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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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FDA approves new treatment Vyleesi (Bremelanotide) for hypoactive sexual desire disorder in premenopausal women


Bremelanotide chemical structure.png

Bremelanotide

SYNTHESIS……. https://newdrugapprovals.org/2015/02/18/palatins-bremelanotide-under-clinical-trials-female-libido-enhancer/

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vyleesi (bremelanotide) to treat acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women.

“There are women who, for no known reason, have reduced sexual desire that causes marked distress, and who can benefit from safe and effective pharmacologic treatment. Today’s approval provides women with another treatment option for this condition,” said Hylton V. Joffe, M.D., M.M.Sc., director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Division of Bone, Reproductive and Urologic Products. “As part of the FDA’s commitment to protect and advance the health of women, we’ll continue to support the development of safe and effective treatments for female sexual dysfunction.”

HSDD is characterized by low sexual desire that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty and is not due to a co-existing medical or psychiatric condition, problems within the relationship or the effects of a medication or other drug substance. Acquired HSDD develops in a patient who previously experienced no problems with sexual desire. Generalized HSDD refers to …

June 21, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vyleesi (bremelanotide) to treat acquired, generalized hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women.

“There are women who, for no known reason, have reduced sexual desire that causes marked distress, and who can benefit from safe and effective pharmacologic treatment. Today’s approval provides women with another treatment option for this condition,” said Hylton V. Joffe, M.D., M.M.Sc., director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Division of Bone, Reproductive and Urologic Products. “As part of the FDA’s commitment to protect and advance the health of women, we’ll continue to support the development of safe and effective treatments for female sexual dysfunction.”

HSDD is characterized by low sexual desire that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty and is not due to a co-existing medical or psychiatric condition, problems within the relationship or the effects of a medication or other drug substance. Acquired HSDD develops in a patient who previously experienced no problems with sexual desire. Generalized HSDD refers to HSDD that occurs regardless of the type of sexual activity, situation or partner.

Vyleesi activates melanocortin receptors, but the mechanism by which it improves sexual desire and related distress is unknown. Patients inject Vyleesi under the skin of the abdomen or thigh at least 45 minutes before anticipated sexual activity and may decide the optimal time to use Vyleesi based on how they experience the duration of benefit and any side effects, such as nausea. Patients should not use more than one dose within 24 hours or more than eight doses per month. Patients should discontinue treatment after eight weeks if they do not report an improvement in sexual desire and associated distress.

The effectiveness and safety of Vyleesi were studied in two 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in 1,247 premenopausal women with acquired, generalized HSDD. Most patients used Vyleesi two or three times per month and no more than once a week. In these trials, about 25% of patients treated with Vyleesi had an increase of 1.2 or more in their sexual desire score (scored on a range of 1.2 to 6.0, with higher scores indicating greater sexual desire) compared to about 17% of those who took placebo. Additionally, about 35% of the patients treated with Vyleesi had a decrease of one or more in their distress score (scored on a range of zero to four, with higher scores indicating greater distress from low sexual desire) compared to about 31% of those who took placebo. There was no difference between treatment groups in the change from the start of the study to end of the study in the number of satisfying sexual events. Vyleesi does not enhance sexual performance.

The most common side effects of Vyleesi are nausea and vomiting, flushing, injection site reactions and headache. About 40% of patients in the clinical trials experienced nausea, most commonly with the first Vyleesi injection, and 13% needed medications for the treatment of nausea. About 1% of patients treated with Vyleesi in the clinical trials reported darkening of the gums and parts of the skin, including the face and breasts, which did not go away in about half the patients after stopping treatment. Patients with dark skin were more likely to develop this side effect.

In the clinical trials, Vyleesi increased blood pressure after dosing, which usually resolved within 12 hours. Because of this effect, Vyleesi should not be used in patients with high blood pressure that is uncontrolled or in those with known cardiovascular disease. Vyleesi is also not recommended in patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.

When naltrexone is taken by mouth, Vyleesi may significantly decrease the levels of naltrexone in the blood. Patients who take a naltrexone-containing medication by mouth to treat alcohol or opioid dependence should not use Vyleesi because it could lead to naltrexone treatment failure.

In 2012, the FDA identified female sexual dysfunction as one of 20 disease areas of high priority and focused attention. The FDA held a two-day meeting in October 2014 to advance the agency’s understanding of female sexual dysfunction. During the first day of the meeting, the FDA solicited perspectives directly from patients about their condition and its impact on daily life. In 2016, the FDA published a draft guidance titled “Low Sexual Interest Desire and/or Arousal in Women: Developing Drugs for Treatment,” to assist companies developing drugs for the treatment of these conditions. The FDA is committed to continuing to work with companies to develop safe and effective treatments for female sexual dysfunction.

The FDA granted approval of Vyleesi to AMAG Pharmaceuticals.

REF

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-new-treatment-hypoactive-sexual-desire-disorder-premenopausal-women?utm_campaign=062119_PR_FDA%20approves%20new%20treatment%20for%20HSDD%20in%20premenopausal%20women&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

//////////////Vyleesi, bremelanotide, FDA 2019, HSDD, female sexual dysfunction, AMAG Pharmaceuticals, , LIBIDO ENHANCER,

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FDA approves new treatment Victoza (liraglutide) for pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Victoza (liraglutide) injection for treatment of pediatric patients 10 years or older with type 2 diabetes. Victoza is the first non-insulin drug approved to treat type 2 diabetes in pediatric patients since metformin was approved for pediatric use in 2000. Victoza has been approved to treat adult patients with type 2 diabetes since 2010.

“The FDA encourages drugs to be made available to the widest number of patients possible when there is evidence of safety and efficacy,” said Lisa Yanoff, M.D, acting director of the Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Victoza has now been shown to improve blood sugar control in pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes. The expanded indication provides an additional treatment option at a time when

June 17, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Victoza (liraglutide) injection for treatment of pediatric patients 10 years or older with type 2 diabetes. Victoza is the first non-insulin drug approved to treat type 2 diabetes in pediatric patients since metformin was approved for pediatric use in 2000. Victoza has been approved to treat adult patients with type 2 diabetes since 2010.

“The FDA encourages drugs to be made available to the widest number of patients possible when there is evidence of safety and efficacy,” said Lisa Yanoff, M.D, acting director of the Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Victoza has now been shown to improve blood sugar control in pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes. The expanded indication provides an additional treatment option at a time when an increasing number of children are being diagnosed with this disease.”

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, occurring when the pancreas cannot make enough insulin to keep blood sugar at normal levels. Although type 2 diabetes primarily occurs in patients over the age of 45, the prevalence rate among younger patients has been rising dramatically over the past couple of decades. The Diabetes Report Card published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 5,000 new cases of type 2 diabetes are diagnosed each year among U.S. youth younger than age 20.

Victoza improves blood sugar levels by creating the same effects in the body as the glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor protein in the pancreas. GLP-1 is often found in insufficient levels in type 2 diabetes patients. Like GLP-1, Victoza slows digestion, prevents the liver from making too much glucose (a simple sugar), and helps the pancreas produce more insulin when needed. As noted on the label, Victoza is not a substitute for insulin and is not indicated for patients with type 1 diabetes or those with diabetic ketoacidosis, a condition associated with diabetes where the body breaks down fat too quickly because there is inadequate insulin or none at all. Victoza is also indicated to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in adults with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease; however, its effect on major adverse cardiovascular events in pediatrics was not studied and it is not indicated for this use in children.

The efficacy and safety of Victoza for reducing blood sugar in patients with type 2 diabetes was studied in several placebo-controlled trials in adults and one placebo-controlled trial with 134 pediatric patients 10 years and older for more than 26 weeks. Approximately 64% of patients in the pediatric study had a reduction in their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) below 7% while on Victoza, compared to only 37% who achieved these results with the placebo. HbA1c is a blood test that is routinely performed to evaluate how well a patient’s diabetes is controlled, and a lower number indicates better control of the disease. These results occurred regardless of whether the patient also took insulin at the same time. Adult patients who took Victoza with insulin or other drugs that increase the amount of insulin the body makes (e.g., sulfonylurea) may have an increased risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Meanwhile, pediatric patients 10 years and older taking Victoza had a higher risk of hypoglycemia regardless of whether they took other therapies for diabetes.

The prescribing information for Victoza includes a Boxed Warning to advise health care professionals and patients about the increased risk of thyroid C-cell tumors. For this reason, patients who have had, or have family members who have ever had medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) should not use Victoza, nor should patients who have an endocrine system condition called multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). In addition, people who have a prior serious hypersensitivity reaction to Victoza or any of the product components should not use Victoza. Victoza also carries warnings about pancreatitis, Victoza pen sharing, hypoglycemia when used in conjunction with certain other drugs known to cause hypoglycemia including insulin and sulfonylurea, renal impairment or kidney failure, hypersensitivity and acute gallbladder disease. The most common side effects are nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, decreased appetite, indigestion and constipation.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review. The approval of Victoza was granted to Novo Nordisk.

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-new-treatment-pediatric-patients-type-2-diabetes?utm_campaign=061719_PR_FDA%20approves%20new%20treatment%20for%20pediatric%20patients%20with%20type%202%20diabetes&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

//////Victoza, liraglutide, FDA 2019, Priority Review, Novo Nordisk, DIABETES

FDA approves new treatment for hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for the previously FDA-approved drug, Zerbaxa (ceftolozane and tazobactam) for the treatment of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) in patients 18 years and older. The FDA initially approved Zerbaxa in 2014 to treat complicated intra-abdominal infections and for complicated urinary tract infections.

“A key global challenge we face as a public health agency is addressing the threat of antimicrobial-resistant infections,” said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D. “Hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia are serious infections that can result in death in some patients. New therapies to treat these infections are important to …

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-new-treatment-hospital-acquired-and-ventilator-associated-bacterial-pneumonia?utm_campaign=060319_PR_FDA%20approves%20treatment%20for%20hospital-acquired%20and%20ventilator-associated%20bacterial%20pneumonia&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

June 03, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for the previously FDA-approved drug, Zerbaxa (ceftolozane and tazobactam) for the treatment of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP) in patients 18 years and older. The FDA initially approved Zerbaxa in 2014to treat complicated intra-abdominal infections and for complicated urinary tract infections.

“A key global challenge we face as a public health agency is addressing the threat of antimicrobial-resistant infections,” said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D. “Hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia are serious infections that can result in death in some patients. New therapies to treat these infections are important to meet patient needs because of increasing antimicrobial resistance. That’s why, among our other efforts to address antimicrobial resistance, we’re focused on facilitating the development of safe and effective new treatments to give patients more options to fight life-threatening infections.”

HABP/VABP occur in patients in hospitals or other health care facilities and can be caused by a variety of bacteria. According to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HABP and VABP are currently the second most common type of hospital-acquired infection in the United States, and are a significant issue in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).

The safety and efficacy of Zerbaxa for the treatment of HABP/VABP, administered via injection, was demonstrated in a multinational, double-blind study that compared Zerbaxa to another antibacterial drug in 726 adult patients hospitalized with HABP/VABP. The study showed that mortality and cure rates were similar between Zerbaxa and the comparator treatment.

The most common adverse reactions observed in the HABP/VABP trial among patients treated with Zerbaxa were elevated liver enzyme levels, renal impairment or failure, and diarrhea.
Zerbaxa should not be used in patients with known serious hypersensitivity to components of Zerbaxa, as well as hypersensitivity to piperacillin/tazobactam or other members of the beta lactam class of antibacterial drugs.

Zerbaxa received FDA’s Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) designation for the treatment of HABP/VABP. The QIDP designation is given to antibacterial and antifungal drug products intended to treat serious or life-threatening infections under the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now (GAIN) title of the FDA Safety and Innovation Act. As part of QIDP designation, the Zerbaxa marketing application for the HABP/VABP indication was granted Priority Review under which the FDA’s goal is to take action on an application within an expedited time frame.

The FDA granted the approval of Zerbaxa for the treatment of HABP/VABP to Merck & Co., Inc.

//////////////ceftolozane,  tazobactam, FDA 2019,  Zerbaxa,  HABP/VABP, Merck , Qualified Infectious Disease Product,  (QIDP),  Priority Review

Onasemnogene abeparvovec オナセムノジーンアベパルボベック


Onasemnogene abeparvovec

オナセムノジーンアベパルボベック

DNA (synthetic adeno-associated virus 9 vector scAAV9.CB.hSMN human survivor motor neuron protein-specifying)

Zolgensma

FDA 2019/5/24 APPROVED

CAS: 1922968-73-7

AVXS-101

Spinal muscular atrophy treatment

Treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Type 1

Gene therapy product

Image result for Onasemnogene abeparvovec

Onasemnogene abeparvovec, sold under the trade name Zolgensma, is a gene therapy medication used to treat spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

SMA is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a mutation in the SMN1 gene, which in turn reduces the amount of SMN protein necessary for survival of motor neurons. Onasemnogene abeparvovec is a biologic drug consisting of AAV9 virus capsids that have been deprived of the original viral DNA and instead contain a SMN1 transgene along with promoters. The drug is administered intravenously or intrathecally. Upon administration, the AAV9 viral vector delivers the SMN1 transgene to cell nuclei where the transgene begins encoding SMN protein, thus addressing the root cause of the disease. Since motor neurons do not divide, it is thought that a single dose of the drug will have a lifelong effect.[1]

The medication was developed by a US biotechnology company AveXis, a subsidiary of Novartis,[2] based on an earlier discovery by French researchers.[3] The intravenous formulation was approved in May 2019 in the United States for use in children under 2 years.[4]It carries a list price of US$ 2.125 million per dose (one-time treatment), making it the most expensive medication in the world as of 2019.[5]

Terminology

Onasemnogene abeparvovec is the international nonproprietary name (INN) and US adopted name (USAN).[6] It was previously known under compound name AVXS-101.

FDA approves a gene therapy that is the most expensive drug in the world

FDA on Friday approved onasemnogene abeparvovec-xioi (Zolgensma—AveXis), a one-time gene therapy for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

FDA on Friday approved onasemnogene abeparvovec-xioi (Zolgensma—AveXis), a one-time gene therapy for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ultrarare disease affects infants. In announcing the approval, Novartis—which acquired AveXis last year—also disclosed the price of the drug, $2.1 million. The company noted that it would provide rebates to insurance companies if the drug is not successful, though it did not offer details about what would be considered failure. Novartis also said it will set up 5-year payment plans for states, small insurance firms, and self-insured employers. Another drug, nusinersen (Spinraza—Biogen) is already available for the treatment of SMA; however, that drug must continue to be injected into patients’ spines throughout their lives, at a cost of $750,000 in the first year and $375,000 a year after that. “Patients with SMA now have another treatment option to minimize the progression of SMA and improve survival,” said Peter Marks, director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research.

References

Onasemnogene abeparvovec
Clinical data
Trade names Zolgensma
Synonyms AVXS-101
License data
Routes of
administration
Intravascular
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Duration of action lifetime (?)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
KEGG

Onasemnogene Abeparvovec; AVXS-101; Onasemnogene Abeparvovec [USAN]; DNA (Synthetic Adeno-Associated Virus 9 Vector ScAAV9.CB.HSMN Human Survivor Motor Neuron Protein-Specifying); 1922968-73-7

/////////Onasemnogene abeparvovec, Zolgensma, FDA 2019, オナセムノジーンアベパルボベック ,Spinal muscular atrophy, Gene therapy product, AVXS-101

FDA approves first PI3K inhibitor Piqray (alpelisib) for breast cancer


Image result for alpelisib

FDA approves first PI3K inhibitor for breast cancer

syn https://newdrugapprovals.org/2018/06/25/alpelisib-byl-719/

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Piqray (alpelisib) tablets, to be used in combination with the FDA-approved endocrine therapy fulvestrant, to treat postmenopausal women, and men, with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, PIK3CA-mutated, advanced or metastatic breast cancer (as detected by an FDA-approved test) following progression on or after an endocrine-based regimen.

The FDA also approved the companion diagnostic test, therascreen PIK3CA RGQ PCR Kit, to detect the PIK3CA mutation in a tissue and/or a liquid biopsy. Patients who are negative by

May 24, 2019

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Piqray (alpelisib) tablets, to be used in combination with the FDA-approved endocrine therapy fulvestrant, to treat postmenopausal women, and men, with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, PIK3CA-mutated, advanced or metastatic breast cancer (as detected by an FDA-approved test) following progression on or after an endocrine-based regimen.

The FDA also approved the companion diagnostic test, therascreen PIK3CA RGQ PCR Kit, to detect the PIK3CA mutation in a tissue and/or a liquid biopsy. Patients who are negative by the therascreen test using the liquid biopsy should undergo tumor biopsy for PIK3CA mutation testing.

“Piqray is the first PI3K inhibitor to demonstrate a clinically meaningful benefit in treating patients with this type of breast cancer. The ability to target treatment to a patient’s specific genetic mutation or biomarker is becoming increasingly common in cancer treatment, and companion diagnostic tests assist oncologists in selecting patients who may benefit from these targeted treatments,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “For this approval, we employed some of our newer regulatory tools to streamline reviews without compromising the quality of our assessment. This drug is the first novel drug approved under the Real-Time Oncology Review pilot program. We also used the updated Assessment Aid, a multidisciplinary review template that helps focus our written review on critical thinking and consistency and reduces time spent on administrative tasks.”

Metastatic breast cancer is breast cancer that has spread beyond the breast to other organs in the body (most often the bones, lungs, liver or brain). When breast cancer is hormone-receptor positive, patients may be treated with anti-hormonal treatment (also called endocrine therapy), alone or in combination with other medicines, or chemotherapy.

The efficacy of Piqray was studied in the SOLAR-1 trial, a randomized trial of 572 postmenopausal women and men with HR-positive, HER2-negative, advanced or metastatic breast cancer whose cancer had progressed while on or after receiving an aromatase inhibitor. Results from the trial showed the addition of Piqray to fulvestrant significantly prolonged progression- free survival (median of 11 months vs. 5.7 months) in patients whose tumors had a PIK3CA mutation.

Common side effects of Piqray are high blood sugar levels, increase in creatinine, diarrhea, rash, decrease in lymphocyte count in the blood, elevated liver enzymes, nausea, fatigue, low red blood cell count, increase in lipase (enzymes released by the pancreas), decreased appetite, stomatitis, vomiting, weight loss, low calcium levels, aPTT prolonged (blood clotting taking longer to occur than it should), and hair loss.

Health care professionals are advised to monitor patients taking Piqray for severe hypersensitivity reactions (intolerance). Patients are warned of potentially severe skin reactions (rashes that may result in peeling and blistering of skin or mucous membranes like the lips and gums). Health care professionals are advised not to initiate treatment in patients with a history of severe skin reactions such as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, erythema multiforme, or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Patients on Piqray have reported severe hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), and the safety of Piqray in patients with Type 1 or uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes has not been established. Before initiating treatment with Piqray, health care professionals are advised to check fasting glucose and HbA1c, and to optimize glycemic control. Patients should be monitored for pneumonitis/interstitial lung disease (inflammation of lung tissue) and diarrhea during treatment. Piqray must be dispensed with a patient Medication Guide that describes important information about the drug’s uses and risks.

Piqray is the first new drug application (NDA) for a new molecular entity approved under the Real-Time Oncology Review (RTOR) pilot program, which permits the FDA to begin analyzing key efficacy and safety datasets prior to the official submission of an application, allowing the review team to begin their review and communicate with the applicant earlier. Piqray also used the updated Assessment Aid (AAid), a multidisciplinary review template intended to focus the FDA’s written review on critical thinking and consistency and reduce time spent on administrative tasks. With these two pilot programs, today’s approval of Piqray comes approximately three months ahead of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) VI deadline of August 18, 2019.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review designation. The FDA granted approval of Piqray to Novartis. The FDA granted approval of the therascreen PIK3CA RGQ PCR Kit to QIAGEN Manchester, Ltd.

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-first-pi3k-inhibitor-breast-cancer?utm_campaign=052419_PR_FDA%20approves%20first%20PI3K%20inhibitor%20for%20breast%20cancer&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

//////////////FDA,  PI3K inhibitor,  breast cancer, fda 2019, Piqray, alpelisib, therascreen PIK3CA RGQ PCR Kit,  QIAGEN Manchester, Priority Review, BYL719, BYL 719

FDA approves first treatment Ruzurgi (amifampridine) for children with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, a rare autoimmune disorder


Diaminopyridine.png

FDA approves first treatment Ruzurgi (amifampridine)  for children with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, a rare autoimmune disorder

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Ruzurgi (amifampridine) tablets for the treatment of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) in patients 6 to less than 17 years of age. This is the first FDA approval of a treatment specifically for pediatric patients with LEMS. The only other treatment approved for LEMS is only approved for use in adults.

“We continue to be committed to facilitating the development and approval of treatments for rare diseases, particularly those in children,” said Billy Dunn, M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This approval will provide a much-needed treatment option for pediatric patients with LEMS who have significant weakness and fatigue that can often cause great difficulties with daily activities.”

LEMS is a rare autoimmune disorder that affects the connection between nerves and muscles and causes weakness and other symptoms in affected patients. In people with LEMS, the body’s own immune system attacks the neuromuscular junction (the connection between nerves and muscles) and disrupts the ability of nerve cells to send signals to muscle cells. LEMS may be associated with …

May 06, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Ruzurgi (amifampridine) tablets for the treatment of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) in patients 6 to less than 17 years of age. This is the first FDA approval of a treatment specifically for pediatric patients with LEMS. The only other treatment approved for LEMS is only approved for use in adults.

“We continue to be committed to facilitating the development and approval of treatments for rare diseases, particularly those in children,” said Billy Dunn, M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This approval will provide a much-needed treatment option for pediatric patients with LEMS who have significant weakness and fatigue that can often cause great difficulties with daily activities.”

LEMS is a rare autoimmune disorder that affects the connection between nerves and muscles and causes weakness and other symptoms in affected patients. In people with LEMS, the body’s own immune system attacks the neuromuscular junction (the connection between nerves and muscles) and disrupts the ability of nerve cells to send signals to muscle cells. LEMS may be associated with other autoimmune diseases, but more commonly occurs in patients with cancer such as small cell lung cancer, where its onset precedes or coincides with the diagnosis of cancer. LEMS can occur at any age. The prevalence of LEMS specifically in pediatric patients is not known, but the overall prevalence of LEMS is estimated to be three per million individuals worldwide.

Use of Ruzurgi in patients 6 to less than 17 years of age is supported by evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies of the drug in adults with LEMS, pharmacokinetic data in adult patients, pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation to identify the dosing regimen in pediatric patients and safety data from pediatric patients 6 to less than 17 years of age.

The effectiveness of Ruzurgi for the treatment of LEMS was established by a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled withdrawal study of 32 adult patients in which patients were taking Ruzurgi for at least three months prior to entering the study. The study compared patients continuing on Ruzurgi to patients switched to placebo. Effectiveness was measured by the degree of change in a test that assessed the time it took the patient to rise from a chair, walk three meters, and return to the chair for three consecutive laps without pause. The patients that continued on Ruzurgi experienced less impairment than those on placebo. Effectiveness was also measured with a self-assessment scale for LEMS-related weakness that evaluated the feeling of weakening or strengthening. The scores indicated greater perceived weakening in the patients switched to placebo.

The most common side effects experienced by pediatric and adult patients taking Ruzurgi were burning or prickling sensation (paresthesia), abdominal pain, indigestion, dizziness and nausea. Side effects reported in pediatric patients were similar to those seen in adult patients. Seizures have been observed in patients without a history of seizures. Patients should inform their health care professional immediately if they have signs of hypersensitivity reactions such as rash, hives, itching, fever, swelling or trouble breathing.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Fast Track designations. Ruzurgi also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted the approval of Ruzurgi to Jacobus Pharmaceutical Company, Inc.

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-first-treatment-children-lambert-eaton-myasthenic-syndrome-rare-autoimmune-disorder?utm_campaign=050619_PR_FDA%20approves%20first%20treatment%20for%20children%20with%20LEMS&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

/////////////////FDA 2019, Ruzurgi, amifampridine,  Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, LEMS,  RARE DISEASES, CHILDREN, Jacobus Pharmaceutical Company, Priority Review,  Fast Track designations, Orphan Drug designation

First FDA-approved vaccine Dengvaxia for the prevention of dengue disease in endemic regions


Image result for dengue

First FDA-approved vaccine for the prevention of dengue disease in endemic regions

May 01, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today the approval of Dengvaxia, the first vaccine approved for the prevention of dengue disease caused by all dengue virus serotypes (1, 2, 3 and 4) in people ages 9 through 16 who have laboratory-confirmed previous dengue infection and who live in endemic areas. Dengue is endemic in the U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

“Dengue disease is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and global incidence has increased in recent decades,” said Anna Abram, FDA deputy commissioner for policy, legislation, and international affairs. “The FDA is committed to working proactively with our partners at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as international partners, including the World Health Organization, to combat public health threats, including through facilitating the development and availability of medical products to address emerging infectious diseases. While there is no cure for dengue disease, today’s approval is an important step toward helping to reduce the impact of this virus in endemic regions of the United States.”

The CDC estimates more than one-third of the world’s population is living in areas at risk for infection by dengue virus which causes dengue fever, a leading cause of illness among people living in the tropics and subtropics. The first infection with dengue virus typically results in either no symptoms or a mild illness that can be mistaken for the flu or another viral infection. A subsequent infection can lead to severe dengue, including dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), a more severe form of the disease that can be fatal. Symptoms may include stomach pain, persistent vomiting, bleeding, confusion and difficulty breathing. Approximately 95 percent of all severe/hospitalized cases of dengue are associated with second dengue virus infection. Because there are no specific drugs approved for the treatment of dengue disease, care is limited to the management of symptoms.

Each year, an estimated 400 million dengue virus infections occur globally according to the CDC. Of these, approximately 500,000 cases develop into DHF, which contributes to about 20,000 deaths, primarily among children. Although dengue cases are rare in the continental U.S., the disease is regularly found in American Samoa, Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as Latin America, Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands.

“Infection by one type of dengue virus usually provides immunity against that specific serotype, but a subsequent infection by any of the other three serotypes of the virus increases the risk of developing severe dengue disease, which may lead to hospitalization or even death,” said Peter Marks, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “As the second infection with dengue is often much more severe than the first, the FDA’s approval of this vaccine will help protect people previously infected with dengue virus from subsequent development of dengue disease.”

The safety and effectiveness of the vaccine was determined in three randomized, placebo-controlled studies involving approximately 35,000 individuals in dengue-endemic areas, including Puerto Rico, Latin America and the Asia Pacific region. The vaccine was determined to be approximately 76 percent effective in preventing symptomatic, laboratory-confirmed dengue disease in individuals 9 through 16 years of age who previously had laboratory-confirmed dengue disease. Dengvaxia has already been approved in 19 countries and the European Union.

The most commonly reported side effects by those who received Dengvaxia were headache, muscle pain, joint pain, fatigue, injection site pain and low-grade fever. The frequency of side effects was similar across Dengvaxia and placebo recipients and tended to decrease after each subsequent dose of the vaccine.

Dengvaxia is not approved for use in individuals not previously infected by any dengue virus serotype or for whom this information is unknown. This is because in people who have not been infected with dengue virus, Dengvaxia appears to act like a first dengue infection – without actually infecting the person with wild-type dengue virus – such that a subsequent infection can result in severe dengue disease.Therefore, health care professionals should evaluate individuals for prior dengue infection to avoid vaccinating individuals who have not been previously infected by dengue virus. This can be assessed through a medical record of a previous laboratory-confirmed dengue infection or through serological testing (tests using blood samples from the patient) prior to vaccination.

Dengvaxia is a live, attenuated vaccine that is administered as three separate injections, with the initial dose followed by two additional shots given six and twelve months later.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and a Tropical Disease Priority Review Voucher under a program intended to encourage development of new drugs and biologics for the prevention and treatment of certain tropical diseases. The approval was granted to Sanofi Pasteur.

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/first-fda-approved-vaccine-prevention-dengue-disease-endemic-regions?utm_campaign=050119_PR_First%20FDA-approved%20vaccine%20for%20prevention%20of%20dengue%20in%20endemic%20areas&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

//////////fda 2019, Priority Review, Tropical Disease Priority Review Voucher , Sanofi Pasteur,  Dengvaxia, vaccine, dengue

Erdafitinib, エルダフィチニブ ,Эрдафитиниб , إيردافيتينيب , 厄达替尼 ,


Erdafitinib.svg

Erdafitinib.png

Erdafitinib

エルダフィチニブ

JNJ-42756493

CAS 1346242-81-6

MF, C25H30N6O2, MW 446.54

UNII-890E37NHMV

890E37NHMV

2019/4/12, FDA APPROVED, BALVERSA (Janssen Products LP)

Balversa

Эрдафитиниб [Russian] [INN]

إيردافيتينيب [Arabic] [INN]
厄达替尼 [Chinese] [INN]

N‘-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N‘-[3-(1-methylpyrazol-4-yl)quinoxalin-6-yl]-N-propan-2-ylethane-1,2-diamine

1,2-Ethanediamine, N1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N2-(1-methylethyl)-N1-[3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-6-quinoxalinyl]- [ACD/Index Name]
10147
1346242-81-6 [RN]
890E37NHMV
N-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N’-(1-methylethyl)-N-[3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)quinoxalin-6-yl]ethane-1,2-diamine
5SF
MFCD28502040
N’-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N’-[3-(1-methylpyrazol-4-yl)quinoxalin-6-yl]-N-propan-2-ylethane-1,2-diamine
N1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N2-(1-methylethyl)-N1-[3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-6-quinoxalinyl]-1,2-ethanediamine

Image result for Erdafitinib

Erdafitinib is an orally bioavailable, pan fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon oral administration, erdafitinib binds to and inhibits FGFR, which may result in the inhibition of FGFR-related signal transduction pathways and thus the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and tumor cell death in FGFR-overexpressing tumor cells. FGFR, upregulated in many tumor cell types, is a receptor tyrosine kinase essential to tumor cell proliferation, differentiation and survival

Erdafitinib has been used in trials studying the basic science and treatment of Tumor or Lymphoma.

Erdafitinib[1] is a small molecule inhibitor of FGFR approved for treatment of cancer and marketed under the name Balversa. FGFRs are a subset of tyrosine kinases which are unregulated in some tumors and influence tumor cell differentiation, proliferation, angiogenesis, and cell survival.[2] Astex Pharmaceuticals discovered the drug and licensed it to Janssen Pharmaceuticals for further development.

Researchers have investigated erdafitinib for safety and efficacy in treatment of cholangiocarcinomagastric cancernon-small cell lung cancer, and esophageal cancer.[3]

In March 2018, erdafitinib was granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treatment of urothelial cancer.[2],

In April 2019, erdafitinib was granted approval by the FDA for treatment of metastatic or locally advanced bladder cancer with an FGFR3 or FGFR2 alteration that has progressed beyond traditional platinum-based therapies, subject to a confirmatory trial.

PATENT

WO 2011135376

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2011135376A1/ru

STR1-1

MORE……………

STR1-1

References

  1. ^ https://searchusan.ama-assn.org/usan/documentDownload?uri=%2Funstructured%2Fbinary%2Fusan%2Ferdafitinib.pdf
  2. Jump up to:a b “Janssen Announces U.S. FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Erdafitinib in the Treatment of Metastatic Urothelial Cancer – Johnson & Johnson”http://www.jnj.com.
  3. ^ “Erdafitinib – Janssen Pharmaceutica – AdisInsight”adisinsight.springer.com.
Erdafitinib
Erdafitinib.svg
Clinical data
Synonyms JNJ-42756493
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
UNII
KEGG
ECHA InfoCard 100.235.008 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
Formula C25H30N6O2
Molar mass 446.555 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

Patent IDTitleSubmitted DateGranted Date

US2018186775QUINOXALINE DERIVATIVES USEFUL AS FGFR KINASE MODULATORS2017-12-28

US2018127397PYRAZOLYL QUINOXALINE KINASE INHIBITORS2017-11-13

US20172601682-ARYL- AND 2-HETEROARYL-SUBSTITUTED 2-PYRIDAZIN-3(2H)-ONE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF FGFR TYROSINE KINASES2016-10-24

US2017267684A DEUTERATED TRIAZOLOPYRIDAZINE AS A KINASE MODULATOR2015-12-03

US9464071PYRAZOLYL QUINOXALINE KINASE INHIBITORS2014-10-022015-04-16

US8895601Pyrazolyl quinoxaline kinase inhibitors2011-04-282014-11-25

US2017100406COMBINATIONS OF AN FGFR INHIBITOR AND AN IGF1R INHIBITOR2015-03-26

US9850228PYRAZOLYL QUINOXALINE KINASE INHIBITORS2016-04-28

US9902714QUINOXALINE DERIVATIVES USEFUL AS FGFR KINASE MODULATORS2015-03-26

US2018296558COMBINATIONS2018-04-17

US2018021332PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS COMPRISING N-(3,5-DIMETHOXYPHENYL)-N’-(1-METHYLETHYL)-N-[3-(1-METHYL-1H-PYRAZOL-4-YL)QUINOXALIN-6-YL]ETHANE-1,2-DIAMINE2016-02-09

US2017119763COMBINATIONS2015-03-26

US2016090633USE OF FGFR MUTANT GENE PANELS IN IDENTIFYING CANCER PATIENTS THAT WILL BE RESPONSIVE TO TREATMENT WITH AN FGFR INHIBITOR2015-09-182016-03-31

US2016287699FGFR/PD-1 COMBINATION THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF CANCER2016-03-24

/////////Erdafitinib, FDA 2019, エルダフィチニブ, BALVERSA, Janssen Products LP, JNJ-42756493, Эрдафитиниб ,  إيردافيتينيب 厄达替尼 ,

CC(C)NCCN(C1=CC2=NC(=CN=C2C=C1)C3=CN(N=C3)C)C4=CC(=CC(=C4)OC)OC

 

FDA approves first treatment for pediatric patients with lupus


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Benlysta (belimumab) intravenous (IV) infusion for treatment of children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) – often referred to as simply “lupus” – a serious chronic disease that causes inflammation and damage to various body tissues and organs. This is the first time that the FDA has approved a treatment for pediatric patients with SLE. Benlysta has been approved for use in adult patients since 2011.
“The agency expedited the review and approval of this application because Benlysta IV fulfils an unmet need for therapies, specifically in pediatric patients with SLE. While there is no cure for lupus, treatment can help our youngest patients control their disease with the hope of …

April 26, 2019

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Benlysta (belimumab) intravenous (IV) infusion for treatment of children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) – often referred to as simply “lupus” – a serious chronic disease that causes inflammation and damage to various body tissues and organs. This is the first time that the FDA has approved a treatment for pediatric patients with SLE. Benlysta has been approved for use in adult patients since 2011.

“The agency expedited the review and approval of this application because Benlysta IV fulfils an unmet need for therapies, specifically in pediatric patients with SLE. While there is no cure for lupus, treatment can help our youngest patients control their disease with the hope of improving their quality of life and lowering their risk of long-term organ damage and disability,” said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

While childhood-onset SLE is rare, when diagnosed, it is generally more active in children and adolescents than adult patients, particularly in how it impacts organs such as the kidneys and central nervous system. As a result of the disease starting early in life, pediatric patients with SLE are at a higher risk for developing increased organ damage and complications from the disease as well as adverse events from the life-long treatments usually required.

The efficacy of Benlysta IV for the treatment of SLE in pediatric patients was studied over 52 weeks in 93 pediatric patients with SLE. The proportion of pediatric patients achieving the composite primary endpoint, the SLE response index (SRI-4), was higher in pediatric patients receiving Benlysta IV plus standard therapy compared to placebo plus standard therapy. Pediatric patients who received Benlysta IV plus standard therapy also had a lower risk of experiencing a severe flare, as well as longer duration of time until a severe flare (160 days versus 82 days). The drug’s safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in pediatric patients were consistent with those in adults with SLE.

Benlysta’s doctor and patient information includes a warning for mortality, serious infections, hypersensitivity and depression, based on data from the clinical studies in adults with SLE. The drug should not be administered with live vaccines. The manufacturer is required to provide a Medication Guide to inform patients of the risks associated with Benlysta.

The most common side effects in patients included nausea, diarrhea and fever. Patients also commonly experienced infusion reactions, so healthcare professionals are advised to pre-treat patients with an antihistamine.

The FDA granted this application a Priority Review designation. The FDA granted the approval of Benlysta to GlaxoSmithKline.

////////////Benlysta, belimumab, fda 2019, Priority Review, GlaxoSmithKline

Solriamfetol hydrochloride, ソルリアムフェトル塩酸塩 , солриамфетол , سولريامفيتول , 索安非托 ,


2D chemical structure of 178429-65-7

Solriamfetol hydrochloride

FDA APPROVED 2019/3/20, Sunosi

ソルリアムフェトル塩酸塩; R228060, R 228060

Formula
C10H14N2O2. HCl
CAS
178429-65-7 HCL
Mol weight
230.6913
(2R)-2-Amino-3-phenylpropyl carbamate
(2R)-2-Amino-3-phenylpropylcarbamat
10117
178429-62-4 [RN] FREE FORM
Benzenepropanol, β-amino-, carbamate (ester), (βR)- [
солриамфетол [Russian] [INN]
سولريامفيتول [Arabic] [INN]
索安非托 [Chinese] [INN]
JZP-110
Originator SK Holdings
  • Developer Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc; SK biopharmaceuticals
  • Class Carbamates; Sleep disorder therapies; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Adrenergic uptake inhibitors; Dopamine uptake inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Narcolepsy
  • Registered Hypersomnia
  • Discontinued Depressive disorders
  • 26 Mar 2019 Discontinued – Phase-I for Depressive disorders (Adjunctive treatment) in USA (PO) (Jazz Pharmaceuticals pipeline, March 2019)
  • 20 Mar 2019 Registered for Hypersomnia (excessive daytime sleepiness) in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and narcolepsy in USA (PO) – First global approval
  • 20 Mar 2019 US FDA approves solriamfetol to improve wakefulness in adult patients with excessive daytime sleepiness associated with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnoea(OSA)
  • New Drug Application (NDA): 211230
    Company: JAZZ PHARMA IRELAND LTD

Solriamfetol, sold under the brand name Sunosi, is a medication used for the treatment of excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy and sleep apnea.[1]

Common side effects include headache, nausea, anxiety, and trouble sleeping.[1] It is a norepinephrine–dopamine reuptake inhibitor(NDRI). It is derived from phenylalanine and its chemical name is (R)-2-amino-3-phenylpropylcarbamate hydrochloride.[2]

The drug was discovered by a subsidiary of SK Group, which licensed rights outside of 11 countries in Asia to Aerial Pharma in 2011.[3]

History

The drug was discovered by a subsidiary of SK Group, which licensed rights outside of 11 countries in Asia to Aerial Pharma in 2011.[3]Aerial ran two Phase II trials of the drug in narcolepsy[4] before selling the license to solriamfetol to Jazz in 2014; Jazz Pharmaceuticalspaid Aerial $125 million up front and will pay Aerial and SK up to $272 million in milestone payments, and will pay double digit royalties to SK.[3][5]

In March 2019 the FDA accepted SK’s and Jazz’ NDA for use of solriamfetol to treat excessive sleepiness in people with narcolepsy or obstructuve sleep apnea; the drug has an orphan designation for narcolepsy.[3][6]

Names

During development it has been called SKL-N05, ADX-N05, ARL-N05, and JZP-110.[6]

Research

Solriamfetol had also been tested in animal models of depression, but as of 2017 that work had not been advanced to clinical trials.[7]

PATENT

WO 9607637

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO1996007637A1/e

Organic alkyl carbamates have been effectively used for controlling various central nervous system (CNS) disorders. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos . 2,884,444, 2,937,119 and 3,313,697 disclose function of carbamate in CNS disorders, especially as antiepileptic and centrally acting muscle relaxant.
Phenylethylamine derivatives, one important class of therapeutical medicines useful for managing CNS diseases, have been used mainly to treat obesity, narcolepsy, minimal brain dysfunction and mild depression.
Recent design of pharmacologically useful compounds has been based on amino acids or the derivatives thereof, which is mainly attributable to the fact that many of the compounds found in biological systems come from amino acids or the derivatives thereof. In addition, in most cases, the function of a pharmaceutically useful compound is effected after it binds to an enzyme or receptor, which may trigger the regulatory mechanisms of the enzyme or receptor.

REACTION SCHEME I

REACTION SCHEME II

REACTION SCHEME III

EXAMPLE I
Preparation of N-Benzyloxycarbonyl-D-phenylalaninol

In a 500 mL RB flask equipped with a mechanical stirrer and a dropping funnel, D-phenylalaninol (45.4 g, 300 mmol) was dissolved in 220 mL of distilled water, and cooled in an ice-bath. The pH of the solution was adjusted with 50 % sodium hydroxide to 14. Benzyl chloroformate (49.3 mL, 345 mmol) was charged into the dropping funnel and added slowly to the well stirred solution over 0.5 hr. After the completion of the addition, the reaction mixture was stirred for 1 hr. at 0 *C. The product precipitated from the reaction mixture as a white solid. It was collected by filtration and washed completely with distilled water. After being dried in vacuo, the solid thus obtained weighed 104 grams without any further purification: 99.8% Yield.
Melting point = 90 – 92 *C
[α]D20 = + 43.4 (c = 1.0, EtOH)
Analysis calc: C, 71.56; H, 6.71; N,4.91
Found: C, 71.35; H, 6.71; N,4.91

EXAMPLE II
Preparation of N-Benzyloxycarbonyl-D-phenylalaninol
carbamate

In a 500 mL RB flask, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-D- phenylalaninol (13.56 g, 50 mmol) was charged with antipyrine (11.29 g, 60 mmol) in 250 mL of dry THF under a nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction mixture was cooled in an ice-bath and phosgene (30.3 mL of 1.93 M solution in toluene, 58.5 mmol) was added quickly while vigorously stirring. After stirring for 1 hr. , the formation of a corresponding chloroformate from the starting material was monitored by TLC. The chloroformate solution thus prepared, was slowly added to a well stirred and ice-chilled aqueous ammonium hydroxide solution (75 mL, 28-30 %, 1,190 mmol) via cannula over 0.5 hr. The resulting reaction mixture was stirred for an extra 0.5 hr. The organic phase separated was collected. The aqueous phase was extracted twice with methylene chloride (100 mL). The combined organic phase was washed with brine (50 mL), dried over sodium sulfate, and concentrated to yield 17.8 g (113%) of foamy solid. It was purified a flash column chromatography to give 14.8 g of the title compound, white solid: 94% Yield.
Melting point = 121 – 125 *C
[α]D20 = + 28.6 (c = 2.0, EtOH)
Analysis calc. : C, 65.84; H, 6.14; N, 8.53
Found: C, 66.68; H, 6.21; N, 7.80

EXAMPLE III
Preparation of D-Phenylalaninol carbamate hydrochloric
acid salt In a 160 mL Parr reactor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-D-phenylalaninol carbamate (9.43 g) was added with 75 mL of anhydrous methanol and 10 % palladium on charcoal (0.32 g). Then, the reactor was closed and purged with hydrogen for 1 in. The reaction was completed in 2 hrs . under 40 psi pressure of hydrogen at 45 #C. The catalyst was filtered off. Thereafter, the organic layer was concentrated into 5.97 g (102 %) of pale yellow thick liquid. The liquid was poured in 50 mL of anhydrous THF and cooled to 0 “C. Anhydrous hydrogen chloride gas was then purged through the solution with slowly stirring for

0.5 hr. 50 mL of anhydrous ether was added, to give a precipitate. Filtration with THF-ether (1:1) mixture provided 6.1 g of the title compound as a white solid: 88 % Yield.
Melting point = 172 – 174 “C
[α]D20 = – 12.9 (c = 2.0, H20)
Analysis calc. : C, 52.60; H, 6.55; N, 12.14; Cl, 15.37
Found: C, 51.90; H, 6.60; N, 12.15; Cl ,

15.52

EXAMPLE IV
Preparation of N-benzyloxγcarbonyl-L-Phenγlalaninol

The title compound was prepared in the same manner as that of Example I, except that (L)-phenylalaninol was used as the starting material.
Melting point = 90 – 92 *C
[α]D20 = – 42.0 (c = 1.0, EtOH)
Analysis calc. : C, 71.56; H, 6.71; N,4.91
Found: C, 70.98; H, 6.67; N,4.95

EXAMPLE V
Preparation of -N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-Phenylalaninol
carbamate

The title compound was prepared in the same manner as that of Example II, except that N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalaninol was used as the starting material.
Melting point = 121 – 128 ‘C
[α]D20 = – 28.9 (c = 2.0, EtOH)
Analysis calc: C, 65.84; H, 6.14; N, 8.53
Found: C, 65.45; H, 6.15; N, 8.32

EXAMPLE VI
Preparation of L-Phenylalaninol carbamate hydrochloric
acid salt

The title compound was prepared in the same manner as that of Example III, except that N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalaninol carbamate was used as the starting material.
Melting point = 175 – 177 *C [α]D20 = + 13.1 (c = 1.0, H20)
Analysis calc : C, 52.60; H, 6.55; N, 12.14; Cl, 15.37
Found: C, 51.95; H, 6.58; N, 12.09; Cl , 15.37

EXAMPLE VII
Preparation of N-benzyloxycarbonyl-D,L-Phenylalaninol

The title compound was prepared in the same manner as that of Example I, except that (D,L)-phenylalaninol was used as the starting material.
Melting point = 72 – 75 #C
Analysis calc: C, 71.56; H, 6.71; N,4.91
Found: C, 71.37; H, 6.74; N,4.84

EXAMPLE VIII
Preparation of N-benzyloxycarbonyl-D,L-Phenylalaninol
carbamate

The title compound was prepared in the same manner as that of Example II, except that N-benzyloxycarbonyl-D,L-phenylalaninol was used as the starting material.
Melting point = 130 – 133 *C
Analysis calc: C, 65.84; H, 6.14; N, 8.53
Found: C, 65.85; H, 6.14; N, 8.49 EXAMPLE IX
Preparation of D,L-Phenylalaninol carbamate hydrochloric
acid salt

The title compound was prepared in the same manner as that of Example III, except that N-benzyloxycarbonyl-D,L-phenylalaninol carbamate was used as the starting material.
Melting point = 163 – 165 *C
Analysis calc: C, 52.60; H, 6.55; N, 12.14; Cl, 15.37
Found: C, 51.92; H, 6.56; N, 11.95; Cl , 15.82

PATENT

US 20050080268

PATENT

WO 2018133703

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2018133703A1/en

Excessive daytime sleepiness (Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, EDS) or pathological somnolence refers to excessive daytime sleep and wakefulness associated with various sleep disorders. These disorders can be the basis for a sleep disorder or sleep have side effects caused by some other medical conditions. Excessive daytime sleep, also known as narcolepsy, sleep clinics is seen mainly in patients with disease that affects 12% of the general population. EDS patients may be manifested as mental distress, poor work or school performance, increasing the risk of accidents, the impact of EDS can debilitating, even life-threatening.

R228060, also known JZP-110, is a selective dopamine and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, originally developed by R & D, SK biopharmaceutical, 2014 Sir ownership of the pharmaceutical compound. R228060 has the potential to treat narcolepsy and sleep apnea syndrome, in three multi-center study in two global reached the primary endpoint, and achieved positive results, significantly improved adult obstructive sleep apnea patients excessive sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy and excessive sleep problems.

R228060 chemical name is O- carbamoyl – (D) – phenylalaninol, as shown in the structural formula of formula (I):

Figure PCTCN2018071889-appb-000001

Solid Form different chemicals, can cause varying their solubility and stability, and thus affects the absorption and bioavailability of the drug, and can lead to differences in clinical efficacy. Improve the candidate compound has a solubility by salt way become an important means of drug development. Compared to the free form of the drug, suitable pharmaceutically acceptable salts can improve the solubility of the drug type, increased physical and chemical stability, and also to improve the drug-salt having a melting point, hygroscopicity, crystal type and other physical properties, further development of the pharmaceutical dosage form It plays an important role. Patent Document WO1996007637A1 discloses R228060 hydrochloride and its preparation method, and other characteristics of the obtained having a melting point of 172-174 deg.] C as a white solid, the solid was not given in the text data. Further, the present inventors found no other relevant R228060 hydrochloride polymorph or patent literature. Accordingly, the present need in the art to develop a comprehensive system R228060 hydrochloride polymorph, found to be suitable to the development of crystalline form. The present inventors after many experiments, found that polymorph CS1 R228060 hydrochloride CS2 and a melting point polymorph, Form CS1 and CS2 is Form 183 ℃, much higher than the melting point disclosed in prior art solid. It provides a better alternative preparation of pharmaceutical preparations containing R228060 is, has very important implications for drug development.

PATENT

WO 2019027941

https://patentscope2.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=15B8F200BCC820C3761C600EA64A2018?docId=WO2019027941&recNum=4220&office=&queryString=&prevFilter=%26fq%3DOF%3AWO&sortOption=Pub+Date+Desc&maxRec=3471866

(i?)-2-amino-3-phenylpropyl carbamate (APC) is a phenylalanine analog that has been demonstrated to be useful in the treatment of a variety of disorders, including excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, narcolepsy, fatigue, depression, bipolar disorder, fibromyalgia, and others. See, for example, US Patent Nos. 8,232,315; 8,440,715; 8,552,060; 8,623,913; 8,729,120; 8,741,950; 8,895,609; 8,927,602; 9,226,910; and 9,359,290; and U.S. Publication Nos. 2012/0004300 and 2015/0018414. Methods for producing APC (which also has other names) and related compounds can be found in US Patent Nos. 5,955,499; 5,705,640; 6,140,532 and 5,756,817. All of the above patents and applications are hereby incorporated by reference in their entireties for all purposes.

EXAMPLE 1

Synthesis of Compounds

Compound 8 (110CR002)

1 B 110CR002

[0083] tert- utyl (if)-(l-(Carbamothioyloxy)-3-phenylpropan-2-yl)carbamate (IB): A

60% dispersion of sodium hydride (0.36 g, 4.78 mmol, 1.2 equiv) in mineral oil was added in portions to compound 1A (1.0 g. 3.98 mmol, 1 equiv) in THF (20 mL) at 0 °C. After stirring for 1 hour, carbon disulfide (0.191 g, 4.78 mmol, 1.2 equiv) was added at 0 °C. After an additional hour of stirring, methyl iodide (0.3 mL, 4.78 mmol, 1.2 equiv) was added and the reaction was warmed to room temperature. After stirring two additional hours, concentrated ammonium hydroxide (1.6 mL, 7.98 mmol, 2 equiv) was added and the reaction was stirred overnight at room temperature. The reaction was diluted with water (50 mL) and extracted with dichloromethane (3 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to give crude compound IB. The solid was triturated in diethyl ether (20 mL) to give compound IB (0.17 g, 14% yield) as a light yellow solid.

[0084] (R)-0-(2-Amino-3-phenylpropyl) carbamothioate dihydrochloride (110CR002):

4M HCI in dioxane (0.68 mL, 2.74 mmol, 5 equiv) was added to neat compound IB (0.17 g, 0.548 mmol, 1 equiv) and the reaction was stirred overnight. The solution was diluted with diethyl ether (20 mL) and the resulting suspension was filtered. The solid was triturated in diethyl ether (20 mL) and the filtered solid was dried under vacuum at room temperature for two hours to give compound 110CR003 (140 mg, 93% yield, 96.9% purity) as a white solid.

Compound 9 (110CR003)

Scheme 2

2A 2B 110CR003

[0085] (R)-2-((ter^Butoxycarbonyl)amino)-3-phenylpropyl sulfamate (2B): A solution of sulfamoyl chloride (1.15 g, 9.95 mmol, 2.5 equiv) in acetonitrile (2 mL) was added dropwise to a solution of compound 2 A (1.0 g, 3.98 mmol, 1 equiv) and triethylamine (2.1 mL, 14.95 mmol, 3.75 equiv) in N,N-dimethylacetamide (20 mL) at 0 °C. After stirring at room temperature for 4 hours, additional triethylamine (2.1 mL, 14.95 mmol, 3.75 equiv) and sulfamoyl chloride (1.15 g, 9.95 mmol, 2.5 equiv) in acetonitrile (2 mL) was added at 0 °C. The reaction was stirred at room temperature overnight, at which point LCMS indicated a 3 :2 mixture of product to starting material. Additional triethylamine (2.1 mL, 14.95 mmol, 3.75 equiv) and sulfamoyl chloride (1.15 g, 9.95 mmol, 2.5 equiv) in acetonitrile (2 mL) was added at 0 °C and the reaction was stirred at room temperature for an additional 6 hours. LCMS indicated a 4: 1 mixture of product to starting material. The reaction was quenched with saturated sodium bicarbonate (5 mL) and stirred for an additional hour at room temperature. The reaction was diluted with saturated sodium bicarbonate (25 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure. The product still contained unreacted starting material which could not be easily separated. Sulfamoyl chloride (1.15 g, 9.95 mmol, 2.5 equiv) in acetonitrile (2 mL) was added dropwise to a solution of crude compound 2B (0.9 g) and triethylamine (2.1 mL, 14.95 mmol, 3.75 equiv) in N,N-dimethylacetamide (20 mL) at 0 °C. After stirring at room temperature for two hours, the reaction was quenched with saturated sodium bicarbonate (5 mL) and the reaction was stirred for an additional hour at room temperature. The reaction was diluted with saturated sodium bicarbonate (25 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified on an AnaLogix automated system (Redisep 24 g silica gel column), eluting with a gradient of 25 to 50% ethyl acetate in heptanes, to give compound 2B (0.37 g, 28% yield) as a white solid.

[0086] (R)-2-Amino-3-phenylpropyl sulfamate hydrochloride (110CR003): 4M HC1 in dioxane (1.4 mL, 5.6 mmol, 5 equiv) was added to neat compound 2B (0.37 g, 1.12 mmol, 1 equiv) and the reaction was stirred overnight. The solution was diluted with diethyl ether (20 mL) and the resulting suspension was filtered. The solid was triturated in diethyl ether (20 mL) and the filtered solid was dried under a vacuum at room temperature for two hours to give compound 110CR003 (250 mg, 84% yield, 97.8% purity) as a white solid.

Com ound 3 (110CR007)

[0087] (Benzyl (R)-(l-phenyl-3-ureidopropan-2-yl)carbamate) (3B): Concentrated hydrochloric acid (0.06 mL, 0.68 mmol, 0.12 equiv) was added to a solution of benzyl (ft)-(l -amino-3-phenylpropan-2-yl)carbamate ( 1.5 g, 5.28 mmol, 1 equiv) and urea (1.26 g, 21.21 mmol, 4 equiv) in toluene (150 mL) under nitrogen. After refluxing overnight, LCMS indicated the reaction was complete. The reaction was concentrated under reduced pressure, diluted with water (150 mL) and stirred for 30 minutes. The resulting solid was filtered and washed with water (25 mL) to give crude compound 3B (1.4 g, 4.27 mmol, 80% yield) as a white solid, which was used sequentially.

[0088] ((R)-l-(2-mino-3-phenylpropyl)urea) (3C): Compound 3B (0.5 g, 1.5 mmol, 1 equiv) and 10% palladium on carbon (0.09 g) in methanol (60 mL) was hydrogenated at 30 psi for 1 hour at which time LC-MS determined that the reaction was incomplete. The solution was filtered and fresh catalyst (0.09 g) was added. The solution was hydrogenated at 30 psi for an additional 45 minutes resulting in complete conversion. Two identical scale reactions were run for 105 minutes each, both resulting in complete conversion. The three runs were combined and filtered through celite, which was washed with methanol (50 mL). The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure to give crude compound 3C (0.9 g), which was used sequentially.

[0089] (R)-l-(2-Amino-3-phenylpropyI)urea hydrochloride (110CR007): Compound 3C (0.88 g, 4.58 mmol, 1 equiv) was dissolved diethyl ether (10 mL) and 4 N HCl in dioxane (2.31 mL, 9.27 mmol, 2 equiv) was added. The reaction was stirred overnight and then concentrated under reduced pressure to give crude 110CR007 as a white solid. The material was twice recrystallized from 10% methanol in ethanol (30 mL) to give 110CR007 (0.163 g, 16 % yield, 93.7 % purity) as a white solid.

Compound 4 (110CR009)

Scheme 4

[0090] Ethyl (R^)-4-((tert-butoxycarbonyI)amino)-5-phenylpent-2-enoate (4B): A solution of compound 4A (4.0 g, 16.1 mmol, 1 equiv) and ethyl (triphenylphos-phoranylidene)acetate (5.6 g, 16.1 mmol, 1 equiv) in dichloromethane (40 mL) was stirred at room temperature overnight. The reaction was concentrated under reduce pressure to remove the organic solvent and the resulting residue was purified on an AnaLogix automated system (40 g Sorbtech silica gel column), eluting with gradient of 50 to 100% ethyl acetate in heptanes, to give compound 4B (4.8 g, 94% yield) as a white solid.

[0091] (R^E)-4-((te *i-ButoxycarbonyI)amino)-5-phenylpent-2-enoic acid (4C): Lithium hydroxide (1.4 g, 60 mmol, 4 equiv) in water (15 mL) was added to compound 4B (4.8 g, 15 mmol, 1 equiv) in THF (60 mL) at room temperature and the reaction was stirred overnight. After 16 hours, the reaction was adjusted to pH 4 with IN hydrochloric acid. The organic layer was removed and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (2 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers was washed with saturated brine (50 mL), dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to give compound 4C (4.2 g, 97% yield) as a light cream solid, which was used subsequently.

[0092] Methyl (R E)-4-((½ -i-butoxycarbonyl)amino)-5-phenylpent-2-enoate (4D1):

Isobutyl chloro formate (1.3 mL, 10 mmol, 1 equiv) in THF (4 mL) was added dropwise to a solution of compound 4C (3.0 g, 10 mmol, 1 equiv) and N-methyl-morpholine (1.1 mL, 10 mmol, 1 equiv) in THF (12 mL) at -15 °C. After 30 minutes of stirring, LCMS indicated complete conversion to the anhydride intermediate. 2M Ammonia in methanol (5 mL, 10 mmol, 1 equiv) was added dropwise over 20 minutes, keeping the internal temperature between -25 to -15 °C. After 30 minutes of stirring, the reaction was warmed to room

temperature and stirred overnight. The reaction mixture was concentrated at reduced pressure to remove the organic solvent. The resulting residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate (50 mL) and washed with water (100 mL). The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (2 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with saturated brine (50 mL), dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified on an AnaLogix automated system (80 g Sorbtech silica gel column), eluting with a gradient of 25 to 50% ethyl acetate in heptanes, to give compound 4D1 (1.1 g, 35 % yield) as a white solid.

[0093] Methyl (S)-4-((te^-butoxycarbonyl)amino)-5-phenylpentanoate (4D2): A mixture of compound 4D1 (1.1 g, 3.6 mmol, 1 equiv) and 10% palladium on carbon (0.33 g, 50% wet) in methanol (40 mL) was hydrogenated at 40 psi at room temperature for 4 hours. The mixture was filtered through celite, which was washed with methanol (100 mL). The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure to give compound 4D2 (1.1 g, 99% yield) as a white solid.

[0094] (S)-4-((ii? i-Butoxycarbonyl)amino)-5-phenylpentanoic acid (4D3): Lithium hydroxide (73 mg, 3 mmol, 1.5 equiv) in water (1 mL) was added to compound 4B (0.6 g, 2 mmol, 1 equiv) in THF (9 mL) at room temperature. After stirring overnight, the reaction was adjusted to pH 4 with IN hydrochloric acid. The organic layer was removed and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The combined organic layers was washed with saturated brine (25 mL), dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to give compound 4D3 (0.56 g, 98% yield) as a white solid, which was used subsequently.

[0095] tert-Butyl (S)-(5-amino-5-oxo-l-phenylpentan-2-yl)carbamate (4E): Isobutyl chloroformate (0.23 mL, 1.8 mmol, 1 equiv) in THF (0.5 mL) was added drop-wise to a solution of compound 4C (0.54 g, 1.8 mmol, 1 equiv) and N-methylmorpholine (0.2 mL, 1.8 mmol, 1 equiv) in THF (1 mL) at -15 °C. After 20 minutes of stirring, LCMS indicated complete conversion to the anhydride intermediate. 0.4M Ammonia in THF (9 mL, 3.6 mmol, 2 equiv) was added drop-wise over 20 minutes, keeping the internal temperature between -25 to -15 °C. After 30 minutes of stirring the reaction was warmed to room temperature and stirred overnight. The reaction mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure to remove the organic solvent. The resulting residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate (25 mL) and washed with water (25 mL). The organic layer was separated and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (2 x 25 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with saturated brine (50 mL), dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under

reduced pressure to give compound 4E (0.5 g, 93% yield) as a white solid, which was used subsequently.

[0096] (S)-4-Amino-5-phenylpentanamide hydrochloride (110CR009): 4M HC1 in dioxane (6 mL, 25 mmol, 10 equiv) was added to compound 4E (0.73 g, 1.12 mmol, 1 equiv) After stirring overnight at room temperature, the reaction was diluted with diethyl ether (20 mL) and stirred for 6 hours. The resulting suspension was filtered and the solid was washed with diethyl ether (20 mL). The filtered solid was dried under vacuum at room temperature for two hours to give compound 110CR009 (340 mg, 60% yield, 97.9 % purity) as a white solid.

Compound 10 (110CR012)

[0097] tert-Butyl (R)-(l-(carbamoylthio)-3-phenyIpropan-2-yI)carbamate (5B):

Compound 5 A (0.15 g, 0.56 mmol, 1 equiv) was dissolved in THF (8 mL) and sparged with nitrogen for 15 minutes. Trichloroacetyl isocyanate (0.1 mL, 0.84 mmol, 1.5 equiv) was added and the solution stirred for 3 hours, at which point TLC (30% ethyl acetate in heptane) indicated absence of starting material. The reaction was cooled to 0°C and concentrated ammonium hydroxide (0.15 mL) was added. After stirring overnight at room temperature, TLC indicated that the reaction was complete. The reaction was washed with a 10% ammonium hydroxide (10 mL). The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was purified on an AnaLogix automated system (12 g silica gel column), eluting with a gradient of 0 to 30% ethyl acetate in heptane, to give compound 5B. This reaction was repeated an additional two times 0.15 g and 0.18 g). The products were to give compound 5B (0.35 g, 1.12 mmol, 62.2% yield) as a white solid.

[0098] (R)-S-(2-Amino-3-phenylpropyl) carbamothioate hydrochloride (110CR012):

Compound 5B (0.35 g, 1.12 mmol, 1 equiv) was dissolved in 4N HCI in dioxane (2 mL). The reaction was stirred for two hours and then concentrated under reduced pressure to give crude 110CR012 as a white solid. The material was triturated in diethyl ether (15 mL) to give 110CR012 (0.215 g, 78 % yield, 98.0 % purity) as a white solid.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b “SUNOSI™ (solriamfetol) Tablets, for Oral Use. Full Prescribing Information” (PDF). Jazz Pharmaceuticals. 2019. Retrieved 21 March2019.
  2. ^ Abad, VC; Guilleminault, C (2017). “New developments in the management of narcolepsy”Nature and Science of Sleep9: 39–57. doi:10.2147/NSS.S103467PMC 5344488PMID 28424564.
  3. Jump up to:a b c d Ji-young, Sohn (5 March 2018). “SK Biopharmaceuticals’ narcolepsy drug on track to hitting US market”The Korea Herald.
  4. ^ Sullivan, SS; Guilleminault, C (2015). “Emerging drugs for common conditions of sleepiness: obstructive sleep apnea and narcolepsy”. Expert Opinion on Emerging Drugs20 (4): 571–82. doi:10.1517/14728214.2015.1115480PMID 26558298.
  5. ^ Garde, Damian (January 14, 2014). “Jazz bets up to $397M on Aerial’s narcolepsy drug”FierceBiotech.
  6. Jump up to:a b “Solriamfetol – Jazz Pharmaceuticals/SK Biopharmaceuticals”. AdisInsight. Retrieved 15 April 2018.
  7. ^ de Biase, S; Nilo, A; Gigli, GL; Valente, M (August 2017). “Investigational therapies for the treatment of narcolepsy”. Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs26 (8): 953–963. doi:10.1080/13543784.2017.1356819PMID 28726523.
Solriamfetol
Solriamfetol.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Sunosi
Synonyms SKL-N05, ADX-N05, ARL-N05, and JZP-110; (R)-2-amino-3-phenylpropylcarbamate hydrochloride
Routes of
administration
By mouth
ATC code
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability ~95%
Protein binding 13.3–19.4%
Metabolism negligible
Elimination half-life ~7.1 h
Excretion urine (95% unchanged)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C10H14N2O2
Molar mass 194.234 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

///////////Solriamfetol hydrochloride, Solriamfetol, ソルリアムフェトル塩酸塩; солриамфетол , سولريامفيتول 索安非托 JZP-110, Orphan Drug, fda 2019, R228060, R 228060

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