal physical weakness or lack of energy), cognitive impairmentvomitingdecreased appetitediarrhea, hair color changes, increased lacrimation (secretion of tears), abdominal painconstipationrash. and dizziness.[1]

Ayvakit is a kinase inhibitor.[1]

History

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved avapritinib in January 2020.[1] The application for avapritinib was granted fast track designation, breakthrough therapy designation, and orphan drug designation.[1] The FDA granted approval of Ayvakit to Blueprint Medicines Corporation.[1]

Avapritinib was approved based on the results from the Phase I NAVIGATOR[2][3] clinical trial involving 43 patients with GIST harboring a PDGFRA exon 18 mutation, including 38 subjects with PDGFRA D842V mutation.[1] Subjects received avapritinib 300 mg or 400 mg orally once daily until disease progression or they experienced unacceptable toxicity.[1] The recommended dose was determined to be 300 mg once daily.[1] The trial measured how many subjects experienced complete or partial shrinkage (by a certain amount) of their tumors during treatment (overall response rate).[1] For subjects harboring a PDGFRA exon 18 mutation, the overall response rate was 84%, with 7% having a complete response and 77% having a partial response.[1] For the subgroup of subjects with PDGFRA D842V mutations, the overall response rate was 89%, with 8% having a complete response and 82% having a partial response.[1] While the median duration of response was not reached, 61% of the responding subjects with exon 18 mutations had a response lasting six months or longer (31% of subjects with an ongoing response were followed for less than six months).[1]

PATENT

WO 2015057873

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2015057873A1/en

Example 7: Synthesis of (R)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4- yl)pyrrolo[2, 1 -f\ [ 1 ,2,4] triazin-4-yl)piperazin- 1 -yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine and (S)- 1 – (4- fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (Compounds 43 and 44)

Figure imgf000080_0001
Figure imgf000080_0002

Step 1 : Synthesis of (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l- f] [ 1 ,2,4] triazin-4-yl)piperazin- 1 -yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methanone:

Figure imgf000081_0001

4-Chloro-6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l-/] [l,2,4]triazine (180 mg, 0.770 mmol), (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methanone, HC1 (265 mg, 0.821 mmol) and DIPEA (0.40 mL, 2.290 mmol) were stirred in 1,4-dioxane (4 mL) at room temperature for 18 hours. Saturated ammonium chloride was added and the products extracted into DCM (x2). The combined organic extracts were dried over Na2S04, filtered through Celite eluting with DCM, and the filtrate concentrated in vacuo. Purification of the residue by MPLC (25- 100% EtOAc-DCM) gave (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methanone (160 mg, 0.331 mmol, 43 % yield) as an off-white solid. MS (ES+) C25H22FN90 requires: 483, found: 484 [M + H]+.

Step 2: Synthesis of (5,Z)-N-((4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-p razol-4-yl)p rrolo[2, l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4- l)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methylene)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide:

Figure imgf000081_0002

(S)-2-Methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (110 mg, 0.908 mmol), (4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l- methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l-/][l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5- yl)methanone (158 mg, 0.327 mmol) and ethyl orthotitanate (0.15 mL, 0.715 mmol) were stirred in THF (3.2 mL) at 70 °C for 18 hours. Room temperature was attained, water was added, and the products extracted into EtOAc (x2). The combined organic extracts were washed with brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo while loading onto Celite. Purification of the residue by MPLC (0- 10% MeOH-EtOAc) gave (5,Z)-N-((4-fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methylene)-2- methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (192 mg, 0.327 mmol, 100 % yield) as an orange solid. MS (ES+) C29H3iFN10OS requires: 586, found: 587 [M + H]+.

Step 3: Synthesis of (lS’)-N-(l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4- l)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethyl)-2-methylpropane-2-

Figure imgf000082_0001

(lS’,Z)-N-((4-Fluorophenyl)(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)methylene)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (190 mg, 0.324 mmol) was taken up in THF (3 mL) and cooled to 0 °C. Methylmagnesium bromide (3 M solution in diethyl ether, 0.50 mL, 1.500 mmol) was added and the resulting mixture stirred at 0 °C for 45 minutes. Additional methylmagnesium bromide (3 M solution in diethyl ether, 0.10 mL, 0.300 mmol) was added and stirring at 0 °C continued for 20 minutes. Saturated ammonium chloride was added and the products extracted into EtOAc (x2). The combined organic extracts were washed with brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo while loading onto Celite. Purification of the residue by MPLC (0-10% MeOH-EtOAc) gave (lS’)-N-(l-(4-fluorophenyl)-l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l- ] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethyl)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (120 mg, 0.199 mmol, 61.5 % yield) as a yellow solid (mixture of diastereoisomers). MS (ES+) C3oH35FN10OS requires: 602, found: 603 [M + H]+. Step 4: Synthesis of l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2,l- f\ [ 1 ,2,4] triazin-4- l)piperazin- 1 -yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine:

Figure imgf000083_0001

(S)-N- ( 1 – (4-Fluorophenyl)- 1 -(2- (4- (6-( 1 -methyl- 1 H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo [2,1- /] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethyl)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (120 mg, 0.199 mmol) was stirred in 4 M HCl in 1,4-dioxane (1.5 mL)/MeOH (1.5 mL) at room temperature for 1 hour. The solvent was removed in vacuo and the residue triturated in EtOAc to give l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l -methyl- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/][l,2,4]triazin-4- yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine, HCl (110 mg, 0.206 mmol, 103 % yield) as a pale yellow solid. MS (ES+) C26H27FN10requires: 498, found: 482 [M- 17 + H]+, 499 [M + H]+.

Step 5: Chiral separation of (R)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4- yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine and (5)-1-(4- fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- 1 -yl)pyrimidin- -yl)ethanamine:

Figure imgf000083_0002

The enantiomers of racemic l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl- lH-pyrazol-4- yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (94 mg, 0.189 mmol) were separated by chiral SFC to give (R)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH- pyrazol-4-yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/][l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin- l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (34.4 mg, 0.069 mmol, 73.2 % yield) and (lS,)-l-(4-fluorophenyl)- l-(2-(4-(6-(l-methyl-lH-pyrazol-4- yl)pyrrolo[2, l-/] [l,2,4]triazin-4-yl)piperazin-l-yl)pyrimidin-5-yl)ethanamine (32.1 mg, 0.064 mmol, 68.3 % yield). The absolute stereochemistry was assigned randomly. MS (ES+)

C26H27FN10 requires: 498, found: 499 [M + H]+.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j k l m “FDA approves the first targeted therapy to treat a rare mutation in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Press release). 9 January 2020. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 9 January 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ “Blueprint Medicines Announces FDA Approval of AYVAKIT (avapritinib) for the Treatment of Adults with Unresectable or Metastatic PDGFRA Exon 18 Mutant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor”Blueprint Medicines Corporation (Press release). 9 January 2020. Archived from the original on 11 January 2020. Retrieved 9 January 2020.
  3. ^ “Blueprint Medicines Announces Updated NAVIGATOR Trial Results in Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Supporting Development of Avapritinib Across All Lines of Therapy”Blueprint Medicines Corporation (Press release). 15 November 2018. Archived from the original on 10 January 2020. Retrieved 9 January 2020.

Further reading

  • Wu CP, Lusvarghi S, Wang JC, et al. (July 2019). “Avapritinib: A Selective Inhibitor of KIT and PDGFRα that Reverses ABCB1 and ABCG2-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Cell Lines”. Mol. Pharm16 (7): 3040–3052. doi:10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.9b00274PMID 31117741.
  • Gebreyohannes YK, Wozniak A, Zhai ME, et al. (January 2019). “Robust Activity of Avapritinib, Potent and Highly Selective Inhibitor of Mutated KIT, in Patient-derived Xenograft Models of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors”. Clin. Cancer Res25 (2): 609–618. doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-1858PMID 30274985.

External links

Avapritinib
Clinical data
Trade names Ayvakit
Other names BLU-285, BLU285
License data
Routes of
administration
By mouth
Drug class Antineoplastic agents
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C26H27FN10
Molar mass 498.570 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

///////Avapritinib, 2020 APPROVALS, PRIORITY, Orphan, BLU-285, BLU285, FDA 2020,  Ayvakit, アバプリチニブ  , авапритиниб أفابريتينيب 

FDA approves first treatment Givlaari (givosiran) for inherited rare disease


Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted approval to Givlaari (givosiran) for the treatment of adult patients with acute hepatic porphyria, a genetic disorder resulting in the buildup of toxic porphyrin molecules which are formed during the production of heme (which helps bind oxygen in the blood).
“This buildup can cause acute attacks, known as porphyria attacks, which can lead to severe pain and paralysis, respiratory failure, seizures and mental status changes. These attacks occur suddenly and can produce permanent neurological damage and death,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Oncologic Diseases in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Prior to today’s approval, treatment options have only provided partial relief from the intense unremitting pain that characterizes these attacks. The drug approved today can treat this disease by helping to reduce the number of attacks that disrupt the lives of patients.”
The approval of Givlaari was based on the results of a clinical trial of 94 patients with acute hepatic porphyria. Patients received a placebo or Givlaari. Givlaari’s performance was measured by the rate of porphyria attacks that required hospitalizations, urgent health care visits or intravenous infusion of hemin at home. Patients who received Givlaari experienced 70% fewer porphyria attacks compared to patients receiving a placebo.
Common side effects for patients taking Givlaari were nausea and injection site reactions. Health care professionals are advised to monitor patients for anaphylactic (allergic) reaction and renal (kidney) function. Patients should have their liver function tested before and periodically during treatment.
The FDA granted this application Breakthrough Therapy designation and Priority Review designation. Givlaari also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases. The FDA granted the approval of Givlaari to Alnylam Pharmaceuticals.

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///////////Givlaari, givosiran, fda 2019, Breakthrough Therapy designation,  Priority ReviewOrphan Drug

FDA approves first treatment Dupixent (Dupilumab) for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Dupixent (dupilumab) to treat adults with nasal polyps (growths on the inner lining of the sinuses) accompanied by chronic rhinosinusitis (prolonged inflammation of the sinuses and nasal cavity). This is the first treatment approved for inadequately controlled chronic rhinosinusis with nasal polyps.

“Nasal polyps can lead to loss of smell and often patients require surgery to remove the polyps,” said Sally Seymour, M.D., Director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Rheumatology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Dupixent provides an important treatment option for patients whose nasal polyps are not …

June 26, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Dupixent (dupilumab) to treat adults with nasal polyps (growths on the inner lining of the sinuses) accompanied by chronic rhinosinusitis (prolonged inflammation of the sinuses and nasal cavity). This is the first treatment approved for inadequately controlled chronic rhinosinusis with nasal polyps.

“Nasal polyps can lead to loss of smell and often patients require surgery to remove the polyps,” said Sally Seymour, M.D., Director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Rheumatology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Dupixent provides an important treatment option for patients whose nasal polyps are not adequately controlled with intranasal steroids. It also reduces the need for nasal polyp surgery and oral steroids.”

Dupixent is given by injection. The efficacy and safety of Dupixent were established in two studies with 724 patients, 18 years and older with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps who were symptomatic despite taking intranasal corticosteroids. Patients who received Dupixent had statistically significant reductions in their nasal polyp size and nasal congestion compared to the placebo group. Patients taking Dupixent also reported an increased ability to smell and required less nasal polyp surgery and oral steroids.

Dupixent may cause serious allergic reactions and eye problems, such as inflammation of the eye (conjunctivitis) and inflammation of the cornea (keratitis). If patients experience new or worsening eye symptoms, such as redness, itching, pain or visual changes, they should consult their health care professional. The most common side effects reported include injection site reactions as well as eye and eyelid inflammation, which included redness, swelling and itching. Patients receiving Dupixent should avoid receiving live vaccines.

Dupixent was originally approved in 2017 for patients 12 and older with eczema that is not controlled adequately by topical therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. In 2018, Dupixent was approved as an add-on maintenance treatment for patients 12 years and older with moderate-to-severe eosinophilic asthma or with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review. The approval of Dupixent was granted to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-first-treatment-chronic-rhinosinusitis-nasal-polyps?utm_campaign=062619_PR_FDA%20approves%20first%20treatment%20for%20chronic%20rhinosinusitis%20with%20nasal%20polyps&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

///////////Dupixent, dupilumab, fda 2019, nasal polyps, chronic rhinosinusitis, Priority Review, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals,

FDA approves treatment Inrebic (fedratinib) for patients with rare bone marrow disorder


FDA approves treatment Inrebic (fedratinib) for patients with rare bone marrow disorder

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Inrebic (fedratinib) capsules to treat adult patients with certain types of myelofibrosis.

“Prior to today, there was one FDA-approved drug to treat patients with myelofibrosis, a rare bone marrow disorder. Our approval today provides another option for patients,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “The FDA is committed to encouraging the development of treatments for patients with rare diseases and providing alternative options, as not all patients respond in the same way.”

Myelofibrosis is a chronic disorder where scar tissue forms in the bone marrow and the production of the blood cells moves from the bone marrow to the spleen and liver, causing organ enlargement. It can cause extreme fatigue, shortness of breath, pain below the ribs, fever, night sweats, itching and bone pain. When myelofibrosis occurs on its own, it is called primary myelofibrosis. Secondary myelofibrosis occurs when there is excessive red blood cell production (polycythemia vera) or excessive platelet production (essential thrombocythemia) that evolves into myelofibrosis.

Jakafi (ruxolitinib) was approved by the FDA in 2011. The approval of Inrebic for intermediate-2 or high-risk primary or secondary (post-polycythemia vera or post-essential thrombocythemia) myelofibrosis was based on the results of a clinical trial where 289 patients with myelofibrosis were randomized to receive two different doses (400 mg or 500 mg daily by mouth) of fedratinib or placebo. The clinical trial showed that 35 of 96 patients treated with the fedratinib 400 mg daily dose (the dose recommended in the approved label) experienced a significant therapeutic effect (measured by greater than or equal to a 35% reduction from baseline in spleen volume at the end of cycle 6 (week 24) as measured by an MRI or CT scan with a follow-up scan four weeks later). As a result of treatment with Inrebic, 36 patients experienced greater than or equal to a 50% reduction in myelofibrosis-related symptoms, such as night sweats, itching, abdominal discomfort, feeling full sooner than normal, pain under ribs on left side, and bone or muscle pain.

The prescribing information for Inrebic includes a Boxed Warning to advise health care professionals and patients about the risk of serious and fatal encephalopathy (brain damage or malfunction), including Wernicke’s, which is a neurologic emergency related to a deficiency in thiamine. Health care professionals are advised to assess thiamine levels in all patients prior to starting Inrebic, during treatment and as clinically indicated. If encephalopathy is suspected, Inrebic should be immediately discontinued.

Common side effects for patients taking Inrebic are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and muscle spasms. Health care professionals are cautioned that patients may experience severe anemia (low iron levels) and thrombocytopenia (low level of platelets in the blood). Patients should be monitored for gastrointestinal toxicity and for hepatic toxicity (liver damage). The dose should be reduced or stopped if a patient develops severe diarrhea, nausea or vomiting. Treatment with anti-diarrhea medications may be recommended. Patients may develop high levels of amylase and lipase in their blood and should be managed by dose reduction or stopping the mediation. Inrebic must be dispensed with a patient Medication Guide that describes important information about the drug’s uses and risks.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review designation. Inrebic also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases. The FDA granted the approval of Inrebic to Impact Biomedicines, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of Celgene Corporation.

LINK

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///////Inrebic , fedratinib, FDA 2019, Priority Review , Orphan Drug, Biomedicines, Celgene , bone marrow disorder

FDA approves third oncology drug Rozlytrek (entrectinib) that targets a key genetic driver of cancer, rather than a specific type of tumor


FDA approves third oncology drug Rozlytrek (entrectinib) that targets a key genetic driver of cancer, rather than a specific type of tumor 

FDA also approves drug for second indication in a type of lung cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rozlytrek (entrectinib), a treatment for adult and adolescent patients whose cancers have the specific genetic defect, NTRK (neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase) gene fusion and for whom there are no effective treatments.

“We are in an exciting era of innovation in cancer treatment as we continue to see development in tissue agnostic therapies, which have the potential to transform cancer treatment. We’re seeing continued advances in the use of biomarkers to guide drug development and the more targeted delivery of medicine,” said FDA Acting Commissioner Ned Sharpless, M.D. “Using the FDA’s expedited review pathways, including breakthrough therapy designation and accelerated approval process, we’re supporting this innovation in precision oncology drug development and the evolution of more targeted and effective treatments for cancer patients. We remain committed to encouraging the advancement of more targeted innovations in oncology treatment and across disease types based on our growing understanding of the underlying biology of diseases.”

This is the third time the agency has approved a cancer treatment based on a common biomarker across different types of tumors rather than the location in the body where the tumor originated. The approval marks a new paradigm in the development of cancer drugs that are “tissue agnostic.” It follows the policies that the FDA developed in a guidance document released in 2018. The previous tissue agnostic indications approved by the FDA were pembrolizumab for tumors with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) or mismatch repair deficient (dMMR) tumors in 2017 and larotrectinib for NTRK gene fusion tumors in 2018.

“Today’s approval includes an indication for pediatric patients, 12 years of age and older, who have NTRK-fusion-positive tumors by relying on efficacy information obtained primarily in adults. The FDA continues to encourage the inclusion of adolescents in clinical trials. Traditionally, clinical development of new cancer drugs in pediatric populations is not started until development is well underway in adults, and often not until after approval of an adult indication,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Efficacy in adolescents was derived from adult data and safety was demonstrated in 30 pediatric patients.”

The ability of Rozlytrek to shrink tumors was evaluated in four clinical trials studying 54 adults with NTRK fusion-positive tumors. The proportion of patients with substantial tumor shrinkage (overall response rate) was 57%, with 7.4% of patients having complete disappearance of the tumor. Among the 31 patients with tumor shrinkage, 61% had tumor shrinkage persist for nine months or longer. The most common cancer locations were the lung, salivary gland, breast, thyroid and colon/rectum.

Rozlytrek was also approved today for the treatment of adults with non-small cell lung cancer whose tumors are ROS1-positive (mutation of the ROS1 gene) and has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Clinical studies evaluated 51 adults with ROS1-positive lung cancer. The overall response rate was 78%, with 5.9% of patients having complete disappearance of their cancer. Among the 40 patients with tumor shrinkage, 55% had tumor shrinkage persist for 12 months or longer.

Rozlytrek’s common side effects are fatigue, constipation, dysgeusia (distorted sense of taste), edema (swelling), dizziness, diarrhea, nausea, dysesthesia (distorted sense of touch), dyspnea (shortness of breath), myalgia (painful or aching muscles), cognitive impairment (confusion, problems with memory or attention, difficulty speaking, or hallucinations), weight gain, cough, vomiting, fever, arthralgia and vision disorders (blurred vision, sensitivity to light, double vision, worsening of vision, cataracts, or floaters). The most serious side effects of Rozlytrek are congestive heart failure (weakening or damage to the heart muscle), central nervous system effects (cognitive impairment, anxiety, depression including suicidal thinking, dizziness or loss of balance, and change in sleep pattern, including insomnia and excessive sleepiness), skeletal fractures, hepatotoxicity (damage to the liver), hyperuricemia (elevated uric acid), QT prolongation (abnormal heart rhythm) and vision disorders. Health care professionals should inform females of reproductive age and males with a female partner of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with Rozlytrek. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not take Rozlytrek because it may cause harm to a developing fetus or newborn baby.

Rozlytrek was granted accelerated approval. This approval commits the sponsor to provide additional data to the FDA. Rozlytrek also received Priority ReviewBreakthrough Therapy and Orphan Drug designation. The approval of Rozlytrek was granted to Genentech, Inc.

link http://s2027422842.t.en25.com/e/es?s=2027422842&e=244904&elqTrackId=376c7bc788024cd5a73d955f2e3dcbdc&elq=46563b1749694ceb96d9f79a6d5cd8a7&elqaid=9150&elqat=1

///////////////Rozlytrek, entrectinib, accelerated approval, priority ReviewBreakthrough Therapy,  Orphan Drug designation, fda 2019, Genentech, cancer

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