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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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PF-06651600


Image result for PF-06651600

Image result for PF-06651600

Image result for PF-06651600

PF-06651600

CAS 1792180-81-4

C₁₅H₁₉N₅O, 285.34, UNII-2OYE00PC25

1-((2S,5R)-5-((7H-Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)-2-methylpiperidin-1-yl)prop-2-en-1-one

Image result for PF-06651600

 1-[(2S,5R)-2-Methyl-5-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamino)-1-piperidinyl]-2-propen-1-one malonate

PF-06651600 malonate
CAS: 2140301-97-7 (malonate)
Chemical Formula: C18H23N5O5

Molecular Weight: 389.412

PHASE 2  alopecia areata, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis.

PF-06651600 is a potent and selective JAK3 inhibitor. PF-06651600 is a potent and low clearance compound with demonstrated in vivo efficacy. The favorable efficacy and safety profile of this JAK3-specific inhibitor PF-06651600 led to its evaluation in several human clinical studies. JAK3 was among the first of the JAKs targeted for therapeutic intervention due to the strong validation provided by human SCID patients displaying JAK3 deficiencies

Pfizer has established a leading kinase research capability with multiple unique kinase inhibitors in development as potential medicines. PF-06651600 is a highly selective and orally bioavailable Janus Kinase 3 (JAK3) inhibitor that represents a potential immunomodulatory therapy. With the favorable efficacy, safety profile, and ADME properties, this JAK3-specific covalent inhibitor has been under clinical investigation for the treatment of alopecia areata, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis. Supported by positive results from a Phase 2 study, 1 was granted Breakthrough Therapy designation by the FDA on Sept. 5, 2018 for treatment of alopecia areata.

SYN

PAPER

J. Med. Chem. 201760 (5), 19711993DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b01694

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b01694

Paper

Process Development and Scale Up of a Selective JAK3 Covalent Inhibitor PF-06651600, 

Yong Tao*

Cite This:Org. Process Res. Dev.2019XXXXXXXXXX-XXX

Publication Date:July 19, 2019

https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.oprd.9b00198

A scalable process for PF-06651600 (1) has been developed through successful enabling of the first generation syntheis. The synthesis highlights include the following: (1) replacement of costly PtO2 with a less expensive 5% Rh/C catalyst for a pyridine hydrogenation, (2) identification of a diasteroemeric salt crystallization to isolate the enantiomerically pure cis-isomer directly from a racemic mixture of cis/trans isomers, (3) a high yielding amidation via Schotten–Baumann conditions, and (4) critical development of a reproducible crystallization procedure for a stable crystalline salt (1·TsOH), which is suitable for long-term storage and tablet formulation. All chromatographic purifications, including two chiral SFC chromatographic separations, were eliminated. Combined with other improvements in each step of the synthesis, the overall yield was increased from 5% to 14%. Several multikilogram batches of the API have been delivered to support clinical studies.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.oprd.9b00198

1-((2S,5R)-5-((7H-Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)-2-methylpiperidin-1-yl)prop-2-en-1-one p-Toluenesulfonate (1·TsOH)

1·TsOH (4.41 kg, 9.64 mol) as a white powder in 89.6% yield (accounting for the amount of seed charged). Achiral HPLC purity: 99.6% with 0.22% of dimer 15. Chiral SFC purity: >99.7%. Mp 199 °C. Rotomers observed for NMR spectroscopies. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ ppm 12.68 (brs, 1H), 9.22 (brs, 1H), 8.40 (s, 1H), 7.50 (d, J = 8.2 Hz, 2H), 7.45 (m, 1H), 7.12 (d, J = 8.2 Hz, 2H), 6.94 (d, J = 1.2 Hz, 1H), 6.84 (m, 1H), 6.13 (m, 1H), 5.70 (m, 1H), 4.81 (m, 0.5H), 4.54 (m, 0.5H), 4.41 (m, 0.5H), 4.12 (m, 0.5H), 3.99 (m, 1H), 3.15 (m, 0.5H), 2.82 (m, 0.5H), 2.29 (s, 3H), 1.91–1.72 (m, 4H), 1.24–1.17 (m, 3H). 13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ ppm 165.52, 165.13, 150.50, 145.64, 143.06, 138.48, 129.51, 129.24, 128.67, 127.99, 127.73, 125.97, 125.02, 102.30, 49.53, 48.92, 47.27, 43.83, 42.96, 29.37, 28.41, 25.22, 21.28, 16.97, 15.51. HRMS (ESI) m/z: calculated for C15H20N5O [M + H]+286.1668; observed 286.1692.

PAPER

Telliez JB, et al. Discovery of a JAK3-Selective Inhibitor: Functional Differentiation of JAK3-Selective Inhibition over pan-JAK or JAK1-Selective Inhibition. ACS Chem Biol. 2016 Dec 16;11(12):3442-3451.

PATENT

WO 2015083028

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2015083028A1

REFERENCES

1: D’Amico F, Fiorino G, Furfaro F, Allocca M, Danese S. Janus kinase inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases: developments from phase I and phase II clinical trials. Expert Opin Investig Drugs. 2018 Jul;27(7):595-599. doi: 10.1080/13543784.2018.1492547. Epub 2018 Jul 6. Review. PubMed PMID: 29938545.

2: Robinette ML, Cella M, Telliez JB, Ulland TK, Barrow AD, Capuder K, Gilfillan S, Lin LL, Notarangelo LD, Colonna M. Jak3 deficiency blocks innate lymphoid cell development. Mucosal Immunol. 2018 Jan;11(1):50-60. doi: 10.1038/mi.2017.38. Epub 2017 May 17. PubMed PMID: 28513593; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5693788.

3: Thorarensen A, Dowty ME, Banker ME, Juba B, Jussif J, Lin T, Vincent F, Czerwinski RM, Casimiro-Garcia A, Unwalla R, Trujillo JI, Liang S, Balbo P, Che Y, Gilbert AM, Brown MF, Hayward M, Montgomery J, Leung L, Yang X, Soucy S, Hegen M, Coe J, Langille J, Vajdos F, Chrencik J, Telliez JB. Design of a Janus Kinase 3 (JAK3) Specific Inhibitor 1-((2S,5R)-5-((7H-Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)-2-methylpiperidin-1-yl)prop -2-en-1-one (PF-06651600) Allowing for the Interrogation of JAK3 Signaling in Humans. J Med Chem. 2017 Mar 9;60(5):1971-1993. doi: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b01694. Epub 2017 Feb 16. PubMed PMID: 28139931.

4: Telliez JB, Dowty ME, Wang L, Jussif J, Lin T, Li L, Moy E, Balbo P, Li W, Zhao Y, Crouse K, Dickinson C, Symanowicz P, Hegen M, Banker ME, Vincent F, Unwalla R, Liang S, Gilbert AM, Brown MF, Hayward M, Montgomery J, Yang X, Bauman J, Trujillo JI, Casimiro-Garcia A, Vajdos FF, Leung L, Geoghegan KF, Quazi A, Xuan D, Jones L, Hett E, Wright K, Clark JD, Thorarensen A. Discovery of a JAK3-Selective Inhibitor: Functional Differentiation of JAK3-Selective Inhibition over pan-JAK or JAK1-Selective Inhibition. ACS Chem Biol. 2016 Dec 16;11(12):3442-3451. Epub 2016 Nov 10. PubMed PMID: 27791347.

5: Walker G, Croasdell G. The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) – 17th Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (June 8-11, 2016 – London, UK). Drugs Today (Barc). 2016 Jun;52(6):355-60. doi: 10.1358/dot.2016.52.6.2516435. PubMed PMID: 27458612.

////////////PF-06651600, PF 06651600, PF06651600, Breakthrough Therapy designation, PHASE 2,   alopecia areata, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease,  ulcerative colitis,

C=CC(N1[C@@H](C)CC[C@@H](NC2=C3C(NC=C3)=NC=N2)C1)=O

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ブレキサノロン , Brexanolone, Allopregnanolone


Allopregnanolone.png

ChemSpider 2D Image | Allopregnanolone | C21H34O2

Image result for Brexanolone

Brexanolone

318.501 g/mol, C21H34O2

CAS: 516-54-1

ブレキサノロン

MFCD00003677
Pregnan-20-one, 3-hydroxy-, (3α,5α)-
Pregnan-20-one, 3-hydroxy-, (3α,5α)- [ACD/Index Name]
S39XZ5QV8Y
TU4383000
UNII:S39XZ5QV8Y
(1S,2S,7S,11S,14S,15S,5R,10R)-14-acetyl-5-hydroxy-2,15-dimethyltetracyclo[8.7.0.0<2,7>.0<11,15>]heptadecane
(+)-3a-Hydroxy-5a-pregnan-20-one
(+)-3α-Hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one
(3α,5α)-3-Hydroxypregnan-20-one [ACD/IUPAC Name]
10446
3211363 [Beilstein]
3a-Hydroxy-5a-pregnan-20-one

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zulresso (brexanolone) injection for intravenous (IV) use for the treatment of postpartum depression (PPD) in adult women. This is the first drug approved by the FDA specifically for PPD. 

https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm633919.htm?utm_campaign=031919_PR_FDA%20approves%20new%20drug%20for%20post-partum%20depression&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

March 19, 2019

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zulresso (brexanolone) injection for intravenous (IV) use for the treatment of postpartum depression (PPD) in adult women. This is the first drug approved by the FDA specifically for PPD.

“Postpartum depression is a serious condition that, when severe, can be life-threatening. Women may experience thoughts about harming themselves or harming their child. Postpartum depression can also interfere with the maternal-infant bond. This approval marks the first time a drug has been specifically approved to treat postpartum depression, providing an important new treatment option,” said Tiffany Farchione, M.D., acting director of the Division of Psychiatry Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Because of concerns about serious risks, including excessive sedation or sudden loss of consciousness during administration, Zulresso has been approved with a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) and is only available to patients through a restricted distribution program at certified health care facilities where the health care provider can carefully monitor the patient.”

PPD is a major depressive episode that occurs following childbirth, although symptoms can start during pregnancy. As with other forms of depression, it is characterized by sadness and/or loss of interest in activities that one used to enjoy and a decreased ability to feel pleasure (anhedonia) and may present with symptoms such as cognitive impairment, feelings of worthlessness or guilt, or suicidal ideation.

Zulresso will be available only through a restricted program called the Zulresso REMS Program that requires the drug be administered by a health care provider in a certified health care facility. The REMS requires that patients be enrolled in the program prior to administration of the drug. Zulresso is administered as a continuous IV infusion over a total of 60 hours (2.5 days). Because of the risk of serious harm due to the sudden loss of consciousness, patients must be monitored for excessive sedation and sudden loss of consciousness and have continuous pulse oximetry monitoring (monitors oxygen levels in the blood). While receiving the infusion, patients must be accompanied during interactions with their child(ren). The need for these steps is addressed in a Boxed Warning in the drug’s prescribing information. Patients will be counseled on the risks of Zulresso treatment and instructed that they must be monitored for these effects at a health care facility for the entire 60 hours of infusion. Patients should not drive, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities until feelings of sleepiness from the treatment have completely gone away.

The efficacy of Zulresso was shown in two clinical studies in participants who received a 60-hour continuous intravenous infusion of Zulresso or placebo and were then followed for four weeks. One study included patients with severe PPD and the other included patients with moderate PPD. The primary measure in the study was the mean change from baseline in depressive symptoms as measured by a depression rating scale. In both placebo controlled studies, Zulresso demonstrated superiority to placebo in improvement of depressive symptoms at the end of the first infusion. The improvement in depression was also observed at the end of the 30-day follow-up period.

The most common adverse reactions reported by patients treated with Zulresso in clinical trials include sleepiness, dry mouth, loss of consciousness and flushing. Health care providers should consider changing the therapeutic regimen, including discontinuing Zulresso in patients whose PPD becomes worse or who experience emergent suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapydesignation.

Approval of Zulresso was granted to Sage Therapeutics, Inc.

Allopregnanolone, also known as 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one or 3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone (3α,5α-THP), as well as brexanolone (USAN),[1] is an endogenous inhibitory pregnane neurosteroid[2] which has been approved by the FDA as a treatment for post-partum depression. It is synthesized from progesterone, and is a potent positive allosteric modulator of the action of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at GABAA receptor.[2] Allopregnanolone has effects similar to those of other positive allosteric modulators of the GABA action at GABAA receptor such as the benzodiazepines, including anxiolyticsedative, and anticonvulsant activity.[2][3][4] Endogenously produced allopregnanolone exerts a pivotal neurophysiological role by fine-tuning of GABAA receptor and modulating the action of several positive allosteric modulators and agonists at GABAA receptor.[5] The 21-hydroxylated derivative of this compound, tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), is an endogenous inhibitory neurosteroid with similar properties to those of allopregnanolone, and the 3β-methyl analogue of allopregnanolone, ganaxolone, is under development to treat epilepsy and other conditions, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).[2]

Biochemistry

Biosynthesis

The biosynthesis of allopregnanolone in the brain starts with the conversion of progesterone into 5α-dihydroprogesterone by 5α-reductase type I. After that, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase converts this intermediate into allopregnanolone.[2] Allopregnanolone in the brain is produced by cortical and hippocampus pyramidal neurons and pyramidal-like neurons of the basolateral amygdala.[6]

Biological activity

Allopregnanolone acts as a highly potent positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor.[2] While allopregnanolone, like other inhibitory neurosteroids such as THDOC, positively modulates all GABAA receptor isoforms, those isoforms containing δ subunitsexhibit the greatest potentiation.[7] Allopregnanolone has also been found to act as a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA-ρ receptor, though the implications of this action are unclear.[8][9] In addition to its actions on GABA receptors, allopregnanolone, like progesterone, is known to be a negative allosteric modulator of nACh receptors,[10] and also appears to act as a negative allosteric modulator of the 5-HT3 receptor.[11] Along with the other inhibitory neurosteroids, allopregnanolone appears to have little or no action at other ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDAAMPAkainate, and glycine receptors.[12]

Unlike progesterone, allopregnanolone is inactive at the nuclear progesterone receptor (nPR).[12] However, allopregnanolone can be intracellularly oxidized into 5α-dihydroprogesterone, which is an agonist of the nPR, and thus/in accordance, allopregnanolone does appear to have indirect nPR-mediated progestogenic effects.[13] In addition, allopregnanolone has recently been found to be an agonist of the newly discovered membrane progesterone receptors (mPR), including mPRδmPRα, and mPRβ, with its activity at these receptors about a magnitude more potent than at the GABAA receptor.[14][15] The action of allopregnanolone at these receptors may be related, in part, to its neuroprotective and antigonadotropic properties.[14][16] Also like progesterone, recent evidence has shown that allopregnanolone is an activator of the pregnane X receptor.[12][17]

Similarly to many other GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators, allopregnanolone has been found to act as an inhibitor of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs),[18] including α1 subtypes Cav1.2 and Cav1.3.[19] However, the threshold concentration of allopregnanolone to inhibit L-VGCCs was determined to be 3 μM (3,000 nM), which is far greater than the concentration of 5 nM that has been estimated to be naturally produced in the human brain.[19] Thus, inhibition of L-VGCCs is unlikely of any actual significance in the effects of endogenous allopregnanolone.[19] Also, allopregnanolone, along with several other neurosteroids, has been found to activate the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor (GPBAR1, or TGR5).[20] However, it is only able to do so at micromolar concentrations, which, similarly to the case of the L-VGCCs, are far greater than the low nanomolar concentrations of allopregnanolone estimated to be present in the brain.[20]

Biological function

Allopregnanolone possesses a wide variety of effects, including, in no particular order, antidepressantanxiolyticstress-reducingrewarding,[21] prosocial,[22] antiaggressive,[23]prosexual,[22] sedativepro-sleep,[24] cognitivememory-impairmentanalgesic,[25] anestheticanticonvulsantneuroprotective, and neurogenic effects.[2] Fluctuations in the levels of allopregnanolone and the other neurosteroids seem to play an important role in the pathophysiology of moodanxietypremenstrual syndromecatamenial epilepsy, and various other neuropsychiatric conditions.[26][27][28]

Increased levels of allopregnanolone can produce paradoxical effects, including negative moodanxietyirritability, and aggression.[29][30][31] This appears to be because allopregnanolone possesses biphasic, U-shaped actions at the GABAA receptor – moderate level increases (in the range of 1.5–2 nM/L total allopregnanolone, which are approximately equivalent to luteal phase levels) inhibit the activity of the receptor, while lower and higher concentration increases stimulate it.[29][30] This seems to be a common effect of many GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators.[26][31] In accordance, acute administration of low doses of micronized progesterone (which reliably elevates allopregnanolone levels) has been found to have negative effects on mood, while higher doses have a neutral effect.[32]

During pregnancy, allopregnanolone and pregnanolone are involved in sedation and anesthesia of the fetus.[33][34]

Chemistry

Allopregnanolone is a pregnane (C21) steroid and is also known as 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one, 3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one, or 3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone (3α,5α-THP). It is very closely related structurally to 5-pregnenolone (pregn-5-en-3β-ol-20-dione), progesterone (pregn-4-ene-3,20-dione), the isomers of pregnanedione (5-dihydroprogesterone; 5-pregnane-3,20-dione), the isomers of 4-pregnenolone (3-dihydroprogesterone; pregn-4-en-3-ol-20-one), and the isomers of pregnanediol (5-pregnane-3,20-diol). In addition, allopregnanolone is one of four isomers of pregnanolone (3,5-tetrahydroprogesterone), with the other three isomers being pregnanolone (5β-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one), isopregnanolone(5α-pregnan-3β-ol-20-one), and epipregnanolone (5β-pregnan-3β-ol-20-one).

Derivatives

A variety of synthetic derivatives and analogues of allopregnanolone with similar activity and effects exist, including alfadolone (3α,21-dihydroxy-5α-pregnane-11,20-dione), alfaxolone (3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnane-11,20-dione), ganaxolone (3α-hydroxy-3β-methyl-5α-pregnan-20-one), hydroxydione (21-hydroxy-5β-pregnane-3,20-dione), minaxolone (11α-(dimethylamino)-2β-ethoxy-3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one), Org 20599 (21-chloro-3α-hydroxy-2β-morpholin-4-yl-5β-pregnan-20-one), Org 21465 (2β-(2,2-dimethyl-4-morpholinyl)-3α-hydroxy-11,20-dioxo-5α-pregnan-21-yl methanesulfonate), and renanolone (3α-hydroxy-5β-pregnan-11,20-dione).

Research

Allopregnanolone and the other endogenous inhibitory neurosteroids have short terminal half-lives and poor oral bioavailability, and for these reason, have not been pursued for clinical use as oral therapies, although development as a parenteral therapy for multiple indications has been carried out. However, synthetic analogs with improved pharmacokineticprofiles have been synthesized and are being investigated as potential oral therapeutic agents.

In other studies of compounds related to allopregnanolone, exogenous progesterone, such as oral micronized progesterone (OMP), elevates allopregnanolone levels in the body with good dose-to-serum level correlations.[35] Due to this, it has been suggested that OMP could be described as a prodrug of sorts for allopregnanolone.[35] As a result, there has been some interest in using OMP to treat catamenial epilepsy,[36] as well as other menstrual cycle-related and neurosteroid-associated conditions. In addition to OMP, oral pregnenolonehas also been found to act as a prodrug of allopregnanolone,[37][38][39] though also of pregnenolone sulfate.[40]

Allopregnanolone has been under development by Sage Therapeutics as an intravenously administered drug for the treatment of super-refractory status epilepticuspostpartum depression, and essential tremor.[41] As of 19 March 2019 the FDA has approved allopregnanolone for postpartum depression.

References

  1. ^ “ChemIDplus – 516-54-1 – AURFZBICLPNKBZ-SYBPFIFISA-N – Brexanolone [USAN] – Similar structures search, synonyms, formulas, resource links, and other chemical information”. NIH Toxnet. Retrieved 26 December 2017.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e f g Reddy DS (2010). Neurosteroids: endogenous role in the human brain and therapeutic potentialsProg. Brain Res. Progress in Brain Research. 186. pp. 113–37. doi:10.1016/B978-0-444-53630-3.00008-7ISBN 9780444536303PMC 3139029PMID 21094889.
  3. ^ Reddy DS, Rogawski MA (2012). “Neurosteroids — Endogenous Regulators of Seizure Susceptibility and Role in the Treatment of Epilepsy”Jasper’s Basic Mechanisms of the Epilepsies, 4th Edition: 984–1002. doi:10.1093/med/9780199746545.003.0077ISBN 9780199746545.
  4. ^ T. G. Kokate, B. E. Svensson & M. A. Rogawski (September 1994). “Anticonvulsant activity of neurosteroids: correlation with γ-aminobutyric acid-evoked chloride current potentiation”. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics270 (3): 1223–1229. PMID 7932175.
  5. ^ Pinna, G; Uzunova, V; Matsumoto, K; Puia, G; Mienville, J. -M; Costa, E; Guidotti, A (2000-03-01). “Brain allopregnanolone regulates the potency of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol”Neuropharmacology39 (3): 440–448. doi:10.1016/S0028-3908(99)00149-5PMID 10698010.
  6. ^ Agís-Balboa, Roberto C.; Pinna, Graziano; Zhubi, Adrian; Maloku, Ekrem; Veldic, Marin; Costa, Erminio; Guidotti, Alessandro (2006-09-26). “Characterization of brain neurons that express enzymes mediating neurosteroid biosynthesis”Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences103 (39): 14602–14607. doi:10.1073/pnas.0606544103ISSN 0027-8424PMC 1600006PMID 16984997.
  7. ^ Mousavi Nik A, Pressly B, Singh V, Antrobus S, Hulsizer S, Rogawski MA, Wulff H, Pessah IN (2017). “Rapid Throughput Analysis of GABAA Receptor Subtype Modulators and Blockers Using DiSBAC1(3) Membrane Potential Red Dye”Mol. Pharmacol92 (1): 88–99. doi:10.1124/mol.117.108563PMC 5452057PMID 28428226.
  8. ^ Morris KD, Moorefield CN, Amin J (October 1999). “Differential modulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type C receptor by neuroactive steroids”. Mol. Pharmacol56 (4): 752–9. PMID 10496958.
  9. ^ Li W, Jin X, Covey DF, Steinbach JH (October 2007). “Neuroactive steroids and human recombinant rho1 GABAC receptors”J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther323 (1): 236–47. doi:10.1124/jpet.107.127365PMC 3905684PMID 17636008.
  10. ^ Bullock AE, Clark AL, Grady SR, et al. (June 1997). “Neurosteroids modulate nicotinic receptor function in mouse striatal and thalamic synaptosomes”. J. Neurochem68 (6): 2412–23. doi:10.1046/j.1471-4159.1997.68062412.xPMID 9166735.
  11. ^ Wetzel CH, Hermann B, Behl C, et al. (September 1998). “Functional antagonism of gonadal steroids at the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor”. Mol. Endocrinol12 (9): 1441–51. doi:10.1210/mend.12.9.0163PMID 9731711.
  12. Jump up to:a b c Mellon SH (October 2007). “Neurosteroid regulation of central nervous system development”Pharmacol. Ther116 (1): 107–24. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2007.04.011PMC 2386997PMID 17651807.
  13. ^ Rupprecht R, Reul JM, Trapp T, et al. (September 1993). “Progesterone receptor-mediated effects of neuroactive steroids”. Neuron11 (3): 523–30. doi:10.1016/0896-6273(93)90156-lPMID 8398145.
  14. Jump up to:a b Thomas P, Pang Y (2012). “Membrane progesterone receptors: evidence for neuroprotective, neurosteroid signaling and neuroendocrine functions in neuronal cells”Neuroendocrinology96 (2): 162–71. doi:10.1159/000339822PMC 3489003PMID 22687885.
  15. ^ Pang Y, Dong J, Thomas P (January 2013). “Characterization, neurosteroid binding and brain distribution of human membrane progesterone receptors δ and {epsilon} (mPRδ and mPR{epsilon}) and mPRδ involvement in neurosteroid inhibition of apoptosis”Endocrinology154 (1): 283–95. doi:10.1210/en.2012-1772PMC 3529379PMID 23161870.
  16. ^ Sleiter N, Pang Y, Park C, et al. (August 2009). “Progesterone receptor A (PRA) and PRB-independent effects of progesterone on gonadotropin-releasing hormone release”Endocrinology150 (8): 3833–44. doi:10.1210/en.2008-0774PMC 2717864PMID 19423765.
  17. ^ Lamba V, Yasuda K, Lamba JK, et al. (September 2004). “PXR (NR1I2): splice variants in human tissues, including brain, and identification of neurosteroids and nicotine as PXR activators”. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol199 (3): 251–65. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2003.12.027PMID 15364541.
  18. ^ Hu AQ, Wang ZM, Lan DM, et al. (July 2007). “Inhibition of evoked glutamate release by neurosteroid allopregnanolone via inhibition of L-type calcium channels in rat medial prefrontal cortex”. Neuropsychopharmacology32 (7): 1477–89. doi:10.1038/sj.npp.1301261PMID 17151597.
  19. Jump up to:a b c Earl DE, Tietz EI (April 2011). “Inhibition of recombinant L-type voltage-gated calcium channels by positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors”J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther337 (1): 301–11. doi:10.1124/jpet.110.178244PMC 3063747PMID 21262851.
  20. Jump up to:a b Keitel V, Görg B, Bidmon HJ, et al. (November 2010). “The bile acid receptor TGR5 (Gpbar-1) acts as a neurosteroid receptor in brain”. Glia58 (15): 1794–805. doi:10.1002/glia.21049PMID 20665558.
  21. ^ Rougé-Pont F, Mayo W, Marinelli M, Gingras M, Le Moal M, Piazza PV (July 2002). “The neurosteroid allopregnanolone increases dopamine release and dopaminergic response to morphine in the rat nucleus accumbens”. Eur. J. Neurosci16 (1): 169–73. doi:10.1046/j.1460-9568.2002.02084.xPMID 12153544.
  22. Jump up to:a b Frye CA (December 2009). “Neurosteroids’ effects and mechanisms for social, cognitive, emotional, and physical functions”Psychoneuroendocrinology. 34 Suppl 1: S143–61. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2009.07.005PMC 2898141PMID 19656632.
  23. ^ Pinna G, Costa E, Guidotti A (February 2005). “Changes in brain testosterone and allopregnanolone biosynthesis elicit aggressive behavior”Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A102 (6): 2135–40. doi:10.1073/pnas.0409643102PMC 548579PMID 15677716.
  24. ^ Terán-Pérez G, Arana-Lechuga Y, Esqueda-León E, Santana-Miranda R, Rojas-Zamorano JÁ, Velázquez Moctezuma J (October 2012). “Steroid hormones and sleep regulation”Mini Rev Med Chem12 (11): 1040–8. doi:10.2174/138955712802762167PMID 23092405.
  25. ^ Patte-Mensah C, Meyer L, Taleb O, Mensah-Nyagan AG (February 2014). “Potential role of allopregnanolone for a safe and effective therapy of neuropathic pain”. Prog. Neurobiol113: 70–8. doi:10.1016/j.pneurobio.2013.07.004PMID 23948490.
  26. Jump up to:a b Bäckström T, Andersson A, Andreé L, et al. (December 2003). “Pathogenesis in menstrual cycle-linked CNS disorders”. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci1007: 42–53. doi:10.1196/annals.1286.005PMID 14993039.
  27. ^ Guille C, Spencer S, Cavus I, Epperson CN (July 2008). “The role of sex steroids in catamenial epilepsy and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: implications for diagnosis and treatment”Epilepsy Behav13 (1): 12–24. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2008.02.004PMC 4112568PMID 18346939.
  28. ^ Finocchi C, Ferrari M (May 2011). “Female reproductive steroids and neuronal excitability”. Neurol. Sci. 32 Suppl 1: S31–5. doi:10.1007/s10072-011-0532-5PMID 21533709.
  29. Jump up to:a b Bäckström T, Haage D, Löfgren M, et al. (September 2011). “Paradoxical effects of GABA-A modulators may explain sex steroid induced negative mood symptoms in some persons”. Neuroscience191: 46–54. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2011.03.061PMID 21600269.
  30. Jump up to:a b Andréen L, Nyberg S, Turkmen S, van Wingen G, Fernández G, Bäckström T (September 2009). “Sex steroid induced negative mood may be explained by the paradoxical effect mediated by GABAA modulators”. Psychoneuroendocrinology34 (8): 1121–32. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2009.02.003PMID 19272715.
  31. Jump up to:a b Bäckström T, Bixo M, Johansson M, et al. (February 2014). “Allopregnanolone and mood disorders”. Prog. Neurobiol113: 88–94. doi:10.1016/j.pneurobio.2013.07.005PMID 23978486.
  32. ^ Andréen L, Sundström-Poromaa I, Bixo M, Nyberg S, Bäckström T (August 2006). “Allopregnanolone concentration and mood–a bimodal association in postmenopausal women treated with oral progesterone”. Psychopharmacology187 (2): 209–21. doi:10.1007/s00213-006-0417-0PMID 16724185.
  33. ^ Mellor DJ, Diesch TJ, Gunn AJ, Bennet L (2005). “The importance of ‘awareness’ for understanding fetal pain”. Brain Res. Brain Res. Rev49 (3): 455–71. doi:10.1016/j.brainresrev.2005.01.006PMID 16269314.
  34. ^ Lagercrantz H, Changeux JP (2009). “The emergence of human consciousness: from fetal to neonatal life”Pediatr. Res65 (3): 255–60. doi:10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181973b0dPMID 19092726[…] the fetus is sedated by the low oxygen tension of the fetal blood and the neurosteroid anesthetics pregnanolone and the sleep-inducing prostaglandin D2 provided by the placenta (36).
  35. Jump up to:a b Andréen L, Spigset O, Andersson A, Nyberg S, Bäckström T (June 2006). “Pharmacokinetics of progesterone and its metabolites allopregnanolone and pregnanolone after oral administration of low-dose progesterone”. Maturitas54 (3): 238–44. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2005.11.005PMID 16406399.
  36. ^ Orrin Devinsky; Steven Schachter; Steven Pacia (1 January 2005). Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Epilepsy. Demos Medical Publishing. pp. 378–. ISBN 978-1-934559-08-6.
  37. ^ Saudan C, Desmarchelier A, Sottas PE, Mangin P, Saugy M (2005). “Urinary marker of oral pregnenolone administration”. Steroids70 (3): 179–83. doi:10.1016/j.steroids.2004.12.007PMID 15763596.
  38. ^ Piper T, Schlug C, Mareck U, Schänzer W (2011). “Investigations on changes in ¹³C/¹²C ratios of endogenous urinary steroids after pregnenolone administration”. Drug Test Anal3(5): 283–90. doi:10.1002/dta.281PMID 21538944.
  39. ^ Sripada RK, Marx CE, King AP, Rampton JC, Ho SS, Liberzon I (2013). “Allopregnanolone elevations following pregnenolone administration are associated with enhanced activation of emotion regulation neurocircuits”Biol. Psychiatry73 (11): 1045–53. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.12.008PMC 3648625PMID 23348009.
  40. ^ Ducharme N, Banks WA, Morley JE, Robinson SM, Niehoff ML, Mattern C, Farr SA (2010). “Brain distribution and behavioral effects of progesterone and pregnenolone after intranasal or intravenous administration”Eur. J. Pharmacol641 (2–3): 128–34. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2010.05.033PMC 3008321PMID 20570588.
  41. ^ “Brexanolone – Sage Therapeutics”. AdisInsight.

Further reading

Allopregnanolone
Skeletal formula of allopregnanolone
Ball-and-stick model of the allopregnanolone molecule
Names
IUPAC name

1-(3-Hydroxy-10,13-dimethyl-2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,11,12,14,15,16,17-tetradecahydro-1H-cyclopenta[a]phenanthren-17-yl)ethanone
Other names

ALLO; Allo; ALLOP; AlloP; Brexanolone; 5α-Pregnan-3α-ol-20-one; 3α-Hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one; 3α,5α-Tetrahydroprogesterone; 3α,5α-THP; Zulresso
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
UNII
Properties
C21H34O2
Molar mass 318.501 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

//////////Brexanolone, Priority Review, Breakthrough Therapy designation, Zulresso, Sage Therapeutics Inc, FDA 2019, ブレキサノロン , Brexanolone, Allopregnanolone

CC(=O)C1CCC2C1(CCC3C2CCC4C3(CCC(C4)O)C)C

FDA approves treatment Poteligeo (mogamulizumab-kpkc) for two rare types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma


 

FDA approves treatment for two rare types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Poteligeo (mogamulizumab-kpkc) injection for intravenous use for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory mycosis fungoides (MF) or Sézary syndrome (SS) after at least one prior systemic therapy. This approval provides a new treatment option for patients with MF and is the first FDA approval of a drug specifically for SS.

August 8, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Poteligeo (mogamulizumab-kpkc) injection for intravenous use for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory mycosis fungoides (MF) or Sézary syndrome (SS) after at least one prior systemic therapy. This approval provides a new treatment option for patients with MF and is the first FDA approval of a drug specifically for SS.

“Mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome are rare, hard-to-treat types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and this approval fills an unmet medical need for these patients,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “We are committed to continuing to expedite the development and review of this type of targeted therapy that offers meaningful treatments for patients.”

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the body’s immune system. MF and SS are types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in which lymphocytes become cancerous and affect the skin. MF accounts for about half of all lymphomas arising from the skin. It causes itchy red rashes and skin lesions and can spread to other parts of the body. SS is a rare form of skin lymphoma that affects the blood and lymph nodes.

Poteligeo is a monoclonal antibody that binds to a protein (called CC chemokine receptor type 4 or CCR4) found on some cancer cells.

The approval was based on a clinical trial of 372 patients with relapsed MF or SS who received either Poteligeo or a type of chemotherapy called vorinostat. Progression-free survival (the amount of time a patient stays alive without the cancer growing) was longer for patients taking Poteligeo (median 7.6 months) compared to patients taking vorinostat (median 3.1 months).

The most common side effects of treatment with Poteligeo included rash, infusion-related reactions, fatigue, diarrhea, musculoskeletal pain and upper respiratory tract infection.

Serious warnings of treatment with Poteligeo include the risk of dermatologic toxicity, infusion reactions, infections, autoimmune problems (a condition where the immune cells in the body attack other cells or organs in the body), and complications of stem cell transplantation that uses donor stem cells (allogeneic) after treatment with the drug.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapydesignation. Poteligeo also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted this approval to Kyowa Kirin, Inc.

///////////////// Poteligeo, mogamulizumab-kpkc, fda 2018, Kyowa Kirin, Priority Review, Breakthrough Therapy designation,  Orphan Drug designation

Larotrectinib, ларотректиниб , 拉罗替尼 ,


Image result for LarotrectinibImage result for Larotrectinib

Image result for LarotrectinibImage result for Larotrectinib

Larotrectinib

ARRY-470, LOXO-101, PF9462I9HX

Molecular Formula: C21H22F2N6O2
Molecular Weight: 428.444 g/mol
(3S)-N-{5-[(2R)-2-(2,5-Difluorphenyl)-1-pyrrolidinyl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl}-3-hydroxy-1-pyrrolidincarboxamid
(S)-N-{5-[(R)-2-(2,5-Difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl}-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide
10360
1223403-58-4 [RN]
UNII:PF9462I9HX
ларотректиниб [Russian] [INN]
拉罗替尼 [Chinese] [INN]
(3S)-N-[5-[(2R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide
NTRK-fusion solid tumours
TRK inhibitor
orphan drug designation in the U.S
In 2013, Array Biopharma licensed the product to Loxo Oncology for development and commercialization in the U.S. In 2016, breakthrough therapy designation was received in the U.S. for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic solid tumors with NTRK-fusion proteins in adult and pediatric patients who require systemic therapy and who have either progressed following prior treatment or who have no acceptable alternative treatments. In 2017, Bayer acquired global co-development and commercialization rights from Loxo Oncology.
  • Originator Array BioPharma
  • Developer Array BioPharma; Loxo Oncology; National Cancer Institute (USA)
  • Class Antineoplastics; Pyrazoles; Pyrimidines; Pyrrolidines; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Tropomyosin-related kinase antagonists
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Solid tumours; Soft tissue sarcoma

Highest Development Phases

  • Preregistration Solid tumours
  • Phase II Histiocytosis; Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
  • Phase I/II CNS cancer
  • Preclinical Precursor cell lymphoblastic leukaemia-lymphoma

Most Recent Events

  • 29 May 2018 FDA assigns PDUFA action date of 26/11/2018 for larotrectinib for Solid tumors
  • 29 May 2018 Larotrectinib receives priority review status for Solid tumors in the US
  • 29 May 2018 The US FDA accepts NDA for larotrectinib for Solid tumours for review

Image result for LarotrectinibImage result for Larotrectinib

Larotrectinib sulfate

(3S)-N-[5-[(2R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl]-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide;sulfuric acid

Larotrectinib (LOXO-101) sulfate is an oral potent and selective ATP-competitive inhibitor of tropomyosin receptor kinases (TRK).

    • Crystalline Form (I-HS) OF

SULFATE SALT REPORTED IN https://patents.google.com/patent/US20170165267

nmr  http://file.selleckchem.com/downloads/nmr/s796001-loxo-101-methanol-hnmr-selleck.pdf

Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00006Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00007

Molecular Weight 526.51
Formula C21H22F2N6O2.H2O4S
CAS No. 1223405-08-0
  1. LOXO-101 sulfate
  2. Larotrectinib sulfate
  3. LOXO-101 (sulfate)
  4. 1223405-08-0
  5. UNII-RDF76R62ID
  6. RDF76R62ID
  7. ARRY-470 sulfate
  8. LOXO-101(sulfate)
  9. Larotrectinib sulfate [USAN]
  10. PXHANKVTFWSDSG-QLOBERJESA-N
  11. HY-12866A
  12. s7960
  13. AKOS030526332
  14. CS-5314

LOXO-101 is a small molecule that was designed to block the ATP binding site of the TRK family of receptors, with 2 to 20 nM cellular potency against the TRKA, TRKB, and TRKC kinases. IC50 value: 2 – 20 nM Target: TRKA/B/C in vitro: LOXO-101 is an orally administered inhibitor of the TRK kinase and is highly selective only for the TRK family of receptors. LOXO-101 is evaluated for off-target kinase enzyme inhibition against a panel of 226 non-TRK kinases at a compound concentration of 1,000 nM and ATP concentrations near the Km for each enzyme. In the panel, LOXO-101 demonstrates greater than 50% inhibition for only one non-TRK kinase (TNK2 IC50, 576 nM). Measurement of proliferation following treatment with LOXO-101 demonstrates a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation in all three cell lines. The IC50 is less than 100 nM for CUTO-3.29 and less than 10 nM for KM12 and MO-91, consistent with the known potency of this drug for the TRK kinase family. [1] LOXO-101 demonstrates potent and highly-selective inhibition of TRKA, TRKB, and TRKC over other kinase- and non-kinase targets. LOXO-101 is a potent, ATP-competitive TRK inhibitor with IC50s in low nanomolar range for inhibition of all TRK family members in binding and cellular assays, with 100x selectivity over other kinases. [2] in vivo: Athymic nude mice injected with KM12 cells are treated with LOXO-101 orally daily for 2 weeks. Dose-dependent tumor inhibition is observed, demonstrating the ability of this selective compound to inhibit tumor growth in vivo. [1]

Image result for Larotrectinib

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd.2018.4

SYNTHESIS

WO 2010048314

Synthesis of larotrectinib

N-Boc-pyrrolidine as starting material The method involves enantioselective deprotonation, transmetalation with ZnCl2, Negishi coupling with 2-bromo-1,4-difluorobenzene,

N-arylation with 5-chloropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine, nitration, nitro reduction and condensation with CDI and 3(S)-pyrrolidinol.

PRODUCT Patent

WO 2010048314

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2010048314A1

InventorJulia HaasSteven W. AndrewsYutong JiangGan Zhang

Original AssigneeArray Biopharma Inc.

Priority date 2008-10-22

Example 14


(S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)pyrazolo[l,5-alpyrimidin-3-yl)- 3 -hydroxypyrrolidine- 1 -carboxamide

[00423] To a DCM (0.8 mL) solution of (R)-5-(2-(2,5-difiuorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-amine (Preparation B; 30 mg, 0.095 mmol) was added CDI (31 mg, 0.19 mmol) at ambient temperature in one portion. After stirring two hours, (S)-pyrrolidin-3-ol (17 mg, 0.19 mmol) [purchased from Suven Life Sciences] was added in one portion. The reaction was stirred for 5 minutes before it was concentrated and directly purified by reverse-phase column chromatography, eluting with 0 to 50% acetonitrile/water to yield the final product as a yellowish foamy powder (30 mg, 74% yield). MS (apci) m/z = 429.2 (M+H).

Example 14A


(S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)pyrazolori,5-alpyrimidin-3-yl)- 3 -hydroxypyrrolidine- 1 -carboxamide sulfate

[00424] To a solution of (S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)pyrazolo [ 1 ,5 -a]pyrimidin-3 -yl)-3 -hydroxypyrrolidine- 1 -carboxamide (4.5 mg, 0.011 mmol) in methanol (1 mL) at ambient temperature was added sulfuric acid in MeOH (105 μL, 0.011 mmol). The resulting solution was stirred for 30 minutes then concentrated to provide (S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3 -hydroxypyrrolidine- 1 -carboxamide sulfate (5.2 mg, 0.0099 mmol, 94 % yield) as a yellow solid.

PATENT

WO 2017201241 

Examples

Preparation of 10:

1)

(R,E)-N-(2,5-difluorobenzylidene)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (17): Compound 16 and (R)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (1.05 eq.) were charged to a reactor outfitted with a mechanical stirrer, reflux condensor, J-Kem temperature probe under N2. DCM (3 mL/g of 14) was added (endothermic from 22 °C to about 5 °C) followed by addition of cesium carbonate (0.70 eq.) (exothermic to -50 °C). Once the addition was complete, the reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 3 h (slowly cools from about 40 °C). When the reaction was called complete (HPLC) the mixture was filtered through Celite. The Celite pad (0.3 wt eq) was equilibrated with DCM (1 mL/g of 16), and the reaction mixture was poured through the pad. The Celite cake was washed with DCM (2 x 1 mL/g), and the filtrate concentrated partially to leave about 0.5 to 1 mL/g DCM remaining. The orange solution was stored at room temperature (generally overnight) and used directly in the next reaction. (100% yield was assumed).

2)

(R)-N-((R)-l-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-3-(l,3-dioxan-2-yl)propyl)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (19): To a reactor equipped with overhead stirring, reflux condensor, under

nitrogen, was added magnesium turnings (2.0 eq), and THF (8 mL/g of 17). The mixture was heated to 40 °C. Dibal-H (25% wt in toluene, 0.004 eq) was added to the solution, and the suspension heated at 40 °C for 25 minutes. A solution of 2-(2-bromoethyl)-l,3-dioxane (18) (2 eq) in THF (4.6 mL/g of 17) was added dropwise to the Mg solution via addition funnel. The solution temperature was maintained < 55 °C. The reaction progress was monitored by GC. When the Grignard formation was judged complete, the solution was cooled to -30 °C, and 17 (1.0 eq, in DCM) was added dropwise via addition funnel. The temperature was kept between -30 °C and -20 °C and the reaction was monitored for completion (FIPLC). Once the reaction was called complete, the suspension (IT = -27.7 °C) was vacuum transferred to a prepared and cooled (10 °C) 10% aqueous citric acid solution (11 mL/g of 17). The mixture temperature rose to 20 °C during transfer. The milky solution was allowed to stir at ambient temperature overnight. MTBE (5.8 mL/g) was added to the mixture, and it was transferred to a separatory funnel. The layers were allowed to separate, and the lower aqueous layer was removed. The organic layer was washed with sat. NaHC03 (11 mL/g) and then sat. NaCl (5.4 mL/g). The organic layer was removed and concentrated to minimum volume via vacuum distillation. MTBE (2 mL/g) was added, and the mixture again concentrated to minimum volume. Finally MTBE was added to give 2 mL/g total MTBE (GC ratio of MTBE:THF was about 9: 1), and the MTBE mixture was heated to 50 °C until full dissolution occurred. The MTBE solution was allowed to cool to about 35 °C, and heptane was added portion -wise. The first portion (2 mL/g) is added, and the mixture allowed to stir and form a solid for 1-2 h, and then the remainder of the heptane is added (8 mL/g). The suspension was allowed to stir for >lh. The solids were collected via filtration through polypropylene filter cloth (PPFC) and washed with 10% MTBE in heptane (4 mL/g. The wet solid was placed in trays and dried in a vacuum oven at 55 °C until constant weight (3101 g, 80.5%, dense white solid, 100a% and 100wt%).

3)

(R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidine (R)-2-hydroxysuccinate (10): To a flask containing 4: 1 TFA:water (2.5 mL/g, pre-mixed and cooled to <35 °C before adding 19) was added (R)-N-((R)-l-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-3-(l,3-dioxan-2-yl)propyl)-2-methylpropane-2-sulfinamide (19) (1 eq). The mixture temperature rose from 34 °C to 48 °C and was stirred at ambient temperature for 1 h. Additional TFA (7.5 mL/g) was added, followed by triethylsilane (3 eq) over 5 minutes. The biphasic mixture was stirred vigorously under nitrogen for 21 h until judged complete (by GC, <5% of imine). The mixture was then concentrated under vacuum until -10 kg target mass (observed 10.8 kg after concentration). The resulting concentrate was transferred to a separatory funnel and diluted with MTBE (7.5 mL/g), followed by water (7.5 mL/g). The layers were separated. The MTBE layer was back-extracted with 1M HC1 (3 mL/g). The layers were separated, and the aqueous layers were combined in a round-bottomed flask with DCM (8 mL/g). The mixture was cooled in an ice bath and 40% NaOH was charged to adjust the pH to >12 (about 0.5 mL/g; the temperature went from 24 °C to 27 °C, actual pH was 13), and the layers separated in the separatory funnel. The aqueous layer was back-extracted twice with DCM (2 x 4 mL/g). The organic layers were concentrated to an oil (<0.5 mL/g) under vacuum (rotovap) and EtOH (1 mL/g based on product) was added. The yellow solution was again concentrated to an oil (81% corrected yield, with 3% EtOH, 0.2% imine and Chiral HPLC showed 99.7%ee).

Salt formation: To a solution of (R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidine 10 (1 eq) in EtOH (15 mL/g) was added Z)-(+)-Malic Acid (1 eq). The suspension was heated to 70 °C for 30 minutes (full dissolution had occurred before 70 °C was reached), and then allowed to cool to room temperature slowly (mixture was seeded when the temperature was < 40 °C). The slurry was stirred at room temperature overnight, then cooled to <5 °C the next morning. The suspension was stirred at <5 °C for 2h, filtered (PPFC), washed with cold EtOH (2 x 2 mL/g), and dried (50-55 °C) under vacuum to give the product as a white solid (96% based on 91% potency, product is an EtOH solvate or hemi- solvate).

Preparation of the compound of Formula I:

1)

(R)-5-(2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)-3-nitropyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidine (11):

Compound 5 and 10 (1.05 eq) were charged to a reactor outfitted with a mechanical stirrer, J-Kem temperature probe, under N2. EtOH and THF (4: 1, 10 mL/g of 5) were added and the mixture was cooled to 15-25 °C. Triethylamine (3.5 eq) was added and the internal temp generally rose from 17.3 – 37.8 °C. The reaction was heated to 50 – 60 °C and held at that temperature for 7 h. Once the reaction is judged complete (HPLC), water (12 mL/g of 5) is added maintaining the temperature at 50 – 60 °C. The heat is removed and the suspension was slowly cooled to 21 °C over two h. After stirring at -21 °C for 2 h, the suspension was centrifuged and the cake was washed with water (3 x 3 mL/g of 5). The solid was transferred to drying trays and placed in a vacuum oven at 50 – 55 °C to give 11.

2)

(R)-5-(2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-amine fumarate Pt/C hydrogenation (12 fumarate): To a Parr reactor was charged 11 (1.0 eq), 5% Pt/C ~ 50 wt% water (2 mol% Pt / Johnson Matthey B 103018-5 or Sigma Aldrich 33015-9), and MeOH (8 mL/g). The suspension was stirred under hydrogen at 25-30 psi and the temperature was maintained below 65 °C for ~8 h. When the reaction was called complete (HPLC), the reaction was cooled to 15 – 25 °C and the hydrogen atmosphere was replaced with a nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction mixture was filtered through a 2 micron bag filter and a 0.2 micron line filter in series. The filtrate from the Pt/C hydrogenation was transferred to a reactor under nitrogen with mechanical stirring and then MTBE (8 mL/g) and fumaric acid (1.01 eq) were charged. The mixture was stirred under nitrogen for 1 h and solids formed after -15 min. The mixture was cooled to -10 to -20 °C and stirred for 3 h. The suspension was filtered (PPFC), washed with MTBE (-2.5 mL/g), and the solids was dried under vacuum at 20-25 °C with a nitrogen bleed to yield an off-white solid (83% yield).

3)

Phenyl (5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)-3,3a-dihydropyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)carbamate (13): To a 5 to 15°C solution of 12-fumarate (1.0 eq) in 2-MeTHF (15 mL/g) was added a solution of potassium carbonate (2.0 eq.) in water (5 mL/g) followed by phenyl chloroformate (1.22 eq.) (over 22 min, an exotherm from 7 °C to 11 °C occurred). The mixture was stirred for 2 h and then the reaction was called complete (HPLC). The stirring ceased and the aqueous layer was removed. The organic layer was washed with brine (5 mL/g) and concentrated to ca. 5 mL/g of 2-MeTHF under vacuum and with heating to 40 °C. To the 2-MeTHF solution was added heptanes (2.5 mL/g) followed by seeds (20 mg, 0.1 wt%). This mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature for 2 h (until a solid formed), and then the remainder of the heptanes (12.5 mL/g) was added. The mixture was stirred at ambient temperature for 2 h and then the solids were collected via filtration (PPFC), washed with 4: 1 heptanes :MeTHF (2 x 2 mL/g), and dried to give 13 (96%).

4)

(S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-l-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate: To a flask containing 13 (1.0 eq) was added a solution of (S)-pyrrolidin-3-ol (1.1 eq.) in EtOH (10 mL/g). The mixture was heated at 50 – 60 °C for 5 h, called complete (HPLC), and then cooled to 20-35 °C. Once <35°C, the reaction was polish-filtered (0.2 micron) into a clean reaction vessel and the mixture was cooled to -5 to 5 °C. Sulfuric acid (1.0 eq.) was added over 40 minutes, the temperature rose to 2 °C and the mixture was seeded. A solid formed, and the mixture was allowed to stir at -5 to 5 °C for 6.5 h. Heptanes (10 mL/g) was added, and the mixture stirred for 6.5 h. The

suspension was filtered (PPFC), washed with 1 : 1 EtOH:heptanes (2 x 2 mL/g), and dried (under vacuum at ambient temperature) to give Formula I (92.3%).

Preparation of the hydrogen sulfate salt of the compound of Formula I:

Concentrated sulfuric acid (392 mL) was added to a solution of 3031 g of (S)-N-(5- ((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)-pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-l-carboxamide in 18322 mL EtOH to form the hydrogen sulfate salt. The solution was seeded with 2 g of (,S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-l-yl)-pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-l-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate and the solution was stirred at room temperature for at least 2 hours to form a slurry of the hydrogen sulfate salt. Heptane (20888 g) was added and the slurry was stirred at room temperature for at least 60 min. The slurry was filtered and the filter cake was washed with 1 : 1 heptane/EtOH. The solids were then dried under vacuum at ambient temperature (oven temperature set at 15° Celsius).

The dried hydrogen sulfate salt (6389 g from 4 combined lots) was added to a 5 :95 w/w solution of water/2-butanone (total weight 41652 g). The mixture was heated at about 68° Celsius with stirring until the weight percent of ethanol was about 0.5%, during which time a slurry formed. The slurry was filtered, and the filter cake was washed with a 5 :95 w/w solution of water/2-butanone. The solids were then dried under vacuum at ambient temperature (oven temperature set at 15° Celsius) to provide the crystalline form of (S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidin-l-yl)-pyrazolo[l,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-l-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate.

PATENT

US2017165267

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20170165267

Provided herein is a novel crystalline form of the compound of Formula I:

[0000]

Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00001

also known as (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2, 5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide. In particular, the novel crystalline form comprises the hydrogen sulfate salt of the compound of Formula I in a stable polymorph form, hereinafter referred to as crystalline form (I-HS) and LOXO-101, which can be characterized, for example, by its X-ray diffraction pattern—the crystalline form (I-HS) having the formula:

[0000]

Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00002

In some embodiments of the above step (c), the base is an alkali metal base, such as an alkali metal carbonate, such as potassium carbonate.

Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00004

Preparation of 5-chloro-3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine Step A—Preparation of sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-olate

A solution of 1H-pyrazol-5-amine and 1,3-dimethylpyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (1.05 equiv.) were charged to a round bottom flask outfitted with a mechanical stirrer, a steam pot, a reflux condenser, a J-Kem temperature probe and an Nadaptor for positive Npressure control. Under mechanical stirring the solids were suspended with 4 vol. (4 mL/g) of absolute EtOH under a nitrogen atmosphere, then charged with 2.1 equivalents of NaOEt (21 wt % solution in EtOH), and followed by line-rinse with 1 vol. (1 mL/g) of absolute EtOH. The slurry was warmed to about 75° Celsius and stirred at gentle reflux until less than 1.5 area % of 1H-pyrazol-5-amine was observed by TRK1PM1 HPLC to follow the progression of the reaction using 20 μL of slurry diluted in 4 mL deionized water and 5 μL injection at 220 nm.

After 1 additional hour, the mixture was charged with 2.5 vol. (2.5 mL/g) of heptane and then refluxed at 70° Celsius for 1 hour. The slurry was then cooled to room temperature overnight. The solid was collected by filtration on a tabletop funnel and polypropylene filter cloth. The reactor was rinsed and charged atop the filter cake with 4 vol. (4 mL/g) of heptane with the cake pulled and the solids being transferred to tared drying trays and oven-dried at 45° Celsius under high vacuum until their weight was constant. Pale yellow solid sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]-pyrimidin-5-olate was obtained in 93-96% yield (corrected) and larger than 99.5 area % observed by HPLC (1 mg/mL dilution in deionized water, TRK1PM1 at 220 nm).

Step B—Preparation of 3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5(4H)-one

A tared round bottom flask was charged with sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-olate that was dissolved at 40-45° Celsius in 3.0 vol. (3.0 mL/g) of deionized water, and then concentrated under high vacuum at 65° Celsius in a water-bath on a rotary evaporator until 2.4× weight of starting material was observed (1.4 vol/1.4 mL/g deionized water content). Gas chromatography (GC) for residual EtOH (30 μL of solution dissolved in ˜1 mL MeOH) was performed showing less than 100 ppm with traces of ethyl nitrate fumes being observed below upon later addition of HNO3. In some cases, the original solution was charged with an additional 1.5 vol. (1.5 mL/g) of DI water, then concentrated under high vacuum at 65° Celsius in a water-bath on a rotary evaporator until 2.4× weight of starting material was observed (1.4 vol/1.4 mL/g DI water content). Gas chromatograph for residual EtOH (30 μL of solution dissolved in about 1 mL MeOH) was performed showing <<100 ppm of residual EtOH without observing any ethyl nitrate fumes below upon later addition of HNO3.

A round bottom vessel outfitted with a mechanical stirrer, a steam pot, a reflux condenser, a J-Kem temperature probe and an Nadaptor for positive Npressure control was charged with 3 vol. (3 mL/g, 10 equiv) of >90 wt % HNOand cooled to about 10° Celsius under a nitrogen atmosphere using external ice-water cooling bath under a nitrogen atmosphere. Using a pressure equalizing addition funnel, the HNO3solution was charged with the 1.75-1.95 volumes of a deionized water solution of sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-olate (1.16-1.4 mL DI water/g of sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-olate) at a rate to maintain 35-40° Celsius internal temperature under cooling. Two azeotropes were observed without any ethyl nitrate fumes. The azeotrope flask, the transfer line (if applicable) and the addition funnel were rinsed with 2×0.1 vol. (2×0.1 mL/g) deionized water added to the reaction mixture. Once the addition was complete, the temperature was gradually increased to about 45-50° Celsius for about 3 hours with HPLC showing >99.5 area % conversion of sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5-olate to 3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5(4H)-one.

Step C—Preparation of 5-chloro-3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine

3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5(4H)-one was charged to a round bottom flask outfitted with a mechanical stirrer, a heating mantle, a reflux condenser, a J-Kem temperature probe and an Nadaptor for positive N2pressure control. Under mechanical stirring the solids were suspended with 8 volumes (8 mL/g) of CH3CN, and then charged with 2,6-lutitine (1.05 equiv) followed by warming the slurry to about 50° Celsius. Using a pressure equalizing addition funnel, the mixture was dropwise charged with 0.33 equivalents of POCl3. This charge yielded a thick, beige slurry of a trimer that was homogenized while stirring until a semi-mobile mass was observed. An additional 1.67 equivalents of POClwas charged to the mixture while allowing the temperature to stabilize, followed by warming the reaction mixture to a gentle reflux (78° Celsius). Some puffing was observed upon warming the mixture that later subsided as the thick slurry got thinner.

The reaction mixture was allowed to reflux until complete dissolution to a dark solution and until HPLC (20 μL diluted in 5 mL of CH3CN, TRK1PM1 HPLC, 5 μL injection, 268 nm) confirmed that no more trimer (RRT 0.92) was present with less than 0.5 area % of 3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5(4H)-one (RRT 0.79) being observed by manually removing any interfering and early eluting peaks related to lutidine from the area integration. On a 1.9 kg scale, 0 area % of the trimer, 0.25 area % of 3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-5(4H)-one, and 99.5 area % of 5-chloro-3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine was observed after 19 hours of gentle reflux using TRK1PM1 HPLC at 268 [0000]

Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00005

Preparation of (R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine (R)-2-hydroxysuccinate Step A—Preparation of tert-butyl(4-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-4-oxobutyl)-carbamate

2-bromo-1,4-difluorobenzene (1.5 eq.) was dissolved in 4 volumes of THF (based on weight of tert-butyl 2-oxopyrrolidine-1-carboxylate) and cooled to about 5° Celsius. A solution of 2.0 M iPrMgCl in THF (1.4 eq.) was added over 2 hours to the mixture while maintaining a reaction temperature below 25° Celsius. The solution was allowed to cool to about 5° Celsius and stirred for 1 hour (GC analysis confirmed Grignard formation). A solution of tert-butyl 2-oxopyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (1.0 eq.) in 1 volume of THF was added over about 30 min while maintaining a reaction temperature below 25° Celsius. The reaction was stirred at about 5° Celsius for 90 min (tert-butyl 2-oxopyrrolidine-1-carboxylate was confirmed to be less than 0.5 area % by HPLC). The reaction was quenched with 5 volumes of 2 M aqueous HCl while maintaining a reaction temperature below 45° Celsius. The reaction was then transferred to a separatory funnel adding 10 volumes of heptane and removing the aqueous layer. The organic layer was washed with 4 volumes of saturated aqueous NaCl followed by addition of 2×1 volume of saturated aqueous NaCl. The organic layer was solvent-switched to heptane (<1% wt THF confirmed by GC) at a distillation temperature of 35-55° Celsius and distillation pressure of 100-200 mm Hg for 2×4 volumes of heptane being added with a minimum distillation volume of about 7 volumes. The mixture was then diluted to 10 volumes with heptane while heating to about 55° Celsius yielded a denser solid with the mixture being allowed to cool to room temperature overnight. The slurry was cooled to less than 5° Celsius and filtered through polypropylene filter cloth. The wet cake was washed with 2×2 volumes of heptane. The solids were dried under vacuum at 55° Celsius until the weight was constant, yielding tert-butyl(4-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-4-oxobutyl)-carbamate as a white solid at about 75% to 85% theoretical yield.

Step B—Preparation of 5-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole

tert-butyl(4-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-4-oxobutyl)-carbamate was dissolved in 5 vol. of toluene with 2.2 eq. of 12M HCl being added observing a mild exotherm and gas evolution. The reaction was heated to 65° Celsius for 12-24 hours and monitored by HPLC. Upon completion the reaction was cooled to less than 15° Celsius with an ice/water bath. The pH was adjusted to about 14 with 3 equivalents of 2M aqueous NaOH (4.7 vol.). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 1-2 hours. The mixture was transferred to a separatory funnel with toluene. The aqueous layer was removed and the organic layer was washed with 3 volumes of saturated aqueous NaCl. The organic layer was concentrated to an oil and redissolved in 1.5 volumes of heptane. The resulting suspension was filtered through a GF/F filter paper and concentrated to a light yellow oil of 5-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole with a 90% to 100% theoretical yield.

Step C—Preparation of (R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine

Chloro-1,5-cyclooctadiene iridium dimer (0.2 mol %) and (R)-2-(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)-4-isopropyl-4,5-dihydrooxazole (0.4 mol %) were suspended in 5 volumes of MTBE (based on 5-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole) at room temperature. The mixture was stirred for 1 hour and most of the solids dissolved with the solution turning dark red. The catalyst formation was monitored using an HPLC/PDA detector. The reaction was cooled to less than 5° Celsius and 5-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (1.0 eq.) was added using a 0.5 volumes of MTBE rinse. Diphenylsilane (1.5 eq.) was added over about 20 minutes while maintaining a reaction temperature below 10° Celsius. The reaction was stirred for 30 minutes below 10° Celsius and then allowed to warm to room temperature. The reaction was stirred overnight at room temperature. The completion of the reaction was confirmed by HPLC and then cooled to less than 5° Celsius. The reaction was quenched with 5 volumes of 2M aqueous HCl maintaining temperature below 20° Celsius. After 10 minutes the ice/water bath was removed and the reaction temperature was allowed to increase to room temperature while stirring for 2 hours. The mixture was transferred to a separatory funnel with 3 volumes of MTBE. The aqueous layer was washed with 3.5 volumes of MTBE followed by addition of 5 volumes of MTBE to the aqueous layer while adjusting the pH to about 14 by adding 0.75 volumes of aqueous 50% NaOH. The organic layer was washed with 5 volumes of aqueous saturated NaCl, then concentrated to an oil, and diluted with 3 volumes of MTBE. The solution was filtered through a polypropylene filter cloth and rinsed with 1 volume of MTBE. The filtrate was concentrated to an oil of (R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine with a 95% to 100% theoretical yield and with 75-85% ee.

Step D—Preparation of (R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine (R)-2-hydroxy-succinate

(R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine (1.0 eq.) was transferred to a round bottom flask charged with 15 volumes (corrected for potency) of EtOH (200 prf). D-malic acid (1.05 eq.) was added and the mixture was heated to 65° Celsius. The solids all dissolved at about 64° Celsius. The solution was allowed to cool to RT. At about 55° Celsius the solution was seeded with (R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine (R)-2-hydroxy-succinate (about 50 mg, >97% ee) and stirred at room temperature overnight. The suspension was then filtered through a polypropylene filter cloth and washed with 2×1 volumes of EtOH (200 prf). The solids were dried under vacuum at 55° Celsius, yielding (R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine (R)-2-hydroxy-succinate with a 75% to 90% theoretical yield and with >96% ee.

Referring to Scheme 1, suitable bases include tertiary amine bases, such as triethylamine, and K2CO3. Suitable solvents include ethanol, heptane and tetrahydrofuran (THF). The reaction is conveniently performed at temperatures between 5° Celsius and 50° Celsius. The reaction progress was generally monitored by HPLC TRK1PM1.

Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00006

Figure US20170165267A1-20170615-C00007

[0247]

Compounds II (5-chloro-3-nitropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine) and III ((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidine (R)-2-hydroxysuccinate, 1.05 eq.) were charged to a round bottom flask outfitted with a mechanical stirrer, a J-Kem temperature probe and an Nadaptor for positive Npressure control. A solution of 4:1 EtOH:THF (10 mL/g of compound II) was added and followed by addition of triethylamine (NEt3, 3.50 eq.) via addition funnel with the temperature reaching about 40° Celsius during addition. Once the addition was complete, the reaction mixture was heated to 50° Celsius and stirred for 0.5-3 hours to yield compound IV.

To a round bottom flask equipped with a mechanical stirrer, a J-Kem temperature probe, and an Ninlet compound IV was added and followed by addition of tetrahydrofuran (10 mL/g of compound IV). The solution was cooled to less than 5° Celsius in an ice bath, and Zn (9-10 eq.) was added. 6M HCl (9-10 eq.) was then added dropwise at such a rate to keep the temperature below 30° Celsius (for 1 kg scale the addition took about 1.5 hours). Once the exotherm subsided, the reaction was allowed to warm to room temperature and was stirred for 30-60 min until compound IV was not detected by HPLC. At this time, a solution of potassium carbonate (K2CO3, 2.0 eq.) in water (5 mL/g of compound IV) was added all at once and followed by rapid dropwise addition of phenyl chloroformate (PhOCOCl, 1.2 eq.). Gas evolution (CO2) was observed during both of the above additions, and the temperature increased to about 30° Celsius after adding phenyl chloroformate. The carbamate formation was stirred at room temperature for 30-90 min. HPLC analysis immediately followed to run to ensure less than 1 area % for the amine being present and high yield of compound VI in the solution.

To the above solution amine VII ((S)-pyrrolidin-3-ol, 1.1 eq. based on theoretical yield for compound VI) and EtOH (10 mL/g of compound VI) was added. Compound VII was added before or at the same time as EtOH to avoid ethyl carbamate impurities from forming. The above EtOH solution was concentrated to a minimum volume (4-5 mL/g) using the batch concentrator under reduced pressure (THF levels should be <5% by GC), and EtOH (10 mL/g of compound VI) was back-added to give a total of 10 mL/g. The reaction was then heated at 50° Celsius for 9-19 hours or until HPLC shows that compound VI is less than 0.5 area %. The reaction was then cooled to room temperature, and sulfuric acid (H2SO4, 1.0 eq. to compound VI) was added via addition funnel to yield compound I-HS with the temperature usually exotherming at about 30° Celsius.

Example 1 Preparation of Crystalline Form (I-HS) (Method 1)

(S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide (0.500 g, 1.17 mmol) was dissolved in EtOH (2.5 mL) and cooled to about 5° Celsius. Concentrated sulfuric acid (0.0636 mL, 1.17 mmol) was added to the cooled solution and stirred for about 10 min, while warming to room temperature. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (2 mL) was slowly added to the mixture, resulting in the product gumming out. EtOH (2.5 mL) was then added to the mixture and heated to about reflux until all solids were dissolved. Upon cooling to room temperature and stirring for about 1 hour, some solids formed. After cooling to about 5° Celsius, the solids were filtered and washed with MTBE. After filtration and drying at air for about 15 minutes, (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate was isolated as a solid.

Example 2 Preparation of Crystalline Form (I-HS) (Method 2)

Concentrated sulfuric acid (392 mL) was added to a solution of 3031 g of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide in 18322 mL EtOH to form the hydrogen sulfate salt. The solution was seeded with 2 g of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate and the solution was stirred at room temperature for at least 2 hours to form a slurry of the hydrogen sulfate salt. Heptane (20888 g) was added and the slurry was stirred at room temperature for at least 60 min. The slurry was filtered and the filter cake was washed with 1:1 heptane/EtOH. The solids were then dried under vacuum at ambient temperature (oven temperature set at 15° Celsius).

The dried hydrogen sulfate salt (6389 g from 4 combined lots) was added to a 5:95 w/w solution of water/2-butanone (total weight 41652 g). The mixture was heated at about 68° Celsius with stirring until the weight percent of ethanol was about 0.5%, during which time a slurry formed. The slurry was filtered, and the filter cake was washed with a 5:95 w/w solution of water/2-butanone. The solids were then dried under vacuum at ambient temperature (oven temperature set at 15° Celsius) to provide the crystalline form of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate.

Example 3 Preparation of Amorphous Form AM(HS)

To a solution of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide (9.40 g, 21.94 mmol) in MeOH (220 mL) was slowly added sulfuric acid (0.1 M in MeOH, 219.4 mL, 21.94 mmol) at ambient temperature under rapid stirring. After 30 minutes, the reaction was first concentrated by rotary evaporator to near dryness, then on high vacuum for 48 h to provide amorphous form of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide sulfate (11.37 g, 21.59 mmol, 98.43% yield). LCMS (apci m/z 429.1, M+H).

PATENT

CN 107987082

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20170281632A1/en

WO 2010/048314 discloses in Example 14A a hydrogen sulfate salt of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide. WO 2010/048314 does not disclose the particular form of the hydrogen sulfate salt described herein when prepared according to the method of Example 14A in that document. In particular, WO 2010/048314 does not disclose crystalline form (l-HS) as described below.

(S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide having the formula (I):

Figure US20170281632A1-20171005-C00001

Example 1 Preparation of Crystalline Form (I-HS) (Method 1)

(S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide (0.500 g, 1.17 mmol) was dissolved in EtOH (2.5 mL) and cooled to about 5° Celsius. Concentrated sulfuric acid (0.0636 mL, 1.17 mmol) was added to the cooled solution and stirred for about 10 min, while warming to room temperature. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) (2 mL) was slowly added to the mixture, resulting in the product gumming out. EtOH (2.5 mL) was then added to the mixture and heated to about reflux until all solids were dissolved. Upon cooling to room temperature and stirring for about 1 hour, some solids formed. After cooling to about 5° Celsius, the solids were filtered and washed with MTBE. After filtration and drying at air for about 15 minutes, (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidi n-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate was isolated as a solid.

Example 2 Preparation of Crystalline Form (I-HS) (Method 2)

Concentrated sulfuric acid (392 mL) was added to a solution of 3031 g of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2, 5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide in 18322 mL EtOH to form the hydrogen sulfate salt. The solution was seeded with 2 g of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate and the solution was stirred at room temperature for at least 2 hours to form a slurry of the hydrogen sulfate salt. Heptane (20888 g) was added and the slurry was stirred at room temperature for at least 60 min. The slurry was filtered and the filter cake was washed with 1:1 heptane/EtOH. The solids were then dried under vacuum at ambient temperature (oven temperature set at 15° Celsius).

The dried hydrogen sulfate salt (6389 g from 4 combined lots) was added to a 5:95 w/w solution of water/2-butanone (total weight 41652 g). The mixture was heated at about 68° Celsius with stirring until the weight percent of ethanol was about 0.5%, during which time a slurry formed. The slurry was filtered, and the filter cake was washed with a 5:95 w/w solution of water/2-butanone. The solids were then dried under vacuum at ambient temperature (oven temperature set at 15° Celsius) to provide the crystalline form of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide hydrogen sulfate.

Example 3 Preparation of Amorphous Form AM(HS)

To a solution of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide (9.40 g, 21.94 mmol) in MeOH (220 mL) was slowly added sulfuric acid (0.1 M in MeOH, 219.4 mL, 21.94 mmol) at ambient temperature under rapid stirring. After 30 minutes, the reaction was first concentrated by rotary evaporator to near dryness, then on high vacuum for 48 h to provide amorphous form of (S)—N-(5-((R)-2-(2,5-difluorophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine-1-carboxamide sulfate (11.37 g, 21.59 mmol, 98.43% yield). LCMS (apci m/z 429.1, M+H).

References

External links

Larotrectinib
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Identifiers
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UNII
Chemical and physical data
3D model (JSmol)
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US8865698 Method of treatment using substituted pyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidine compounds
2013-07-16
2014-10-21
US8513263 Substituted Pyrazolo[1, 5-a]Pyrimidine Compounds as TRK Kinase Inhibitors
2011-08-11
US2017165267 CRYSTALLINE FORM OF (S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2, 5-DIFLUOROPHENYL)-PYRROLIDIN-1-YL)-PYRAZOLO[1, 5-A]PYRIMIDIN-3-YL)-3-HYDROXYPYRROLIDINE-1-CARBOXAMIDE HYDROGEN SULFATE
2017-01-05
US2017260589 POINT MUTATIONS IN TRK INHIBITOR-RESISTANT CANCER AND METHODS RELATING TO THE SAME
2016-10-26
US9676783 METHOD OF TREATMENT USING SUBSTITUTED PYRAZOLO[1, 5-A] PYRIMIDINE COMPOUNDS
2015-09-04
2016-08-11
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Patent Title

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US9447104 METHOD OF TREATMENT USING SUBSTITUTED PYRAZOLO[1, 5-a]PYRIMIDINE COMPOUNDS
2014-09-18
2015-01-01
US9127013 Method of treatment using substituted pyrazolo[1, 5-a] pyrimidine compounds
2015-01-14
2015-09-08
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

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US9676783 METHOD OF TREATMENT USING SUBSTITUTED PYRAZOLO[1, 5-A] PYRIMIDINE COMPOUNDS
2015-09-04
2016-08-11
US2015073036 NOVEL NTRK1 FUSION MOLECULES AND USES THEREOF
2014-08-29
2015-03-12
US2017114067 METHOD OF TREATMENT USING SUBSTITUTED PYRAZOLO[1, 5-A] PYRIMIDINE COMPOUNDS
2017-01-05
US2016137654 CRYSTALLINE FORM OF (S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2, 5-DIFLUOROPHENYL)-PYRROLIDIN-1-YL)-PYRAZOLO[1, 5-A]PYRIMIDIN-3-YL)-3-HYDROXYPYRROLIDINE-1-CARBOXAMIDE HYDROGEN SULFATE
2015-11-16
2016-05-19
US2015133429 METHOD OF TREATMENT USING SUBSTITUTED PYRAZOLO[1, 5-a] PYRIMIDINE COMPOUNDS
2015-01-14
2015-05-14
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

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US2015366866 METHODS OF TREATING CHOLANGIOCARCINOMA
2014-01-17
2015-12-24
US8865698 Method of treatment using substituted pyrazolo[1, 5-a]pyrimidine compounds
2013-07-16
2014-10-21
US8513263 Substituted Pyrazolo[1, 5-a]Pyrimidine Compounds as TRK Kinase Inhibitors
2011-08-11
US2017165267 CRYSTALLINE FORM OF (S)-N-(5-((R)-2-(2, 5-DIFLUOROPHENYL)-PYRROLIDIN-1-YL)-PYRAZOLO[1, 5-A]PYRIMIDIN-3-YL)-3-HYDROXYPYRROLIDINE-1-CARBOXAMIDE HYDROGEN SULFATE
2017-01-05
US2017260589 POINT MUTATIONS IN TRK INHIBITOR-RESISTANT CANCER AND METHODS RELATING TO THE SAME
2016-10-26

///////////Larotrectinib, UNII:PF9462I9HX, ларотректиниб , 拉罗替尼 , ARRY-470, LOXO-101, PF9462I9HX, phase 3,  Array BioPharma, Loxo Oncology, National Cancer Institute, BAYER, orphan drug designation, breakthrough therapy designation

C1CC(N(C1)C2=NC3=C(C=NN3C=C2)NC(=O)N4CCC(C4)O)C5=C(C=CC(=C5)F)F.OS(=O)(=O)O

PF 06650833


img

PF-06650833

1-{[(2S,3S,4S)-3-ethyl-4-fluoro-5-oxopyrrolidin-2-yl]methoxy}-7-methoxyisoquinoline-6-carboxamide

CAS 1817626-54-2
Chemical Formula: C18H20FN3O4
Molecular Weight: 361.3734

  • Originator Pfizer
  • Class Anti-inflammatories; Antirheumatics
  • Mechanism of Action Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase inhibitors
  • Phase II Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Phase I Lupus vulgaris
  • 01 Aug 2018 Pfizer completes a phase II trial in Rheumatoid arthritis (Treatment-experienced) in USA, Ukraine, Taiwan, Serbia, Russia, Romania, Poland, Mexico, South Korea, Georgia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Australia, Croatia, Spain, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Germany, Bulgaria (PO) (NCT02996500)
  • 28 Jul 2018 No recent reports of development identified for phase-I development in Lupus(In volunteers) in USA (PO, Controlled release)
  • 28 Jul 2018 No recent reports of development identified for phase-I development in Lupus(In volunteers) in USA (PO, Immediate release)
  • PF-06650833 is an inhibitor of Interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 4 (IRAK4). RAK4 is located proximal to TLR/IL-1 receptors, and in preclinical studies, inhibits downstream signaling from these receptors. The development of novel small molecule inhibitors of this kinase has the potential to lead to new therapeutics to treat diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and lymphomas.

Interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) is a serine threonine kinases that plays a key role in innate immune signaling. IRAK-4 is activated by the interleukin (IL-1) family receptors (IL-1R, IL-18R, and IL-33R), as well as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Inhibition of IRAK-4 blocks the production of inflammatory cytokines such as type I interferons, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-1, IL-6, and IL-12 that are key drivers of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IRAK-4 is an attractive therapeutic target for diseases associated with dysregulated inflammation, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

Figure

Figure

First Discovery Synthesis of 1

Conditions: (a) LDA (1.2 equiv), TMSCl (1.3 equiv), THF, −60 °C, 30 min; (b) allyl methyl carbonate (1.1 equiv), Pd(OAc)2 (0.05 equiv), THF, 65 °C, 2 h, 73% (2 steps); (c) LiThCN (1.5 equiv), EtMgCl (1.5 equiv), TMSCl (2.0 equiv), THF, −78 °C, 6 h, 90%; (d) LDA (1.8 equiv), NFSI (1.25 equiv), THF, −78 °C, 1 h, 23% (8), 45% (9); (e) pTsOH (0.05 equiv), MeCN, H2O, 90 °C, 2 h, 97%; (f) 3 (0.9 equiv), KHMDS (2.0 equiv), DMF, THF, −10 °C, 30 min, 84%; (g) H2O2 (10 equiv), K2CO3 (4.0 equiv), DMSO, 20 °C, 2 h, 97%.

CLIP

Image result for PF-06650833

Target: Interleukin-1 receptor associated kinase 4 (IRAK4): This kinase is important in innate immunity, and its inhibition is predicted to be beneficial in treating inflammatory diseases.

Disease: Rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disorder

Notes: PF06650833 came from a screening assay that used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine binding between molecular fragments and IRAK4. The initial hit, which bound weakly to IRAK4, was optimized with structure- and property-based medicinal chemistry to generate a series of potent inhibitors, said Katherine Lee, an associate research fellow at Pfizer.

Paper

Improvements to Enable the Large Scale Synthesis of 1-{[(2S,3S,4S)-3-Ethyl-4-fluoro-5-oxopyrrolidin-2-yl]methoxy}-7-methoxyisoquinoline-6-carboxamide (PF-06650833)

§ Medicine DesignPfizer Worldwide Research and Development445 Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
 Chemical Research and DevelopmentPfizer Worldwide Research and Development445 Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.8b00386
Stephen Wright
Senior Principal Scientist at Pfizer Inc.
New London/Norwich, Connecticut Area
Robert Singer
Robert Singer
Process Chemist -Assoc Research Fellow at Pfizer
New London/Norwich, Connecticut Area

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acs.oprd.8b00386/suppl_file/op8b00386_si_001.pdf

Abstract Image

An improved process for the large scale synthesis of 1-{[(2S,3S,4S)-3-ethyl-4-fluoro-5-oxopyrrolidin-2-yl]methoxy}-7-methoxyisoquinoline-6-carboxamide (1), a candidate currently in clinical development, was developed. Key objectives were to eliminate chromatographic purifications, to maximize the reproducibility of each step, and to improve the yield and efficiency of each step relative to the previous discovery syntheses of 1. This work was focused on improvements to the synthesis of the stereochemically complex lactam 2. Steps of particular concern were the preparation of the unsaturated lactam 6, the cuprate conjugate addition reaction to produce 7, and the conversion of 7 to 8 with a high degree of diastereoselection. The solutions to these challenges have permitted the synthesis of 2 in excess of 100 kg, which in turn has permitted 1 to be prepared in sufficient amounts to support further development.

1 (31.3 kg, 91%, 82% overall) as a white, free-flowing powder.

 1H NMR (500 MHz, DMSO): δ 8.86 (s, 1H), 8.16 (s, 1H), 7.90 (d, J = 5.9 Hz, 1H), 7.84 (br. s., 1H), 7.74 (s, 1H), 7.70 (br. s., 1H), 7.42 (d, J = 5.9 Hz, 1H), 4.90 (dd, J = 5.9, 53.8 Hz, 1H), 4.54 (dd, J = 3.5, 11.1 Hz, 1H), 4.26 (dd, J = 6.4, 11.0 Hz, 1H), 4.13–4.05 (m, 1H), 3.97 (s, 3H), 2.69–2.54 (m, 1H), 1.68–1.53 (m, 2H), 1.02 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 3H).

13C NMR{1H} (126 MHz, DMSO): δ 171.0 (d, J = 19.4 Hz), 166.4, 158.4, 155.1, 137.7, 131.8, 130.3, 128.4, 120.3, 115.2, 103.2 (d, J = 4.2 Hz), 90.0 (d, J = 179.2 Hz), 66.3, 56.0, 54.1, 42.2 (d, J = 19.4 Hz), 16.4 (d, J = 8.4 Hz), 12.1.

19F NMR (H decoupled, 376 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ −199.26.

LCMS: 362 (MH+).

capture

//////////////PF-06650833, PF 06650833, PF06650833, PF-6650833, PF 6650833, PF6650833.

O=C(C1=CC2=C(C(OC[C@H]([C@H](CC)[C@@H]3F)NC3=O)=NC=C2)C=C1OC)N

/////////////////PF-06650833, PF 06650833, Phase 3, Atopic dermatitis, PFIZER, Breakthrough Therapy Designation

FDA approves new uses for two drugs Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib) administered together for the treatment of BRAF-positive anaplastic thyroid cancer


Image result for Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

 

FDA approves new uses for two drugs Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib) administered together for the treatment of BRAF-positive anaplastic thyroid cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib), administered together, for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), and has a type of abnormal gene, BRAF V600E (BRAF V600E mutation-positive). Continue reading.

May 4, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tafinlar (dabrafenib) and Mekinist (trametinib), administered together, for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic), and has a type of abnormal gene, BRAF V600E (BRAF V600E mutation-positive).

“This is the first FDA-approved treatment for patients with this aggressive form of thyroid cancer, and the third cancer with this specific gene mutation that this drug combination has been approved to treat,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “This approval demonstrates that targeting the same molecular pathway in diverse diseases is an effective way to expedite the development of treatments that may help more patients.”

Thyroid cancer is a disease in which cancer cells form in the tissues of the thyroid gland. Anaplastic thyroid cancer is a rare, aggressive type of thyroid cancer. The National Institutes of Health estimates there will be 53,990 new cases of thyroid cancer and an estimated 2,060 deaths from the disease in the United States in 2018. Anaplastic thyroid cancer accounts for about 1 to 2 percent of all thyroid cancers.

Both Tafinlar and Mekinist are also approved for use, alone or in combination, to treat BRAF V600 mutation-positive metastatic melanoma. Additionally, Tafinlar and Mekinist are approved for use, in combination, to treat BRAF V600E mutation-positive, metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

The efficacy of Tafinlar and Mekinist in treating ATC was shown in an open-label clinical trial of patients with rare cancers with the BRAF V600E mutation. Data from trials in BRAF V600E mutation-positive, metastatic melanoma or lung cancer and results in other BRAF V600E mutation-positive rare cancers provided confidence in the results seen in patients with ATC. The trial measured the percent of patients with a complete or partial reduction in tumor size (overall response rate). Of 23 evaluable patients, 57 percent experienced a partial response and 4 percent experienced a complete response; in nine (64 percent) of the 14 patients with responses, there were no significant tumor growths for six months or longer.

The side effects of Tafinlar and Mekinist in patients with ATC are consistent with those seen in other cancers when the two drugs are used together. Common side effects include fever (pyrexia), rash, chills, headache, joint pain (arthralgia), cough, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myalgia (muscle pain), dry skin, decreased appetite, edema, hemorrhage, high blood pressure (hypertension) and difficulty breathing (dyspnea).

Severe side effects of Tafinlar include the development of new cancers, growth of tumors in patients with BRAF wild-type tumors, serious bleeding problems, heart problems, severe eye problems, fever that may be severe, serious skin reactions, high blood sugar or worsening diabetes, and serious anemia.

Severe side effects of Mekinist include the development of new cancers; serious bleeding problems; inflammation of intestines and perforation of the intestines; blood clots in the arms, legs or lungs; heart problems; severe eye problems; lung or breathing problems; fever that may be severe; serious skin reactions; and high blood sugar or worsening diabetes.

Both Tafinlar and Mekinist can cause harm to a developing fetus; women should be advised of the potential risk to the fetus and to use effective contraception.

The FDA granted Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapy designation for this indication. Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases, was also granted for this indication.

The FDA granted this approval to Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

 

///////////////Tafinlar, dabrafenib,  Mekinist, trametinib, fda 2018, Priority Review,  Breakthrough Therapy designation, Orphan Drug designation,  Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation,

Acalabrutinib, ACP-196, Акалабрутиниб , أكالابروتينيب , 阿可替尼 ,


ChemSpider 2D Image | acalabrutinib | C26H23N7O2

Acalabrutinib.png

Image result for Acalabrutinib

Acalabrutinib

  • Molecular FormulaC26H23N7O2
  • Average mass465.507 Da

AcalabrutinibrINN, ACP-196,

FDA 2017 APPROVED, Lymphoma, mantle cell, ACERTA PHARMA

Orphan Drug, breakthrough therapy designation,

CAS 1420477-60-6 [RN]

(S)-4-[8-Amino-3-[1-(but-2-ynoyl)pyrrolidin-2-yl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

(S)-4-(8-amino-3-n-but-2-vnoylpyrrolidin-2-vnimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-1-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

4-{8-Amino-3-[(2S)-1-(2-butynoyl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl}-N-(2-pyridinyl)benzamide
Benzamide, 4-[8-amino-3-[(2S)-1-(1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-2-pyridinyl-
Calquence [Trade name]
UNII:I42748ELQW
Акалабрутиниб [Russian] [INN]
أكالابروتينيب [Arabic] [INN]
阿可替尼 [Chinese] [INN]
4-[8-amino-3-[(2S)-1-(1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-2-pyridinyl-benzamide
4-[8-amino-3-[(2S)-1-but-2-ynoylpyrrolidin-2-yl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-pyridin-2-ylbenzamide
I42748ELQW
Image result for Acalabrutinib
Image result for Acalabrutinib
 Acalabrutinib, also known as ACP-196, is an orally available inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon administration, ACP-196 inhibits the activity of BTK and prevents the activation of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling pathway. This prevents both B-cell activation and BTK-mediated activation of downstream survival pathways. This leads to an inhibition of the growth of malignant B cells that overexpress BTK. BTK, a member of the src-related BTK/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, is overexpressed in B-cell malignancies; it plays an important role in B lymphocyte development, activation, signaling, proliferation and survival.
Image result for Acalabrutinib

Acalabrutinib (rINN,[1] ACP-196) is a novel experimental anti-cancer drug and a 2nd generation Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor[2][3] developed by Acerta Pharma.[4] It is more potent and selective (fewer side-effects) than ibrutinib, the first-in-class BTK inhibitor.[2][3][5]

The compound was granted orphan drug designation for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and mantle cell lymphoma in the U.S. and the E.U. in 2015 and 2016, respectively. In 2017, the product was granted breakthrough therapy designation in the U.S. for the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma who have received at least one prior therapy.

Acalabrutinib is an orally available inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon administration, acalabrutinib inhibits the activity of BTK and prevents the activation of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling pathway. This prevents both B-cell activation and BTK-mediated activation of downstream survival pathways. This leads to an inhibition of the growth of malignant B cells that overexpress BTK. BTK, a member of the src-related BTK/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosinekinases, is overexpressed in B-cell malignancies; it plays an important role in B lymphocyte development, activation, signaling, proliferation and survival.

Acalabrutinib is a Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) inhibitor developed at Acerta Pharma launched in 2017 in the U.S. for the oral treatment of adults with mantle cell lymphoma who have received at least one prior therapy.

Image result for Acalabrutinib

Image result for Acalabrutinib

To date, acalabrutinib has been used in trials studying the treatment of B-All, Myelofibrosis, Ovarian Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, and Hodgkin Lymphoma, among others. As of October 31, 2017 the FDA approved Astra Zeneca’s orally administered Calquence (acalabrutinib) medication as a Bruton Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) inhibitor indicated for the treatment of adult patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) who have already received at least one prior therapy, marking the company’s first entry into the treatment of blood cancers. Also known as ACP-196, acalabrutinib is also considered a second generation BTK inhibitor because it was rationally designed to be more potent and selective than ibrutinib, theoretically expected to demonstrate fewer adverse effects owing to minimized bystander effects on targets other than BTK. Nevertheless, acalabrutinib was approved under the FDA’s accelerated approval pathway, which is based upon overall response rate and faciliates earlier approval of medicines that treat serious conditions or/and that fill an unmet medical need based on a surrogate endpoint. Continued approval for acalabrutinib’s currently accepted indication may subsequently be contingent upon ongoing verification and description of clinical benefit in confimatory trials. Furthermore, the FDA granted this medication Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapy designations. It also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases. At this time, more than 35 clinical trials across 40 countries with more than 2500 patients are underway or have been completed with regards to further research into better understanding and expanding the therapeutic uses of acalabrutinib [L1009].
Image result for Acalabrutinib

Clinical and Regulatory Status

Pre-clinical

Relative to ibrutinib, acalabrutinib demonstrated higher selectivity and inhibition of the targeted activity of BTK, while having a much greater IC50 or otherwise virtually no inhibition on the kinase activities of ITK, EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB4, JAK3, BLK, FGR, FYN, HCK, LCK, LYN, SRC, and YES1.[3] In addition, in platelets treated with ibrutinib, thrombus formation was clearly inhibited while no impact to thrombus formation was identified relative to controls for those treated with acalabrutinib.[3] These findings strongly suggest an improved safety profile of acalabrutinib with minimized adverse effects relative to ibrutinib.[3]

As was conducted in the development of ibrutinib, pre-clinical studies of acalabrutinib included in vitro and in vivo pharmacodynamic evaluation in a canine lymphoma model.[6] A dose-dependent relationship resulting in cyto-toxicity and anti-proliferative effects was first demonstrated in a canine lymphoma cell line in vitro.[6] In vivo, the compound was found to be generally safe and well tolerated in the dosage range of 2.5–20 mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours, with clinical benefit observed in 30% of canine patients while observed adverse events consisted primarily of gastrointestinal effects such as anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy.[6]

Image result for Acalabrutinib

Clinical

The interim results of the still on-going first human phase 1/2 clinical trial (NCT02029443) with 61 patients for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are encouraging, with a 95% overall response rate demonstrating potential to become a best-in-class treatment for CLL.[2][7] Notably, a 100% response rate was achieved for those patients which were positive for the 17p13.1 gene deletion – a subgroup of patients that typically results in a poor response to therapy and expected outcomes.[3]

The most common adverse events were headache, diarrhea and weight gain.[3] Despite the appearance of a greater occurrence of transient headaches, the pre-clinical data suggests a preferred advantage of acalabrutinib over ibrutinib due to expected reduced adverse events of skin rash, severe diarrhea, and bleeding risk.[3] An additional clinical trial is currently in progress to directly compare the safety and efficacy performance of acalabrutinib to ibrutinib to better elucidate the differences in the therapeutic agents.[3]

While the primary indication is for CLL, as of late 2016, acalabrutinib is under evaluation for multiple indications in 20+ clinical trials (alone and in combination with other interventions) for various blood cancers, solid tumors, and rheumatoid arthritis.[7][8] Approximately 1,000 patients have been treated with acalabrutinib in clinical trials so far, including more than 600 on acalabrutinib alone and almost 400 on additional therapies in combination with acalabrutinib.[9]

Regulatory

As of February 2016, acalabrutinib had received orphan designation in the United States for CLL only,[10] and was similarly designated as an orphan medicinal product by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products (COMP) for treatment of three indications – chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/ small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (Waldenström’s macroglobulinaemia, MG).[11] If the drug is ultimately approved, this designation will result in a 10-year period of market exclusivity for the stated indications within Europe.[12]

Commercial Aspects

Acerta Pharma, the innovator responsible for the discovery and development of acalabrutinib, is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company recently founded in 2012 in Oss, the Netherlands.[13] A combined $13 Million in Series A funding was secured March 14, 2013 from various investor sources including the venture capital firms of BioGeneration Ventures and OrbiMed Advisors, the Dutch State and Province of Brabant through the Brabant Development Agency, and the private US equity firm Frazier Healthcare.[14] Further undisclosed amounts of Series B funding was secured May 2015 from the mutual fund company T. Rowe Price.[15]

After the promising results for the treatment of CLL in initial clinical trials,[2] Astra Zeneca purchased a 55% stake in Acerta Pharma for $4 billion in December 2015, with an option to acquire the remaining 45% stake for an additional $3 billion, conditional on the first approval in both the US and Europe and the establishment of commercial opportunity.[16]

Intellectual Property

Several patents have been filed by Acerta Pharma through the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) for the use of acalabrutinib (and structurally similar derivatives) either alone or in combination with additional therapeutic agents for the treatment of various hematological and solid tumor cancers as well as inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.[17][18][19][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27]

Notably, patents filed through WIPO still need to be filed appropriately for each individual nation on the path to commercialization. For example, one related United States patent application is US2014155385, which was filed July 11, 2012 and approved June 5th, 2014 for the use of 6-5 membered fused pyridine ring compounds (including acalabrutnib and its structurally similar derivatives) in the treatment of BTK mediated disorders.[28]

SYNTHESIS

Inventors Tjeerd A. BarfChristiaan Gerardus Johannes Maria Jansde Adrianus Petrus Antonius MANArthur A. OubrieHans C.A. RaaijmakersJohannes Bernardus Maria RewinkelJan-Gerard SterrenburgJacobus C.H.M. Wijkmans
Applicant Msd Oss B.V.

WO 2013010868

Synthesis of acalabrutinib, using 3-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile as the starting material, is described. The method comprises reduction of the starting material, condensation with N-Cbz-L-proline, intramolecular cyclization, bromination, Suzuki coupling with (4-(2-pyridylcarbamoyl)phenyl)boronic acid and condensation with 2-butynoic acid. WO 2013010868

Reduction of 3-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile  with H2 over Raney-Ni in AcOH, followed by treatment with aqueous HCl in Et2O gives (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl)methylamine hydrochloride , which upon condensation with N-Cbz-L-proline  in the presence of HATU and Et3N in CH2Cl2 affords amide .

Intramolecular cyclization of intermediate  by means of DMI and POCl3 in acetonitrile at 63 °C provides N-Cbz-8-chloro-3-[2(S)-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine , which is brominated with NBS in DMF to yield N-Cbz-1-bromo-8-chloro-3-[2(S)-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine .

Reaction of chloro compound  with NH3 in i-PrOH at 110 °C produces N-Cbz-1-bromo-3-[2(S)-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-8-amine , which upon Suzuki coupling with (4-(2-pyridylcarbamoyl)phenyl)boronic acid in the presence of PdCl2(dppf) and K2CO3 in dioxane at 140 °C under microwave irradiation furnishes diaryl derivative .

Removal of the benzyloxycarbonyl moiety in intermediate  using HBr in AcOH generates pyrrolidine derivative , which is condensed with 2-butynoic acid  in the presence of HATU and Et3N in CH2Cl2 to afford the target acalabrutinib 

PATENT

WO 2013010868

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2013010868A1?cl=en

scheme I

Figure imgf000026_0001

 scheme II

Figure imgf000027_0001

Intermediate 1

Figure imgf000032_0001

(S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-vnpyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

(a) (3-Chloropyrazin-2-yl)methanamine. hydrochloride

To a solution of 3-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile (160 g, 1 .147 mol) in acetic acid (1.5 L) was added Raney Nickel (50% slurry in water, 70 g, 409 mmol). The resulting mixture was stirred under 4 bar hydrogen at room temperature overnight. Raney Nickel was removed by filtration over decalite and the filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure and co-evaporated with toluene. The remaining brown solid was dissolved in ethyl acetate at 50°C and cooled on an ice-bath. 2M hydrogen chloride solution in diethyl ether (1 .14 L) was added in 30 min. The mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature over weekend. The crystals were collected by filtration, washed with diethyl ether and dried under reduced pressure at 40°C. The product brown solid obtained was dissolved in methanol at 60°C. The mixture was filtered and partially concentrated, cooled to room temperature and diethyl ether (1000 ml) was added. The mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature overnight. The solids formed were collected by filtration, washed with diethyl ether and dried under reduced pressure at 40°C to give 153.5 g of (3-chloropyrazin-2- yl)methanamine. hydrochloride as a brown solid (74.4 %, content 77 %).

(b) (S)-benzyl 2-((3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methylcarbamoyl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

To a solution of (3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methanamine.HCI (9.57 g, 21.26 mmol, 40% wt) and Z-Pro-OH (5.3 g, 21 .26 mmol) in dichloromethane (250 mL) was added triethylamine (1 1.85 mL, 85 mmol) and the reaction mixture was cooled to 0°C. After 15 min stirring at 0°C, HATU (8.49 g, 22.33 mmol) was added. The mixture was stirred for 1 hour at 0°C and then overnight at room temperature. The mixture was washed with 0.1 M HCI-solution, 5% NaHC03, water and brine, dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated in vacuo. The product was purified using silica gel chromatography (heptane/ethyl acetate = 1/4 v/v%) to give 5 g of (S)-benzyl 2-((3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methylcarbamoyl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (62.7%).

(c) (S)-Benzyl 2-(8-chloroimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

(S)-Benzyl 2-((3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methylcarbamoyl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (20.94 mmol, 7.85 g) was dissolved in acetonitrile (75 ml), 1 ,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (62.8 mmol, 6.9 ml, 7.17 g) was added and the reaction mixture was cooled to 0°C before POCI3 (84 mmol, 7.81 ml, 12.84 g) was added drop wise while the temperature remained around 5°C. The reaction mixture was refluxed at 60-65°C overnight. The reaction mixture was poured carefully in ammonium hydroxide 25% in water (250 ml)/crushed ice (500 ml) to give a yellow suspension (pH -8-9) which was stirred for 15 min until no ice was present in the suspension. Ethyl acetate was added, layers were separated and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (3x). The organic layers were combined and washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and evaporated to give 7.5 g crude product. The crude product was purified using silica gel chromatography (heptane/ethyl acetate = 1/4 v/v%) to give 6.6 g of (S)-benzyl 2-(8- chloroimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (88%).

(d) (S)-Benzyl 2-(1-bromo-8-chloroimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

N-Bromosuccinimide (24.69 mmol, 4.4 g) was added to a stirred solution of (S)-benzyl 2-(8- chloroimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (24.94 mmol, 8.9 g) in DMF (145 mL). The reaction was stirred 3 h at rt. The mixture was poored (slowly) in a stirred mixture of water (145 mL), ethyl acetate (145 mL) and brine (145 mL). The mixture was then transferred into a separating funnel and extracted. The water layer was extracted with 2×145 mL ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with 3×300 mL water, 300 mL brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and evaporated. The product was purified using silica gel chromatography (ethyl acetate/heptane = 3/1 v/v%) to give 8.95 g of (S)-benzyl 2-(1-bromo-8-chloroimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (82.3%).

(e) (S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

(S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (20.54 mmol, 8.95 g) was suspended in 2-propanol (1 13 ml) in a pressure vessel. 2-propanol (50 ml) was cooled to -78°C in a pre-weighed flask (with stopper and stirring bar) and ammonia gas (646 mmol, 1 1 g) was lead through for 15 minutes. The resulting solution was added to the suspension in the pressure vessel. The vessel was closed and stirred at room temperature and a slight increase in pressure was observed. Then the suspension was heated to 1 10 °C which resulted in an increased pressure to 4.5 bar. The clear solution was stirred at 1 10 °C, 4.5 bar overnight. After 18h the pressure remained 4 bar. The reaction mixture was concentrated in vacuum, the residue was suspended in ethyl acetate and subsequent washed with water. The layers were separated and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with water, saturated sodium chloride solution, dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated to give 7.35 g of (S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1- carboxylate (86%).

Intermediate 2

Figure imgf000034_0001

(S)-4-(8-Amino-3-(pyrrolidin-2-v0im^

(a) (S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-(4-(pyridin-2-ylcarbamov0

carboxylate

(S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1 -carboxylate (0.237 mmol, 98.5 mg) and 4-(pyridin-2-yl-aminocarbonyl)benzeneboronic acid (0.260 mmol, 63.0 mg) were suspended in a mixture of 2N aqueous potassium carbonate solution (2.37 mmol, 1 .18 mL) and dioxane (2.96 mL). Nitrogen was bubbled through the mixture, followed by the addition of 1 , 1 ‘- bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene palladium (ii) chloride (0.059 mmol, 47.8 mg). The reaction mixture was heated for 20 minutes at 140°C in the microwave. Water was added to the reaction mixture, followed by an extraction with ethyl acetate (2x). The combined organic layer was washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate and evaporated. The product was purified using silicagel and dichloromethane/methanol = 9/1 v/v% as eluent to afford 97.1 mg of (S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-(4-(pyridin- 2-ylcarbamoyl)phenyl)imidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1 -carboxylate (77%).

(b) (S)-4-(8-Amino-3-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)imidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-1-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

To (S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-(4-(pyridin-2-ylcarbamoyl)phenyl)imidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1- carboxylate (0.146 mmol, 78 mg) was added a 33% hydrobromic acid/acetic acid solution (1 1.26 mmol, 2 ml) and the mixture was left at room temperature for 1 hour. The mixture was diluted with water and extracted with dichloromethane. The aqueous phase was neutralized using 2N sodium hydroxide solution, and then extracted with dichloromethane. the organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and evaporated to give 34 mg of (S)-4-(8-Amino-3-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)imidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl)-N- (pyridin-2-yl)benzamide (58%).

Example 6

Figure imgf000038_0001

(S)-4-(8-amino-3-n-but-2-vnoylpyrrolidin-2-vnimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-1-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

This compound was prepared, in an analogues manner as described in Example 2, from the compound described in intermediate 2b and 2-butynoic acid, to afford the title compound (10.5 mg, 18.0%). Data: LCMS (B) Rt : 2.08 min; m/z 466.1 (M+H)+.

PATENT

WO 2016024228

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2016024228A1?cl=en

PATENT

CN 107056786

Step SI:

[0029] The pressure in the reactor was added 3-chloro-2-carboxaldehyde l-yl P ratio of (II) (0.71g, 5mmol) and dioxane (20mL), under stirring ammonia gas (I. 7g, 0 . Imol), was added 4- (pyridin-2-yl – aminocarbonyl) phenylboronic acid (III) (2.42g, lOmmol), Ming dicarbonyl acetylacetonate (0.26g, lmmol), and water 4mL. The reactor was sealed, gradually warmed to 80~90 °, the reaction 16-18 hours, TLC detection, the reaction was complete. Concentrated under reduced pressure, the residue was dissolved in dichloromethane, washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate and water successively, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate. Concentrated to give brown oil, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether (volume ratio 1: 2) column chromatography to give an off-white solid 4- [amino (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl) methyl] -N- (2-pyridyl) benzamide (IV) 1.38g, yield 81 · 2%; ESI-MS (m / z): 340 (m + H).

[0030] Step S2:

[0031] added in the reactor [1- (1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)] – L- proline (1.09g, 6mmol) and thionyl chloride (IOmL), was added dropwise 4mL of triethylamine and heated to 30 to 40 degrees, after the reaction for 2-4 hours under reduced pressure to remove excess thionyl chloride, the residue that is [I- (1- oxo-2-butyn-1-yl )] – L- proline acid chloride (V). The resulting [I- (1- oxo-2-butynyl -1_ yl)] _ L_ proline acid chloride (V) dissolved in 20mL dichloromethane burning, to a solution of 4- [amino (3-chloro -2-P ratio piperazinyl) methyl] -N- (2- pyridinyl) benzamide (IV) (1.35g, 4mmol) and triethylamine (0.6g, 6mmol) in dichloromethane (30mL) solution of in. Dropwise, warmed to 30-50 °, the reaction was stirred for 6 ~ 8 hours, TLC detection, the reaction was complete. Cooled to room temperature, washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution, brine and water, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate. Concentrated to give a beige solid of 4- [1- (1-acyl-2-yne-2-yl) carboxamido (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl) methyl] -N- (2- pyridinyl) benzamide (VI) 1.8g, yield 89.6% C3ESI-MS (m / z): 503 (m + H).

[0032] Step S3:

[0033] in a reaction flask was added 4- [I- (1- but-2-yn-acyl-2-yl) carboxamido (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl) methyl] -N- ( 2-P ratio piperidinyl) benzamide (VI) (1 · 0g, 2mmol), phosphorus oxychloride (1 · 53g, IOmmol) and acetonitrile (25 mL), warmed to 80 ~ 100 ° with stirring, maintaining the temperature reaction 6 ~ 8 h, TLC the reaction was complete. Cooled to room temperature, the reaction solution was poured into 50mL concentration of 8% aqueous ammonia was added ethyl acetate, and the organic phase was separated, the aqueous phase was extracted twice with ethyl acetate. The combined organic phases were washed with brine and water, dried over anhydrous over sodium sulfate. Concentrated and the resulting residue with ethyl acetate and petroleum ether (volume ratio 2: 1) column chromatography to give an off-white solid 4- [8-Chloro -3- [(2S) -I- (1- oxo-2 – butyn-1-yl) -2-pyrrolidinyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-1-yl] -N-2- pyridinyl benzamide (VII) 0.85g, yield 87.8 %; EI-MS m / z: 485 [m + H] + square

[0034] Step S4:

[0035] The pressure reactor was added to 4- [8-Chloro -3- [(2S) -I- (1- oxo-2-butyn-1-yl) -2-pyrrolidinyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin – Buji] -N-2- pyridinyl benzamide (VII) (0.48g, lmmol) and isopropanol (15 mL), cooled to 0 degrees, by controlling the dose into ammonia gas (0.51g, 30mmol), the reactor is closed, warmed up to room temperature for 1 hour, and then continuously increasing the reaction temperature to 110~120 °, maintained at the reaction temperature and pressure 20~24 h, TLC the reaction was complete. Cooled to room temperature, slowly vented, and concentrated under reduced pressure, the resulting residue was dissolved with ethyl acetate, water and saturated brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate. Concentrated and the resulting residue with ethyl acetate and petroleum ether (volume ratio 2: 1) column chromatography to give an off-white solid Acre imatinib ⑴ 0.40g, yield 86 · 0%; 1Η bandit R (DMS0-d6) 1.63 (m, lH), 1.97 (s, 3H), 2.02 ~2.12 (m, lH), 2 · 28~2.35 (m, 2H); 3.36~3.85 (m, 2H), 5 · 47~5.49 (m , lH), 6 · 17~6.23 (m, 2H), 7.12~7.20 (m, 2H), 7 · 73~7.86 (m, 4H), 8 · 16~8.25 (m, 3H), 8 · 41 ( dd, lH), 10.86 (s, lH); EI-MS m / z: 466 [m + H] +.

[0036] 3-chloro starting material employed in the method above relates to the present invention yl pyrazin-2-carbaldehyde (II) and 4- (pyridin-2-yl – aminocarbonyl) phenylboronic acid (III), respectively, refer to methods for their preparation Document “Tetrahedron Letters, 47 (l), 31-34; 2006” international Patent W02013010868 and method for preparing the same compound. Raw [1- (1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)] – L- proline acid chloride (V), in one embodiment, the compound may be made [the I-(1-oxo-known -2-yn-1-yl)] – L- proline acylation.

PATENT

US 20170224688

PATENT

CN 107522701

 Example I

[0030] (1) Preparation of ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0031] (S) -2- (8- chloro-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (10g, 28mmol) was dissolved in N- methylpyrrolidone ( SOML), the mass concentration was added 28% aqueous ammonia (168mm〇l), the reaction mixture was placed in a sealed stainless steel autoclave at 85 ° C, stirring the reaction under a pressure of 2.5 atm 6h, after the completion of the reaction, was cooled to 40 ° C and delivery system pressure, slow addition of water (50 mL), cooled to 10 ° C, crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin – 3- yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (8.5 g of), yield 90%, reaction formula of this step is as follows:

Figure CN107522701AD00091

[0033] (2) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0034] (S) -2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (8g, 24mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane (IOOmL) was added tert-butyl dicarbonate (5.7g, 26mmol), reaction mixture was stirred 3h at 25 ° C, after completion of the reaction, post-treatment and purification to give ⑸-2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazole and [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (IoG), 96% yield, this step follows the reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00092

[0036] (3) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0037] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (IOg, 23mmol) was dissolved in tetrahydrofuran ( 80mL), was slowly added N- bromosuccinimide (4.5g, 25mmol), the reaction mixture was 25 ° C the reaction was stirred for 4h. The mixture was then slowly added water (80 mL), cooled to -10 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (I I. Ig), a yield of 94.5%, the reaction formula of this step is as follows:

Figure CN107522701AD00093

[0039] (4) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} 1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0040] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (I Ig, 2lmmol ), 4- (2-pyridyl-carbamoyl) phenylboronic acid (5.7g, 23.4mmol), [1, Γ – bis (diphenylphosphino) ferrocene] dichloropalladium cesium (〇.78g, the I · lmmol), potassium carbonate (4.0g, 29mmol), N, N- dimethylformamide (120 mL) and water (50mL) added to the reaction flask, the reaction mixture was heated to 90 ° C the reaction was stirred for 20 h, the reaction solution was reduced at room temperature, was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, extracted with ethyl acetate, washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, a mixed solvent of ethyl acetate and n-hexane and recrystallized to give (S) -2- {8- tert butoxycarbonyl group -I- [4- (2-P of pyridine-ylcarbamoyl) phenyl] imidazole and sat Jie [I, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, class as a white solid (10.3 g of), a yield of 76.5%, the reaction formula of this step is as follows:

Figure CN107522701AD00101

[0042] (5) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} pyrrolidine:

[0043] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1- [1-carboxylic acid than the burning section slightly ester (10g, 15.8mmol) was dissolved in methanol (80mL), was added cesium charcoal (0.5g), under a hydrogen pressure into 35 ° C the reaction 8h. Concentrated suction through Celite to remove the catalyst and the filtrate was rotary evaporated to dryness to afford ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} pyrrolidine as a white solid powder (7.6 g of), 96% yield, this step follows the reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00102

[0045] (6) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine:

[0046] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } ratio slightly burning Jie (7g, 14mmol) was dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (75 mL), with stirring, was added 2-butyne chloride (I. 7g, 16.6mmol), was added dropwise N, N- diisopropylethylamine (2.7 g, 21 mmol), the reaction mixture was 50 ° C the reaction was stirred for 8h, the reaction solution was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, dilute hydrochloric acid was added was adjusted to neutral, extracted with ethyl acetate was added, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, recrystallized from methanol to give ⑸ -2_ {8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino -1- [4- (2-P of pyridine-ylcarbamoyl) phenyl] imidazole and sat Jie [I, 5_a] [! than 3-yl} -1 – (2_ butynoyl) pyrrolidine-white solid (7g), in 88% yield, this step follows the reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00111

[0048] ⑺ prepared Acalabrutinib:

[0049] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine (7g, 12.4mmol) and dissolved in methanol (70 mL), trifluoroacetic acid (1.55g, 13.6mmol), 65 ° C until the reaction was complete the reaction was stirred for 6h, the reaction was added dropwise to a stirred solution of water (150 mL), cooled to 0 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered to give the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia BTK inhibitors Acalabrut inib, as a white solid (5.3 g of), 92% yield, this step is the following reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00112

[0051] Example 2:

[0052] (1) Preparation of ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0053] (S) -2- (8- chloro-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (15g, 42mmol) was dissolved in N- methylpyrrolidone ( 75 mL), aqueous ammonia (273_〇1) was added mass percent concentration of 28%, the reaction mixture was placed in a sealed stainless steel autoclave at 70 ° C, stirring the reaction under a pressure of 3 atm 8h, after the completion of the reaction, was cooled to 40 ° C and releasing the pressure in the system, slow addition of water (50 mL), cooled to 10 ° C, crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl) pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester, off-white solid (12.9 g of), yield 91% ,, this step reaction scheme in Example 1.

[0054] (2) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0055] (S) -2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (12g, 35.6mmol) was dissolved in chloroform (80mL), was added tert-butyl dicarbonate (7.8g, 35.6mmol), the reaction mixture was stirred for lh the reaction at 35 ° C, after completion of the reaction, post-treatment and purification to give ⑸-2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazole and [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (14.8 g of), in 95% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0056] (3) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0057] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (Hg, 32mmol) was dissolved in 1, 1,2-dichloroethane (90mL), was slowly added bromine (6g, 37.8mmol), the reaction mixture was 20 ° C the reaction was stirred for 6h. After the reaction, water was slowly added (I5mL), cooled to -5 ° C crystallization 4h, filtered and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1-bromo-imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (15.8 g), yield 95.5%, the reaction of the present step is the same formula as in Example 1.

[0058] (4) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} 1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0059] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (15g, 29mmol) , 4- (2-pyridyl-carbamoyl) phenylboronic acid (34 · 7mmol 8 · 4g,), tetrakis (triphenylphosphine) palladium (0 · 84g, 0.73mmol), sodium carbonate (6.9g, 65mmol), tetrahydrofuran (IOOmL) and water (40 mL) was added a reaction flask, the reaction mixture was heated to 80 ° C the reaction was stirred for 24h, the reaction was cooled to room temperature, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, extracted with ethyl acetate, washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, a mixed solvent of ethyl acetate and n-hexane and recrystallized to give ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazole and [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (14.4g), 78% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0060] (5) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} pyrrolidine:

[0061] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-yl _3- it is slightly burned} -1-carboxylic acid ester section (14g, 22mmol) dissolved in isopropanol (85mL), was added Raney nickel (0.5g), under a hydrogen pressure into the reaction 60 ° C 12h. Concentrated suction through Celite to remove the catalyst and the filtrate was rotary evaporated to dryness to afford ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} pyrrolidine as a white solid powder (10.4 g of), 94% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0062] (6) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine:

[0063] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } pyrrolidine (10g, 20mmo 1) was dissolved in N, N- dimethylformamide (SOML), with stirring, was added 2-butyne chloride (3. lg, 30mmol), dropwise addition of triethylamine (2.2g, 22mmol ), the reaction mixture was 60 ° C the reaction was stirred for 4h, the reaction solution was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, dilute hydrochloric acid was added was adjusted to neutral, extracted with ethyl acetate was added, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, and recrystallized from methanol to give ⑸- 2- {8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -l- (2- butynoyl) pyrrolidine-white solid (10.2 g of), a yield of 90.2%, the same reaction scheme of the present embodiment step 1〇

[0064] ⑺ prepared Acalabrutinib:

[0065] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine (IOg, 17.7mmol) was dissolved in ethanol, and (IOOmL), trifluoroacetic acid (2.6g, 23mmol), 50 ° C with stirring until the reaction was complete IOh reaction, the reaction solution was added dropwise to a stirred solution of water (70 mL), cooled to 0 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered to give the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia BTK inhibitors AcaIabrut inib, as a white solid (7.5 g of), yield 91%, reaction of this step formula same as in Example 1.

[0066] Example 3:

[0067] (1) Preparation of ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0068] (S) -2- (8- chloro-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (4.5g, 12.6mmol) was dissolved in N- methyl pyrrolidinone (70 mL), was added mass percent concentration of 28% aqueous ammonia (69.4 mmol), the reaction mixture was placed in the autoclave 90 ° C, the reaction was stirred under atmospheric pressure of 4h, after the completion of the reaction, it was cooled to 35 ° C a sealed stainless steel reactor and releasing the pressure in the system, slow addition of water (50 mL), cooled to 10 ° C, crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl) pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester, off-white solid (3.9 g of), 92% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0069] (2) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0070] (S) -2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester (3 · 5g, 10 · 4mmol) was dissolved in 1, 4- dioxane (50 mL), was added tert-butyl dicarbonate (2.7g, 12.4mmol), the reaction mixture was stirred at 10 ° C the reaction 6h, after the completion of the reaction, workup and purification, to give (S) 2- (8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (4.3 g of), in 95% yield, according to the present step reaction scheme in Example 1.

[0071] (3) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0072] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [l, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1_ pyrrolidine-carboxylate (4g, 9.6mmol) was dissolved in toluene (50 mL ), was slowly added N- bromosuccinimide (I. 8g, 10. lmmol), the reaction mixture was 35 ° C the reaction was stirred for 2h. The mixture was then slowly added water (25 mL), cooled to -10 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (4.7 g), 94% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0073] (4) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} 1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0074] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (4g, 7 · 7mmol), 4_ (2- piperidinyl than Jie carbamoyl) phenylboronic acid (2 · 4g, IOmmol), bis (triphenylphosphine) dichloride Leba (0.41g, 0.58mmol), potassium phosphate (I. 9g, 8.9mmol), methyl tert-butyl ether (IOOmL) and water (40 mL) was added a reaction flask, the reaction mixture was heated to 100 ° C the reaction was stirred for 12h, the reaction was cooled to room temperature, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, was added acetic acid extracted with ethyl, brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, a mixed solvent of ethyl acetate and n-hexane and recrystallized to give ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2 – pyridin-ylcarbamoyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (3.9 g of), in 79% yield, this step the reaction scheme in Example 1.

[0075] (5) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5_a] pyrazin-3 -} pyrrolidine:

[0076] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl group -I- [4- (2- carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1 Jie section than slightly burning acid ester (3.5g, 5.5mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (50mL), was added cesium charcoal (0.2g), under a hydrogen pressure into 45 ° C the reaction 6h. Concentrated suction through Celite to remove the catalyst and the filtrate was rotary evaporated to dryness to afford ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} pyrrolidine as a white solid powder (2.6 g of), in 95% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0077] (6) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine:

[0078] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } ratio slightly burning Jie (2.5g, 5mmol) was dissolved in toluene (50 mL), with stirring, was added 2-butyne chloride (0.62g, 6mmol), was added dropwise N, N- dimethylaniline (Ig, 8.5mmo 1), The reaction mixture was 40 ° C the reaction was stirred for 12h, the reaction solution was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, dilute hydrochloric acid was added was adjusted to neutral, extracted with ethyl acetate was added, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, and recrystallized from methanol to give ⑸-2- {8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1- (2-butyn acyl) pyrrolidine-white solid (2.5g), 88% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0079] ⑺ prepared Acalabrutinib:

[0080] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-yl _3_ } -1- (2-block group) ratio slightly burning Jie (2.5g, 4.4mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane and burned (IOmL), two gas was added acetic acid (0.76g, 6.6mmol), 80 ° C The reaction was stirred 4h until the reaction was complete, the reaction was added dropwise to a stirred solution of water (25 mL), cooled to 0 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered to give the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia BTK inhibitors AcaIabrut inib, as a white solid (1.8 g of), the yield of 89%, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

PATENT

US 20170035881

References

  1. Jump up^ “WHO Drug Information – recommended INN” (PDF). WHO Drug Information. World Health Oorganisation. Retrieved 24 December 2015.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d Byrd; et al. (2015). “Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia”doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1509981.
  3. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i Wu, Jingjing; Zhang, Mingzhi; Liu, Delong (2016-01-01). “Acalabrutinib (ACP-196): a selective second-generation BTK inhibitor”Journal of Hematology & Oncology9: 21. doi:10.1186/s13045-016-0250-9ISSN 1756-8722PMC 4784459Freely accessiblePMID 26957112.
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  6. Jump up to:a b c Harrington, Bonnie K.; Gardner, Heather L.; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R.; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael (2016-07-19). “Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma”PLOS ONE11 (7): e0159607. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0159607ISSN 1932-6203PMC 4951150Freely accessiblePMID 27434128.
  7. Jump up to:a b Acerta Pharma Announces Study Published in New England Journal of Medicine Demonstrates Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) Shows Marked Activity in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
  8. Jump up^ 21 studies found for: ACP-196
  9. Jump up^ “Acerta Investor Conference Call – 17 December 2015” (PDF). http://www.astrazeneca.com. Retrieved 2016-11-20.
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  12. Jump up^ House, SA Editor Douglas W. (2016-02-25). “AstraZeneca and Acerta Pharma’s acalabrutinib tagged an Orphan Drug in Europe for three indications”Seeking Alpha. Retrieved 2016-11-21.
  13. Jump up^ “Acerta Pharma B.V. – Company Profile – BioCentury”http://www.biocentury.com. Retrieved 2016-11-12.
  14. Jump up^ “Log in to CB Insights”http://www.cbinsights.com. Retrieved 2016-11-12.
  15. Jump up^ “This is The Most Valuable Startup You’ve Never Heard Of”Fortune. 2015-12-17. Retrieved 2016-11-12.
  16. Jump up^ Walker, Ian; Roland, Denise (2015-12-17). “AstraZeneca to Buy Stake in Acerta Pharma”Wall Street JournalISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2016-11-19.
  17. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Nov 26, 2015), Btk inhibitor for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic and small lymphocytic leukemia, retrieved 2016-11-19
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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Acalabrutinib is a potent and selective BTK (Bruton’s tyrosine kinase) inhibitor. BTK is a cytoplasmic, non-receptor tyrosine kinase that transmits signals from a variety of cell-surface molecules, including the B-cell receptor (BCR) and tissue homing receptors. Genetic BTK deletion causes B-cell immunodeficiency in humans and mice, making this kinase an attractive therapeutic target for B-cell disorders. BTK inhibitors targeting B cell receptor signaling and other survival mechanism showed great promise for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)s holds great promise.

As of 2015 it is in late stage clinical trials for relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Interim results are encouraging : 95% overall response rate. It is also in another 20 clinical trials (alone and in combination) for various cancers.

REFERENCES

1: Maly J, Blachly JS. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Exploiting Vulnerabilities with Targeted Agents. Curr Hematol Malig Rep. 2016 Feb 11. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26893063.

2: Byrd JC, Harrington B, O’Brien S, Jones JA, Schuh A, Devereux S, Chaves J, Wierda WG, Awan FT, Brown JR, Hillmen P, Stephens DM, Ghia P, Barrientos JC, Pagel JM, Woyach J, Johnson D, Huang J, Wang X, Kaptein A, Lannutti BJ, Covey T, Fardis M, McGreivy J, Hamdy A, Rothbaum W, Izumi R, Diacovo TG, Johnson AJ, Furman RR. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 28;374(4):323-32. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509981. Epub 2015 Dec 7. PubMed PMID: 26641137.

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017231995 BTK Inhibitors to Treat Solid Tumors Through Modulation of the Tumor Microenvironment
2015-08-11
US2017095471 Methods of Treating Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Small Lymphocytic Leukemia Using a BTK Inhibitor
2015-01-21
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017231986 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor, a JAK-2 Inhibitor, and/or a BCL-2 Inhibitor
2015-08-11
US2017035756 METHODS OF BLOCKING THE CXCR-4/SDF-1 SIGNALING PATHWAY WITH INHIBITORS OF BRUTON’S TYROSINE KINASE
2015-04-10
US2017266191 Therapeutic Combination of PI3K Inhibitor and a BTK Inhibitor
2014-12-05
US2016159810 4-IMIDAZOPYRIDAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AND 4-IMIDAZOTRIAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AS BTK INHIBITORS
2016-02-09
2016-06-09
US2017143712 Methods of Treating Cancers, Immune and Autoimmune Diseases, and Inflammatory Diseases Based on BTK Occupancy and BTK Resynthesis Rate
2017-02-07
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017035881 Therapeutic Combinations of an IRAK4 Inhibitor and a BTK Inhibitor
2016-10-19
US2017071962 Therapeutic Combinations of a Proteasome Inhibitor and a BTK Inhibitor
2016-09-12
US9717745 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS AND THEIR USE FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES
2016-06-15
US9758524 4-IMIDAZOPYRIDAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AND 4-IMIDAZOTRIAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AS BTK INHIBITORS
2016-02-09
2016-06-02
US2017224819 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor, a JAK-2 Inhibitor, and/or a CDK 4/6 Inhibitor
2015-08-11
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017029428 Solid Forms and Formulations of Imidazopyrazine Compound
2016-07-01
US2017239351 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor, a JAK-2 Inhibitor, a PD-1 Inhibitor, and/or a PD-L1 Inhibitor
2015-08-11
US2017136014 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor and/or a JAK-2 Inhibitor
2015-06-17
US9290504 4-IMIDAZOPYRIDAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AND 4-IMIDAZOTRIAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AS BTK INHIBITORS
2012-07-11
2014-06-05
US2017224688 Methods of Using BTK Inhibitors to Treat Dermatoses
2017-02-03
Acalabrutinib
Acalabrutinib.svg
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
Chemical and physical data
Formula C26H23N7O2
Molar mass 465.507 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

FDA Orange Book Patents

FDA Orange Book Patents: 1 of 3 (FDA Orange Book Patent ID)
Patent 9290504
Expiration Jul 11, 2032
Applicant ASTRAZENECA
Drug Application N210259 (Prescription Drug: CALQUENCE. Ingredients: ACALABRUTINIB)
FDA Orange Book Patents: 2 of 3 (FDA Orange Book Patent ID)
Patent 9758524
Expiration Jul 11, 2032
Applicant ASTRAZENECA
Drug Application N210259 (Prescription Drug: CALQUENCE. Ingredients: ACALABRUTINIB)
FDA Orange Book Patents: 3 of 3 (FDA Orange Book Patent ID)
Patent 9796721
Expiration Jul 1, 2036
Applicant ASTRAZENECA
Drug Application N210259 (Prescription Drug: CALQUENCE. Ingredients: ACALABRUTINIB)

////////////AcalabrutinibrINNACP-196, fda 2017, Акалабрутиниб , أكالابروتينيب , 阿可替尼 , Orphan Drug, breakthrough therapy designation, Lymphoma, mantle cell, ACERTA PHARMA

CC#CC(=O)N1CCC[C@H]1c2nc(c3n2ccnc3N)c4ccc(cc4)C(=O)Nc5ccccn5

CC#CC(=O)N1CCCC1C2=NC(=C3N2C=CN=C3N)C4=CC=C(C=C4)C(=O)NC5=CC=CC=N5

VOXELOTOR


Image result for VOXELOTORhttps://integrity.thomson-pharma.com/integrity/edcontent/structures/pro/818/818824.gifVoxelotor.png

VOXELOTOR

GBT 440; GTx-011, Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease

RN: 1446321-46-5
UNII: 3ZO554A4Q8

Molecular Formula, C19-H19-N3-O3, Molecular Weight, 337.3771

Benzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-(1-methylethyl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)-3-pyridinyl)methoxy)-

2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-(propan-2-yl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde

NMR http://file.selleckchem.com/downloads/nmr/S854001-GBT440-CDCl3-hnmr-selleck.pdf

  • Originator Global Blood Therapeutics
  • Class Antianaemics; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Abnormal haemoglobin modulators; Sickle haemoglobin modulators
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Sickle cell anaemia
  • New Molecular Entity Yes

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase III Sickle cell anaemia
  • Phase I Hypoxia; Liver disorders
  • Discontinued Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Nov 2017 Chemical structure information added
  • 28 Oct 2017 Efficacy and adverse event data from a case study under the compassionate use programme in Sickle cell anaemia released by Global Blood Therapeutics
  • 27 Oct 2017 Discontinued – Phase-II for Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in USA (PO)

Voxelotor, also known as GBT-440, is a hemoglobin S allosteric modulator. GBT440 Inhibits Sickling of Sickle Cell Trait Blood Under In Vitro Conditions Mimicking Strenuous Exercise. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease.

Treatment Of Sickle Cell Disease In Adults And Adolescents With Episodes Of Vaso-Occlusive Crisis

FDA gave breakthrough therapy designation to this product

Innovator – Global Blood Therapeutics

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PATENT

WO 2013102142

Inventors Brian MetcalfChihyuan ChuangJeffrey WarringtonKumar PAULVANNANMatthew P. JacobsonLan HUABradley Morgan
Applicant Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc.Cytokinetics, Inc.The Regents Of The University Of California

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2013102142

Hemoglobin (Hb) is a tetrameric protein in red blood cells that transports up to four oxygen molecules from the lungs to various tissues and organs throughout the body.

Hemoglobin binds and releases oxygen through conformational changes, and is in the tense (T) state when it is unbound to oxygen and in the relaxed (R) state when it is bound to oxygen. The equilibrium between the two conformational states is under allosteric regulation. Natural compounds such as 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), protons, and carbon dioxide stabilize hemoglobin in its de-oxygenated T state, while oxygen stabilizes hemoglobin in its oxygenated R state. Other relaxed R states have also been found, however their role in allosteric regulation has not been fully elucidated.

Sickle cell disease is a prevalent disease particularly among those of African and Mediterranean descent. Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) contains a point mutation where glutamic acid is replaced with valine, allowing the T state to become susceptible to polymerization to give the HbS containing red blood cells their characteristic sickle shape. The sickled cells are also more rigid than normal red blood cells, and their lack of flexibility can lead to blockage of blood vessels. Certain synthetic aldehydes have been found to shift the equilibrium from the polymer forming T state to the non-polymer forming R state (Nnamani et al. Chemistry & Biodiversity Vol. 5, 2008 pp. 1762-1769) by acting as allosteric modulators to stabilize the R state through formation of a Schiff base with an amino group on hemoglobin.

US 7, 160,910 discloses 2-furfuraldehydes and related compounds that are also allosteric modulators of hemoglobin. One particular compound 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde (5HMF) was found to be a potent hemoglobin modulator both in vitro and in vivo. Transgenic mice producing human HbS that were treated with 5HMF were found to have significantly improved survival times when exposed to extreme hypoxia (5% oxygen). Under these hypoxic conditions, the 5HMF treated mice were also found to have reduced amounts of hypoxia-induced sickled red blood cells as compared to the non-treated mice.

A need exists for therapeutics that can shift the equilibrium between the deoxygenated and oxygenated states of Hb to treat disorders that are mediated by Hb or by abnormal Hb such as HbS. A need also exists for therapeutics to treat disorders that would benefit from having Hb in the R state with an increased affinity for oxygen. Such therapeutics would have applications ranging, for example, from sensitizing hypoxic tumor cells that are resistant to standard radiotherapy or chemotherapy due to the low levels of oxygen in the cell, to treating pulmonary and hypertensive disorders, and to promoting wound healing

Example 18. Preparation of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (Compound 43).

A mixture of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (1.58 g, 11.47 mmol, 2 eq.) and K2CO3 (2.4 g, 17.22 mmol, 3 eq.) in DMF (150 mL) was stirred at rt for 10 min. To this mixture was added 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(1-isopropyI-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine hydrochloride (1.56 g, 5.74 mmol, leq.) at rt. The mixture was heated at 50 °C for 2 h, filtered, concentrated and purified on silica gel using a mixture of EtOAc and hexanes as eluent to give 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (1.71 g, 88%) as a pale yellow solid.

PAPER

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2017), 8(3), 321-326.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acsmedchemlett.6b00491

Discovery of GBT440, an Orally Bioavailable R-State Stabilizer of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

 Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc., South San Francisco, California 94080, United States
 Cytokinetics, Inc., South San Francisco, California 94080, United States
 Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461, United States
 Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, California 94158, United States
§ Tandem Sciences, Inc., Menlo Park, California 94025, United States
ACS Med. Chem. Lett.20178 (3), pp 321–326
DOI: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.6b00491

ACS Editors’ Choice – This is an open access article published under an ACS AuthorChoice License, which permits copying and redistribution of the article or any adaptations for non-commercial purposes.

Abstract Image

We report the discovery of a new potent allosteric effector of sickle cell hemoglobin, GBT440 (36), that increases the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen and consequently inhibits its polymerization when subjected to hypoxic conditions. Unlike earlier allosteric activators that bind covalently to hemoglobin in a 2:1 stoichiometry, 36 binds with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Compound 36 is orally bioavailable and partitions highly and favorably into the red blood cell with a RBC/plasma ratio of ∼150. This partitioning onto the target protein is anticipated to allow therapeutic concentrations to be achieved in the red blood cell at low plasma concentrations. GBT440 (36) is in Phase 3 clinical trials for the treatment of sickle cell disease (NCT03036813).

Figure

Scheme 1. Synthesis of 36a

aReagents and conditions: (a) MOMCl, DIEPA, DCM, 0 °C to rt 2 h, 90%; (b) nBuLi, DMF, THF, −78 to 0 °C, 94%; (c) 12 N HCl, THF, rt, 1.5 h, 81%; (d) Pd(dppf)Cl2, NaHCO3, H2O/dioxane, 100 °C, 12 h, 40%; (e) SOCl2, DCM, rt, 100%; (f) Na2CO3, DMF, 65 °C, 1.5 h, 81%; (g) 12 N HCl, THF, rt, 3 h, 96%.

GBT440 (36) (15.3 g).

HRMS calcd for C19H20N3O3 (M+H + ) 338.1499, found 338.1497; MS (ESI) m/z 338.4 [M+H]+ ;

1H NMR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 11.94 (s, 1H), 10.37 (d, J = 0.6 Hz, 1H), 8.75 (dd, J = 4.8, 1.7 Hz, 1H), 7.97 (dd, J = 7.8, 1.6 Hz, 1H), 7.63 – 7.57 (m, 1H), 7.46 – 7.33 (m, 2H), 6.57 (dt, J = 8.6, 0.7 Hz, 1H), 6.34 (d, J = 1.9 Hz, 1H), 6.27 (dt, J = 8.3, 1.0 Hz, 1H), 5.07 (s, 2H), 4.65 (hept, J = 6.6 Hz, 1H), 1.47 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 7H);

13C NMR (101 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 194.0, 162.9, 161.1, 149.6, 149.1, 139.1, 138.2, 138.2, 138.0, 131.6, 124.0, 111.1, 110.2, 107.4, 103.5, 67.8, 50.5, 23.1.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acsmedchemlett.6b00491/suppl_file/ml6b00491_si_001.pdf

PATENT

WO 2015031285

https://www.google.co.in/patents/WO2015031285A1?cl=en

2-Hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde is a compound having the formula:

Sickle cell disease is a disorder of the red blood cells, found particularly among those of African and Mediterranean descent. The basis for sickle cell disease is found in sickle hemoglobin (HbS), which contains a point mutation relative to the prevalent peptide sequence of hemoglobin (Hb).

[ Hemoglobin (Hb) transports oxygen molecules from the lungs to various tissues and organs throughout the body. Hemoglobin binds and releases oxygen through

conformational changes. Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) contains a point mutation where glutamic acid is replaced with valine, allowing HbS to become susceptible to polymerization to give the HbS containing red blood cells their characteristic sickle shape. The sickled cells are also more rigid than normal red blood cells, and their lack of flexibility can lead to blockage of blood vessels. A need exists for therapeutics that can treat disorders that are mediated by Hb or by abnormal Hb such as HbS, such as 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde hydrochloride.

When used for treating humans, it is important that a crystalline form of a therapeutic agent, like 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde, or a salt thereof, retains its polymorphic and chemical stability, solubility, and other physicochemical properties over time and among various manufactured batches of the agent. If the physicochemical properties vary with time and among batches, the administration of a therapeutically effective dose becomes problematic and may lead to toxic side effects or to ineffective therapy, particularly if a given polymorph decomposes prior to use, to a less active, inactive, or toxic compound. Therefore, it is important to choose a form of the crystalline agent that is stable, is manufactured reproducibly, and has physicochemical properties favorable for its use as a therapeutic agent.

Figure imgf000016_0001

 

Example ί : Synthesis of Compound 15

OH DIPEA OMOM

(8063J To s solution of 2 >ronao enzsae-i -diol (5 g, 26.45 m ol) m. DCM (50 ml) at 0 *C was added DIPEA (11.54 mL, 66.13 aan l) and MOMCi (4.42 mL. 58.19 ratnoi). The mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 1.5 h, and then warmed to room temperature. The so ntioa was dilated with DCM, washed with sat. NaH€<¾, brum dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was purified by coinran ihexane&/EtOAc~4;l) to give desired product 15.58 g (90%).

14C

Example 2: Synthesis of Compound 13 from 15

Figure imgf000018_0001

[0064] To a solution of 2-bromo-l ,3-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzene (15) (19.9g, 71.8 mmol) in THF (150 mL) at -78 °C was added BuLi (2.5 M, 31.6 mL, 79.0 mmol) dropwise. The solution was stirred at -78 °C for 25 min (resulting white cloudy mixture), then it was warmed to 0 °C and stirred for 25 min. The reaction mixture slowly turns homogenous. To the solution was added DMF at 0 °C. After 25 min, HPLC showed reaction completed. The mixture was quenched with sat. NH4C1 (150 mL), diluted with ether (300 mL). The organic layer was separated, aq layer was further extracted with ether (2X200 mL), and organic layer was combined, washed with brine, dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was triturated to give 14.6 g desired product. The filtrate was then concentrated and purified by column to give additional 0.7 g, total mass is 15.3 g.

Example 3: Synthesis of Compound 13 from resorcinol 11

1.1 R:TMEDA R:BuLi S:THF 2 h -10°C

Figure imgf000018_0002

Journal of Organic Chemistry, 74(1 1), 431 1-4317; 2009

[0065] A three-necked round-bottom flask equipped with mechanical stirrer was charged with 0.22 mol of NaH (50 % suspension in mineral oil) under nitrogen atmosphere. NaH was washed with 2 portions (100 mL) of n-hexane and then with 300 mL of dry diethyl ether; then 80 mL of anhydrous DMF was added. Then 0.09 mol of resorcinol 11, dissolved in 100 mL of diethyl ether was added dropwise and the mixture was left under stirring at rt for 30 min. Then 0.18 mol of MOMCI was slowly added. After 1 h under stirring at rt, 250 mL of water was added and the organic layer was extracted with diethyl ether. The extracts were

15A

washed with brine, dried (Na2S04), then concentrated to give the crude product that was purified by silica gel chromatography to give compound 12 (93 % yield).

15B

[0066] A three-necked round-bottom flask was charged with 110 mL of n-hexane, 0.79 mol of BuLi and 9.4 mL of tetramethylethylendiamine (TMEDA) under nitrogen atmosphere. The mixture was cooled at -10 °C and 0.079 mol of bis-phenyl ether 12 was slowly added. The resulting mixture was left under magnetic stirring at -10 °C for 2 h. Then the temperature was raised to 0 °C and 0.067 mol of DMF was added dropwise. After 1 h, aqueous HC1 was added until the pH was acidic; the mixture was then extracted with ethyl ether. The combined extracts were washed with brine, dried (Na2S04), and concentrated to give aldehyde 13

(84%).

[0067] 2,6-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (13): mp 58-59 °C (n-hexane) ; IR (KBr) n: 1685 (C=0) cm“1; 1H-NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) δ 3.51 (s, 6H, 2 OCH3), 5.28 (s, 4H, 2 OCH20), 6.84 (d, 2H, J = 8.40 Hz, H-3, H-5), 7.41 (t, 1H, J = 8.40 Hz, H-4), 10.55 (s, 1H, CHO); MS, m/e (relative intensity) 226 (M+, 3), 180 (4), 164 (14), 122 (2), 92 (2), 45 (100); Anal. Calc’d. for CnHi405: C,58.40; H, 6.24. Found: C, 57.98; H, 6.20.

Example 4: The Synthesis of Compound 16

Figure imgf000020_0001

13 16

81 %

[0068] To a solution of 2,6-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (13) (15.3 g, 67.6 mmol) in THF (105 mL) (solvent was purged with N2) was added cone. HC1 (12N, 7 mL) under N2, then it was further stirred under N2 for 1.5 h. To the solution was added brine (100 mL) and ether (150 ml). The organic layer was separated and the aqueous layer was further extracted with ether (2×200 mL). The organic layer was combined, washed with brine, dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was purified by column (300g,

hexanes/EtOAc=85: 15) to give desired product 16 (9.9 g) as yellow liquid.

Example 5: Synthesis of Compound 17

Figure imgf000020_0002

16

[0069] To a solution of 2-hydroxy-6-(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (16) (10.88 g, 59.72 mmol) in DMF (120 mL) (DMF solution was purged with N2 for 10 min) was added K2C03 (32.05 g, 231.92 mmol) and 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine hydrochloride (10) (15.78 g, 57.98 mmol). The mixture was heated at 65 °C for 1.5 h, cooled to rt, poured into ice water (800 mL). The precipitated solids were isolated by filtration, dried and concentrated to give desired product (17, 18 g).

Example 6: Synthesis of Compound (I)

Figure imgf000021_0001

[0070] To a solution of 2-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)-6-(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (17) (18 g, 47.19 mmol) in THF (135 mL, solution was purged with N2) was added cone. HCI (12N, 20 mL). The solution was stirred at rt for 3 h when HPLC showed the reaction complete. The mixture was added to a solution of NaHC03 (15 g) in water (1.2 L), and the resulting precipitate was collected by filtration, dried to give crude solid, which was further purified by column (DCM/EtOAc=60:40) to give pure product

(15.3 g).

Example 7: Synthesis of Compound I (free base) and its HCI salt form

[0071] Compound (I) free base (40g) was obtained from the coupling of the alcohol intermediate 7 and 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldedhye 9 under Mitsunobu conditions. A procedure is also provided below:

Figure imgf000021_0002

17

Example 8: Synthesis of Compound (I) by Mitsunobu coupling

[0072] Into a 2000-mL three neck round-bottom flask, which was purged and maintained with an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, was placed a solution of [2-[l-(propan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl]pyridin-3-yl]methanol (7) (70 g, 322.18 mmol, 1.00 equiv) in tetrahydrofuran (1000 mL). 2,6-Dihydroxybenzaldehyde (9) (49.2 g, 356.21 mmol, 1.10 equiv) and PPh3 (101 g, 385.07 mmol, 1.20 equiv) were added to the reaction mixture. This was followed by the addition of a solution of DIAD (78.1 g, 386.23 mmol, 1.20 equiv) in tetrahydrofuran (200 ml) dropwise with stirring. The resulting solution was stirred overnight at room temperature. The resulting solution was diluted with 500 ml of H20. The resulting solution was extracted with 3×500 ml of dichloromethane and the combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under vacuum. The residue was applied onto a silica gel column with EA:PE (1 :50-l :3) as eluent to yield the crude product. The crude product was re-crystallized from i-propanol/H20 in the ratio of 1/1.5. This resulted in 40 g (37%) of 2-hydroxy-6-([2-[l-(propan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazol-5-yl]pyridin-3-yl]methoxy)benzaldehyde as a light yellow solid. The compound exhibited a melting point of 80-82 °C. MS (ES, m/z): 338.1 [M+l]. 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 11.72(s, 1H), 10.21(s, 1H), 8.76(d, J=3.6Hz, 1H), 8.24(d, J=2.7Hz, lH),7.55(m, 3H), 6.55(m,3H) ,5.21 (s, 2H), 4.65 (m, 1H), 1.37 (d, J=5.1Hz, 6H). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) δ 11.96 (s, 1H), 10.40 (s, 1H), 8.77 (dd, J= 4.8, 1.5 Hz, 1H), 8.00 (d, J= 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.63 (d, J= 1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.49 – 7.34 (m, 2H), 6.59 (d, J= 8.5 Hz, 1H), 6.37 (d, J= 1.8 Hz, 1H), 6.29 (d, J= 8.2 Hz, 1H), 5.10 (s, 2H), 4.67 (sep, J= 6.7 Hz, 1H), 1.50 (d, J= 6.6 Hz, 6H).

[0073] In another approach, multiple batches of Compound (I) free base are prepared in multi gram quantities (20g). The advantage of this route is the use of mono-protected 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (16), which effectively eliminates the possibility of bis-alkylation side product. The mono-MOM ether of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (16) can be obtained from two starting points, bromoresorcinol (14) or resorcinol (11) [procedures described in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, 74(11), 4311-4317; 2009 ]. All steps and procedures are provided below. Due to the presence of phenolic aldehyde group, precautions (i.e., carry out all reactions under inert gas such as nitrogen) should be taken to avoid oxidation of the phenol and/or aldehyde group.

18

Preparation of compound I HC1 salt: A solution of compound I (55.79 g, 165.55 mmol) in acetonitrile (275 mL) was flushed with nitrogen for 10 min, then to this solution was added 3N aqueous HC1 (62 mL) at room temperature. The mixture was stirred for additional 10 min after the addition, most of the acetonitrile (about 200 mL) was then removed by evaporation on a rota

PATENT

WO2017096230

PATENT

WO-2017197083

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017197083

Processes for the preparation of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (also referred to as voxelotor or Compound (I)) and its intermediates is claimed. Compound (I) binds to hemoglobin and increases it oxygen affinity and hence can be useful for the treatment of diseases such as sickle cell disease.

Disclosed herein are processes for synthesizing 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (Compound (I)) and intermediates used in such processes. Compound (I) binds to hemoglobin and increases it oxygen affinity and hence can be useful for the treatment of diseases such as sickle cell disease.

BACKGROUND

Compound (I) is disclosed in Example 17 of the International Publication No.

WO2013/102142. Compound (I) binds to hemoglobin and increases it oxygen affinity and hence can be useful for the treatment of diseases such as sickle cell disease.

In general, for a compound to be suitable as a therapeutic agent or part of a therapeutic agent, the compound synthesis must be amendable to large scale manufacturing and isolation. The large scale manufacturing and isolation should not impact the physical properties and purity of the compound nor should it negatively impact cost or efficacy of a formulated active ingredient. Accordingly, scale up of manufacturing and isolation may require significant efforts to meet these goals.

ompound (I) has been synthesized by certain methods starting with 2,6-dihydroxbenzaldehyde (compound 1) where each hydroxyl moiety is protected with an unbranched, straight-chain alkyl or alkoxyalkyl such as, for example, methyl or methoxymethyl. Following installation of the aldehyde group, various methods of deprotection of the hydroxyl group were employed to synthesize compound (1) used in the synthesis and production of Compound (I). However, the deprotection processes used lead to unwanted polymerization and decomposition reactions of compound (1) – attributed, in part, to the conditions used for

deprotection of the hydroxy groups. The undesired byproducts yield complex mixtures, lower yields of Compound (I), and require significant effort to purify Compound (I) to a degree acceptable for use as a part of a therapeutic agent, thus rendering the above processes impractical for commercial scale synthesis of Compound (I).

Provided herein are processes for the synthesis of Compound (I):

Examples

Example 1

Synthesis of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (Compound (1))

Step 1:

Tetrahydrofuran (700 mL) was added to resorcinol (170g, 1.54 mol, leq.) under inert gas protection, followed by addition of pyridinium tosylate (3.9 g, 15.4 mmol, O.Oleq.), THF 65 mL) and the reaction mixture was cooled down to 0 – 5 °C. Within 1 – 1.5 h ethylvinyl ether (444 mL, 4.63 mol, 3.0 eq.) was added while maintaining a temperature <5°C. After the addition was complete the reaction mixture was allowed to reach room temperature within 1.5 h. The reaction was stirred overnight, cooled down to 10-15 °C, and 510 mL of ½ sat. NaHC03 was added while maintaining the reaction solution below 20 °C. The phases were separated. The organic phase was washed once with 425 mL of water and once with 425 mL 12.5% NaCl solution and evaporated and azeotroped with THF to give bis-EOE-protected resorcinol (401.2 g, 1.55 mol, 102% uncorrected) as a clear colorless to yellowish oil.

Step 2:

Bis-EOE-protected resorcinol (390 g of, actual: 398.6g = 1.53 mol, 1 eq., corrected to 100%) conversion) was added under inert gas protection to a 6 L glass vessel and THF (1170 mL) was added. The reaction mixture was cooled down to -10°C to -5°C and n-BuLi (625 mL, 2.7 M in heptane, 1.687 mol, 1.1 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was agitated at -5°C- 0°C for 30-40 min and then DMF (153.4 mL, 1.99 mmol, 1.3 eq.) was added starting at -10°C to -5°C. The reaction mixture was stirred until complete and then quenched with lNHCl/EtOAc. It was also discovered, inter alia, that protection with the EOE groups not only resulted in less byproducts but appeared to increase the speed of the formylation reaction to provide 2,6-bis(l-ethoxyethoxy)benzaldehyde (compound (2)).

The mixture was worked up, phase separated and the aqueous washed with MTBE. After aqueous wash to remove salts the organic phase was concentrated to the neat oil to obtain the compound (2) as yellow oil (almost quantitative).

A batch preparation was performed using solvent swap and was completed faster than other known methods for synthesizing Compound (I) with better purity and yield. The deprotection sequence allowed in-situ use of compound (2).

Step 3:

To the reaction solution of Step 2 was added IN HC1 (1755 mL) while maintaining the temperature < 20°C. The pH was of the solution was adjusted to pH = 0.7 – 0.8 with 6 M HC1.

The reaction mixture was stirred for 16 h. After the reaction was complete the organic phase was separated and 1560 mL of methyl tert butyl ether was added. The organic phase was washed once with 1170 mL of IN HC1, once with 780 mL of ½ sat. NaCl solution and once with 780 mL of water and then concentrated to a volume of – 280mL. To the solution was added 780 mL of methyl tert butyl ether and concentrate again to 280 mL [temperature <45°C, vacuo]. To the slurry was added 780 mL of acetonitrile and the solution was concentrated in vacuo at T < 45°C to a final volume of – 280 mL. The slurry was heated to re-dissolve the solids. The solution was cooled slowly to RT and seeded at 60-65 °C to initiate crystallization of the product. The slurry was cooled down to -20°C to -15°C and agitated at this temperature for 1-2 h. The product was isolated by filtration and washed with DCM (pre-cooled to -20°C to -15°C) and dried under a stream of nitrogen to give 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde as a yellow solid. Yield: 138.9 g (1.00 mol, 65.6%).

Example 1A

Alternate Synthesis of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde compound (1)

Step 1:

In a suitable reactor under nitrogen, tetrahydrofuran (207 L) was added to resorcinol (46 kg, 0.42 kmol, leq.) followed by addition of pyridinium tosylate (1.05 kg, 4.2 mol, O.Oleq.), and the reaction mixture was cooled down to 0 – 5 °C. Within 1 – 1.5 h ethylvinyl ether (90.4 kg, 120.5 L, 125 kmol, 3.0 eq.) was added while maintaining a temperature <5°C. After the addition was complete the reaction mixture was allowed to reach room temperature within 1.5 h. The reaction was stirred overnight, cooled down to 10-15 °C, and 138 L of aqueous 4% NaHC03 was added while maintaining the reaction solution below 20 °C. The phases were separated. The organic phase was washed once with 115 L of water and once with 125.2 kg of a 12.5% NaCl solution. The organic layer was dried by azeotropic distillation with THF to a water content value < 0.05%) (by weight) to yield bis-EOE-protected resorcinol (106.2 kg, 0.42 kmol) as a solution in THF. An advantage over previously reported protection procedures is that the bis-EOE-protected resorcinol product does not need to be isolated as a neat product. The

product-containing THF solution can be used directly in the next reaction step thus increasing throughput and reducing impurity formation.

Step 2:

Bis-EOE-protected resorcinol solution (assumption is 100% conversion) was added under inert gas protection to suitable reactor. The reaction mixture was cooled down to -10°C to -5°C and n-BuLi (117.8 kg, 25% in heptane, 1.1 eq.) was added. The reaction mixture was agitated at -5°C- 0°C for 30-40 min and then DMF (39.7 kg, 0.54 kmol, 1.3 eq.) was added at -10°C to -5°C. The reaction mixture was stirred until complete and then quenched with aqueous HC1 (1M, 488.8 kg) to give 2,6-bis(l-ethoxyethoxy)benzaldehyde. An advantage over previously reported procedures of using EOE protecting group is that the HC1 quenched solution can be used directly in the deprotection step, and 2,6-bis(l-ethoxyethoxy)benzaldehyde does not need to be isolated as a neat oil.

Step 3:

The pH of the quenched solution was adjusted to < 1 with aqueous HC1 (6M, ca 95.9 kg) and the reaction mixture stirred at ambient temperature for 16 h. After the reaction was complete the organic phase was separated and 279.7 kg of methyl tert butyl ether was added. The organic phase was washed once with aqueous IN HC1 (299 kg), once with aqueous 12.5% NaCl (205.8 kg) and once with 189 kg of water and then concentrated to a volume of ca. 69 L. To the slurry was added 164 kg of acetonitrile and the solution was concentrated in vacuo at T < 45°C to a final volume of ca. 69 L. The slurry was heated to re-dissolve the solids. The solution was seeded at 60-65 °C to initiate crystallization of the product and cooled slowly to RT over 8 hrs. The slurry was cooled down to -20 °C to -15°C and agitated at this temperature for l-2h. The product was isolated by filtration and washed with DCM (50.3 kg, pre-cooled to -20 °C to -15 °C) and dried under a stream of nitrogen to yield 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde as a yellow solid. Yield: 37.8 kg (0.27 kmol, 65.4% Yield). The described telescoped approach from deprotection to crystallization increases the throughput and integrity of the product.

Example 2

Synthesis of 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine

dihydrochloride salt

Step 1:

An appropriately sized flask was purged with nitrogen and charged with (2-chloropyridin-3-yl)methanol (1.0 equiv), sodium bicarbonate (3.0 equiv), [1, l ‘-bis(diphenyl-phosphino)-ferrocene]dichloropalladium (5 mol %), l-isopropyl-5-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazole (1.2 equiv), and a mixture of 2-MeTHF (17.4 vol) and deionized water (5.2 vol). The resulting solution was heated to 70°C to 75°C and conversion monitored by HPLC. Once the reaction was complete, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature, diluted with deionized water, and the phases were separated. The organic layer was extracted with 2 N HC1 (10 vol) and the phases were separated. The aqueous phase was washed with MTBE. The pH of the aqueous phase was adjusted to 8-9 with 6 N NaOH. The product was extracted into EtOAc, treated with Darco G-60 for 30 to 60 min, dried over MgS04, filtered through Celite®, and concentrated to give (2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methanol as a brown oil.

Step 2:

A suitably equipped reactor was charged with (2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methanol hydrochloride salt (1 equivalent) and purified water. An aqueous sodium

bicarbonate solution (8% NaHC03) was added slowly to maintain the solution temperature between 17 °C to 25 °C. After addition was complete, the reaction mixture was stirred at 17 °C to 25 °C and dichloromethane was added and the organic layer was separated. DCM solution was then distilled under atmospheric conditions at approximately 40°C and the volume was reduced. DCM was added the reactor and the contents of the reactor are stirred at 20°C to 30°C until a clear solution is formed. The contents of the reactor were cooled to 0°C to 5°C and thionyl chloride was charged to the reactor slowly to maintain a temperature of < 5 °C. The reaction solution was stirred at 17 °C to 25 °C. When the reaction was complete, a solution of HC1 (g) in 1,4-dioxane (ca. 4 N, 0.8 equiv.) was charged to the reactor slowly to maintain the solution temperature between 17 °C and 25 °C. The product 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl- lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine dihydrochloride salt was filtered washed with dichloromethane and dried.

Example 3

Synthesis of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde

Form I

(I)

tably equipped reactor was charged with 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine dihydrochloride salt (1 equivalent), sodium iodide (0.05 equivalent), sodium bicarbonate (4 equivalent), l-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), and 2,6-dihydroxy-benzaldehyde (1 to 1.05 equiv.). The reaction mixture was heated slowly to 40 °C to 50 °C and stirred until the reaction was complete. Water was then added and the reaction mixture was cooled and maintained at 17 °C to 25 °C. When the water addition was complete, the reaction mixture was stirred at 17 °C to 25 °C and slowly cooled to 0°C to 5°C and the resulting solids were collected by filtration. The solids were washed with a 0 °C to 5 °C 2: 1 water/NMP solution, followed by 0 °C to 5 °C water. The solids were filtered and dried to give 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde as Form I or a mixture of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde as Form I Form I and NMP solvates.

Alternative Synthesis:

A suitably equipped reactor was charged with 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine bishydrochloride salt (1 equivalent), sodium iodide (0.05 equivalent), sodium bicarbonate (3 to 4 equivalent), l-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (7 equivalent, NMP), and 2,6-dihydoxybenzaldehyde (1.05 equivalent). The reaction mixture was heated to 40 °C to 50° C and stirred until the reaction was complete. Water (5 equivalent) was then added while maintaining the contents of the reactor at 40 °C to 460 C and the resulting clear solution seeded with 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde Form I. Additional water (5 equivalent) was added while maintaining the contents of the reactor at 40 °C to 500 C, the reactor contents cooled to 15 °C to 25 0 C, and the reactor contents stirred for at least 1 hour at 15 °C to 25 0 C. The solids were collected, washed twice with 1 :2 NMP: water and twice with water, and dried to yield 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde Form I devoid of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde as NMP solvates.

Example 4

Preparation of 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)- benzaldehyde Form II

Step 1:

A suitably equipped reactor with an inert atmosphere was charged with crude 2-hydroxy- 6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (from Example 3 above) and MTBE and the contents stirred at 17°C to 25°C until dissolution was achieved. The reaction solution was passed through a 0.45 micron filter and MTBE solvent volume reduced using vacuum distillation at approximately 50 °C. The concentrated solution was heated to 55°C to 60°C to dissolve any crystallized product. When a clear solution was obtained, the solution was cooled to 50 °C to 55 °C and n-heptane was added. 2-Hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde (e.g., Form II) seeds in a slurry of n-heptane were charged and the solution was stirred at 50°C to 55°C. The solution was cooled to 45 °C to 50 °C and n-heptane was added to the reactor slowly while maintaining a reaction solution temperature of 45°C to 50°C. The reaction solution are stirred at 45°C to 50°C and then slowly cooled to 17°C to 25°C. A sample was taken for FTIR analysis and the crystallization was considered complete when FTIR analysis confirmed 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(l-isopropyl-lH-pyrazol-5-yl)-pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)-benzaldehyde (Form II). The contents of the reactor were then cooled to 0°C to 5°C and the solids were isolated and washed with cold n-heptane and dried.

POLYMORPHS

US9447071

 

US2016207904

 

US2016346263

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20160207904

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20160346263A1/en

  • 2-Hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde is a compound having the formula:
  • [0000]
    Figure US20160346263A1-20161201-C00001
  • [0003]
    Sickle cell disease is a disorder of the red blood cells, found particularly among those of African and Mediterranean descent. The basis for sickle cell disease is found in sickle hemoglobin (HbS), which contains a point mutation relative to the prevalent peptide sequence of hemoglobin (Hb).
  • [0004]
    Hemoglobin (Hb) transports oxygen molecules from the lungs to various tissues and organs throughout the body. Hemoglobin binds and releases oxygen through conformational changes. Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) contains a point mutation where glutamic acid is replaced with valine, allowing HbS to become susceptible to polymerization to give the HbS containing red blood cells their characteristic sickle shape. The sickled cells are also more rigid than normal red blood cells, and their lack of flexibility can lead to blockage of blood vessels. A need exists for therapeutics that can treat disorders that are mediated by Hb or by abnormal Hb such as HbS, such as 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde.
  • [0005]
    When used for treating humans, it is important that a crystalline form of a therapeutic agent, like 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)benzaldehyde, or a salt thereof, retains its polymorphic and chemical stability, solubility, and other physicochemical properties over time and among various manufactured batches of the agent. If the physicochemical properties vary with time and among batches, the administration of a therapeutically effective dose becomes problematic and may lead to toxic side effects or to ineffective therapy, particularly if a given polymorph decomposes prior to use, to a less active, inactive, or toxic compound. Therefore, it is important to choose a form of the crystalline agent that is stable, is manufactured reproducibly, and has physicochemical properties favorable for its use as a therapeutic agent.
  • [0006]
    However, the art remains unable to predict which crystalline form of an agent will have a combination of the desired properties and will be suitable for human administration, and how to make the agent in such a crystalline form.

PATENT

https://patents.google.com/patent/US9447071B2/en

It has now been discovered that 2-hydroxy-6-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-y1)methoxy)benzaldehyde (or Compound 1) i.e., the free base of Compound 1, can be obtained as one or more crystalline ansolvate forms, several of which are referred to here as crystalline Form I, Form II and Material N. In preferred embodiments, the free base of Compound 1 is a crystalline ansolvate, such as a crystalline anhydrous form. The free base of Compound 1, can be obtained from its corresponding salt form, such as the HCl salt of Compound 1.

Three anhydrous crystalline forms of the free base were identified, termed Free Base Forms I, II, and Material N. It has been discovered that nucleation of Free Base Form I generally occurs first from a slurry. Extending the slurry time can induce the transformation of Free Base Form I to Free Base Form II, a thermodynamically more stable phase relative to Form I. It has further been discovered that Free Base Material N can be stable relative to Forms I and II, at room temperature.

Synthetic Routes for Preparing Compound 1

The compound of formula (I) was synthesized as schematically described below and elaborated thereafter.

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00003

Example 1 Synthesis of Compound 15

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00004

To a solution of 2-bromobenzene-1,3-diol (5 g, 26.45 mmol) in DCM (50 ml) at 0° C. was added DIPEA (11.54 mL, 66.13 mmol) and MOMCl (4.42 mL, 58.19 mmol). The mixture was stirred at 0° C. for 1.5 h, and then warmed to room temperature. The solution was diluted with DCM, washed with sat. NaHCO3, brine, dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was purified by column (hexanes/EtOAc=4:1) to give desired product 15.58 g (90%).

Example 2 Synthesis of Compound 13 from 15

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00005

To a solution of 2-bromo-1,3-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzene (15) (19.9 g, 71.8 mmol) in THF (150 mL) at −78° C. was added BuLi (2.5 M, 31.6 mL, 79.0 mmol) dropwise. The solution was stirred at −78° C. for 25 min (resulting white cloudy mixture), then it was warmed to 0° C. and stirred for 25 min. The reaction mixture slowly turns homogenous. To the solution was added DMF at 0° C. After 25 min, HPLC showed reaction completed. The mixture was quenched with sat. NH4Cl (150 mL), diluted with ether (300 mL). The organic layer was separated, aq layer was further extracted with ether (2×200 mL), and organic layer was combined, washed with brine, dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was triturated to give 14.6 g desired product. The filtrate was then concentrated and purified by column to give additional 0.7 g, total mass is 15.3 g.

Example 3 Synthesis of Compound 13 from resorcinol 11

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00006

A three-necked round-bottom flask equipped with mechanical stirrer was charged with 0.22 mol of NaH (50% suspension in mineral oil) under nitrogen atmosphere. NaH was washed with 2 portions (100 mL) of n-hexane and then with 300 mL of dry diethyl ether; then 80 mL of anhydrous DMF was added. Then 0.09 mol of resorcinol 11, dissolved in 100 mL of diethyl ether was added dropwise and the mixture was left under stirring at rt for 30 min. Then 0.18 mol of MOMCl was slowly added. After 1 h under stirring at rt, 250 mL of water was added and the organic layer was extracted with diethyl ether. The extracts were washed with brine, dried (Na2SO4), then concentrated to give the crude product that was purified by silica gel chromatography to give compound 12 (93% yield).

A three-necked round-bottom flask was charged with 110 mL of n-hexane, 0.79 mol of BuLi and 9.4 mL of tetramethylethylendiamine (TMEDA) under nitrogen atmosphere. The mixture was cooled at −10° C. and 0.079 mol of bis-phenyl ether 12 was slowly added. The resulting mixture was left under magnetic stirring at −10° C. for 2 h. Then the temperature was raised to 0° C. and 0.067 mol of DMF was added dropwise. After 1 h, aqueous HCl was added until the pH was acidic; the mixture was then extracted with ethyl ether. The combined extracts were washed with brine, dried (Na2SO4), and concentrated to give aldehyde 13 (84%).

2,6-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (13): mp 58-59° C. (n-hexane); IR (KBr) n: 1685 (C═O) cm−11H-NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 3.51 (s, 6H, 2 OCH3), 5.28 (s, 4H, 2 OCH2O), 6.84 (d, 2H, J=8.40 Hz, H-3, H-5), 7.41 (t, 1H, J=8.40 Hz, H-4), 10.55 (s, 1H, CHO); MS, m/e (relative intensity) 226 (M+, 3), 180 (4), 164 (14), 122 (2), 92 (2), 45 (100); Anal. Calc’d. for C11H14O5: C, 58.40; H, 6.24. Found: C, 57.98; H, 6.20.

Example 4 The Synthesis of Compound 16

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00007

To a solution of 2,6-bis(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (13) (15.3 g, 67.6 mmol) in THF (105 mL) (solvent was purged with N2) was added conc. HCl (12N, 7 mL) under N2, then it was further stirred under Nfor 1.5 h. To the solution was added brine (100 mL) and ether (150 ml). The organic layer was separated and the aqueous layer was further extracted with ether (2×200 mL). The organic layer was combined, washed with brine, dried and concentrated to give crude product, which was purified by column (300 g, hexanes/EtOAc=85:15) to give desired product 16 (9.9 g) as yellow liquid.

Example 5 Synthesis of Compound 17

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00008

To a solution of 2-hydroxy-6-(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (16) (10.88 g, 59.72 mmol) in DMF (120 mL) (DMF solution was purged with Nfor 10 min) was added K2CO(32.05 g, 231.92 mmol) and 3-(chloromethyl)-2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridine hydrochloride (10) (15.78 g, 57.98 mmol). The mixture was heated at 65° C. for 1.5 h, cooled to rt, poured into ice water (800 mL). The precipitated solids were isolated by filtration, dried and concentrated to give desired product (17, 18 g).

Example 6 Synthesis of Compound (I)

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00009

To a solution of 2-((2-(1-isopropyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl)methoxy)-6-(methoxymethoxy)benzaldehyde (17) (18 g, 47.19 mmol) in THF (135 mL, solution was purged with N2) was added conc. HCl (12N, 20 mL). The solution was stirred at rt for 3 h when HPLC showed the reaction complete. The mixture was added to a solution of NaHCO(15 g) in water (1.2 L), and the resulting precipitate was collected by filtration, dried to give crude solid, which was further purified by column (DCM/EtOAc=60:40) to give pure product (15.3 g).

Example 7 Synthesis of Compound I (Free Base) and its HCl Salt Form

Compound (I) free base (40 g) was obtained from the coupling of the alcohol intermediate 7 and 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldedhye 9 under Mitsunobu conditions. A procedure is also provided below:

Figure US09447071-20160920-C00010

Example 8 Synthesis of Compound (I) by Mitsunobu Coupling

Into a 2000-mL three neck round-bottom flask, which was purged and maintained with an inert atmosphere of nitrogen, was placed a solution of [2-[1-(propan-2-yl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]pyridin-3-yl]methanol (7) (70 g, 322.18 mmol, 1.00 equiv) in tetrahydrofuran (1000 mL). 2,6-Dihydroxybenzaldehyde (9) (49.2 g, 356.21 mmol, 1.10 equiv) and PPh(101 g, 385.07 mmol, 1.20 equiv) were added to the reaction mixture. This was followed by the addition of a solution of DIAD (78.1 g, 386.23 mmol, 1.20 equiv) in tetrahydrofuran (200 ml) dropwise with stirring. The resulting solution was stirred overnight at room temperature. The resulting solution was diluted with 500 ml of H2O. The resulting solution was extracted with 3×500 ml of dichloromethane and the combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated under vacuum. The residue was applied onto a silica gel column with EA:PE (1:50-1:3) as eluent to yield the crude product. The crude product was re-crystallized from i-propanol/H2O in the ratio of 1/1.5. This resulted in 40 g (37%) of 2-hydroxy-6-([2-[1-(propan-2-yl)-1H-pyrazol-5-yl]pyridin-3-yl]methoxy)benzaldehyde as a light yellow solid. The compound exhibited a melting point of 80-82° C. MS (ES, m/z): 338.1 [M+1]. 1H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 11.72 (s, 1H), 10.21 (s, 1H), 8.76 (d, J=3.6 Hz, 1H), 8.24 (d, J=2.7 Hz, 1H), 7.55 (m, 3H), 6.55 (m, 3H), 5.21 (s, 2H), 4.65 (m, 1H), 1.37 (d, J=5.1 Hz, 6H). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 11.96 (s, 1H), 10.40 (s, 1H), 8.77 (dd, J=4.8, 1.5 Hz, 1H), 8.00 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.63 (d, J=1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.49-7.34 (m, 2H), 6.59 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1H), 6.37 (d, J=1.8 Hz, 1H), 6.29 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 5.10 (s, 2H), 4.67 (sep, J=6.7 Hz, 1H), 1.50 (d, J=6.6 Hz, 6H).

In another approach, multiple batches of Compound (I) free base are prepared in multi gram quantities (20 g). The advantage of this route is the use of mono-protected 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (16), which effectively eliminates the possibility of bis-alkylation side product. The mono-MOM ether of 2,6-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (16) can be obtained from two starting points, bromoresorcinol (14) or resorcinol (11) [procedures described in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, 74(11), 4311-4317; 2009]. All steps and procedures are provided below. Due to the presence of phenolic aldehyde group, precautions (i.e., carry out all reactions under inert gas such as nitrogen) should be taken to avoid oxidation of the phenol and/or aldehyde group. Preparation of compound I HCl salt: A solution of compound I (55.79 g, 165.55 mmol) in acetonitrile (275 mL) was flushed with nitrogen for 10 min, then to this solution was added 3N aqueous HCl (62 mL) at room temperature. The mixture was stirred for additional 10 min after the addition, most of the acetonitrile (about 200 mL) was then removed by evaporation on a rotary evaporator at around 32° C., the remaining solution was frozen by cooling in an acetone-dry ice bath and lyophilized to afford compound I HCl salt (59.4 g).

Biological Activity

Description Voxelotor(GBT440, GTx011) is a novel small molecule hemoglobin modifier which increases hemoglobin oxygen affinity.
In vitro GBT440 is a new potent allosteric effector of sickle cell hemoglobin that increases the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen and consequently inhibits its polymerization when subjected to hypoxic conditions. GBT440 inhibits these isozymes(CYP 1A2, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4) with IC50 ranging from 7.9 to 148 μM. It is not a substrate for either P-gp or BCRP transporters[1]. It binds to the N-terminal a chain of Hb[2].
In vivo GBT440 has favorable oral bioavailability of 60, 37, and 36% in rats, dogs, and monkeys, respectively, with similar blood and plasma half-lives of approximately 20 h each. T1/2 value of GBT440 in all animal species is significantly shorter than the T1/2 of red blood cells (∼20 days), which supports that binding of GBT440 to hemoglobin is a reversible process. GBT440 is currently in Phase 3 clinical trials (NCT03036813) in SCD patients[1]. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease. In a murine model of SCD, GBT440 extends the half-life of RBCs, reduces reticulocyte counts and prevents ex vivo RBC sickling. Importantly, oral dosing of GBT440 in animals demonstrates suitability for once daily dosing in humans and a highly selective partitioning into RBCs, which is a key therapeutic safety attribute. GBT440 shows dose proportional PK, a terminal half-life of 1.5-3 d[2].

GBT Receives FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Voxelotor for Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

Voxelotor is First Investigational Treatment for SCD to Receive Breakthrough Therapy Designation

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Jan. 09, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Global Blood Therapeutics, Inc. (GBT) (NASDAQ:GBT) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation (BTD) to voxelotor (previously called GBT440) for the treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD). Voxelotor is being developed as a disease-modifying therapy for SCD and previously received European Medicines Agency (EMA) Priority Medicines (PRIME) designation for the treatment of SCD.

“The FDA’s decision to grant voxelotor the first Breakthrough Therapy designation for the treatment of sickle cell disease reflects a recognition of the promising efficacy and safety data we have collected to date for this investigational drug, as well as an acknowledgement of the overwhelming need for major advances over available therapies in the treatment of SCD patients,” said Ted W. Love, president and chief executive officer of GBT. “This designation is another significant milestone for GBT as we work to expedite the development of voxelotor.”

The FDA selectively grants BTD to expedite the development and review of drugs that have demonstrated preliminary clinical evidence indicating the potential for substantial improvement over available therapy. The BTD decision for voxelotor was based on clinical data submitted from the following studies:

  • Preliminary efficacy and safety data from Part A of the Phase 3 HOPE Study (GBT440-031)
  • Phase 1/2 study and open-label extension in adults (GBT440-001/024)
  • Ongoing Phase 2 HOPE-KIDS 1 study in children age 6 to 17 (GBT440-007)
  • Compassionate Access experience in adults with severe SCD (not eligible for the HOPE Study)

About Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)
SCD is a lifelong inherited blood disorder caused by a genetic mutation in the beta-chain of hemoglobin, which leads to the formation of abnormal hemoglobin known as sickle hemoglobin (HbS). In its deoxygenated state, HbS has a propensity to polymerize, or bind together, forming long, rigid rods within a red blood cell (RBC). The polymer rods deform RBCs to assume a sickled shape and to become inflexible, which can cause blockage in capillaries and small blood vessels. Beginning in childhood, SCD patients suffer unpredictable and recurrent episodes or crises of severe pain due to blocked blood flow to organs, which often lead to psychosocial and physical disabilities. This blocked blood flow, combined with hemolytic anemia (the destruction of RBCs), can eventually lead to multi-organ damage and early death.

About Voxelotor in Sickle Cell Disease
Voxelotor (previously called GBT440) is being developed as an oral, once-daily therapy for patients with SCD. Voxelotor works by increasing hemoglobin’s affinity for oxygen. Since oxygenated sickle hemoglobin does not polymerize, GBT believes voxelotor blocks polymerization and the resultant sickling of red blood cells. With the potential to restore normal hemoglobin function and improve oxygen delivery, GBT believes that voxelotor may potentially modify the course of SCD. In recognition of the critical need for new SCD treatments, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted voxelotor Fast Track, Orphan Drug and Rare Pediatric Disease designations for the treatment of patients with SCD. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has included voxelotor in its Priority Medicines (PRIME) program, and the European Commission (EC) has designated voxelotor as an orphan medicinal product for the treatment of patients with SCD.

GBT is currently evaluating voxelotor in the HOPE (Hemoglobin Oxygen Affinity Modulation to Inhibit HbS PolymErization) Study, a Phase 3 clinical study in patients age 12 and older with SCD. Additionally, voxelotor is being studied in the ongoing Phase 2a HOPE-KIDS 1 Study, an open-label, single- and multiple-dose study in pediatric patients (age 6 to 17) with SCD. HOPE-KIDS 1 is assessing the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and exploratory treatment effect of voxelotor.

About GBT
GBT is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company determined to discover, develop and deliver innovative treatments that provide hope to underserved patient communities. GBT is developing its lead product candidate, voxelotor, as an oral, once-daily therapy for sickle cell disease. To learn more, please visit www.gbt.com and follow the company on Twitter @GBT_news.

 

REFERENCES

1: Oksenberg D, Dufu K, Patel MP, Chuang C, Li Z, Xu Q, Silva-Garcia A, Zhou C, Hutchaleelaha A, Patskovska L, Patskovsky Y, Almo SC, Sinha U, Metcalf BW, Archer DR. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease. Br J Haematol. 2016 Oct;175(1):141-53. doi: 10.1111/bjh.14214. PubMed PMID: 27378309.

2: Dufu K, Lehrer-Graiwer J, Ramos E, Oksenberg D. GBT440 Inhibits Sickling of Sickle Cell Trait Blood Under In Vitro Conditions Mimicking Strenuous Exercise. Hematol Rep. 2016 Sep 28;8(3):6637. PubMed PMID: 27757216; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5062624.

3: Ferrone FA. GBT440 increases haemoglobin oxygen affinity, reduces sickling and prolongs RBC half-life in a murine model of sickle cell disease. Br J Haematol. 2016 Aug;174(4):499-500. doi: 10.1111/bjh.14212. PubMed PMID: 27410726.

4: Oder E, Safo MK, Abdulmalik O, Kato GJ. New developments in anti-sickling agents: can drugs directly prevent the polymerization of sickle haemoglobin in vivo? Br J Haematol. 2016 Oct;175(1):24-30. doi: 10.1111/bjh.14264. Review. PubMed PMID: 27605087; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5035193.

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016346263 CRYSTALLINE POLYMORPHS OF THE FREE BASE OF 2-HYDROXY-6-((2-(1-ISOPROPYL-1H-PYRAZOL-5-YL)PYRIDIN-3-YL)METHOXY)BENZALDEHYDE
2016-08-12
US2014271591 Compositions and methods for the modulation of hemoglobin (s)
2013-03-15
2014-09-18
US2016303099 METHODS OF TREATMENT
2016-03-29
US2016206614 SUBSTITUTED BENZALDEHYDE COMPOUNDS AND METHODS FOR THEIR USE IN INCREASING TISSUE OXYGENATION
2016-03-25
2016-07-21
US9248199 1:1 ADDUCTS OF SICKLE HEMOGLOBIN
2014-01-29
2015-07-30

////////////VOXELOTOR, GBT 440, GTx-011, Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease, phase 3, gbt, 1446321-46-5, orphan drug,  breakthrough therapy designation

CC(C)n1nccc1c2ncccc2COc3cccc(O)c3C=O

DISCLAIMER

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS ” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

FDA approves first drug Actemra (tocilizumab) to specifically treat giant cell arteritis


Image result for actemra logo
05/22/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of subcutaneous Actemra (tocilizumab) to treat adults with giant cell arteritis. This new indication provides the first FDA-approved therapy, specific to this type of vasculitis.

May 22, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved use of subcutaneous Actemra (tocilizumab) to treat adults with giant cell arteritis. This new indication provides the first FDA-approved therapy, specific to this type of vasculitis.

“We expedited the development and review of this application because this drug fulfills a critical need for patients with this serious disease who had limited treatment options,” said Badrul Chowdhury, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Rheumatology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

Giant cell arteritis is a form of vasculitis, a group of disorders that results in inflammation of blood vessels. This inflammation causes the arteries to narrow or become irregular, impeding adequate blood flow. In giant cell arteritis, the vessels most involved are those of the head, especially the temporal arteries (located on each side of the head). For this reason, the disorder is sometimes called temporal arteritis. However, other blood vessels, including large ones like the aorta, can become inflamed in giant cell arteritis. Standard treatment involves high doses of corticosteroids that are tapered over time.

The efficacy and safety of subcutaneous (injected under the skin) Actemra for giant cell arteritis were established in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study with 251 patients with giant cell arteritis. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving sustained remission from Week 12 through Week 52. Sustained remission was defined as the absence of symptoms of giant cell arteritis, normalization of inflammatory laboratory tests, and tapering the use of prednisone (a steroid drug). A greater proportion of patients receiving subcutaneous Actemra with standardized prednisone regimens achieved sustained remission from Week 12 through Week 52 as compared to patients receiving placebo with standardized prednisone regimens. The cumulative prednisone dose was lower in treated patients with Actemra relative to placebo.

The overall safety profile observed in the Actemra treatment groups was generally consistent with the known safety profile of Actemra. Actemra carries a Boxed Warning for serious infections. Patients treated with Actemra who develop a serious infection should stop that treatment until the infection is controlled. Live vaccines should be avoided during treatment with Actemra. Actemra should be used with caution in patients at increased risk of gastrointestinal perforation. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis and death, have occurred. Laboratory monitoring is recommended due to potential consequences of treatment-related changes in neutrophils (type of white blood cell), platelets, lipids and liver function tests.

Subcutaneous Actemra was previously approved for the treatment of moderate to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. Intravenous Actemra was also previously approved for the treatment of moderate to severely active rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Intravenous administration is not approved for giant cell arteritis.

The FDA granted this application a Breakthrough Therapy designation and a Priority Review.

The FDA granted the supplemental approval of Actemra to Hoffman La Roche, Inc.

//////////Actemra, tocilizumab, fda 2017, Breakthrough Therapy designation, Priority Review,  supplemental approval, Hoffman La Roche, Inc.

Glecaprevir (ABT-493)


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2D chemical structure of 1365970-03-1

ChemSpider 2D Image | Glecaprevir | C38H46F4N6O9S

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Glecaprevir (ABT-493), A-1282576.0

(3aR,7S,10S,12R,21E,24aR)-7-tert-butyl-N-((1R,2R)-2-(difluoromethyl)-1-((1-methylcyclopropane-1-sulfonyl)carbamoyl)cyclopropyl)-20,20-difluoro-5,8-dioxo-2,3,3a,5,6,7,8,11,12,20,23,24a-dodecahydro-1H,10H-9,12-methanocyclopenta(18,19)(1,10,17,3,6)trioxadiazacyclononadecino(11,12-b)quinoxaline-10-carboxamide

Cyclopropanecarboxamide, N-((((1R,2R)-2-((4,4-difluoro-4-(3-hydroxy-2-quinoxalinyl)-2-buten-1-yl)oxy)cyclopentyl)oxy)carbonyl)-3-methyl-L-valyl-(4R)-4-hydroxy-L-prolyl-1-amino-2-(difluoromethyl)-N-((1-methylcyclopropyl)sulfonyl)-, cyclic (1-&gt;2)-ether, (1R,2R)-
CAS RN: 1365970-03-1
UNII: K6BUU8J72P

Molecular Formula, C38-H46-F4-N6-O9-S

Molecular Weight, 838.8724

Classification Code, Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Infection

(1R,14E,18R,22R,26S,29S)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-(Difluormethyl)-1-{[(1-methylcyclopropyl)sulfonyl]carbamoyl}cyclopropyl]-13,13-difluor-26-(2-methyl-2-propanyl)-24,27-dioxo-2,17,23-trioxa-4,11,25,28-tetraazapent ;acyclo[26.2.1.03,12.05,10.018,22]hentriaconta-3,5(10),6,8,11,14-hexaen-29-carboxamid
(1R,14E,18R,22R,26S,29S)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-(Difluoromethyl)-1-{[(1-methylcyclopropyl)sulfonyl]carbamoyl}cyclopropyl]-13,13-difluoro-26-(2-methyl-2-propanyl)-24,27-dioxo-2,17,23-trioxa-4,11,25,28-tetraazape ;ntacyclo[26.2.1.03,12.05,10.018,22]hentriaconta-3,5(10),6,8,11,14-hexaene-29-carboxamide
Class Antivirals (small molecules)
Mechanism Of Action Hepatitis C virus NS3 protein inhibitors
Who Atc Codes J05A-E (Protease inhibitors)
Ephmra Codes J5B1 (Viral hepatitis products)
Indication Hepatitis C, Renal Impairment, Hepatic impairment
  • Originator AbbVie; Enanta Pharmaceuticals
  • Developer AbbVie
  • Class Antivirals; Aza compounds; Cyclic ethers; Cyclopentanes; Cyclopropanes; Quinoxalines; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Hepatitis C virus NS3 protein inhibitors
  • Phase II Hepatitis C

Most Recent Events

  • 18 Apr 2016 Pooled efficacy and adverse event data from the phase II SURVEYOR-I and SURVEYOR-2 trials for Hepatitis C presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2016 (ILC-2016)
  • 15 Apr 2016 Updated efficacy data from a phase II MAGELLAN 1 study were reported by Enanta Pharmaceuticals
  • 15 Apr 2016 Updated safety and efficacy data from a phase II MAGELLAN 1 study were presented at the International Liver Congress™ (ILC-2016)
  • OCT 2016, US FDA grants breakthrough therapy designation to AbbVie’s G/P to treat HCV 

AbbVie’s investigational, pan-genotypic regimen of glecaprevir (ABT-493) / pibrentasvir (ABT-530) (G/P) has received breakthrough therapy designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV).

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HCV is the principal cause of non-A, non-B hepatitis and is an increasingly severe public health problem both in the developed and developing world. It is estimated that the virus infects over 200 million people worldwide, surpassing the number of individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by nearly five fold. HCV infected patients, due to the high percentage of individuals inflicted with chronic infections, are at an elevated risk of developing cirrhosis of the liver, subsequent hepatocellular carcinoma and terminal liver disease. HCV is the most prevalent cause of hepatocellular cancer and cause of patients requiring liver transplantations in the western world.

There are considerable barriers to the development of anti-HCV therapeutics, which include, but are not limited to, the persistence of the virus, the genetic diversity of the virus during replication in the host, the high incident rate of the virus developing drug-resistant mutants, and the lack of reproducible infectious culture systems and small-animal models for HCV replication and pathogenesis. In a majority of cases, given the mild course of the infection and the complex biology of the liver, careful consideration must be given to antiviral drugs, which are likely to have significant side effects.

Only two approved therapies for HCV infection are currently available. The original treatment regimen generally involves a 3-12 month course of intravenous interferon-α (IFN-α), while a new approved second-generation treatment involves co-treatment with IFN-α and the general antiviral nucleoside mimics like ribavirin. Both of these treatments suffer from interferon related side effects as well as low efficacy against HCV infections. There exists a need for the development of effective antiviral agents for treatment of HCV infection due to the poor tolerability and disappointing efficacy of existing therapies.

In a patient population where the majority of individuals are chronically infected and asymptomatic and the prognoses are unknown, an effective drug would desirably possess significantly fewer side effects than the currently available treatments. The hepatitis C non-structural protein-3 (NS3) is a proteolytic enzyme required for processing of the viral polyprotein and consequently viral replication. Despite the huge number of viral variants associated with HCV infection, the active site of the NS3 protease remains highly conserved thus making its inhibition an attractive mode of intervention. Recent success in the treatment of HIV with protease inhibitors supports the concept that the inhibition of NS3 is a key target in the battle against HCV.

HCV is a flaviridae type RNA virus. The HCV genome is enveloped and contains a single strand RNA molecule composed of circa 9600 base pairs. It encodes a polypeptide comprised of approximately 3010 amino acids.

The HCV polyprotein is processed by viral and host peptidase into 10 discreet peptides which serve a variety of functions. There are three structural proteins, C, E1 and E2. The P7 protein is of unknown function and is comprised of a highly variable sequence. There are six non-structural proteins. NS2 is a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase that functions in conjunction with a portion of the NS3 protein. NS3 incorporates two catalytic functions (separate from its association with NS2): a serine protease at the N-terminal end, which requires NS4A as a cofactor, and an ATP-ase-dependent helicase function at the carboxyl terminus. NS4A is a tightly associated but non-covalent cofactor of the serine protease.

The NS3/4A protease is responsible for cleaving four sites on the viral polyprotein. The NS3-NS4A cleavage is autocatalytic, occurring in cis. The remaining three hydrolyses, NS4A-NS4B, NS4B-NS5A and NS5A-NS5B all occur in trans. NS3 is a serine protease which is structurally classified as a chymotrypsin-like protease. While the NS serine protease possesses proteolytic activity by itself, the HCV protease enzyme is not an efficient enzyme in terms of catalyzing polyprotein cleavage. It has been shown that a central hydrophobic region of the NS4A protein is required for this enhancement. The complex formation of the NS3 protein with NS4A seems necessary to the processing events, enhancing the proteolytic efficacy at all of the sites.

A general strategy for the development of antiviral agents is to inactivate virally encoded enzymes, including NS3, that are essential for the replication of the virus. Current efforts directed toward the discovery of NS3 protease inhibitors were reviewed by S. Tan, A. Pause, Y. Shi, N. Sonenberg, Hepatitis C Therapeutics: Current Status and Emerging Strategies, Nature Rev. Drug Discov. 1, 867-881 (2002).

PATENT

US 20120070416

Yat Sun Or, Jun Ma, Guoqiang Wang, Jiang Long, Bin Wang 

Enanta Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Example 6Compound of Formula VIII, Wherein

Figure US20120070416A1-20120322-C01583

Step 6a

Figure US20120070416A1-20120322-C01584

The acid 1-6a (21 mg, 0.0356 mmol) was dissolved in DCM (1.5 ml), and to this solution was added sulfonamide 1-7e (13.0 mg, 0.0463 mmol), HATU (17.6 mg, 0.0462 mmol) and DIPEA (12.4 ul, 0.0712 mmol). The mixture was stirred for 3 h, and then diluted with DCM. The organic layer was washed with 1 N HCl, water, brine, dried and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was purified by HPLC to afford the title compound. MS-ESI m/z 839.41 (M+H)+.

REFERENCES

http://aac.asm.org/content/60/3/1546.full

////////////glecaprevir, ABT-493, US FDA, breakthrough therapy designation,  AbbVie’s G/P,  treat HCV , PHASE 2, A-1282576.0, 1365970-03-1, US 20120070416

CC1(CC1)S(=O)(=O)NC(=O)[C@]2(C[C@H]2C(F)F)NC(=O)[C@@H]3C[C@@H]4CN3C(=O)[C@@H](NC(=O)O[C@@H]5CCC[C@H]5OC/C=C/C(c6c(nc7ccccc7n6)O4)(F)F)C(C)(C)C

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US FDA grants breakthrough therapy designation to AbbVie’s G/P to treat HCV

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4 October 2016

AbbVie’s investigational, pan-genotypic regimen of glecaprevir (ABT-493) / pibrentasvir (ABT-530) (G/P) has received breakthrough therapy designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV).

The HCV is a bloodborne virus commonly transmitted through injecting drug use due to the sharing of injection equipment, reuse or inadequate sterilisation of medical equipment, and the transfusion of unscreened blood and blood products.

The designation facilitates the use of AbbVie’s G/P to treat chronic HCV patients who failed previous therapy with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in genotype 1 (GT1), including therapy with an NS5A inhibitor and / or protease inhibitor.

AbbVie research and development executive vice-president Michael Severino said: “AbbVie is committed to advancing HCV care and addressing areas of continued unmet need for people living with chronic HCV.

“AbbVie is committed to advancing HCV care and addressing areas of continued unmet need for people living with chronic HCV.”

“The FDA’s breakthrough therapy designation is an important step in our effort to bring our pan-genotypic regimen to market, which we are also investigating as an eight-week path to virologic cure for the majority of patients.”

AbbVie said that G/P is currently in Phase III trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of the regimen across all major HCV genotypes (genotypes 1-6).

Figures released by the World Health Organisation revealed that an estimated 700,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver diseases.

There is currently no vaccine for hepatitis C, although research in this area is underway at present.

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