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Lurbinectedin

(1’R,6R,6aR,7R,13S,14S,16R)-5-(Acetyloxy)-2′,3′,4′,6,6a,7,9′-decahydro-8,14-dihydroxy-6′,9-dimethoxy-4,10,23-trimethyl-spiro(6,16-(epithiopropaneoxymethano)-7.13-imino-12H-1,3-dioxolo[7,8]soquino[3,2-b][3]benzazocine-20,1′-[1H]pyrido[3,4-b]indol]-19-one

Molecular Weight784.87
FormulaC41H44N4O10S
CAS No.497871-47-3 (Lurbinectedin);
Chemical NameSpiro[6,16-(epithiopropanoxymethano)-7,13-imino-12H-1,3-dioxolo[7,8]isoquino[3,2-b][3]benzazocine-20,1′-[1H]pyrido[3,4-b]indol]-19-one, 5-(acetyloxy)-2′,3′,4′,6,6a,7,9′,13,14,16-decahydro-8,14-dihydroxy-6′,9-dimethoxy-4,10,23-trimethyl-, (1’R,6R,6aR,7R,13S,14S,16R)- (9CI)

fda approved , 6/15/2020 , ZEPZELCA, Pharma Mar S.A.

To treat metastatic small cell lung cancer
Drug Trials Snapshot

Research Code:PM-01183; PM-1183

MOA:RNA polymerase inhibitor

Indication:Ovarian cancer; Breast cancer; Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)лурбинектединلوربينيكتيدين芦比替定(1R,1’R,2’R,3’R,11’S,12’S,14’R)-5′,12′-Dihydroxy-6,6′-dimethoxy-7′,21′,30′-trimethyl-27′-oxo-2,3,4,9-tetrahydrospiro[β-carboline-1,26′-[17,19,28]trioxa[24]thia[13,30]diazaheptacyclo[12.9.6.13,11. 02,13.04,9.015,23.016,20]triaconta[4,6,8,15,20,22]hexaen]-22′-yl acetate [ACD/IUPAC Name]2CN60TN6ZS497871-47-3[RN]9397

Lurbinectedin is in phase III clinical development for the treatment of platinum refractory/resistant ovarian cancer.

Phase II clinical trials are also ongoing for several oncology indications: non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, small cell lung cancer, head and neck carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, biliary tract carcinoma, endometrial carcinoma, germ cell tumors and Ewing’s family of tumors.

Lurbinectedin, sold under the brand name Zepzelca, is a medication for the treatment of adults with metastatic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.[1][2][3]

The most common side effects include leukopenia, lymphopenia, fatigue, anemia, neutropenia, increased creatinine, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased glucose, thrombocytopenia, nausea, decreased appetite, musculoskeletal pain, decreased albumin, constipation, dyspnea, decreased sodium, increased aspartate aminotransferase, vomiting, cough, decreased magnesium and diarrhea.[1][2][3]

Lurbinectedin is a synthetic tetrahydropyrrolo [4, 3, 2-de]quinolin-8(1H)-one alkaloid analogue with potential antineoplastic activity.[4] Lurbinectedin covalently binds to residues lying in the minor groove of DNA, which may result in delayed progression through S phase, cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell death.[4]

Lurbinectedin was approved for medical use in the United States in June 2020.[5][1][2][3][6]

Structure

Lurbinectedin is structurally similar to trabectedin, although the tetrahydroisoquinoline present in trabectedin is replaced with a tetrahydro β-carboline which enables lurbinectedin to exhibit increased antitumor activity compared with trabectedin.[7]

Biosynthesis

Lurbinectedin a marine agent isolated from the sea squirt species Ecteinascidia turbinata. Synthetic production is necessary because very small amounts can be obtained from sea organisms. For example, one ton (1000 kg) of sea squirts are required to produce one gram of trabectedin, which is analogue of lurbinectedin. Complex synthesis of lurbinectedin starts from small, common starting materials that require twenty-six individual steps to produce the drug with overall yield of 1.6%.[8][9]

Mechanism of action

According to PharmaMar,[10] lurbinectedin inhibits the active transcription of the encoding genes. This has two consequences. On one hand, it promotes tumor cell death, and on the other it normalizes tumor microenvironment. Active transcription is the process by which there are specific signal where information contained in the DNA sequence is transferred to an RNA molecule. This activity depends on the activity of an enzyme called RNA polymerase II. Lurbinectedin inhibits transcription through a very precise mechanism. Firstly, lurbinectedin binds to specific DNA sequences. It is at these precise spots that slides down the DNA to produce RNA polymerase II that is blocked and degraded by lurbinectedin. Lurbinectedin also has important role in tumor microenvironment. The tumor cells act upon macrophages to avoid them from behaving like an activator of the immune system. Literally, macrophages work in any tumor’s favor. Macrophages can contribute to tumor growth and progression by promoting tumor cell proliferation and invasion, fostering tumor angiogenesis and suppressing antitumor immune cells.[11][12] Attracted to oxygen-starved (hypoxic) and necrotic tumor cells they promote chronic inflammation. So, not only that macrophages inhibit immune system avoiding the destruction of tumor cells, but they also create tumor tissue that allows tumor growth. However, macrophages associated with tumors are cells that are addicted to the transcription process. Lurbinectedin acts specifically on the macrophages associated with tumors in two ways: firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of macrophages that leads to cell death and secondly, inhibiting the production of tumor growth factors. In this way, lurbinectedin normalizes the tumor microenvironment.

History

Lurbinectedin was approved for medical use in the United States in June 2020.[5][1][2][3][6]

Efficacy was demonstrated in the PM1183-B-005-14 trial (Study B-005; NCT02454972), a multicenter open-label, multi-cohort study enrolling 105 participants with metastatic SCLC who had disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.[3][6] Participants received lurbinectedin 3.2 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion every 21 days until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.[3] The trial was conducted at 26 sites in the United States, Great Britain, Belgium, France, Italy, Spain and Czech Republic.[6]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted the application for lurbinectedin priority review and orphan drug designations and granted the approval of Zepzelca to Pharma Mar S.A.[3][13]

Research

Clinical Trials

Lurbinectedin can be used as monotherapy in the treatment of SCLC.  Lurbinectedin monotherapy demonstrated the following clinical results in relapsed extensive stage SCLC:

  • For sensitive disease (chemotherapy-free interval of ≥ 90 days) overall response rate (ORR) was 46.6% with 79.3% disease control rate and median overall survival (OS) being increased to 15.2 months.[14]
  • For resistant disease (chemotherapy-free interval of < 90 days) overall response rate (ORR) was 21.3% with 46.8% disease control rate and 5.1 months median overall survival (OS).[14]

Lurbinectedin is also being investigated in combination with doxorubicin as second-line therapy in a randomized Phase III trial.[medical citation needed] While overall survival in this trial is not yet known, response rates at second line were

  • 91.7% in sensitive disease with median progression-free survival of 5.8 months, and
  • 33.3% in resistant disease with median progression-free of 3.5 months.[15]

Lurbinectedin is available in the U.S. under Expanded Access Program (EAP).[15][16]

SYN

SYN

WO2011/147828

Ecteinascidins is a group of naturally occurring marine compounds and analogs thereof, which are well identified and structurally characterized, and are disclosed to have antibacterial and cytotoxic properties. See for example, European Patent 309.477; WO 03/66638; WO 03/08423; WO 01 /771 15; WO 03/014127; R. Sakai et al., 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, pages 1 1456- 1 1460; R. Menchaca et al., 2003, J. Org. Chem. 68(23), pages 8859-8866; and I. Manzanares et al., 2001 , Curr. Med. Chem. Anti-Cancer Agents, 1 , pages 257-276; and references therein. Examples of ecteinascidins are provided by ET-743, ET-729, ET-745, ET-759A, ET-759B, ET-759C, ET-770, ET-815, ET-731 , ET-745B, ET-722, ET-736, ET-738, ET-808, ET-752, ET-594, ET-552, ET-637, ET-652, ET-583, ET-597, ET-596, ET-639, ET-641 , and derivatives thereof, such as acetylated forms, formylated forms, methylated forms, and oxide forms.

The structural characterizations of such ecteinascidins are not given again explicitly herein because from the detailed description provided in such references and citations any person of ordinary skill in this technology is capable of obtaining such information directly from the sources cited here and related sources.

At least one of the ecteinascidin compounds, ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743), has been extensively studied, and it will be referred to

specifically herein to illustrate features of this invention. ET-743 is being employed as an anticancer medicament, under the international nonproprietary name (INN) trabectedin, for the treatment of patients with advanced and metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS), after failure of anthracyclines and ifosfamide, or who are unsuited to receive such agents, and for the treatment of relapsed platinum- sensitive ovarian cancer in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin.

ET-743 has a complex tris(tetrahydroisoquinoline) structure of formula

It was originally prepared by isolation from extracts of the marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata. The yield was low, and alternative preparative processes had been sought.

The first synthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in US Patent 5,721 ,362. This process employed sesamol as starting material and yielded ET-743 after a long and complicated sequence of 38 examples each describing one or more steps in the synthetic sequence.

An improvement in the preparation of one intermediate used in such process was disclosed in US Patent 6,815,544. Even with this improvement, the total synthesis was not suitable for manufacturing ET-743 at an industrial scale.

A hemisynthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in EP 1.185.536. This process employs cyanosafracin B as starting material to provide ET-743. Cyanosafracin B is a pentacyclic antibiotic obtained by fermentation from the bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens.

Cyanosafracin B

An improvement in such hemisynthetic process was disclosed in

EP 1.287.004.

To date four additional synthetic process (2 total and 2 formal synthesis) have been disclosed in patent applications JP 2003221395, WO 2007/045686, and WO 2007/087220 and in J. Org. Chem. 2008, 73, pages 9594-9600.

WO 2007/045686 also relates to the synthesis of Ecteinascidins-583 and 597 using intermediate compounds of formula:

Total synthesis strategies for the synthesis of the pentacyclic core -743 are overviewed in Figure I.

X = OH or CI

R = Protecting Group

WO2007087220 JOC 2008, 73, 9594-9600

EXAMPLE 3: SYNTHESIS OF COMPOUND 17.

Scheme X above provides an example of the synthesis of compound 17 from intermediate 10.

Compounds 16 and 17 are obtainable from intermediate 15 using the same procedures than those previously described in WO03/014127.

SYN

Reference:

1. WO2003014127A1.

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2003014127A1/en

The ecteinascidins are exceedingly potent antitumour agents isolated from the marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata. Several ecteinascidins have been reported previously in the patent and scientific literature. See, for example:

U.S. Patent No 5.256.663, which describes pharmaceutical compositions comprising matter extracted from the tropical marine invertebrate, Ecteinascidia turbinata, and designated therein as ecteinascidins, and the use of such compositions as antibacterial, antiviral, and/ or antitumour agents in mammals.

U.S. Patent No 5.089.273, which describes novel compositions of matter extracted from the tropical marine invertebrate, Ecteinascidia turbinata, and designated therein as ecteinascidins 729, 743, 745, 759A, 759B and 770. These compounds are useful as antibacterial and/or antitumour agents in mammals.

U.S. Patent No 5.149.804 which describes Ecteinascidins 722 and 736 (Et’s 722 and 736) isolated from the Caribbean tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata and their structures. Et’s 722 and 736 protect mice in vivo at very low concentrations against P388 lymphoma, B 16 melanoma, and Lewis lung carcinoma.

U.S. Patent No 5.478.932, which describes ecteinascidins isolated from the Caribbean tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata, which provide in vivo protection against P388 lymphoma, B 16 melanoma, M5076 ovarian sarcoma, Lewis lung carcinoma, and the LX- 1 human lung and MX- 1 human mammary carcinoma xenografts.

U.S. Patent No 5.654.426, which describes several ecteinascidins isolated from the Caribbean tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata, which provide in vivo protection against P388 lymphoma, B 16 melanoma, M5076 ovarian sarcoma, Lewis lung carcinoma, and the LX-1 human lung and MX- 1 human mammary carcinoma xenografts.

U.S. Patent No 5.721.362 which describes a synthetic process for the formation of ecteinascidin compounds and related structures.

U.S. Patent No 6.124.292 which describes a series of new ecteinascidin- like compounds.

WO 0177115, WO 0187894 and WO 0187895, which describe new synthetic compounds of the ecteinascidin series, their synthesis and biological properties.

See also: Corey, E.J., J. Am. Chem. Soc, 1996, 118 pp. 9202-9203; Rinehart, et al., Journal of Natural Products, 1990, “Bioactive Compounds from Aquatic and Terrestrial Sources”, vol. 53, pp. 771- 792; Rinehart et al., Pure and Appl. Chem., 1990, “Biologically active natural products”, vol 62, pp. 1277- 1280; Rinehart, et al., J. Org. Chem., 1990, “Ecteinascidins 729, 743, 745, 759A, 759B, and 770: potent Antitumour Agents from the Caribbean Tunicate Ecteinascidia tuminata”, vol. 55, pp. 4512-4515; Wright et al., J. Org. Chem., 1990, “Antitumour Tetrahydroisoquinoline Alkaloids from the Colonial ascidian Ecteinascidia turbinata”, vol. 55, pp. 4508-4512; Sakai et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1992, “Additional anitumor ecteinascidins from a Caribbean tunicate: Crystal structures and activities in vivo”, vol. 89, 1 1456- 1 1460; Science 1994, “Chemical Prospectors Scour the Seas for Promising Drugs”, vol. 266, pp.1324; Koenig, K.E., “Asymmetric Synthesis”, ed. Morrison, Academic Press, Inc., Orlando, FL, vol. 5, 1985, p. 71; Barton, et al., J. Chem Soc. Perkin Trans., 1 , 1982, “Synthesis and Properties of a Series of Sterically Hindered Guanidine bases”, pp. 2085; Fukuyama et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc, 1982, “Stereocontrolled Total Synthesis of (+)-Saframycin B”, vol. 104, pp. 4957; Fukuyama et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc, 1990, “Total Synthesis of (+) – Saframycin A”, vol. 112, p. 3712; Saito, et al., J. Org. Chem., 1989, “Synthesis of Saframycins. Preparation of a Key tricyclic Lactam Intermediate to Saframycin A”, vol. 54, 5391; Still, et al., J Org. Chem., 1978, “Rapid Chromatographic Technique for Preparative Separations with Moderate Resolution”, vol. 43, p. 2923; Kofron, W.G.; Baclawski, L.M., J. Org. Chem., 1976, vol. 41, 1879; Guan et al., J. Biomolec Struc & Dynam., vol. 10, pp. 793-817 (1993); Shamma et al., “Carbon- 13 NMR Shift Assignments of Amines and Alkaloids”, p. 206 (1979); Lown et al., Biochemistry, 21, 419-428 (1982); Zmijewski et al., Chem. Biol. Interactions, 52, 361-375 (1985); Ito, CRC Crit. Rev. Anal. Chem., 17, 65- 143 (1986); Rinehart et al., “Topics in Pharmaceutical Sciences 1989”, pp. 613-626, D. D. Breimer, D. J. A. Cromwelin, K. K. Midha, Eds., Amsterdam Medical Press B. V., Noordwijk, The Netherlands (1989); Rinehart et al., “Biological Mass Spectrometry”, 233-258 eds. Burlingame et al., Elsevier Amsterdam (1990); Guan et al., Jour. Biomolec. Struct. & Dynam., vol. 10 pp. 793-817 (1993); Nakagawa et al., J. Amer. Chem. Soc, 11 1 : 2721-2722 (1989);; Lichter et al., “Food and Drugs from the Sea Proceedings” (1972), Marine Technology Society, Washington, D.C. 1973, 117- 127; Sakai et al., J. Amer. Chem. Soc, 1996, 1 18, 9017; Garcϊa-Rocha et al., Brit. J. Cancer, 1996, 73: 875-883; and pommier et al., Biochemistry, 1996, 35: 13303- 13309;

In 2000, a hemisynthetic process for the formation of ecteinascidin compounds and related structures such as phthalascidin starting from natural bis(tetrahydroisoquinoline) alkaloids such as the saframycin and safracin antibiotics available from different culture broths was reported; See Manzanares et al., Org. Lett., 2000, “Synthesis of Ecteinascidin ET-743 and Phthalascidin Pt-650 from Cyanosafracin B”, Vol. 2, No 16, pp. 2545-2548; and International Patent Application WO 00 69862.

Ecteinascidin 736 was first discovered by Rinehart and features a tetrahydro-β-carboline unit in place of the tetrahydroisoquinoline unit more usually found in the ecteinascidin compounds isolated from natural sources; See for example Sakai et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 1992, “Additional antitumor ecteinascidins from a Caribbean tunicate: Crystal structures and activities in vivo”, vol. 89, 11456-11460.

Figure imgf000005_0001

Et-736

WO 9209607 claims ecteinascidin 736, as well as ecteinascidin 722 with hydrogen in place of methyl on the nitrogen common to rings C and D of ecteinascidin 736 and O-methylecteinascidin 736 with methoxy in place of hydroxy on ring C of ecteinascidin 736.

Despite the positive results obtained in clinical applications in chemotherapy, the search in the field of ecteinascidin compounds is still open to the identification of new compounds with optimal features of cytotoxicity and selectivity toward the tumour and with a reduced systemic toxicity and improved pharmacokinetic properties.

PATENT

WO2001087894A1.

PATENT

 US 20130066067

https://patents.google.com/patent/US20130066067A1/en

  • Ecteinascidins is a group of naturally occurring marine compounds and analogs thereof, which are well identified and structurally characterized, and are disclosed to have antibacterial and cytotoxic properties. See for example, European Patent 309.477; WO 03/66638; WO 03/08423; WO 01/77115; WO 03/014127; R. Sakai et al., 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, pages 11456-11460; R. Menchaca et al., 2003, J. Org. Chem. 68(23), pages 8859-8866; and I. Manzanares et al., 2001, Curr. Med. Chem. AntiCancer Agents, 1, pages 257-276; and references therein. Examples of ecteinascidins are provided by ET-743, ET-729, ET-745, ET-759A, ET-759B, ET-759C, ET-770, ET-815, ET-731, ET-745B, ET-722, ET-736, ET-738, ET-808, ET-752, ET-594, ET-552, ET-637, ET-652, ET-583, ET-597, ET-596, ET-639, ET-641, and derivatives thereof, such as acetylated forms, formylated forms, methylated forms, and oxide forms.
  • [0003]
    The structural characterizations of such ecteinascidins are not given again explicitly herein because from the detailed description provided in such references and citations any person of ordinary skill in this technology is capable of obtaining such information directly from the sources cited here and related sources.
  • [0004]
    At least one of the ecteinascidin compounds, ecteinascidin 743 (ET-743), has been extensively studied, and it will be referred to specifically herein to illustrate features of this invention. ET-743 is being employed as an anticancer medicament, under the international nonproprietary name (INN) trabectedin, for the treatment of patients with advanced and metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (STS), after failure of anthracyclines and ifosfamide, or who are unsuited to receive such agents, and for the treatment of relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin.
  • [0005]
    ET-743 has a complex tris(tetrahydroisoquinoline) structure of formula
  • [0006]
    It was originally prepared by isolation from extracts of the marine tunicate Ecteinascidia turbinata. The yield was low, and alternative preparative processes had been sought.
  • [0007]
    The first synthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,721,362. This process employed sesamol as starting material and yielded ET-743 after a long and complicated sequence of 38 examples each describing one or more steps in the synthetic sequence.
  • [0008]
    An improvement in the preparation of one intermediate used in such process was disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,815,544. Even with this improvement, the total synthesis was not suitable for manufacturing ET-743 at an industrial scale.
  • [0009]
    A hemisynthetic process for producing ecteinascidin compounds was described in EP 1.185.536. This process employs cyanosafracin B as starting material to provide ET-743. Cyanosafracin B is a pentacyclic antibiotic obtained by fermentation from the bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens.
  • [0010]
    An improvement in such hemisynthetic process was disclosed in EP 1.287.004.
  • [0011]
    To date four additional synthetic process (2 total and 2 formal synthesis) have been disclosed in patent applications JP 2003221395, WO 2007/045686, and WO 2007/087220 and in J. Org. Chem. 2008, 73, pages 9594-9600.
  • [0012]
    WO 2007/045686 also relates to the synthesis of Ecteinascidins-583 and 597 using intermediate compounds of formula:
  • [0013]
    Total synthesis strategies for the synthesis of the pentacyclic core of ET-743 are overviewed in FIG. 1.

PAPER

Angewandte Chemie, International Edition (2019), 58(12), 3972-3975.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/anie.201900035

An efficient and scalable approach is described for the total synthesis of the marine natural product Et‐743 and its derivative lubinectedin, which are valuable antitumor compounds. The method delivers 1.6 % overall yield in 26 total steps from Cbz‐protected (S)‐tyrosine. It features the use of a common advanced intermediate to create the right and left parts of these compounds, and a light‐mediated remote C−H bond activation to assemble a benzo[1,3]dioxole‐containing intermediate.

Synthesis of lactone SI-5. A mixture of 19 (98.0 mg, 0.16 mmol, 1.0 equiv), 2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl) ethanamine hydrochloride salt (357.8 mg, 1.58 mmol, 10.0 equiv) and NaOAc (144 mg, 1.74 mmol, 11.0 equiv) in anhydrous EtOH (5.0 mL) was stirred at 60 oC for 5 h. The cooled mixture was extracted with ethyl acetate, and the organic layer was dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated. The residue was purified by flash column chromatography (eluting with DCM/MeOH = 20:1) to afford compound SI-5 (109 mg, 87%). [α]𝐷 20 = -27.7 (c = 1.0, CHCl3). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.13 (d, J = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 6.82 (d, J = 2.2 Hz, 1H), 6.75 (dd, J = 8.8, 2.4 Hz, 1H), 6.66 (s, 1H), 6.22 (d, J = 1.0 Hz, 1H), 6.02 (d, J = 1.0 Hz, 1H), 5.78 (s, 1H), 5.08 (d, J = 11.7 Hz, 1H), 4.55 (s, 1H), 4.32 (s, 1H), 4.27 (d, J = 3.8 Hz, 1H), 4.23–4.15 (m, 2H), 3.81 (s, 3H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 3.47–3.39 (m, 2H), 3.20–3.10 (m, 1H), 3.06 (d, J = 18.1 Hz, 1H), 2.93 (dd, J = 18.2, 9.1 Hz, 1H), 2.86–2.76 (m, 1H), 2.62 (dt, J = 14.9, 4.8 Hz, 1H), 2.56–2.47 (m, 2H), 2.37 (s, 3H), 2.30–2.27 (m, 1H), 2.26 (s, 3H), 2.22 (s, 3H), 2.06 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 171.6, 168.8, 154.0, 148.2, 145.8, 143.1, 141.3, 140.5, 131.4, 130.8, 130.7, 129.4, 127.3, 120.9, 120.8, 118.4, 118.4, 113.9, 113.8, 112.2, 111.8, 110.2, 102.2, 100.5, 62.6, 61.4, 60.7, 60.5, 59.6, 59.6, 55.9, 54.9, 54.8, 42.1, 41.6, 39.9, 39.5, 29.5, 24.0, 20.8, 16.0, 9.9; HRMS (ESI) m/z calcd. for C42H43N5O9S [M + H]+ 794.2860, found 794.2858

Lurbinectedin: To a solution of SI-5 (80 mg, 0.1 mmol, 1.0 equiv) in acetonitrile and water (3:2, v/v, 10 mL) was added silver nitrate (514 mg, 3 mmol, 30.0 equiv). The suspension was stirred at 25 oC for 24 h before a mixture of saturated brine (5.0 mL) and saturated sodium hydrogen carbonate (5 mL) were added. The resultant mixture was stirred at 25 oC for 15 min before it was filtered through celite and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 × 20 mL). The combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated, and the residue was purified by flash column chromatography (eluting with DCM/MeOH = 20:1) to afford Lurbinectedin (71 mg, 89%). [α]𝐷 20 = -45.0 (c = 1.0, CHCl3) 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.13 (d, J = 8.8 Hz, 1H), 6.82 (d, J = 2.2 Hz, 1H), 6.74 (dd, J = 8.8, 2.4 Hz, 1H), 6.67 (s, 1H), 6.19 (d, J = 1.1 Hz, 1H), 5.99 (d, J = 1.1 Hz, 1H), 5.77 (br s, 1H), 5.20 (d, J = 11.3 Hz, 1H), 4.82 (s, 1H), 4.53–4.40 (m, 2H), 4.18–4.08 (m, 2H), 3.81 (s, 3H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 3.49 (d, J = 4.2 Hz, 1H), 3.24–3.13 (m, 2H), 3.01 (d, J = 17.9 Hz, 1H), 2.88–2.79 (m, 2H), 2.63 (dt, J = 15.0, 4.9 Hz, 1H), 2.56–2.47 (m, 2H), 2.37 (s, 3H), 2.32–2.27 (m, 1H), 2.26 (s, 3H), 2.19 (s, 3H), 2.05 (s, 3H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3) δ 171.4, 168.8, 153.8, 147.9, 145.5, 142.9, 141.1, 140.7, 131.8, 131.3, 130.7, 129.1, 127.3, 121.4, 121.0, 118.2, 115.6, 112.9, 111.9, 111.7, 110.0, 101.8, 100.4, 82.0, 62.4, 61.9, 60.4, 57.8, 57.5, 56.0, 55.8, 55.0, 42.2, 41.3, 39.8, 39.3, 29.3, 23.6, 20.6, 15.9, 9.7; HRMS (ESI) m/z calcd. for C41H44N4O10S [M – OH]+ 767.2745, found 767.2742.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e “Zepzelca- lurbinectedin injection, powder, lyophilized, for solution”DailyMed. 15 June 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d “Jazz Pharmaceuticals Announces U.S. FDA Accelerated Approval of Zepzelca (lurbinectedin) for the Treatment of Metastatic Small Cell Lung Cancer” (Press release). Jazz Pharmaceuticals. 15 June 2020. Retrieved 15 June 2020 – via PR Newswire.
  3. Jump up to:a b c d e f g “FDA grants accelerated approval to lurbinectedin for metastatic small”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 15 June 2020. Retrieved 16 June 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. Jump up to:a b “Lurbinectedin”National Cancer Institute. Retrieved 15 June 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  5. Jump up to:a b “Zepzelca: FDA-Approved Drugs”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  6. Jump up to:a b c d “Drug Trials Snapshots: Zepzelca”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 15 June 2020. Retrieved 28 June 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. ^ Takahashi, Ryoko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawano, Mahiru; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yuri; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kimura, Tadashi (17 March 2016). “Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary”PLOS ONE11 (3): e0151050. Bibcode:2016PLoSO..1151050Tdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0151050PMC 4795692PMID 26986199.
  8. ^ Total synthesis of marine antitumor agents trabectedin and lurbinectedin | https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190219111659.htm
  9. ^ A Scalable Total Synthesis of the Antitumor Agents Et‐743 and Lurbinectedin | https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/anie.201900035
  10. ^ PharmaMar presentation of Lurbinectedin’s Mechanism of Action Lurbinectedin Mechanisim of Action | https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8daELhxAXcQ
  11. ^ Qian BZ, Pollard JW (April 2010). “Macrophage diversity enhances tumor progression and metastasis”Cell141 (1): 39–51. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2010.03.014PMC 4994190PMID 20371344.
  12. ^ Engblom C, Pfirschke C, Pittet MJ (July 2016). “The role of myeloid cells in cancer therapies”. Nature Reviews. Cancer16 (7): 447–62. doi:10.1038/nrc.2016.54PMID 27339708S2CID 21924175.
  13. ^ “Lurbinectedin Orphan Drug Designation and Approval”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 1 August 2018. Retrieved 16 June 2020.
  14. Jump up to:a b Paz-Ares, Luis G.; Trigo Perez, Jose Manuel; Besse, Benjamin; Moreno, Victor; Lopez, Rafael; Sala, Maria Angeles; Ponce Aix, Santiago; Fernandez, Cristian Marcelo; Siguero, Mariano; Kahatt, Carmen Maria; Zeaiter, Ali Hassan; Zaman, Khalil; Boni, Valentina; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Martinez Aguillo, Maite; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Awada, Ahmad; Kristeleit, Rebecca Sophie; Olmedo Garcia, Maria Eugenia; Subbiah, Vivek (20 May 2019). “Efficacy and safety profile of lurbinectedin in second-line SCLC patients: Results from a phase II single-agent trial”. Journal of Clinical Oncology37 (15_suppl): 8506. doi:10.1200/JCO.2019.37.15_suppl.8506.
  15. Jump up to:a b Calvo, E.; Moreno, V.; Flynn, M.; Holgado, E.; Olmedo, M.E.; Lopez Criado, M.P.; Kahatt, C.; Lopez-Vilariño, J.A.; Siguero, M.; Fernandez-Teruel, C.; Cullell-Young, M.; Soto Matos-Pita, A.; Forster, M. (October 2017). “Antitumor activity of lurbinectedin (PM01183) and doxorubicin in relapsed small-cell lung cancer: results from a phase I study”Annals of Oncology28 (10): 2559–2566. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdx357PMC 5834091PMID 28961837Lay summary.
  16. ^ Farago, Anna F; Drapkin, Benjamin J; Lopez-Vilarino de Ramos, Jose Antonio; Galmarini, Carlos M; Núñez, Rafael; Kahatt, Carmen; Paz-Ares, Luis (January 2019). “ATLANTIS: a Phase III study of lurbinectedin/doxorubicin versus topotecan or cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine in patients with small-cell lung cancer who have failed one prior platinum-containing line”Future Oncology15 (3): 231–239. doi:10.2217/fon-2018-0597PMC 6331752PMID 30362375.

External links

FDA grants accelerated approval to lurbinectedin for metastatic small cell lung cancer

On June 15, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to lurbinectedin(ZEPZELCA, Pharma Mar S.A.) for adult patients with metastatic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.

Efficacy was demonstrated in the PM1183-B-005-14 trial (Study B-005; NCT02454972), a multicenter open-label, multi-cohort study enrolling 105 patients with metastatic SCLC who had disease progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients received lurbinectedin 3.2 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion every 21 days until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

The main efficacy outcome measures were confirmed overall response rate (ORR) determined by investigator assessment using RECIST 1.1 and response duration. Among the 105 patients, the ORR was 35% (95% CI: 26%, 45%), with a median response duration of 5.3 months (95% CI: 4.1, 6.4). The ORR as per independent review committee was 30% (95% CI: 22%, 40%) with a median response duration of 5.1 months (95% CI: 4.9, 6.4).

The most common adverse reactions (≥20%), including laboratory abnormalities, were myelosuppression, fatigue, increased creatinine, increased alanine aminotransferase, increased glucose, nausea, decreased appetite, musculoskeletal pain, decreased albumin, constipation, dyspnea, decreased sodium, increased aspartate aminotransferase, vomiting, cough, decreased magnesium and diarrhea.

The recommended lurbinectedin dose is 3.2 mg/m2 every 21 days.

View full prescribing information for ZEPZELCA.

This indication is approved under accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval for this indication may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

This review was conducted under Project Orbis, an initiative of the FDA Oncology Center of Excellence. Project Orbis provides a framework for concurrent submission and review of oncology drugs among international partners. For this application, a modified Project Orbis was undertaken because of the timing of submission to other regulatory agencies. FDA is collaborating with the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). FDA approved this application 2 months ahead of the goal date. The review is ongoing for the Australian TGA.

FDA granted lurbinectedin orphan drug  designation for the treatment of SCLC and priority review to this application. A description of FDA expedited programs is in the Guidance for Industry: Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions-Drugs and Biologics.

REFERENCES

1: Calvo E, Moreno V, Flynn M, Holgado E, Olmedo ME, Lopez Criado MP, Kahatt C, Lopez-Vilariño JA, Siguero M, Fernandez-Teruel C, Cullell-Young M, Soto Matos-Pita A, Forster M. Antitumor activity of lurbinectedin (PM01183) and doxorubicin in relapsed small-cell lung cancer: results from a phase I study. Ann Oncol. 2017 Oct 1;28(10):2559-2566. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdx357. PubMed PMID: 28961837.

2: Erba E, Romano M, Gobbi M, Zucchetti M, Ferrari M, Matteo C, Panini N, Colmegna B, Caratti G, Porcu L, Fruscio R, Perlangeli MV, Mezzanzanica D, Lorusso D, Raspagliesi F, D’Incalci M. Ascites interferes with the activity of lurbinectedin and trabectedin: Potential role of their binding to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. Biochem Pharmacol. 2017 Nov 15;144:52-62. doi: 10.1016/j.bcp.2017.08.001. Epub 2017 Aug 4. PubMed PMID: 28782526.

3: Belgiovine C, Bello E, Liguori M, Craparotta I, Mannarino L, Paracchini L, Beltrame L, Marchini S, Galmarini CM, Mantovani A, Frapolli R, Allavena P, D’Incalci M. Lurbinectedin reduces tumour-associated macrophages and the inflammatory tumour microenvironment in preclinical models. Br J Cancer. 2017 Aug 22;117(5):628-638. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2017.205. Epub 2017 Jul 6. PubMed PMID: 28683469; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5572168.

4: Jimeno A, Sharma MR, Szyldergemajn S, Gore L, Geary D, Diamond JR, Fernandez Teruel C, Soto Matos-Pita A, Iglesias JL, Cullell-Young M, Ratain MJ. Phase I study of lurbinectedin, a synthetic tetrahydroisoquinoline that inhibits activated transcription, induces DNA single- and double-strand breaks, on a weekly × 2 every-3-week schedule. Invest New Drugs. 2017 Aug;35(4):471-477. doi: 10.1007/s10637-017-0427-2. Epub 2017 Jan 20. PubMed PMID: 28105566.

5: Paz-Ares L, Forster M, Boni V, Szyldergemajn S, Corral J, Turnbull S, Cubillo A, Teruel CF, Calderero IL, Siguero M, Bohan P, Calvo E. Phase I clinical and pharmacokinetic study of PM01183 (a tetrahydroisoquinoline, Lurbinectedin) in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors. Invest New Drugs. 2017 Apr;35(2):198-206. doi: 10.1007/s10637-016-0410-3. Epub 2016 Nov 21. PubMed PMID: 27873130.

6: Harlow ML, Maloney N, Roland J, Guillen Navarro MJ, Easton MK, Kitchen-Goosen SM, Boguslawski EA, Madaj ZB, Johnson BK, Bowman MJ, D’Incalci M, Winn ME, Turner L, Hostetter G, Galmarini CM, Aviles PM, Grohar PJ. Lurbinectedin Inactivates the Ewing Sarcoma Oncoprotein EWS-FLI1 by Redistributing It within the Nucleus. Cancer Res. 2016 Nov 15;76(22):6657-6668. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-0568. Epub 2016 Oct 3. PubMed PMID: 27697767; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5567825.

7: Céspedes MV, Guillén MJ, López-Casas PP, Sarno F, Gallardo A, Álamo P, Cuevas C, Hidalgo M, Galmarini CM, Allavena P, Avilés P, Mangues R. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models. Dis Model Mech. 2016 Dec 1;9(12):1461-1471. Epub 2016 Oct 20. PubMed PMID: 27780828; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5200894.

8: Santamaría Nuñez G, Robles CM, Giraudon C, Martínez-Leal JF, Compe E, Coin F, Aviles P, Galmarini CM, Egly JM. Lurbinectedin Specifically Triggers the Degradation of Phosphorylated RNA Polymerase II and the Formation of DNA Breaks in Cancer Cells. Mol Cancer Ther. 2016 Oct;15(10):2399-2412. Epub 2016 Sep 14. PubMed PMID: 27630271.

9: Metaxas Y, Cathomas R, Mark M, von Moos R. Combination of cisplatin and lurbinectedin as palliative chemotherapy in progressive malignant pleural mesothelioma: Report of two cases. Lung Cancer. 2016 Dec;102:136-138. doi: 10.1016/j.lungcan.2016.07.012. Epub 2016 Jul 14. PubMed PMID: 27440191.

10: Lima M, Bouzid H, Soares DG, Selle F, Morel C, Galmarini CM, Henriques JA, Larsen AK, Escargueil AE. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair. Oncotarget. 2016 May 3;7(18):25885-901. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.8292. PubMed PMID: 27029031; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5041952.

11: Takahashi R, Mabuchi S, Kawano M, Sasano T, Matsumoto Y, Kuroda H, Kozasa K, Hashimoto K, Sawada K, Kimura T. Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary. PLoS One. 2016 Mar 17;11(3):e0151050. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151050. eCollection 2016. PubMed PMID: 26986199; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4795692.

12: Pernice T, Bishop AG, Guillen MJ, Cuevas C, Aviles P. Development of a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry assay for the quantification of PM01183 (lurbinectedin), a novel antineoplastic agent, in mouse, rat, dog, Cynomolgus monkey and mini-pig plasma. J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2016 May 10;123:37-41. doi: 10.1016/j.jpba.2016.01.043. Epub 2016 Jan 21. PubMed PMID: 26871278.

13: Elez ME, Tabernero J, Geary D, Macarulla T, Kang SP, Kahatt C, Pita AS, Teruel CF, Siguero M, Cullell-Young M, Szyldergemajn S, Ratain MJ. First-in-human phase I study of Lurbinectedin (PM01183) in patients with advanced solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Apr 15;20(8):2205-14. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-13-1880. Epub 2014 Feb 21. PubMed PMID: 24563480.

14: Romano M, Frapolli R, Zangarini M, Bello E, Porcu L, Galmarini CM, García-Fernández LF, Cuevas C, Allavena P, Erba E, D’Incalci M. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo biological effects of trabectedin, lurbinectedin (PM01183) and Zalypsis® (PM00104). Int J Cancer. 2013 Nov;133(9):2024-33. doi: 10.1002/ijc.28213. Epub 2013 May 25. PubMed PMID: 23588839.

15: Vidal A, Muñoz C, Guillén MJ, Moretó J, Puertas S, Martínez-Iniesta M, Figueras A, Padullés L, García-Rodriguez FJ, Berdiel-Acer M, Pujana MA, Salazar R, Gil-Martin M, Martí L, Ponce J, Molleví DG, Capella G, Condom E, Viñals F, Huertas D, Cuevas C, Esteller M, Avilés P, Villanueva A. Lurbinectedin (PM01183), a new DNA minor groove binder, inhibits growth of orthotopic primary graft of cisplatin-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 2012 Oct 1;18(19):5399-411. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-12-1513. Epub 2012 Aug 15. PubMed PMID: 22896654.

Clinical data
PronunciationLOOR-bih-NEK-teh-din
Trade namesZepzelca
Other namesPM-01183
AHFS/Drugs.comProfessional Drug Facts
MedlinePlusa620049
License dataUS DailyMedLurbinectedin
Pregnancy
category
US: N (Not classified yet)
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
Drug classAntineoplastic agent
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusUS: ℞-only [1]
Identifiers
IUPAC name[show]
CAS Number497871-47-3
PubChem CID57327016
DrugBank12674
ChemSpider32701856
UNII2CN60TN6ZS
KEGGD11644
ChEMBLChEMBL4297516
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)DTXSID30198065 
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC41H44N4O10S
Molar mass784.88 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)Interactive image
SMILES[hide]CC1=CC2=C([C@@H]3[C@@H]4[C@H]5C6=C(C(=C7C(=C6[C@@H](N4[C@H]([C@H](C2)N3C)O)COC(=O)[C@@]8(CS5)C9=C(CCN8)C2=C(N9)C=CC(=C2)OC)OCO7)C)OC(=O)C)C(=C1OC)O
InChI[hide]InChI=1S/C41H44N4O10S/c1-17-11-20-12-25-39(48)45-26-14-52-40(49)41(38-22(9-10-42-41)23-13-21(50-5)7-8-24(23)43-38)15-56-37(31(45)30(44(25)4)27(20)32(47)33(17)51-6)29-28(26)36-35(53-16-54-36)18(2)34(29)55-19(3)46/h7-8,11,13,25-26,30-31,37,39,42-43,47-48H,9-10,12,14-16H2,1-6H3/t25-,26-,30+,31+,37+,39-,41+/m0/s1Key:YDDMIZRDDREKEP-HWTBNCOESA-N

//////////lurbinectedin,  FDA 2020, 2020 APPROVALS, ORPHAN, priority review , ZEPZELCA, Pharma Mar, PM-1183, PM 1183, PM 01183, лурбинектедин , لوربينيكتيدين  , 芦比替定

Cc1cc2c(c(c1OC)O)[C@@H]3[C@@H]4[C@H]5c6c(c7c(c(c6OC(=O)C)C)OCO7)[C@@H](N4[C@H]([C@H](C2)N3C)O)COC(=O)[C@@]8(CS5)c9c(c1cc(ccc1[nH]9)OC)CCN8


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DR ANTHONY CRASTO

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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