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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK LIFE SCIENCES LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 PLUS year tenure till date June 2021, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 90 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, 233 countries, 7 continents, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 33 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 233 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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Tisotumab vedotin


Pipeline – Tisotumab Vedotin – Seagen
A first-in-human antibody–drug conjugate: Hope for patients with advanced solid tumours? | Immunopaedia

Tisotumab vedotin

チソツマブベドチン (遺伝子組換え)Immunoglobulin G1, anti-(human blood-coagulation factor III) (human monoclonal HuMax-TF heavy chain), disulfide with human monoclonal HuMax-TF κ-chain, dimer, tetrakis(thioether) with N-[[[4-[[N-[6-(3-mercapto-2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxohexyl]-L-valyl-N5-(aminocarbonyl)-L-ornithyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]carbonyl]-N-methyl-L-valyl-N-[(1S,2R)-4-[(2S)-2-[(1R,2R)-3-[[(1R,2S)-2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl]amino]-1-methoxy-2-methyl-3-oxopropyl]-1-pyrrolidinyl]-2-methoxy-1-[(1S)-1-methylpropyl]-4-oxobutyl]-N-methyl-L-valinamide 

  • HuMax-TF-ADC
  • Immunoglobulin G1, anti-(human tissue factor) (human monoclonal HuMax-TF heavy chain), disulfide with human monoclonal HuMax-TF κ-chain, dimer, tetrakis(thioether) with N-[[[4-[[N-[6-(3-mercapto-2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxohexyl]-L-valyl-N5-(aminocarbonyl)-L-ornithyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]carbonyl]-N-methyl-L-valyl-N-[(1S,2R)-4-[(2S)-2-[(1R,2R)-3-[[(1R,2S)-2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl]amino]-1-methoxy-2-methyl-3-oxopropyl]-1-pyrrolidinyl]-2-methoxy-1-[(1S)-1-methylpropyl]-4-oxobutyl]-N-methyl-L-valinamide

Protein Sequence

Sequence Length: 1324, 448, 448, 214, 214multichain; modified (modifications unspecified)

FormulaC6418H9906N1710O2022S44.(C68H106N11O15)n
EfficacyAntineoplastic
  DiseaseCervical cancer
CommentAntibody-drug conjugateCAS:1418731-10-8
  • HuMax-TF-ADC
  • Tisotumab vedotin
  • Tisotumab vedotin [WHO-DD]
  • UNII-T41737F88A
  • WHO 10148

US FDA APPROVED 2021/9/20 , TIVDAK

25 Great American USA Animated Flags Gifs

FDA grants accelerated approval to tisotumab vedotin-tftv for recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer………..  https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resources-information-approved-drugs/fda-grants-accelerated-approval-tisotumab-vedotin-tftv-recurrent-or-metastatic-cervical-cancer

On September 20, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to tisotumab vedotin-tftv (Tivdak, Seagen Inc.), a tissue factor-directed antibody and microtubule inhibitor conjugate, for adult patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer with disease progression on or after chemotherapy.

Approval was based on innovaTV 204, an open-label, multicenter, single-arm clinical trial (NCT03438396). Efficacy was evaluated in 101 patients with recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer who had received no more than two prior systemic regimens in the recurrent or metastatic setting, including at least one prior platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Sixty-nine percent of patients had received bevacizumab as part of prior systemic therapy. Patients received tisotumab vedotin-tftv 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

The main efficacy outcome measures were confirmed objective response rate (ORR) as assessed by an independent review committee (IRC) using RECIST v1.1 and duration of response (DOR). The ORR was 24% (95% CI: 15.9%, 33.3%) with a median response duration of 8.3 months (95% CI: 4.2, not reached).

The most common adverse reactions (≥25%), including laboratory abnormalities, were hemoglobin decreased, fatigue, lymphocytes decreased, nausea, peripheral neuropathy, alopecia, epistaxis, conjunctival adverse reactions, hemorrhage, leukocytes decreased, creatinine increased, dry eye, prothrombin international normalized ratio increased, activated partial thromboplastin time prolonged, diarrhea, and rash. Product labeling includes a boxed warning for ocular toxicity.

The recommended dose is 2 mg/kg (up to a maximum of 200 mg for patients ≥100 kg) given as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

View full prescribing information for Tivdak.

This review used the Assessment Aid, a voluntary submission from the applicant to facilitate the FDA’s assessment.

This application was granted priority review. A description of FDA expedited programs is in the Guidance for Industry: Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions-Drugs and Biologics.

A fully human monoclonal antibody specific for tissue factor conjugated to the microtubule-disrupting agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) via a protease-cleavable valine-citrulline linker.

Tisotumab vedotin, sold under the brand name Tivdak is a human monoclonal antibody used to treat cervical cancer.[1]

Tisotumab vedotin was approved for medical use in the United States in September 2021.[1][2]

Tisotumab vedotin is the international nonproprietary name (INN).[3]

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References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2021/761208s000lbl.pdf
  2. ^ “Seagen and Genmab Announce FDA Accelerated Approval for Tivdak (tisotumab vedotin-tftv) in Previously Treated Recurrent or Metastatic Cervical Cancer”. Seagen. 20 September 2021. Retrieved 20 September 2021 – via Business Wire.
  3. ^ World Health Organization (2016). “International nonproprietary names for pharmaceutical substances (INN): recommended INN: list 75”. WHO Drug Information30 (1): 159–60. hdl:10665/331046.

External links

Monoclonal antibody
TypeWhole antibody
SourceHuman
TargetTissue factor (TF)
Clinical data
Trade namesTivdak
Other namesTisotumab vedotin-tftv
License dataUS DailyMedTisotumab_vedotin
Pregnancy
category
Contraindicated[1]
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
Drug classAntineoplastic
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusUS: ℞-only [1]
Identifiers
CAS Number1418731-10-8
UNIIT41737F88A
KEGGD11814

//////////Tisotumab vedotin, チソツマブベドチン (遺伝子組換え) , FDA 2021, APPROVALS 2021, Antineoplastic, CERVICAL CANCER, CANCER, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, UNII-T41737F88A, WHO 10148

Bimekizumab


Heavy chain)
EVQLVESGGG LVQPGGSLRL SCAASGFTFS DYNMAWVRQA PGKGLEWVAT ITYEGRNTYY
RDSVKGRFTI SRDNAKNSLY LQMNSLRAED TAVYYCASPP QYYEGSIYRL WFAHWGQGTL
VTVSSASTKG PSVFPLAPSS KSTSGGTAAL GCLVKDYFPE PVTVSWNSGA LTSGVHTFPA
VLQSSGLYSL SSVVTVPSSS LGTQTYICNV NHKPSNTKVD KKVEPKSCDK THTCPPCPAP
ELLGGPSVFL FPPKPKDTLM ISRTPEVTCV VVDVSHEDPE VKFNWYVDGV EVHNAKTKPR
EEQYNSTYRV VSVLTVLHQD WLNGKEYKCK VSNKALPAPI EKTISKAKGQ PREPQVYTLP
PSRDELTKNQ VSLTCLVKGF YPSDIAVEWE SNGQPENNYK TTPPVLDSDG SFFLYSKLTV
DKSRWQQGNV FSCSVMHEAL HNHYTQKSLS LSPGK
(Light chain)
AIQLTQSPSS LSASVGDRVT ITCRADESVR TLMHWYQQKP GKAPKLLIYL VSNSEIGVPD
RFSGSGSGTD FRLTISSLQP EDFATYYCQQ TWSDPWTFGQ GTKVEIKRTV AAPSVFIFPP
SDEQLKSGTA SVVCLLNNFY PREAKVQWKV DNALQSGNSQ ESVTEQDSKD STYSLSSTLT
LSKADYEKHK VYACEVTHQG LSSPVTKSFN RGEC
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H96, H152-H208, H228-L214, H234-H’234, H237-H’237, H269-H329, H375-H433, H’22-H’96, H’152-H’208, H’228-L’214, H’269-H’329, H’375-H’433, L23-L88, L134-L194, L’23-L’88, L’134-L’194)

Bimekizumab

ビメキズマブ (遺伝子組換え)

UCB 4940

FormulaC6552H10132N1750O2029S42
CAS1418205-77-2
Mol weight147227.7921

EU APPROVED, 2021/8/20, Bimzelx

Immunoglobulin G1, anti-​(human interleukin 17A​/interleukin 17F) (human-​Rattus norvegicus monoclonal UCB4940 heavy chain)​, disulfide with human-​Rattus norvegicus monoclonal UCB4940 light chain, dimer

Protein Sequence

Sequence Length: 1338, 455, 455, 214, 214multichain; modified (modifications unspecified)

Product details
NameBimzelx
Agency product numberEMEA/H/C/005316
Active substanceBimekizumab
International non-proprietary name (INN) or common namebimekizumab
Therapeutic area (MeSH)Psoriasis
Anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) codeL04AC

Bimzelx 160 mg solution for injection in pre-filled syringe Bimzelx 160 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen

The active substance in Bimzelx, bimekizumab, is a monoclonal antibody, a protein designed to attach to interleukins IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-17AF, which are messenger molecules in the body’s immune system (the body’s natural defences). High levels of these interleukins have been shown to be involved in developing inflammatory diseases caused by the immune system, such as plaque psoriasis. By attaching to these interleukins, bimekizumab prevents them from interacting with their receptors (targets) on the surface of the epidermis (outer layer of the skin), which reduces inflammation and improves the symptoms related to plaque psoriasis.,,, https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/overview/bimzelx-epar-medicine-overview_en.pdf

Antipsoriatic, Anti-IL-17A/IL-17F antibody, Monoclonal antibody
Treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Bimekizumab, sold under the brand name Bimzelx, is a humanized anti-IL17A, anti-IL-17F, and anti-IL17AF monoclonal antibody[1][2] that is used to treat plaque psoriasis.[1]

The most common side effects include upper respiratory tract infections (nose and throat infection) and oral candidiasis (thrush, a fungal infection in the mouth or throat).[1]

Bimekizumab was approved for medical use in the European Union in August 2021.[1][3]

Drug: bimekizumab
Company: UCB
Used for: psoriasis
Est. 2026 sales: $1.63 billion

Monoclonal antibody treatments for psoriasis are stacking up—but UCB hopes to muscle into the market with bimekizumab this year. The anti-IL-17A and IL-17F injection showed up both Johnson & Johnson’s Stelara and Novartis blockbuster Cosentyx in trials.

UCB’s Stelara head-to-head, the Be Vivid study presented in June at the American Academy of Dermatology and later published in The Lancet,  found 85% of bimekizumab patients had a 90% or greater reduction in the area and severity of their psoriasis symptoms at 16 weeks. Complete skin clearance, indicated by a score of PASI 100, happened in 59% of patients.

Stelara, for its part, helped just half of patients reach PASI 90 and 21% achieve complete skin clearance over the same time period.

That Be Vivid readout raised expectations of a potentially favorable outcome in UCB’s head-to-head study with Novartis blockbuster Cosentyx (secukinumab), called Be Radiant.

RELATED: UCB’s bimekizumab blows J&J’s Stelara away in phase 3, raising expectations for Cosentyx showdown

In July, UCB announced that in that phase 3 study, its candidate had “demonstrate(d) superiority to secukinumab for complete skin clearance at both weeks 16 and 48.” The full study results will be presented “in due course,” UCB promised.

The data from the Cosentyx trial could be worth a lot to UCB, Evaluate wrote in June, adding that Jefferies analysts at the time expected annual sales of bimekizumab to top out around $1.5 billion. If bimekizumab beats Cosentyx, the sales forecast could rise to above $2 billion, it said at the time.

Without specific Cosentyx-topping data from the Be Radiant study in hand, Evaluate pegs consensus sales estimates at $1.63 billion in 2026.

One concern for UCB is whether the smaller pharma will be able to compete with the big marketing budgets in psoriasis. AbbVie’s Skyrizi and Humira, Novartis’ Cosentyx, Eli Lilly’s Taltz and Amgen’s Otezla are just a handful of the psoriasis drugs that have spent millions on mainstream TV ads to build brand names.

RELATED: DiCE scores $80M to roll oral IL-17 psoriasis med into the clinic

In September, the FDA and EMA accepted UCB’s biologics license application (BLA) for bimekizumab for adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, the company reported. Ongoing phase 3 trials are evaluating the drug to treat a variety of other conditions, including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis and hidradenitis suppurativa.

In the meantime, more competition is on the way. South San Francisco biotech DiCE Molecules, for its part, last month nabbed new funding to the tune of $80 million to roll its oral small molecule IL-17 program into a clinical trial in psoriasis and build out preclinical programs.

In addition to IL-17 rivals, others are also looking to get in on the action—particularly, several TYK2 inhibitors. Bristol Myers Squibb’s deucravacitinib recently bested Otezla in a study, while both Pfizer and Nimbus Therapeutics are in phase 2 studies with prospects of their own.

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a complex and heterogeneous inflammatory disease that affects 20% to 30% of patients with psoriasis and is associated with substantial disability, impaired quality of life (QoL), and several comorbidities.1–3 It involves diverse clinical domains that extend beyond musculoskeletal manifestations (peripheral and axial arthritis, enthesitis and dactylitis): eg, nails, gut, and eyes, in addition to latent or manifest psoriasis.

Although there is still a huge gap in knowledge on the pathophysiology of PsA, what is known has fortunately turned into new treatment approaches that have improved symptoms and outcomes for PsA patients over the last two decades. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have been recognized as potential treatment targets in inflammatory diseases and have led to the creation of a number of anti-cytokine monoclonal antibodies that have revolutionized its treatment, such as TNFα and IL-12/23 inhibitors.4 More recently, the IL-17 pathway has been shown to play an important role in the pathophysiology of psoriatic disease and its blockage has shown to be clinically beneficial, as demonstrated with IL-17A inhibitors secukinumab and ixekizumab.4 Some patients, however, still do not respond, stop responding over time or suffer from side effects, leading to drug discontinuation, and other times combination strategies are required to control all PsA’s disease domains. Thus, there is still a great need for novel therapeutic options.5

Dual inhibitor antibodies target two different cytokines simultaneously potentially offering a better disease control. Interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F share structural homology and have a similar biologic function. IL-17A is classically considered to be the most biologically active, but recent studies have shown that IL-17F is also increased in psoriatic skin and synovial cell in psoriatic arthritis, supporting the rationale for targeting both IL-17A and IL-17F in psoriatic disease. Bimekizumab is the first-in-class monoclonal antibody designed to simultaneously target IL-17A and IL-17F.

Medical uses

Bimekizumab is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adults who are candidates for systemic therapy.[1]

History

This drug is being developed by Belgian pharmaceutical UCB. Phase III trials have demonstrated that bimekizumab is superior to not only adalimumab[4] but also secukinumab[5] for the treatment of plaque psoriasis.

Names

Bimekizumab is the international nonproprietary name (INN).[6]

The Role of Interleukin (IL)‑17A and IL‑17F in Psoriatic Arthritis

The IL-17 cytokine family comprises six different members (from A to F), of which IL-17A is the most studied. Known to be produced by a wide range of immune cells, IL-17A is involved in the pathophysiology of several inflammatory diseases including spondyloarthritis.6–8

Most non-hematopoietic cells possess IL-17 receptors, including fibroblasts, epithelial cells and synoviocytes,8 but despite this ubiquitous presence, IL-17 seems to have only moderate inflammatory capability per se, rather recruiting and amplifying other pathways, such as IL-6, IL-8, TNF and inflammatory-cell attracting chemokines.6,7,9,10

Still, evidence supporting the centrality of the IL-17 pathway in both PsO and PsA is available from a wide range of data.11 Th17 cells, IL-17 protein and related genes are elevated in both skin, blood and synovial fluid of PsO and PsA patients.11,12 In PsA, increased levels of IL-17+ CD4 and CD813,14, as well as IL-17A+Tγδ cells, have been found in the synovial fluid compared with peripheral blood. Specifically, the levels of IL-17+CD8+ cells in the synovial fluid distinguish PsA from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and correlate with increased DAS28 scores, C-reactive protein levels, power-doppler findings of activity and prevalence of erosions.13 Inhibition of this pathway is capable of normalizing almost four times more disease-related genes than anti-TNFα treatments.11,15

Within the entire IL-17 family, IL-17F is the most structurally homologous (~50%) to IL-17A8 (Figure 1). They can both be secreted as homodimers (ie IL-17A/A or IL-17F/F) or as heterodimers of IL-17A/IL-17F,9 sharing signaling pathways through the same heterodimeric complex of IL-17 receptors A and C (IL-RA/RC) and biologic function.7–9

Figure 1 Summarized schematic of inhibition of the IL-17 cytokine family. *Not approved for psoriatic arthritis. Notes: Reprinted by permission from Springer Nature Customer Service Centre GmbH: Springer Nature, BioDrugs, Reis J, Vender R, Torres T. Bimekizumab: the first dual inhibitor of interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F for the treatment of psoriatic disease and ankylosing spondylitis, COPYRIGHT 2019.6Abbreviations: IL, interleukin; IL-17RA, IL-17 receptor A; IL-17RB, IL-17 receptor B; IL-17RC, IL-17 receptor C; IL-17RE, IL-17 receptor E.

The role of both IL-17A and F in psoriasis pathogenesis has been previously addressed.6,9,16

In enthesitis, a central pathologic process in PsA, Tγδ cells have recently been described that are capable of producing both IL-17A and IL-17F even independently of IL-23 stimulation.17 IL-17A and F had already been shown to promote osteogenic differentiation in in vitro models of human periosteum activated through the use of Th17 and Tγδ cells or through culture with serum from patients with ankylosing spondylitis,18 a mechanism potentially implied in the development of enthesitis. Importantly, both cytokines seem to be equipotent in this role, unlike in inflammatory processes where IL-17F seems to be less potent.18

Both IL-17A and IL-17F, when synergized with TNF, lead to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-8 and IL-6 in synoviocytes of PsA patients.9 IL-17A seems to be the most pro-inflammatory of the two cytokines.9,19 However, despite some inconsistencies in the literature regarding IL-17F detection levels which might be attributable to differences in methodology,19 IL-17F levels have been reported to be 30–50 times higher in some cytokine microenvironments, such as in psoriatic skin lesions of PsA patients20 or the synovium,21 which might dilute differences in relative potency. Additionally, IL-17F seems to be significantly increased in the synovium of PsA compared to osteoarthritis (OA) patients, unlike IL-17A.21 Dual neutralization of both IL-17A and IL-17F (using bimekizumab) resulted in greater downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production than a single blockade in synovial fibroblasts.9,19 Critically, in in vitro models, anti-TNF blockade alone did not reduce the production of IL-8 as much as both IL-17A and F neutralization or even just anti-IL17A alone.9,19 In in vitro models of human periosteum dual blockade of IL-17A and F was also more effective in suppressing osteogenic differentiation than the blockade of either cytokine individually.18

Interestingly, in Tγδ cells, the predominant IL-17 production seems to be the F subtype.18 Also of note is the recent description that the IL-17receptorC (IL-17RC) competes with IL-17RA for IL-17F, IL-17A and IL-17A/F heterodimers,22 suggesting the possibility of IL-17RA-independent signaling pathways (and thus not targeted by brodalumab, an anti-IL17RA monoclonal antibody).

Bimekizumab

Bimekizumab is a humanized monoclonal IgG1 antibody that selectively neutralizes both IL-17A and IL-17F. In in vitro models, bimekizumab appears to be as potent as ixekizumab at inhibiting IL-17A (also more potent than secukinumab)8 but, unlike those drugs, also possesses the unique ability to inhibit IL-17F as well, functioning as a dual inhibitor. Unlike brodalumab, an IL-17 receptor A blocker – which targets not only IL-17A and F signaling but also IL-17 C, D and E – bimekizumab spares IL-17E (also known as IL-25), for example, which is believed to have anti-inflammatory properties.6

Bimekizumab demonstrates dose-proportional linear pharmacokinetics, with a half-life ranging from 17 to 26 days, and its distribution is restricted to the extravascular compartment.23 Currently, bimekizumab is in advanced clinical development for psoriasis, but also for psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis (both currently in phase III).

Bimekizumab in PsA – Efficacy

Phase I

The first bimekizumab clinical trial in PsA was a phase Ib randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial that included 53 patients (39 treated with bimekizumab, 14 with placebo) with active psoriatic arthritis who had failed conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and/or one biologic DMARD. Patients in the active treatment arm were randomized to four different treatment regimens of varying loading doses (ranging from 80 to 560 mg) and maintenance doses (from 40 to 320 mg) at weeks 0, 3 and 6. Patients were followed for up to 20 weeks.9

Patients treated with bimekizumab had a faster response, compared to placebo. This was first detected at week two, with maximal or near-maximal responses maintained up to week 20, for both arthritis and skin psoriasis. ACR20, 50 and 70 responses were maximal at week 8 (80%), week 12 (57%) and week 16 (37%), respectively. For patients with skin involvement, PASI75 and PASI100 responses at week 8 were 100% and 87%, respectively (Table 1).

Table 1 Results from Published Trials Involving Bimekizumab in Psoriatic Arthritis

Phase II

BE ACTIVE10 was a 48-week multicentric, international, phase 2b dose-ranging, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of bimekizumab. Two hundred and six adult patients (out of 308 screened) with active (tender and swollen count >3) PsA (diagnosed according to CASPAR criteria) were enrolled in 5 treatment arms (placebo, 16 mg, 160 mg with single 320 mg loading dose, 160 mg, 320 mg bimekizumab dose, with SC injections every 4 weeks). Concurrent use of TNF inhibitors was not permitted but conventional DMARDs (if on a stable dose and kept throughout the study), corticosteroids (equal or less 10mg/day) and NSAIDs were allowed. Sixteen-milligram bimekizumab (a much lower dose than other treatment arms) was tested with a programmed re-randomization at week 12 to either 160 or 320 mg dosing (meaning no placebo arm after 12 weeks). All patients received treatment up to week 48.

The primary outcome was ACR50 response at 12 weeks, a much more stringent outcome than used for other IL-17 inhibitors. The prespecified analysis was not possible due to the absence of a statistically significant difference versus placebo for the 320 mg group at week 12. All other outcomes were thus considered exploratory, rendering this a failed primary endpoint with no active comparator group.

At 12 weeks, significant ACR50 responses were present for every bimekizumab group, although lower in both the 16 mg and 320 mg dose group (Table 1 reports average values for all bimekizumab treatment groups). The 160 mg dosing had the greatest ACR and PASI response rates. These were confirmed to be increasing response rates up to week 24 and stability thereafter up to week 48, where the results of both 160 and 320 mg were similar. There were also responses in PASI scores, enthesitis, HAQ-DI and SF-36 across all bimekizumab doses. There was no loss of efficacy by week 48.

At the recent American College of Rheumatology (ACR) congress, additional data on BE ACTIVE were reported. BASDAI scoring was improved on the 93 patients in the treatment arm (160–320 mg bimekizumab) who had a baseline score >4 (mean 6.2 ± 1.42). BASDAI50 response rates were 43% and 56% at week 12 and 48, respectively.24

Regarding patient-reported outcomes (PROs), the Health assessment questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and the psoriatic arthritis impact of disease-9 (PsAID-9) questionnaire developed specifically to assess health-related quality of life (QoL) in PsA were used on 206 patients from the BE ACTIVE trial. Rapid improvement was registered by week 12 and this response was sustained up to 48 weeks. Better QoL was associated with the better clinical outcomes reported in that study.25,26

Open-Label Extension Study (OLE)

Results from the 108 weeks of follow-up in the open-label extension study of BE ACTIVE (BE ACTIVE2, NCT03347110) have been recently presented.27,28 All patients who completed all 48 weeks of the BE ACTIVE trial were enrolled and switched to the 160 mg dosing regardless of previous treatment dose regimen. Over 108 weeks (an additional 60 weeks of OLE study over the 48 of the original BE ACTIVE trial) there was a 66.7% and 75.4% ACR 50 and body surface area (BSA) 0% response, respectively. Dactylitis and enthesitis were also significantly improved completely resolving in 65.9% and 77.9% of patients, respectively.27 Regarding week 12 responders, ACR20/50/70 and BSA 0% responses were maintained until week 108 in 80/78/81% and 72%, respectively.27 MDA/VLDA responses and DAPSA remission were maintained by 81/72/76% of Week 12 responders, respectively, to Week 120 (MDA/VLDA), and Week 108 (DAPSA remission).

Bimekizumab in PsA – Safety

Phase I

Over 90% of reported adverse events, in both arms, were mild or moderate. In the treatment arm, two fungal infections (oropharyngeal and vulvovaginal candidiasis) were reported, both treated with oral medication. There was no increased incidence of other infections. There were no deaths or severe adverse events resulting from treatment, and no patient discontinued bimekizumab.9

Phase II

No difference was found in the frequency of adverse events between placebo and treatment arms by week 12 in the BE ACTIVE trial. After reallocation (after week 12) and up to the 48 weeks of the trial 151 (74%) of the total 204 patients who ever received bimekizumab reported some AE (exposure adjusted incidence rate 166.8/100 patient-years). Most AE were mild or moderate (the most frequently reported were nasopharyngitis and upper respiratory tract infections) and there was no direct association with bimekizumab dose.

Nine patients (8 of which received bimekizumab) had serious adverse effects. These included one patient with drug-induced liver injury. Another patient also had severe liver enzyme elevation. Both had been given the 320 mg dosing. From the hepatic point of view, the other 11 patients were noted to have increased liver enzymes (>3x ULN). There was no relation with bimekizumab dose, and most were on DMARDs and one was on TB prophylaxis. At least two serious adverse events were related to infections across the entire study period (28 weeks) – 1 hepatitis E infection, 1 cellulitis (both with the 160 mg dosing). Non-severe Candida infection was reported in 7% of the patients, none led to treatment discontinuation. Other serious AEs reported were melanoma in situ (160 mg), suicidal ideation (160 mg loading dose), and neutropenia (320 mg dosing) (only in one patient each).10 In summary, this safety profile overlaps with those of other anti-IL17 therapies.29

In the OLE study, at week 108, serious adverse events occurred in 9.3% of patients (no deaths or major adverse cardiac events) and a total of 8.8% of patients withdrew from the study due to side effects. Full publication is still pending but the authors share that the safety profile observed in the OLE study reflected previous observations.27

Discussion

Dual inhibitor antibodies represent a novel therapeutic strategy, and a logical extension of the success monoclonal antibodies has had over the last couple of decades.

Here we review the most recent information on IL-17A and F inhibition in psoriatic arthritis through the first-of-its-class bimekizumab, a dual inhibitor of both cytokines.

The importance of the IL-17 pathway in psoriatic arthritis, already suggested by preclinical data, was reinforced by the excellent results obtained by secukinumab30 or ixekizumab31 in the control of the disease in the last few years.

Indeed, IL-17 seems to be involved in all of the clinical domains of psoriatic arthritis. In preclinical trials, it has been shown that both IL-17A and F are capable of inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines, like IL-8 or IL-6, in synoviocytes, periosteum and the skin,23 and that this activation was greatly suppressed by blocking both these cytokines simultaneously. Research is expanding on the differential role of IL-17F in different environments,18,21 compared with the more studied IL-17A, as well as possible alternative signaling pathways.22 Taken together these findings could potentially explain different clinical phenotypes in PsA and treatment responses to anti-IL17A (secukinumab, ixekizumab) and IL-17RA (brodalumab) inhibitors furthering support for the use of dual cytokine blockade such as with bimekizumab (Figure 1).

Phase II trials, specifically BE ACTIVE results, have been encouraging. Bimekizumab has shown to be relatively fast-acting, with initial improvements detected by week 8 and well established by week 12. Additionally, at a dose of 160 mg every 4 weeks, bimekizumab has shown to be capable of retaining this level of response in a high percentage of patients for at least 2 years. These results are independent of prior exposure to anti-TNF therapy.10

As with all new drugs, there are still pending questions regarding its optimal use. In BE ACTIVE,10 in which patients received four different dosages through the first 12 weeks, the 160 mg seemed most effective. The initial lower response in the 320 mg group might have been produced by a higher proportion of refractory patients in which bimekizumab took longer to work. This impression is reinforced, in the author’s opinion, by the fact that response rates were different as early as week 4 in both 160 mg (loading dose) and 320 mg dose groups although by that time period both groups had received the same dose. Co-medication was balanced between both groups.

Whichever dose proves best, these results were achieved with mostly mild side-effects that did not lead to treatment discontinuation – most commonly nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory infections and candidiasis. Overall the available data have not revealed any unexpected adverse events. Nonetheless, the number of patients included in the trials is still small. Thirteen out of the 204 patients (6,4%) receiving any dose of bimekizumab in the BE ACTIVE trial had some hepatic adverse effect, raising the need for attentive monitoring by treating physicians. Co-medication needs to be well pondered in this setting as well, but if real-world outcomes of bimekizumab prove as beneficial as in the trials there might be a reduced need for concomitant use of other DMARDs. Although IL-17F has been shown to be associated with increased susceptibility in many forms of human cancer, it has shown a protective role in colon tumorigenesis in mice,32,33 mainly by regulating tumor angiogenesis.6 Longer and bigger trials will be needed to fully ascertain the safety of bimekizumab.

Overall the available results for this new therapeutic option in psoriatic arthritis are encouraging, although it is still early to completely understand the added value offered by bimekizumab. As of yet, however, there are no head-to-head trials directly comparing it to other treatment options in PsA. Anti-IL17A monoclonal antibodies have been evaluated against other therapies, such as anti-TNF inhibitors in the treatment of PsA with mixed results (using different endpoints).34,35

Right now we can only look to early reports from the more advanced Phase 3 trials in psoriasis, where bimekizumab was first studied, which already encompass hundreds of patients and compare bimekizumab with other biologics. A head-to-head comparison with ustekinumab was recently published36 involving 567 patients (321 randomized to bimekizumab, 163 to ustekinumab and 83 to a placebo arm that was switched to bimekizumab at week 16). Using a 320 mg dose of bimekizumab every 4 weeks (and not the 160 mg shown in BE ACTIVE to be the most efficacious in PsA) bimekizumab was superior to ustekinumab (85% vs 49.7% PASI 90 responses at week 16, p<0.001). This response was also sustained throughout the 52-week duration of the study (81.6% vs 55.8%, p<0.001). Similar responses (86.2% vs 47.2% PASI 90 at week 16, p<0.001) in the BE SURE trial comparing bimekizumab (320 mg every 4 weeks or 320 mg until week 16 and then every 8 weeks) and adalimumab (80 mg week 0, 40 mg week 1 and every 2 weeks) were recently presented.37 Switching adalimumab patients to bimekizumab resulted in increased response rates, comparable to rates in bimekizumab-randomized patients at week 56. UCB, the company developing bimekizumab, have also reported the superiority of bimekizumab against secukinumab.38

If nothing else, bimekizumab is a proof-of-concept for a novel avenue in treating inflammatory diseases. Up until now the clinical practice in inflammatory diseases has been to steer clear of the combination of monoclonal antibodies. The results of the trials reported here using bimekizumab to simultaneously inhibit two cytokines, even if related ones, are an important reminder of the redundant and overlapping nature of the immune system and of the multiple pathways through which one arrives at inflammatory disease.

As of yet, however, there are no head-to-head trials directly comparing bimekizumab to conventional DMARDS or other bDMARDs in PsA although the results reported here seem encouraging. Upcoming trials (see Table 2) will hopefully fill this gap in knowledge.

Table 2 Ongoing Trials of Bimekizumab in Psoriatic Arthritis

Conclusion

Psoriatic arthritis can be a severe and disabling disease. Although improvements in its treatment have been achieved in the past decade, its pathogenesis is not completely known, and its treatment is still difficult particularly throughout all disease domains.

The IL-17 pathway has been implicated in disease pathogenesis and targeting IL-17A with secukinumab and ixekizumab has shown good results, although there is still a large proportion of patients that respond only partially. The simultaneous blockade of both IL-17A and IL-17F seems to have a synergistic benefit, with IL-17F inhibition contributing with a differentiated role in both osteogenesis and skin inflammation, important domains of PsA.

Bimekizumab uses a novel approach to biologic treatment in psoriatic arthritis through dual cytokine blockade. Mounting evidence from early trials has shown a good safety and efficacy profile, with rapid onset and sustained response, with results now extending to 108 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, clinical trials in skin psoriasis have also shown that bimekizumab is highly effective, confirming the importance of inhibiting these two cytokines in psoriatic disease.

In the near future, phase III trials will help to better understand the potential of bimekizumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e f “Bimzelx EPAR”European Medicines Agency (EMA). 23 June 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021. Text was copied from this source which is © European Medicines Agency. Reproduction is authorized provided the source is acknowledged.
  2. ^ Lim SY, Oon HH (2019-05-13). “Systematic review of immunomodulatory therapies for hidradenitis suppurativa”Biologics13: 53–78. doi:10.2147/BTT.S199862PMC 6526329PMID 31190730.
  3. ^ “UCB Announces European Commission Approval of Bimzelx (bimekizumab) for the Treatment of Adults with Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis”UCB (Press release). 24 August 2021. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  4. ^ Warren, Richard B.; Blauvelt, Andrew; Bagel, Jerry; Papp, Kim A.; Yamauchi, Paul; Armstrong, April; Langley, Richard G.; Vanvoorden, Veerle; De Cuyper, Dirk; Cioffi, Christopher; Peterson, Luke (2021-07-08). “Bimekizumab versus Adalimumab in Plaque Psoriasis”New England Journal of Medicine385 (2): 130–141. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2102388ISSN 0028-4793PMID 33891379.
  5. ^ Reich, Kristian; Warren, Richard B.; Lebwohl, Mark; Gooderham, Melinda; Strober, Bruce; Langley, Richard G.; Paul, Carle; De Cuyper, Dirk; Vanvoorden, Veerle; Madden, Cynthia; Cioffi, Christopher (2021-07-08). “Bimekizumab versus Secukinumab in Plaque Psoriasis”New England Journal of Medicine385 (2): 142–152. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2102383ISSN 0028-4793PMID 33891380.
  6. ^ World Health Organization (2014). “International nonproprietary names for pharmaceutical substances (INN): recommended INN: list 72”. WHO Drug Information28 (3). hdl:10665/331112.

Further reading

  • Reis J, Vender R, Torres T (August 2019). “Bimekizumab: The First Dual Inhibitor of Interleukin (IL)-17A and IL-17F for the Treatment of Psoriatic Disease and Ankylosing Spondylitis”. BioDrugs33 (4): 391–9. doi:10.1007/s40259-019-00361-6PMID 31172372S2CID 174812750.

External links

Monoclonal antibody
TypeWhole antibody
SourceHumanized
TargetIL17AIL17FIL17AF
Clinical data
Trade namesBimzelx
License dataEU EMAby INN
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusEU: Rx-only [1]
Identifiers
CAS Number1418205-77-2
UNII09495UIM6V
KEGGD11550

//////////Bimekizumab, Bimzelx, EU 2021, APPROVALS 2021, Monoclonal antibody
,  plaque psoriasis,ビメキズマブ (遺伝子組換え) , UCB 4940

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ONE TIME ANTHONY CRASTO +919321316780 amcrasto@gmail.com

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Pepinemab, VX 15


(Heavy chain)
QVQLVQSGAE VKKPGSSVKV SCKASGYSFS DYYMHWVRQA PGQGLEWMGQ INPTTGGASY
NQKFKGKATI TVDKSTSTAY MELSSLRSED TAVYYCARYY YGRHFDVWGQ GTTVTVSSAS
TKGPSVFPLA PCSRSTSEST AALGCLVKDY FPEPVTVSWN SGALTSGVHT FPAVLQSSGL
YSLSSVVTVP SSSLGTKTYT CNVDHKPSNT KVDKRVESKY GPPCPPCPAP EFLGGPSVFL
FPPKPKDTLM ISRTPEVTCV VVDVSQEDPE VQFNWYVDGV EVHNAKTKPR EEQFNSTYRV
VSVLTVLHQD WLNGKEYKCK VSNKGLPSSI EKTISKAKGQ PREPQVYTLP PSQEEMTKNQ
VSLTCLVKGF YPSDIAVEWE SNGQPENNYK TTPPVLDSDG SFFLYSRLTV DKSRWQEGNV
FSCSVMHEAL HNHYTQKSLS LSLGK
(Light chain)
DIVMTQSPDS LAVSLGERAT INCKASQSVD YDGDSYMNWY QQKPGQPPKL LIYAASNLES
GVPDRFSGSG SGTDFTLTIS SLQAEDVAVY YCQQSNEDPY TFGQGTKLEI KRTVAAPSVF
IFPPSDEQLK SGTASVVCLL NNFYPREAKV QWKVDNALQS GNSQESVTEQ DSKDSTYSLS
STLTLSKADY EKHKVYACEV THQGLSSPVT KSFNRGEC
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H96, H132-L218, H145-H201, H224-H’224, H227-H’227, H259-H319, H365-H423, H’22-H’96, H’132-L’218, H’145-H’201, H’259-H’319, H’365-H’423, L23-L92, L138-L198, L’23-L’92, L’138-L’198)

Pepinemab

VX15/2503

Antineoplastic, Anti-human semaphorin 4D antibody

Monoclonal antibody
Treatment of solid tumors, multiple sclerosis and Huntington’s disease

FormulaC6442H9910N1702O2052S48
MOL WGT145481.0022
  • Moab VX15/2503
  • Pepinemab
  • UNII-BPZ4A29SYE
  • VX-15
  • VX15
  • VX15/2503
Product namePepinemab Biosimilar – Anti-SEMA4D mAb – Research Grade
SourceCAS 2097151-87-4
SpeciesChimeric,Humanized
Expression systemMammalian cells
  • OriginatorVaccinex
  • DeveloperBristol-Myers Squibb; Children’s Oncology Group; Emory University; Merck KGaA; National Cancer Institute (USA); Teva Pharmaceutical Industries; UCLAs Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center; Vaccinex
  • ClassAntibodies; Antidementias; Antineoplastics; Immunotherapies; Monoclonal antibodies
  • Mechanism of ActionCD100 antigen inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug StatusYes – Huntington’s disease
  • New Molecular EntityYes
  • Phase IIHuntington’s disease
  • Phase I/IIAlzheimer’s disease; Non-small cell lung cancer; Osteosarcoma; Solid tumours; Squamous cell cancer
  • Phase IColorectal cancer; Malignant melanoma; Pancreatic cancer
  • No development reportedMultiple sclerosis
  • 22 May 2021Pepinemab is still in phase I trials for Colorectal cancer and Pancreatic cancer in USA (NCT03373188)
  • 17 May 2021Phase-I/II clinical trials in Squamous cell cancer (Combination therapy, Late-stage disease, Metastatic disease, Recurrent, Second-line therapy or greater) in USA (IV) (NCT04815720)
  • 17 May 2021Vaccinex plans a phase I/II trial for Alzheimer’s disease (In volunteers), in H2 2021

Semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D) plays a role in multiple cellular processes that contribute to the pathophysiology of neuroinflammatory/neurodegenerative diseases. SEMA4D is, therefore, a uniquely promising target for therapeutic development.

Pepinemab is a novel monoclonal antibody that blocks the activity of SEMA4D, and preclinical testing has demonstrated the beneficial effects of anti-SEMA4D treatment in a variety of neurodegenerative disease models. Vaccinex is committed to the development of this potentially important antibody that has the potential to help people with different neurodegenerative disorders that share common mechanisms of pathology.

Note: Pepinemab (VX15/2503) is an investigational drug currently in clinical studies. It has not been demonstrated to be safe and effective for any disease indication. There is no guarantee that pepinemab (VX15/2503) will be approved for the treatment of any disease by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or by any other health authority worldwide.

////////////////////Pepinemab, VX15/2503, vx 15, Antineoplastic, Anti-human semaphorin 4D antibody, Monoclonal antibody, solid tumors, multiple sclerosis,  Huntington’s disease, PEPTIDES

wdt-17

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Tralokinumab


(Heavy chain)
QVQLVQSGAE VKKPGASVKV SCKASGYTFT NYGLSWVRQA PGQGLEWMGW ISANNGDTNY
GQEFQGRVTM TTDTSTSTAY MELRSLRSDD TAVYYCARDS SSSWARWFFD LWGRGTLVTV
SSASTKGPSV FPLAPCSRST SESTAALGCL VKDYFPEPVT VSWNSGALTS GVHTFPAVLQ
SSGLYSLSSV VTVPSSSLGT KTYTCNVDHK PSNTKVDKRV ESKYGPPCPS CPAPEFLGGP
SVFLFPPKPK DTLMISRTPE VTCVVVDVSQ EDPEVQFNWY VDGVEVHNAK TKPREEQFNS
TYRVVSVLTV LHQDWLNGKE YKCKVSNKGL PSSIEKTISK AKGQPREPQV YTLPPSQEEM
TKNQVSLTCL VKGFYPSDIA VEWESNGQPE NNYKTTPPVL DSDGSFFLYS RLTVDKSRWQ
EGNVFSCSVM HEALHNHYTQ KSLSLSLGK
(Light chain)
SYVLTQPPSV SVAPGKTARI TCGGNIIGSK LVHWYQQKPG QAPVLVIYDD GDRPSGIPER
FSGSNSGNTA TLTISRVEAG DEADYYCQVW DTGSDPVVFG GGTKLTVLGQ PKAAPSVTLF
PPSSEELQAN KATLVCLISD FYPGAVTVAW KADSSPVKAG VETTTPSKQS NNKYAASSYL
SLTPEQWKSH RSYSCQVTHE GSTVEKTVAP TECS
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H96, H149-H205, H263-H323, H369-H427, H228-H’228, H231-H’231, L22-L87, L136-L195, H136-L213)

Tralokinumab

トラロキヌマブ (遺伝子組換え)

FormulaC6374H9822N1698O2014S44
CAS1044515-88-9
Mol weight143873.2167

EU APPROVED, Adtralza, 2021/6/17

Antiasthmatic, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-IL-13 antibody

Tralokinumab is a human monoclonal antibody which targets the cytokine interleukin 13,[1] and is designed for the treatment of asthma and other inflammatory diseases.[2] Tralokinumab was discovered by Cambridge Antibody Technology scientists, using Ribosome Display, as CAT-354[3] and taken through pre-clinical and early clinical development.[4] After 2007 it has been developed by MedImmune, a member of the AstraZeneca group, where it is currently in Ph3 testing for asthma and Ph2b testing for atopic dermatitis.[5][6] This makes it one of the few fully internally discovered and developed drug candidates in AstraZeneca’s late stage development pipeline.

Discovery and development

Tralokinumab (CAT-354) was discovered by Cambridge Antibody Technology scientists[7] using protein optimization based on Ribosome Display.[8] They used the extensive data sets from ribosome display to patent protect CAT-354 in a world-first of sequence-activity-relationship claims.[7] In 2004, clinical development of CAT-354 was initiated with this first study completing in 2005.[9] On 21 July 2011, MedImmune LLC initiated a Ph2b, randomized, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy of tralokinumab in adults with asthma.[10]

In 2016, MedImmune and AstraZeneca were developing tralokinumab for asthma (Ph3) and atopic dermatitis (Ph2b) while clinical development for moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have been discontinued.[9] In July of that year AstraZeneca licensed Tralokinumab to LEO Pharma for skin diseases.[11]

A phase IIb study of Tralokinumab found that treatment was associated with early and sustained improvements in atopic dermatitis symptoms and tralokinumab had an acceptable safety and tolerability profile, thereby providing evidence for targeting IL-13 in patients with atopic dermatitis.[12]

On 15 June 2017, Leo Pharma announced that they were starting phase III clinical trials with tralokinumab in atopic dermatitis.[13]

Society and culture

Legal status

On 22 April 2021, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) adopted a positive opinion, recommending the granting of a marketing authorization for the medicinal product Adtralza, intended for the treatment of moderate‑to‑severe atopic dermatitis.[14]

The applicant for this medicinal product is LEO Pharma A/S.

References

  1. ^ Kopf M, Bachmann MF, Marsland BJ (September 2010). “Averting inflammation by targeting the cytokine environment”. Nature Reviews. Drug Discovery9 (9): 703–18. doi:10.1038/nrd2805PMID 20811382S2CID 23769909.
  2. ^ “Statement On A Nonproprietary Name Adopted By The USAN Council: Tralokinumab” (PDF). American Medical Association.
  3. ^ Thom G, Cockroft AC, Buchanan AG, Candotti CJ, Cohen ES, Lowne D, et al. (May 2006). “Probing a protein-protein interaction by in vitro evolution” [P]. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America103 (20): 7619–24. Bibcode:2006PNAS..103.7619Tdoi:10.1073/pnas.0602341103PMC 1458619PMID 16684878.
  4. ^ May RD, Monk PD, Cohen ES, Manuel D, Dempsey F, Davis NH, et al. (May 2012). “Preclinical development of CAT-354, an IL-13 neutralizing antibody, for the treatment of severe uncontrolled asthma”British Journal of Pharmacology166 (1): 177–93. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01659.xPMC 3415647PMID 21895629.
  5. ^ “Pipeline”MedImmune. Retrieved 11 June 2013.
  6. ^ “Studies found for CAT-354”ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved 11 June 2013.
  7. Jump up to:a b Human Antibody Molecules for Il-13, retrieved 2015-07-26
  8. ^ Jermutus L, Honegger A, Schwesinger F, Hanes J, Plückthun A (January 2001). “Tailoring in vitro evolution for protein affinity or stability”Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America98 (1): 75–80. Bibcode:2001PNAS…98…75Jdoi:10.1073/pnas.98.1.75PMC 14547PMID 11134506.
  9. Jump up to:a b “Tralokinumab”Adis Insight. Springer Nature Switzerland AG.
  10. ^ Clinical trial number NCT01402986 for “A Phase 2b, Randomized, Double-blind Study to Evaluate the Efficacy of Tralokinumab in Adults With Asthma” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  11. ^ “AstraZeneca enters licensing agreements with LEO Pharma in skin diseases”.
  12. ^ Wollenberg A, Howell MD, Guttman-Yassky E, Silverberg JI, Kell C, Ranade K, et al. (January 2019). “Treatment of atopic dermatitis with tralokinumab, an anti-IL-13 mAb”The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology143 (1): 135–141. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2018.05.029PMID 29906525.
  13. ^ “LEO Pharma starts phase 3 clinical study for tralokinumab in atopic dermatitis”leo-pharma.com. AstraZeneca. 1 July 2016.
  14. ^ “Adtralza: Pending EC decision”European Medicines Agency. 23 April 2021. Retrieved 23 April 2021.
Tralokinumab Fab fragment bound to IL-13. From PDB 5L6Y​.
Monoclonal antibody
TypeWhole antibody
SourceHuman
TargetIL-13
Clinical data
ATC codeD11AH07 (WHO)
Identifiers
CAS Number1044515-88-9 
ChemSpidernone
UNIIGK1LYB375A
KEGGD09979
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC6374H9822N1698O2014S44
Molar mass143875.20 g·mol−1
  (what is this?)  (verify)

/////////Tralokinumab, Adtralza, EU 2021, APPROVALS 2021, Antiasthmatic, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-IL-13 antibody, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, PEPTIDE, トラロキヌマブ (遺伝子組換え) ,

wdt-1

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Casirivimab


(Heavy chain)
QVQLVESGGG LVKPGGSLRL SCAASGFTFS DYYMSWIRQA PGKGLEWVSY ITYSGSTIYY
ADSVKGRFTI SRDNAKSSLY LQMNSLRAED TAVYYCARDR GTTMVPFDYW GQGTLVTVSS
ASTKGPSVFP LAPSSKSTSG GTAALGCLVK DYFPEPVTVS WNSGALTSGV HTFPAVLQSS
GLYSLSSVVT VPSSSLGTQT YICNVNHKPS NTKVDKKVEP KSCDKTHTCP PCPAPELLGG
PSVFLFPPKP KDTLMISRTP EVTCVVVDVS HEDPEVKFNW YVDGVEVHNA KTKPREEQYN
STYRVVSVLT VLHQDWLNGK EYKCKVSNKA LPAPIEKTIS KAKGQPREPQ VYTLPPSRDE
LTKNQVSLTC LVKGFYPSDI AVEWESNGQP ENNYKTTPPV LDSDGSFFLY SKLTVDKSRW
QQGNVFSCSV MHEALHNHYT QKSLSLSPGK
(Light chain)
DIQMTQSPSS LSASVGDRVT ITCQASQDIT NYLNWYQQKP GKAPKLLIYA ASNLETGVPS
RFSGSGSGTD FTFTISGLQP EDIATYYCQQ YDNLPLTFGG GTKVEIKRTV AAPSVFIFPP
SDEQLKSGTA SVVCLLNNFY PREAKVQWKV DNALQSGNSQ ESVTEQDSKD STYSLSSTLT
LSKADYEKHK VYACEVTHQG LSSPVTKSFN RGEC
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H96, H147-H203, H223-L214, H229-H’229, H232-H’232, H264-H324, H370-H428, H’22-H’96, H’147-H’203, H’223-L’214, H’264-H’324, H’370-H’428, L23-L88, L134-L194, L’23-L’88, L’134-L’194)

Casirivimab

カシリビマブ;

  • Immunoglobulin G1, anti-​(severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 spike glycoprotein) (human monoclonal REGN10933 γ1-​chain)​, disulfide with human monoclonal REGN10933 κ-​chain, dimer
FormulaC6454H9976N1704O2024S44
CAS2415933-42-3
Mol weight145233.3296

Monoclonal antibody
Treatment and prophylaxis of SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19)

SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein

  • Protein Sequence
  • Sequence Length: 1328, 450, 450, 214, 214
  • REGN 10933
  • RG 6413

https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/coronavirus-covid-19-update-fda-authorizes-monoclonal-antibodies-treatment-covid-19 November 21, 2020

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for casirivimab and imdevimab to be administered together for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in adults and pediatric patients (12 years of age or older weighing at least 40 kilograms [about 88 pounds]) with positive results of direct SARS-CoV-2 viral testing and who are at high risk for progressing to severe COVID-19. This includes those who are 65 years of age or older or who have certain chronic medical conditions.

In a clinical trial of patients with COVID-19, casirivimab and imdevimab, administered together, were shown to reduce COVID-19-related hospitalization or emergency room visits in patients at high risk for disease progression within 28 days after treatment when compared to placebo. The safety and effectiveness of this investigational therapy for use in the treatment of COVID-19 continues to be evaluated.

Casirivimab and imdevimab must be administered together by intravenous (IV) infusion.

Casirivimab and imdevimab are not authorized for patients who are hospitalized due to COVID-19 or require oxygen therapy due to COVID-19. A benefit of casirivimab and imdevimab treatment has not been shown in patients hospitalized due to COVID-19. Monoclonal antibodies, such as casirivimab and imdevimab, may be associated with worse clinical outcomes when administered to hospitalized patients with COVID-19 requiring high flow oxygen or mechanical ventilation.

“The FDA remains committed to advancing the nation’s public health during this unprecedented pandemic. Authorizing these monoclonal antibody therapies may help outpatients avoid hospitalization and alleviate the burden on our health care system,” said FDA Commissioner Stephen M. Hahn, M.D. “As part of our Coronavirus Treatment Acceleration Program, the FDA uses every possible pathway to make new treatments available to patients as quickly as possible while continuing to study the safety and effectiveness of these treatments.” 

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-made proteins that mimic the immune system’s ability to fight off harmful pathogens such as viruses. Casirivimab and imdevimab are monoclonal antibodies that are specifically directed against the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2, designed to block the virus’ attachment and entry into human cells.

“The emergency authorization of these monoclonal antibodies administered together offers health care providers another tool in combating the pandemic,” said Patrizia Cavazzoni, M.D., acting director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “We will continue to facilitate the development, evaluation and availability of COVID-19 therapies.”

The issuance of an EUA is different than an FDA approval. In determining whether to issue an EUA, the FDA evaluates the totality of available scientific evidence and carefully balances any known or potential risks with any known or potential benefits of the product for use during an emergency. Based on the FDA’s review of the totality of the scientific evidence available, the agency has determined that it is reasonable to believe that casirivimab and imdevimab administered together may be effective in treating patients with mild or moderate COVID-19. When used to treat COVID-19 for the authorized population, the known and potential benefits of these antibodies outweigh the known and potential risks. There are no adequate, approved and available alternative treatments to casirivimab and imdevimab administered together for the authorized population.

The data supporting this EUA for casirivimab and imdevimab are based on a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 799 non-hospitalized adults with mild to moderate COVID-19 symptoms. Of these patients, 266 received a single intravenous infusion of 2,400 milligrams casirivimab and imdevimab (1,200 mg of each), 267 received 8,000 mg casirivimab and imdevimab (4,000 mg of each), and 266 received a placebo, within three days of obtaining a positive SARS-CoV-2 viral test.

The prespecified primary endpoint for the trial was time-weighted average change in viral load from baseline. Viral load reduction in patients treated with casirivimab and imdevimab was larger than in patients treated with placebo at day seven. However, the most important evidence that casirivimab and imdevimab administered together may be effective came from the predefined secondary endpoint of medically attended visits related to COVID-19, particularly hospitalizations and emergency room visits within 28 days after treatment. For patients at high risk for disease progression, hospitalizations and emergency room visits occurred in 3% of casirivimab and imdevimab-treated patients on average compared to 9% in placebo-treated patients. The effects on viral load, reduction in hospitalizations and ER visits were similar in patients receiving either of the two casirivimab and imdevimab doses.

Under the EUA, fact sheets that provide important information about using casirivimab and imdevimab administered together in treating COVID-19 as authorized must be made available to health care providers and to patients and caregivers. These fact sheets include dosing instructions, potential side effects and drug interactions. Possible side effects of casirivimab and imdevimab include: anaphylaxis and infusion-related reactions, fever, chills, hives, itching and flushing.

The EUA was issued to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

Related Information

Casirivimab/imdevimab, sold under the brand name REGEN-COV,[1] is an experimental medicine developed by the American biotechnology company Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. It is an artificial “antibody cocktail” designed to produce resistance against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.[3][4] It consists of two monoclonal antibodies, casirivimab (REGN10933) and imdevimab (REGN10987) that must be mixed together.[1][5][6] The combination of two antibodies is intended to prevent mutational escape.[7]

Trials

In a clinical trial of people with COVID-19, casirivimab and imdevimab, administered together, were shown to reduce COVID-19-related hospitalization or emergency room visits in people at high risk for disease progression within 28 days after treatment when compared to placebo.[2] The safety and effectiveness of this investigational therapy for use in the treatment of COVID-19 continues to be evaluated.[2]

The data supporting the emergency use authorization (EUA) for casirivimab and imdevimab are based on a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in 799 non-hospitalized adults with mild to moderate COVID-19 symptoms.[2] Of these participants, 266 received a single intravenous infusion of 2,400 milligrams casirivimab and imdevimab (1,200 mg of each), 267 received 8,000 mg casirivimab and imdevimab (4,000 mg of each), and 266 received a placebo, within three days of obtaining a positive SARS-CoV-2 viral test.[2]

The prespecified primary endpoint for the trial was time-weighted average change in viral load from baseline.[2] Viral load reduction in participants treated with casirivimab and imdevimab was larger than in participants treated with placebo at day seven.[2] However, the most important evidence that casirivimab and imdevimab administered together may be effective came from the predefined secondary endpoint of medically attended visits related to COVID-19, particularly hospitalizations and emergency room visits within 28 days after treatment.[2] For participants at high risk for disease progression, hospitalizations and emergency room visits occurred in 3% of casirivimab and imdevimab-treated participants on average compared to 9% in placebo-treated participants.[2] The effects on viral load, reduction in hospitalizations and ER visits were similar in participants receiving either of the two casirivimab and imdevimab doses.[2]

As of September 2020, REGEN-COV is being evaluated as part of the RECOVERY Trial.[8]

On 12 April 2021, Roche and Regeneron announced that the Phase III clinical trial REGN-COV 2069 met both primary and secondary endpoints, reducing risk of infection by 81% for the non-infected patients, and reducing time-to-resolution of symptoms for symptomatic patients to one week vs. three weeks in the placebo group.[9]

Authorization

On 21 November 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for casirivimab and imdevimab to be administered together for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in people twelve years of age or older weighing at least 40 kilograms (88 lb) with positive results of direct SARS-CoV-2 viral testing and who are at high risk for progressing to severe COVID-19.[2][10][11] This includes those who are 65 years of age or older or who have certain chronic medical conditions.[2] Casirivimab and imdevimab must be administered together by intravenous (IV) infusion.[2]

Casirivimab and imdevimab are not authorized for people who are hospitalized due to COVID-19 or require oxygen therapy due to COVID-19.[2] A benefit of casirivimab and imdevimab treatment has not been shown in people hospitalized due to COVID-19.[2] Monoclonal antibodies, such as casirivimab and imdevimab, may be associated with worse clinical outcomes when administered to hospitalized people with COVID-19 requiring high flow oxygen or mechanical ventilation.[2]

The EUA was issued to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc.[2][10][12]

On 1 February 2021, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) started a rolling review of data on the REGN‑COV2 antibody combination (casirivimab/imdevimab), which is being co-developed by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and F. Hoffman-La Roche, Ltd (Roche) for the treatment and prevention of COVID‑19.[13][14] In February 2021, the CHMP concluded that the combination, also known as REGN-COV2, can be used for the treatment of confirmed COVID-19 in people who do not require supplemental oxygen and who are at high risk of progressing to severe COVID-19.[15]

The Central Drugs Standards Control Organisation (CDSCO) in India, on 5 May 2021, granted an Emergency Use Authorisation to Roche (Genentech)[16] and Regeneron[17] for use of the casirivimab/imdevimab cocktail in the country. The announcement came in light of the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in India. Roche India maintains partnership with Cipla, thereby permitting the latter to market the drug in the country.[18]

Deployment

Although Regeneron is headquartered in Tarrytown, New York (near New York City), REGEN-COV is manufactured at the company’s primary U.S. manufacturing facility in Rensselaer, New York (near the state capital at Albany).[19] In September 2020, to free up manufacturing capacity for REGEN-COV, Regeneron began to shift production of its existing products from Rensselaer to the Irish city of Limerick.[20]

Regeneron has a deal in place with Roche (Genentech)[21]to manufacture and market REGEN-COV outside the United States.[10][22]

On 2 October 2020, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals announced that US President Donald Trump had received “a single 8 gram dose of REGN-COV2” after testing positive for SARS-CoV-2.[23][24] The drug was provided by the company in response to a “compassionate use” (temporary authorization for use) request from the president’s physicians.[23]

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c “REGEN-COV- casirivimab and imdevimab kit”DailyMed. Retrieved 18 March 2021.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q “Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Authorizes Monoclonal Antibodies for Treatment of COVID-19”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Press release). 21 November 2020. Retrieved 21 November 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ Kelland K (14 September 2020). “Regeneron’s antibody drug added to UK Recovery trial of COVID treatments”Reuters. Retrieved 14 September 2020.
  4. ^ “Regeneron’s COVID-19 Response Efforts”Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. Retrieved 14 September 2020.
  5. ^ Morelle R (14 September 2020). “Antibody treatment to be given to Covid patients”BBC News Online. Retrieved 14 September2020.
  6. ^ “Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Anti-Spike (S) SARS-CoV-2 Monoclonal Antibodies for Hospitalized Adult Patients With COVID-19”ClinicalTrials. 3 September 2020. Retrieved 14 September2020.
  7. ^ Baum A, Fulton BO, Wloga E, Copin R, Pascal KE, Russo V, et al. (August 2020). “Antibody cocktail to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein prevents rapid mutational escape seen with individual antibodies”Science369 (6506): 1014–1018. Bibcode:2020Sci…369.1014Bdoi:10.1126/science.abd0831PMC 7299283PMID 32540904.
  8. ^ “RECOVERY COVID-19 phase 3 trial to evaluate Regeneron’s REGN-COV2 investigational antibody cocktail in the UK”Recovery Trial. Retrieved 14 September 2020.
  9. ^ “Phase III prevention trial showed subcutaneous administration of investigational antibody cocktail casirivimab and imdevimab reduced risk of symptomatic COVID-19 infections by 81%”streetinsider.comArchived from the original on 2021-04-12. Retrieved 2021-04-12.
  10. Jump up to:a b c “Regeneron Reports Positive Interim Data with REGEN-COV Antibody Cocktail used as Passive Vaccine to Prevent COVID-19”(Press release). Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. 26 January 2021. Retrieved 19 March 2021 – via PR Newswire.
  11. ^ “Fact Sheet For Health Care Providers Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) Of Casirivimab And Imdevimab” (PDF). U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  12. ^ “Casirivimab and Imdevimab”Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  13. ^ “EMA starts rolling review of REGN‑COV2 antibody combination (casirivimab / imdevimab)” (Press release). European Medicines Agency (EMA). 1 February 2021. Retrieved 1 February 2021. Text was copied from this source which is © European Medicines Agency. Reproduction is authorized provided the source is acknowledged.
  14. ^ “EMA reviewing data on monoclonal antibody use for COVID-19” (Press release). European Medicines Agency (EMA). 4 February 2021. Retrieved 4 March 2021.
  15. ^ “EMA issues advice on use of REGN-COV2 antibody combination (casirivimab / imdevimab)” (Press release). European Medicines Agency (EMA). 26 February 2021. Retrieved 5 March 2021. Text was copied from this source which is © European Medicines Agency. Reproduction is authorized provided the source is acknowledged.
  16. ^https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200818005847/en/Genentech-and-Regeneron-Collaborate-to-Significantly-Increase-Global-Supply-of-REGN-COV2-Investigational-Antibody-Combination-for-COVID-19
  17. ^ https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/india-approves-roche/regeneron-antibody-cocktail-to-treat-covid-19/articleshow/82407551.cms
  18. ^ “Roche receives Emergency Use Authorisation in India for its investigational Antibody Cocktail (Casirivimab and Imdevimab) used in the treatment of Covid-19 | Cipla”http://www.cipla.com. Retrieved 2021-05-06.
  19. ^ Williams, Stephen (3 October 2020). “Experimental drug given to President made locally”The Daily Gazette.
  20. ^ Stanton, Dan (11 September 2020). “Manufacturing shift to Ireland frees up US capacity for Regeneron’s COVID antibodies”BioProcess International.
  21. ^https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200818005847/en/Genentech-and-Regeneron-Collaborate-to-Significantly-Increase-Global-Supply-of-REGN-COV2-Investigational-Antibody-Combination-for-COVID-19
  22. ^ “Roche and Regeneron link up on a coronavirus antibody cocktail”CNBC. 19 August 2020. Retrieved 14 September 2020.
  23. Jump up to:a b Thomas K (2 October 2020). “President Trump Received Experimental Antibody Treatment”The New York TimesISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2 October 2020.
  24. ^ Hackett DW (3 October 2020). “8-Gram Dose of COVID-19 Antibody Cocktail Provided to President Trump”http://www.precisionvaccinations.comArchived from the original on 3 October 2020.

External links

REGN10933 (blue) and REGN10987 (orange) bound to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein (pink). From PDB6VSB6XDG.
Combination of
CasirivimabMonoclonal antibody against spike protein of SARS-CoV-2
ImdevimabMonoclonal antibody against spike protein of SARS-CoV-2
Clinical data
Trade namesREGEN-COV
Other namesREGN-COV2
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
License dataUS DailyMedCasirivimab
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusUS: Unapproved (Emergency Use Authorization)[1][2]
Identifiers
DrugBankDB15691
KEGGD11938

//////////// Casirivimab, ANTI VIRAL, PEPTIDE, SARS-CoV-2, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, FDA 2020, 2020APPROVALS, CORONA VIRUS, COVID 19, カシリビマブ, REGN-COV2, REGN10933+REGN10987 combination therapy, REGN 10933, RG 6413

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Casirivimab with Imdevimab

Sacituzumab govitecan-hziy


TRODELVY structure
Sacituzumab govitecan.png
Sacituzumab govitecan.png
Sacituzumab Govitecan for Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer -  National Cancer Institute

Sacituzumab govitecan-hziy

1601.8 g/mol

C76H104N12O24S

(2R)-2-amino-3-[1-[[4-[[1-[2-[2-[2-[2-[2-[2-[2-[2-[2-[[2-[2-[[(2S)-6-amino-1-[4-[[(19S)-10,19-diethyl-7-hydroxy-14,18-dioxo-17-oxa-3,13-diazapentacyclo[11.8.0.02,11.04,9.015,20]henicosa-1(21),2,4(9),5,7,10,15(20)-heptaen-19-yl]oxycarbonyloxymethyl]anilino]-1-oxohexan-2-yl]amino]-2-oxoethoxy]acetyl]amino]ethoxy]ethoxy]ethoxy]ethoxy]ethoxy]ethoxy]ethoxy]ethoxy]ethyl]triazol-4-yl]methylcarbamoyl]cyclohexyl]methyl]-2,5-dioxopyrrolidin-3-yl]sulfanylpropanoic acid

Trodelvy 

  • hRS 7SN38
  • hRS7-SN38
  • IMMU 132
  • IMMU-132

CAS: 1491917-83-9

M9BYU8XDQ6

EX-A4354

UNII-DA64T2C2IO component ULRUOUDIQPERIJ-PQURJYPBSA-N

UNII-SZB83O1W42 component ULRUOUDIQPERIJ-PQURJYPBSA-N

EfficacyAntineoplastic, Topoisomerase I inhibitor
  DiseaseBreast cancer (triple negative)
sacituzumab govitecan-hziy Archives | Access Market Intelligence

Sacituzumab Govitecan is an antibody drug conjugate containing the humanized monoclonal antibody, hRS7, against tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2 or TROP2) and linked to the active metabolite of irinotecan7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38), with potential antineoplastic activity. The antibody moiety of sacituzumab govitecan selectively binds to TROP2. After internalization and proteolytic cleavage, SN-38 selectively stabilizes topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes, resulting in DNA breaks that inhibit DNA replication and trigger apoptosis. TROP2, also known as epithelial glycoprotein-1 (EGP-1), is a transmembrane calcium signal transducer that is overexpressed by a variety of human epithelial carcinomas; this antigen is involved in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion and its expression is associated with increased cancer growth, aggressiveness and metastasis.

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https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210407006027/en/FDA-Approves-Trodelvy%C2%AE-the-First-Treatment-for-Metastatic-Triple-Negative-Breast-Cancer-Shown-to-Improve-Progression-Free-Survival-and-Overall-Survival?fbclid=IwAR16bUSCbkK98d8j01NNKVnJ-7r8nHSvCOGE4ogCp_Aex79mNh8AOwQFIQc

FDA Approves Trodelvy®, the First Treatment for Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Shown to Improve Progression-Free Survival and Overall Survival

– Trodelvy Significantly Reduced the Risk of Death by 49% Compared with Single-Agent Chemotherapy in the Phase 3 ASCENT Study –

– Trodelvy is Under Regulatory Review in the EU and in the United Kingdom, Canada, Switzerland and Australia as Part of Project Orbis April 07, 2021 07:53 PM Eastern Daylight Time

FOSTER CITY, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Gilead Sciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: GILD) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted full approval to Trodelvy® (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) for adult patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who have received two or more prior systemic therapies, at least one of them for metastatic disease. The approval is supported by data from the Phase 3 ASCENT study, in which Trodelvy demonstrated a statistically significant and clinically meaningful 57% reduction in the risk of disease worsening or death (progression-free survival (PFS)), extending median PFS to 4.8 months from 1.7 months with chemotherapy (HR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.35-0.54; p<0.0001). Trodelvy also extended median overall survival (OS) to 11.8 months vs. 6.9 months (HR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.62; p<0.0001), representing a 49% reduction in the risk of death.

Trodelvy is directed to the Trop-2 receptor, a protein frequently expressed in multiple types of epithelial tumors, including TNBC, where high expression is associated with poor survival and relapse. Prior to the FDA approval of Trodelvy, patients with previously treated metastatic TNBC had few treatment options in this high unmet-need setting. The FDA granted accelerated approval to Trodelvy in April 2020 based on objective response rate and duration of response results in a Phase 1/2 study. Today’s approval expands the previous Trodelvy indication to include treatment in adult patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic TNBC who have received two or more prior systemic therapies, at least one of them for metastatic disease.

“Women with triple-negative breast cancer have historically had very few effective treatment options and faced a poor prognosis,” said Aditya Bardia, MD, MPH, Director of Breast Cancer Research Program, Mass General Cancer Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and global principal investigator of the ASCENT study. “Today’s FDA approval reflects the statistically significant survival benefit seen in the landmark ASCENT study and positions sacituzumab govitecan-hziy as a potential standard of care for pre-treated TNBC.”

“A metastatic TNBC diagnosis is frightening. As an aggressive and difficult-to-treat disease, it’s a significant advance to have an FDA-approved treatment option with a proven survival benefit for patients with metastatic disease that continues to progress,” said Ricki Fairley, Founder and CEO of Touch, the Black Breast Cancer Alliance. “For far too long, people with metastatic TNBC had very few treatment options. Today’s news continues the progress of bringing more options to treat this devastating disease.”

Among all patients evaluable for safety in the ASCENT study (n=482), Trodelvy had a safety profile consistent with the previously approved FDA label. The most frequent Grade ≥3 adverse reactions for Trodelvy compared to single-agent chemotherapy were neutropenia (52% vs. 34%), diarrhea (11% vs. 1%), leukopenia (11% vs. 6%) and anemia (9% vs. 6%). Adverse reactions leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in 5% of patients receiving Trodelvy.

“Today’s approval is the culmination of a multi-year development program and validates the clinical benefit of this important treatment in metastatic TNBC,” said Merdad Parsey, MD, PhD, Chief Medical Officer, Gilead Sciences. “Building upon this milestone, we are committed to advancing Trodelvy with worldwide regulatory authorities so that, pending their decision, Trodelvy may become available to many more people around the world who are facing this difficult-to-treat cancer.”

Regulatory submissions for Trodelvy in metastatic TNBC have been filed in the United Kingdom, Canada, Switzerland and Australia as part of Project Orbis, an initiative of the FDA Oncology Center of Excellence (OCE) that provides a framework for concurrent submission and review of oncology products among international partners, as well as in Singapore through our partner Everest Medicines.The European Medicines Agency has also validated a Marketing Authorization Application for Trodelvy in the European Union. All filings are based on data from the Phase 3 ASCENT study.

Trodelvy Boxed Warning

The Trodelvy U.S. Prescribing Information has a BOXED WARNING for severe or life-threatening neutropenia and severe diarrhea; see below for Important Safety Information.

About Trodelvy

Trodelvy (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) is a first-in-class antibody and topoisomerase inhibitor conjugate directed to the Trop-2 receptor, a protein frequently expressed in multiple types of epithelial tumors, including metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), where high expression is associated with poor survival and relapse.

Trodelvy is also being developed as an investigational treatment for metastatic urothelial cancer, hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HR+/HER 2-) metastatic breast cancer and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Additional evaluation across multiple solid tumors is also underway.

About Triple-Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC)

TNBC is an aggressive type of breast cancer, accounting for approximately 15% of all breast cancers. The disease is diagnosed more frequently in younger and premenopausal women and is more prevalent in African American and Hispanic women. TNBC cells do not have estrogen and progesterone receptors and have limited HER 2. Medicines targeting these receptors therefore are not typically effective in treating TNBC.

About the ASCENT Study

The Phase 3 ASCENT study, an open-label, active-controlled, randomized confirmatory trial, enrolled more than 500 patients with relapsed/refractory metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who had received two or more prior systemic therapies (including a taxane), at least one of them for metastatic disease. Patients were randomized to receive either Trodelvy or a chemotherapy chosen by the patients’ treating physicians. The primary efficacy outcome was progression-free survival (PFS) in patients without brain metastases at baseline, as measured by a blinded, independent, centralized review using RECIST v1.1 criteria. Additional efficacy measures included PFS for the full population (all patients with and without brain metastases) and overall survival (OS). More information about ASCENT is available at http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02574455.

Important Safety Information for Trodelvy

BOXED WARNING: NEUTROPENIA AND DIARRHEA

  • Severe, life-threatening, or fatal neutropenia may occur. Withhold TRODELVY for absolute neutrophil count below 1500/mm3 or neutropenic fever. Monitor blood cell counts periodically during treatment. Consider G-CSF for secondary prophylaxis. Initiate anti-infective treatment in patient with febrile neutropenia without delay.
  • Severe diarrhea may occur. Monitor patients with diarrhea and give fluid and electrolytes as needed. Administer atropine, if not contraindicated, for early diarrhea of any severity. At the onset of late diarrhea, evaluate for infectious causes and, if negative, promptly initiate loperamide. If severe diarrhea occurs, withhold TRODELVY until resolved to ≤ Grade 1 and reduce subsequent doses.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

  • Severe hypersensitivity to TRODELVY

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Neutropenia: Dose modifications may be required due to neutropenia. Neutropenia occurred in 62% of patients treated with TRODELVY, leading to permanent discontinuation in 0.5% of patients. Grade 3-4 neutropenia occurred in 47% of patients. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 6%.

Diarrhea: Diarrhea occurred in 64% of all patients treated with TRODELVY. Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 12% of patients. Neutropenic colitis occurred in 0.5% of patients. Withhold TRODELVY for Grade 3-4 diarrhea and resume when resolved to ≤ Grade 1. At onset, evaluate for infectious causes and if negative, promptly initiate loperamide, 4 mg initially followed by 2 mg with every episode of diarrhea for a maximum of 16 mg daily. Discontinue loperamide 12 hours after diarrhea resolves. Additional supportive measures (e.g., fluid and electrolyte substitution) may also be employed as clinically indicated. Patients who exhibit an excessive cholinergic response to treatment can receive appropriate premedication (e.g., atropine) for subsequent treatments.

Hypersensitivity and Infusion-Related Reactions: TRODELVY can cause severe and life-threatening hypersensitivity and infusion-related reactions, including anaphylactic reactions. Hypersensitivity reactions within 24 hours of dosing occurred in 37% of patients. Grade 3-4 hypersensitivity occurred in 1% of patients. The incidence of hypersensitivity reactions leading to permanent discontinuation of TRODELVY was 0.4%. Pre-infusion medication is recommendedObserve patients closely for hypersensitivity and infusion-related reactions during each infusion and for at least 30 minutes after completion of each infusion. Medication to treat such reactions, as well as emergency equipment, should be available for immediate use.

Nausea and Vomiting: Nausea occurred in 67% of all patients treated with TRODELVY. Grade 3-4 nausea occurred in 5% of patients. Vomiting occurred in 40% of patients and Grade 3-4 vomiting occurred in 3% of these patients. Premedicate with a two or three drug combination regimen (e.g., dexamethasone with either a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist or an NK-1 receptor antagonist as well as other drugs as indicated) for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). Withhold TRODELVY doses for Grade 3 nausea or Grade 3-4 vomiting and resume with additional supportive measures when resolved to Grade ≤ 1. Additional antiemetics and other supportive measures may also be employed as clinically indicated. All patients should be given take-home medications with clear instructions for prevention and treatment of nausea and vomiting.

Increased Risk of Adverse Reactions in Patients with Reduced UGT1A1 Activity: Individuals who are homozygous for the uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyl transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1)*28 allele are at increased risk for neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, and anemia and may be at increased risk for other adverse reactions with TRODELVY. The incidence of Grade 3-4 neutropenia in genotyped patients was 69% in patients homozygous for the UGT1A1*28, 48% in patients heterozygous for the UGT1A1*28 allele and 46% in patients homozygous for the wild-type allele. The incidence of Grade 3-4 anemia in genotyped patients was 24% in patients homozygous for the UGT1A1*28 allele, 8% in patients heterozygous for the UGT1A1*28 allele, and 10% in patients homozygous for the wild-type allele. Closely monitor patients with known reduced UGT1A1 activity for adverse reactions. Withhold or permanently discontinue TRODELVY based on severity of the observed adverse reactions in patients with evidence of acute early-onset or unusually severe adverse reactions, which may indicate reduced UGT1A1 function.

Embryo-Fetal Toxicity: Based on its mechanism of action, TRODELVY can cause teratogenicity and/or embryo-fetal lethality when administered to a pregnant woman. TRODELVY contains a genotoxic component, SN-38, and targets rapidly dividing cells. Advise pregnant women and females of reproductive potential of the potential risk to a fetus. Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with TRODELVY and for 6 months after the last dose. Advise male patients with female partners of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with TRODELVY and for 3 months after the last dose.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

In the ASCENT study (IMMU-132-05), the most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥25%) were nausea, neutropenia, diarrhea, fatigue, alopecia, anemia, vomiting, constipation, rash, decreased appetite, and abdominal pain. The most frequent serious adverse reactions (SAR) (>1%) were neutropenia (7%), diarrhea (4%), and pneumonia (3%). SAR were reported in 27% of patients, and 5% discontinued therapy due to adverse reactions. The most common Grade 3-4 lab abnormalities (incidence ≥25%) in the ASCENT study were reduced hemoglobin, lymphocytes, leukocytes, and neutrophils.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

UGT1A1 Inhibitors: Concomitant administration of TRODELVY with inhibitors of UGT1A1 may increase the incidence of adverse reactions due to potential increase in systemic exposure to SN-38. Avoid administering UGT1A1 inhibitors with TRODELVY.

UGT1A1 Inducers: Exposure to SN-38 may be substantially reduced in patients concomitantly receiving UGT1A1 enzyme inducers. Avoid administering UGT1A1 inducers with TRODELVY

Please see full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNING.

About Gilead Sciences

Gilead Sciences, Inc. is a biopharmaceutical company that has pursued and achieved breakthroughs in medicine for more than three decades, with the goal of creating a healthier world for all people. The company is committed to advancing innovative medicines to prevent and treat life-threatening diseases, including HIV, viral hepatitis and cancer. Gilead operates in more than 35 countries worldwide, with headquarters in Foster City, California.

Sacituzumab govitecan, sold under the brand name Trodelvy, is a Trop-2-directed antibody and topoisomerase inhibitor drug conjugate indicated for the treatment of metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC) in adult patients that have received at least two prior therapies.[1][2]

The most common side effects are nauseaneutropeniadiarrheafatigueanemiavomitingalopecia (hair loss), constipationdecreased appetiterash and abdominal pain.[1][2] Sacituzumab govitecan has a boxed warning about the risk of severe neutropenia (abnormally low levels of white blood cells) and severe diarrhea.[1][2] Sacituzumab govitecan may cause harm to a developing fetus or newborn baby.[1] Women are advised not to breastfeed while on sacituzumab govitecan and 1 month after the last dose is administered.[3]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers it to be a first-in-class medication.[4]

Mechanism

Sacituzumab govitecan is a conjugate of the humanized anti-Trop-2 monoclonal antibody linked with SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan.[5] Each antibody having on average 7.6 molecules of SN-38 attached.[6] SN-38 is too toxic to administer directly to patients, but linkage to an antibody allows the drug to specifically target cells containing Trop-2.

Sacituzumab govitecan is a Trop-2-directed antibody and topoisomerase inhibitor drug conjugate, meaning that the drug targets the Trop-2 receptor that helps the cancer grow, divide and spread, and is linked to topoisomerase inhibitor, which is a chemical compound that is toxic to cancer cells.[1] Approximately two of every ten breast cancer diagnoses worldwide are triple-negative.[1] Triple-negative breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that tests negative for estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein.[1] Therefore, triple-negative breast cancer does not respond to hormonal therapy medicines or medicines that target HER2.[1]

Development

Immunomedics announced in 2013, that it had received fast track designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the compound as a potential treatment for non-small cell lung cancer, small cell lung cancer, and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. Orphan drug status was granted for small cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer.[7][8] In February 2016, Immunomedics announced that sacituzumab govitecan had received an FDA breakthrough therapy designation (a classification designed to expedite the development and review of drugs that are intended, alone or in combination with one or more other drugs, to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition) for the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer who have failed at least two other prior therapies for metastatic disease.[9][10]

History

Sacituzumab govitecan was added to the proposed INN list in 2015,[11] and to the recommended list in 2016.[12]

Sacituzumab govitecan-hziy was approved for use in the United States in April 2020.[1][13][14][2]

Sacituzumab govitecan-hziy was approved based on the results of IMMU-132-01, a multicenter, single-arm clinical trial (NCT01631552) of 108 subjects with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer who had received at least two prior treatments for metastatic disease.[1][14][2] Of the 108 patients involved within the study, 107 were female and 1 was male.[15] Subjects received sacituzumab govitecan-hziy at a dose of 10 milligrams per kilogram of body weight intravenously on days one and eight every 21 days.[14][15] Treatment with sacituzumab govitecan-hziy was continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.[15] Tumor imaging was obtained every eight weeks.[14][2] The efficacy of sacituzumab govitecan-hziy was based on the overall response rate (ORR) – which reflects the percentage of subjects that had a certain amount of tumor shrinkage.[1][14] The ORR was 33.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.6 to 43.1). [1][14][15] Additionally, with the 33.3% of study participants who achieved a response, 2.8% of patients experienced complete responses.[15] The median time to response in patients was 2.0 months (range, 1.6 to 13.5), the median duration of response was 7.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.9 to 10.8), the median progression free survival was 5.5 months, and the median overall survival was 13.0 months.[15] Of the subjects that achieved an objective response to sacituzumab govitecan-hziy, 55.6% maintained their response for six or more months and 16.7% maintained their response for twelve or more months.[1][14]

Sacituzumab govitecan-hziy was granted accelerated approval along with priority reviewbreakthrough therapy, and fast track designations.[1][14] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted approval of Trodelvy to Immunomedics, Inc.[1]

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o “FDA Approves New Therapy for Triple Negative Breast Cancer That Has Spread, Not Responded to Other Treatments”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 22 April 2020. Retrieved 22 April 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e f “Drug Trial Snapshot: Trodelvy”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 22 April 2020. Retrieved 29 April 2020. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ (PDF)https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2020/761115s000lbl.pdf. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ “New Drug Therapy Approvals 2020”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 31 December 2020. Retrieved 17 January2021.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  5. ^ Sacituzumab Govitecan (IMMU-132), an Anti-Trop-2/SN-38 Antibody-Drug Conjugate: Characterization and Efficacy in Pancreatic, Gastric, and Other Cancers. 2015
  6. ^ “Novel Agents are Targeting Drivers of TNBC”http://www.medpagetoday.com. 28 June 2016.
  7. ^ “Sacituzumab govitecan Orphan Drug Designation and Approval”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 24 December 1999. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  8. ^ “Sacituzumab govitecan Orphan Drug Designation and Approval”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 24 December 1999. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  9. ^ “New Therapy Shows Early Promise, Continues to Progress in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer”Cure Today.
  10. ^ “U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Grants Breakthrough Therapy Designation to Immunomedics for Sacituzumab Govitecan for the Treatment of Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer”(Press release). Immunomedics. 5 February 2016. Retrieved 25 April 2020 – via GlobeNewswire.
  11. ^ World Health Organization (2015). “International nonproprietary names for pharmaceutical substances (INN): proposed INN: list 113”. WHO Drug Information29 (2): 260–1. hdl:10665/331080.
  12. ^ World Health Organization (2016). “International nonproprietary names for pharmaceutical substances (INN): recommended INN: list 75”. WHO Drug Information30 (1): 151–3. hdl:10665/331046.
  13. ^ “Trodelvy: FDA-Approved Drugs”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  14. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h “FDA grants accelerated approval to sacituzumab govitecan-hziy for metastatic triple negative breast cancer”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 22 April 2020. Retrieved 23 April 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  15. Jump up to:a b c d e f “Sacituzumab Govitecan-hziy in Refractory Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer”The New England Journal of Medicine.

Further reading

External links

 
Monoclonal antibody
Type?
SourceHumanized (from mouse)
TargetTrop-2
Clinical data
Trade namesTrodelvy
Other namesIMMU-132, hRS7-SN-38, sacituzumab govitecan-hziy
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
MedlinePlusa620034
License dataUS DailyMedSacituzumab_govitecan
Pregnancy
category
Contraindicated
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusUS: ℞-only
Identifiers
CAS Number1491917-83-9
PubChem CID91668186
DrugBankDB12893
ChemSpidernone
UNIIM9BYU8XDQ6
KEGGD10985
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC76H104N12O24S
Molar mass1601.79 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)Interactive image
showSMILES
show 

//////////sacituzumab govitecan-hziy, fda 2021, approvals 2021, Trodelvy , hRS 7SN38, hRS7-SN38, IMMU 132, IMMU-132, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, Sacituzumab govitecan, sacituzumab govitecan-hziy, CANCER, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

#sacituzumab govitecan-hziy, #fda 2021, #approvals 2021, #Trodelvy , #hRS 7SN38, #hRS7-SN38, #IMMU 132, #IMMU-132, #MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, #Sacituzumab govitecan, #sacituzumab govitecan-hziy, #CANCER, #MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

CCC1=C2CN3C(=CC4=C(C3=O)COC(=O)C4(CC)OC(=O)OCC5=CC=C(C=C5)NC(=O)C(CCCCN)NC(=O)COCC(=O)NCCOCCOCCOCCOCCOCCOCCOCCOCCN6C=C(N=N6)CNC(=O)C7CCC(CC7)CN8C(=O)CC(C8=O)SCC(C(=O)O)N)C2=NC9=C1C=C(C=C9)O

wdt-14

NEW DRUG APPROVALS

ONE TIME

$10.00

Evinacumab


(Heavy chain)
EVQLVESGGG VIQPGGSLRL SCAASGFTFD DYAMNWVRQG PGKGLEWVSA ISGDGGSTYY
ADSVKGRFTI SRDNSKNSLY LQMNSLRAED TAFFYCAKDL RNTIFGVVIP DAFDIWGQGT
MVTVSSASTK GPSVFPLAPC SRSTSESTAA LGCLVKDYFP EPVTVSWNSG ALTSGVHTFP
AVLQSSGLYS LSSVVTVPSS SLGTKTYTCN VDHKPSNTKV DKRVESKYGP PCPPCPAPEF
LGGPSVFLFP PKPKDTLMIS RTPEVTCVVV DVSQEDPEVQ FNWYVDGVEV HNAKTKPREE
QFNSTYRVVS VLTVLHQDWL NGKEYKCKVS NKGLPSSIEK TISKAKGQPR EPQVYTLPPS
QEEMTKNQVS LTCLVKGFYP SDIAVEWESN GQPENNYKTT PPVLDSDGSF FLYSRLTVDK
SRWQEGNVFS CSVMHEALHN HYTQKSLSLS LGK
(Light chain)
DIQMTQSPST LSASVGDRVT ITCRASQSIR SWLAWYQQKP GKAPKLLIYK ASSLESGVPS
RFSGSGSGTE FTLTISSLQP DDFATYYCQQ YNSYSYTFGQ GTKLEIKRTV AAPSVFIFPP
SDEQLKSGTA SVVCLLNNFY PREAKVQWKV DNALQSGNSQ ESVTEQDSKD STYSLSSTLT
LSKADYEKHK VYACEVTHQG LSSPVTKSFN RGEC
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H96, H140-L214, H153-H209, H232-H’232, H235-H’235, H267-H327, H373-H431, H’22-H’96, H’140-L’214, H’153-H’209, H’267-H’327, H’373-H’431, L23-L88, L134-L194, L’23-L’88, L’134-L’194)

Evinacumab

エビナクマブ (遺伝子組換え)

Immunoglobulin G4, anti-​(human protein ANGPTL3 (angiopoietin-​like 3)​) (human monoclonal REGN1500 heavy chain)​, disulfide with human monoclonal REGN1500 light chain, dimer

FormulaC6480H9992N1716O2042S46
CAS1446419-85-7
Mol weight146081.9345

Protein Sequence

Sequence Length: 1334, 453, 453, 214, 214multichain; modified (modifications unspecified)

FDA APPROVED,  2021/2/11, EVKEEZA

Antihyperlipidemic, Anti-angiopietin like 3

Monoclonal antibody
Treatment of dyslipidemia

  • REGN 1500
  • REGN-1500
  • REGN1500

Sequence:

1EVQLVESGGG VIQPGGSLRL SCAASGFTFD DYAMNWVRQG PGKGLEWVSA51ISGDGGSTYY ADSVKGRFTI SRDNSKNSLY LQMNSLRAED TAFFYCAKDL101RNTIFGVVIP DAFDIWGQGT MVTVSSASTK GPSVFPLAPC SRSTSESTAA151LGCLVKDYFP EPVTVSWNSG ALTSGVHTFP AVLQSSGLYS LSSVVTVPSS201SLGTKTYTCN VDHKPSNTKV DKRVESKYGP PCPPCPAPEF LGGPSVFLFP251PKPKDTLMIS RTPEVTCVVV DVSQEDPEVQ FNWYVDGVEV HNAKTKPREE301QFNSTYRVVS VLTVLHQDWL NGKEYKCKVS NKGLPSSIEK TISKAKGQPR351EPQVYTLPPS QEEMTKNQVS LTCLVKGFYP SDIAVEWESN GQPENNYKTT401PPVLDSDGSF FLYSRLTVDK SRWQEGNVFS CSVMHEALHN HYTQKSLSLS451LGK

Sequence:

1EVQLVESGGG VIQPGGSLRL SCAASGFTFD DYAMNWVRQG PGKGLEWVSA51ISGDGGSTYY ADSVKGRFTI SRDNSKNSLY LQMNSLRAED TAFFYCAKDL101RNTIFGVVIP DAFDIWGQGT MVTVSSASTK GPSVFPLAPC SRSTSESTAA151LGCLVKDYFP EPVTVSWNSG ALTSGVHTFP AVLQSSGLYS LSSVVTVPSS201SLGTKTYTCN VDHKPSNTKV DKRVESKYGP PCPPCPAPEF LGGPSVFLFP251PKPKDTLMIS RTPEVTCVVV DVSQEDPEVQ FNWYVDGVEV HNAKTKPREE301QFNSTYRVVS VLTVLHQDWL NGKEYKCKVS NKGLPSSIEK TISKAKGQPR351EPQVYTLPPS QEEMTKNQVS LTCLVKGFYP SDIAVEWESN GQPENNYKTT401PPVLDSDGSF FLYSRLTVDK SRWQEGNVFS CSVMHEALHN HYTQKSLSLS451LGK

Sequence:

1DIQMTQSPST LSASVGDRVT ITCRASQSIR SWLAWYQQKP GKAPKLLIYK51ASSLESGVPS RFSGSGSGTE FTLTISSLQP DDFATYYCQQ YNSYSYTFGQ101GTKLEIKRTV AAPSVFIFPP SDEQLKSGTA SVVCLLNNFY PREAKVQWKV151DNALQSGNSQ ESVTEQDSKD STYSLSSTLT LSKADYEKHK VYACEVTHQG201LSSPVTKSFN RGEC

Sequence:

1DIQMTQSPST LSASVGDRVT ITCRASQSIR SWLAWYQQKP GKAPKLLIYK51ASSLESGVPS RFSGSGSGTE FTLTISSLQP DDFATYYCQQ YNSYSYTFGQ101GTKLEIKRTV AAPSVFIFPP SDEQLKSGTA SVVCLLNNFY PREAKVQWKV151DNALQSGNSQ ESVTEQDSKD STYSLSSTLT LSKADYEKHK VYACEVTHQG201LSSPVTKSFN RGEC

Sequence Modifications

TypeLocationDescription
bridgeCys-22 – Cys-96disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-140 – Cys-214”disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-153 – Cys-209disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-232 – Cys-232′disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-235 – Cys-235′disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-267 – Cys-327disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-373 – Cys-431disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-22′ – Cys-96′disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-140′ – Cys-214”’disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-153′ – Cys-209′disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-267′ – Cys-327′disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-373′ – Cys-431′disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-23” – Cys-88”disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-134” – Cys-194”disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-23”’ – Cys-88”’disulfide bridge
bridgeCys-134”’ – Cys-194”’disulfide bridge

PATENTS

WO 2017024062

 US 20170305999 

Evinacumab, sold under the brand name Evkeeza, is a monoclonal antibody medication for the treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH).[1][2]

Evinacumab is a recombinant human IgG4 monoclonal antibody targeted against angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) and the first drug of its kind. The ANGPTL family of proteins serve a number of physiologic functions – including involvement in the regulation of lipid metabolism – which have made them desirable therapeutic targets in recent years.2 Loss-of-function mutations in ANGPTL3 have been noted to result in hypolipidemia and subsequent reductions in cardiovascular risk, whereas increases in function appear to be associated with cardiovascular risk, and it was these observations that provided a rationale for the development of a therapy targeted against ANGPTL3.3

In February 2021, evinacumab became the first-and-only inhibitor of ANGPTL3 to receive FDA approval after it was granted approval for the adjunctive treatment of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) under the brand name “Evkeeza”.8 Evinacumab is novel in its mechanism of action compared with other lipid-lowering therapies and therefore provides a unique and synergistic therapeutic option in the treatment of HoFH.

Common side effects include nasopharyngitis (cold), influenza-like illness, dizziness, rhinorrhea (runny nose), and nausea. Serious hypersensitivity (allergic) reactions have occurred in the Evkeeza clinical trials.[2]

Evinacumab binds to the angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3).[2] ANGPTL3 slows the function of certain enzymes that break down fats in the body.[2] Evinacumab blocks ANGPTL3, allowing faster break down of fats that lead to high cholesterol.[2] Evinacumab was approved for medical use in the United States in February 2021.[2][3]

NAMEDOSAGESTRENGTHROUTELABELLERMARKETING STARTMARKETING END  
EvkeezaInjection, solution, concentrate150 mg/1mLIntravenousRegeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.2021-02-11Not applicableUS flag 
EvkeezaInjection, solution, concentrate150 mg/1mLIntravenousRegeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.2021-02-11Not applicableUS flag 
EVKEEZA™ (evinacumab-dgnb) INJECTION | Regeneron Corporate

History

The effectiveness and safety of evinacumab were evaluated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, 24-week trial enrolling 65 participants with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH).[2] In the trial, 43 participants received 15 mg/kg of evinacumab every four weeks and 22 participants received the placebo.[2] Participants were taking other lipid-lowering therapies as well.[2]

The primary measure of effectiveness was the percent change in low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) from the beginning of treatment to week 24.[2] At week 24, participants receiving evinacumab had an average 47% decrease in LDL-C while participants on the placebo had an average 2% increase.[2]

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted the application for evinacumab orphan drugbreakthrough therapy, and priority review designations.[2] The FDA granted approval of Evkeeza to Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.[2]

References

  1. Jump up to:a b https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2021/761181s000lbl.pdf
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j k l m n “FDA approves add-on therapy for patients with genetic form of severely”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 11 February 2021. Retrieved 12 February 2021.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ “FDA Approves First-in-class Evkeeza (evinacumab-dgnb) for Patients with Ultra-rare Inherited Form of High Cholesterol” (Press release). Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. 11 February 2021. Retrieved 12 February 2021 – via PR Newswire.

Further reading

External links

Monoclonal antibody
TypeWhole antibody
SourceHuman
TargetAngiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3)
Clinical data
Trade namesEvkeeza
Other namesREGN1500, evinacumab-dgnb
License dataUS DailyMedEvinacumab
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusUS: ℞-only [1][2]
Identifiers
CAS Number1446419-85-7
DrugBankDB15354
ChemSpidernone
UNIIT8B2ORP1DW
KEGGD11753
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC6480H9992N1716O2042S46
Molar mass146083.95 g·mol−1

//////////////

#Evinacumab, #Peptide, #APPROVALS 2021, #FDA 2021, #Monoclonal antibody, #dyslipidemia, #エビナクマブ (遺伝子組換え) , #REGN 1500, #REGN-1500, #REGN1500, #Anthony melvin crasto, #world drug tracker. # new drug approvals, #pharma

Naxitamab


Danyelza (naxitamab) Cancer Medication - Cancer Health

(Heavy chain)
QVQLVESGPG VVQPGRSLRI SCAVSGFSVT NYGVHWVRQP PGKGLEWLGV IWAGGITNYN
SAFMSRLTIS KDNSKNTVYL QMNSLRAEDT AMYYCASRGG HYGYALDYWG QGTLVTVSSA
STKGPSVFPL APSSKSTSGG TAALGCLVKD YFPEPVTVSW NSGALTSGVH TFPAVLQSSG
LYSLSSVVTV PSSSLGTQTY ICNVNHKPSN TKVDKRVEPK SCDKTHTCPP CPAPELLGGP
SVFLFPPKPK DTLMISRTPE VTCVVVDVSH EDPEVKFNWY VDGVEVHNAK TKPREEQYNS
TYRVVSVLTV LHQDWLNGKE YKCKVSNKAL PAPIEKTISK AKGQPREPQV YTLPPSRDEL
TKNQVSLTCL VKGFYPSDIA VEWESNGQPE NNYKTTPPVL DSDGSFFLYS KLTVDKSRWQ
QGNVFSCSVM HEALHNHYTQ KSLSLSPGK
(Light chain)
EIVMTQTPAT LSVSAGERVT ITCKASQSVS NDVTWYQQKP GQAPRLLIYS ASNRYSGVPA
RFSGSGYGTE FTFTISSVQS EDFAVYFCQQ DYSSFGQGTK LEIKRTVAAP SVFIFPPSDE
QLKSGTASVV CLLNNFYPRE AKVQWKVDNA LQSGNSQESV TEQDSKDSTY SLSSTLTLSK
ADYEKHKVYA CEVTHQGLSS PVTKSFNRGE C
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H95, H146-H202, H222-L211, H228-H’228, H231-H’231, H263-H323, H369-H427, H’22-H’95, H’146-H’202, H’222-L’211, H’263-H’323, H’369-H’427, L23-L88, L131-L191, L’23-L’88, L’131-L’191)

Naxitamab

ナキシタマブ;

Antineoplastic, Anti-GD2 antibody

FormulaC6414H9910N1718O1996S44
CAS1879925-92-4
Mol weight144434.4882

FDA APPROVED 2020/11/25, Danyelza

FDA grants accelerated approval to naxitamab for high-risk neuroblastoma in bone or bone marrow

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-approvals-and-databases/fda-grants-accelerated-approval-naxitamab-high-risk-neuroblastoma-bone-or-bone-marrow

On November 25, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to naxitamab (DANYELZA, Y-mAbs Therapeutics, Inc.) in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for pediatric patients one year of age and older and adult patients with relapsed or refractory high-risk neuroblastoma in the bone or bone marrow demonstrating a partial response, minor response, or stable disease to prior therapy.

Efficacy was evaluated in patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma in the bone or bone marrow enrolled in two single-arm, open-label trials: Study 201 (NCT 03363373) and Study 12-230 (NCT 01757626). Patients with progressive disease following their most recent therapy were excluded. Patients received 3 mg/kg naxitamab administered as an intravenous infusion on days 1, 3, and 5 of each 4-week cycle in combination with GM-CSF subcutaneously at 250 µg/m2/day on days -4 to 0 and at 500 µg/m2/day on days 1 to 5. At the investigator’s discretion, patients were permitted to receive pre-planned radiation to the primary disease site in Study 201 and radiation therapy to non-target bony lesions or soft tissue disease in Study 12-230.

The main efficacy outcome measures were confirmed overall response rate (ORR) per the revised International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria (INRC) and duration of response (DOR). Among 22 patients treated in the multicenter Study 201, the ORR was 45% (95% CI: 24%, 68%) and 30% of responders had a DOR greater or equal to 6 months. Among 38 patients treated in the single-center Study 12-230, the ORR was 34% (95% CI: 20%, 51%) with 23% of patients having a DOR greater or equal to 6 months. For both trials, responses were observed in either the bone, bone marrow or both.

The prescribing information contains a Boxed Warning stating that naxitamab can cause serious infusion-related reactions and neurotoxicity, including severe neuropathic pain, transverse myelitis and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). To mitigate these risks, patients should receive premedication prior to each naxitamab infusion and be closely monitored during and for at least two hours following completion of each infusion.

The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥25% in either trial) in patients receiving naxitamab were infusion-related reactions, pain, tachycardia, vomiting, cough, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, hypertension, fatigue, erythema multiforme, peripheral neuropathy, urticaria, pyrexia, headache, injection site reaction, edema, anxiety, localized edema, and irritability. The most common Grade 3 or 4 laboratory abnormalities (≥5% in either trial) were decreased lymphocytes, decreased neutrophils, decreased hemoglobin, decreased platelet count, decreased potassium, increased alanine aminotransferase, decreased glucose, decreased calcium, decreased albumin, decreased sodium and decreased phosphate.

The recommended naxitamab dose is 3 mg/kg/day (up to 150 mg/day) on days 1, 3, and 5 of each treatment cycle, administered after dilution as an intravenous infusion in combination with GM-CSF, subcutaneously at 250 µg/m2/day on days -4 to 0 and at 500 µg/m2/day on days 1 to 5. Treatment cycles are repeated every 4 to 8 weeks.

View full prescribing information for DANYELZA. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2020/761171lbl.pdf

This review used the Real-Time Oncology Review (RTOR) pilot program and the Assessment Aid, a voluntary submission from the applicant to facilitate the FDA’s assessment.

This application was granted accelerated approval based on overall response rate and duration of response. Continued approval may be contingent upon verification and description of clinical benefit in confirmatory trials.

This application was granted priority review, breakthrough therapy, and orphan drug designation. A priority review voucher was issued for this rare pediatric disease product application. A description of FDA expedited programs is in the Guidance for Industry: Expedited Programs for Serious Conditions-Drugs and Biologics.

////////////Naxitamab, priority review, breakthrough therapy, orphan drug, FDA 2020, 2020 APPROVALS, Danyelza, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, PEPTIDE, ナキシタマブ, 

Ansuvimab-zykl


Ebola Virus Treatment Ebanga Gets FDA Approval - MPR

Ansuvimab-zykl

FDA APPROVED, 12/21/2020, EBANGA

To treat ebola

https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-approves-treatment-ebola-virus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Ebanga (Ansuvimab-zykl), a human monoclonal antibody, for the treatment for Zaire ebolavirus (Ebolavirus) infection in adults and children. Ebanga blocks binding of the virus to the cell receptor, preventing its entry into the cell.

Zaire ebolavirus is one of four Ebolavirus species that can cause a potentially fatal human disease. It is transmitted through blood, body fluids, and tissues of infected people or wild animals, and through surfaces and materials, such as bedding and clothing, contaminated with these fluids. Individuals who care for people with the disease, including health care workers who do not use correct infection control precautions, are at the highest risk for infection.

During an Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2018-2019, Ebanga was evaluated in a clinical trial (the PALM trial). The PALM trial was led by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the DRC’s Institut National de Recherche Biomédicale with contributions from several other international organizations and agencies.

In the PALM trial, the safety and efficacy of Ebanga was evaluated in a multi-center, open-label, randomized controlled trial. 174 participants (120 adults and 54 pediatric patients) with confirmed Ebolavirus infection received Ebanga intravenously as a single 50 mg/kg infusion and 168 participants (135 adults and 33 pediatric patients) received an investigational control. The primary efficacy endpoint was 28-day mortality. The primary analysis population was all patients who were randomized and concurrently eligible to receive either Ebanga or the investigational control during the same time period of the trial. Of the 174 patients who received Ebanga, 35.1% died after 28 days, compared to 49.4% of the 168 patients who received a control.

The most common symptoms experienced while receiving Ebanga include: fever, tachycardia (fast heart rate), diarrhea, vomiting, hypotension (low blood pressure), tachypnea (fast breathing) and chills; however, these are also common symptoms of Ebolavirus infection. Hypersensitivity, including infusion-related events, can occur in patients taking Ebanga, and treatment should be discontinued in the event of a hypersensitivity reaction.

Patients who receive Ebanga should avoid the concurrent administration of a live virus vaccine against Ebolavirus. There is the potential for Ebanga to inhibit replication of a live vaccine virus and possibly reduce the efficacy of this vaccine.

Ebanga was granted an Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage drug development for rare diseases. Additionally, the agency granted Ebanga a Breakthrough Therapy designation.

FDA granted the approval to Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, LP.

Ansuvimab, sold under the brand name Ebanga, is a monoclonal antibody medication for the treatment of Zaire ebolavirus (Ebolavirus) infection.[1][2]

The most common symptoms include fever, tachycardia (fast heart rate), diarrhea, vomiting, hypotension (low blood pressure), tachypnea (fast breathing) and chills; however, these are also common symptoms of Ebolavirus infection.[1]

Ansuvimab was approved for medical use in the United States in December 2020.[1][2]

Chemistry

The drug is composed of a single monoclonal antibody (mAb) and was initially isolated from immortalized B-cells that were obtained from a survivor of the 1995 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in KikwitDemocratic Republic of Congo.[3] In work supported by the United States National Institutes of Health and the Defense Advanced Projects Agency, the heavy and light chain sequences of ansuvimab mAb was cloned into CHO cell lines and initial production runs were produced by Cook Phamica d.b.a. Catalent under contract of Medimmune.[4][5]

Mechanism of action

Neutralization

Ansuvimab is a monoclonal antibody therapy that is infused intravenously into patients with Ebola virus disease. Ansuvimab is a neutralizing antibody,[3] meaning it binds to a protein on the surface of Ebola virus that is required to infect cells. Specifically, ansuvimab neutralizes infection by binding to a region of the Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein that, in the absence of ansuvimab, would interact with virus’s cell receptor protein, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1).[6][7][8] This “competition” by ansuvimab prevents Ebola virus from binding to NPC1 and “neutralizes” the virus’s ability to infect the targeted cell.[6]

Effector function

Antibodies have antigen-binding fragment (Fab) regions and constant fragment (Fc) regions. The Neutralization of virus infection occurs when the Fab regions of antibodies binds to virus antigen(s) in a manner that blocks infection. Antibodies are also able to “kill” virus particles directly and/or kill infected cells using antibody-mediated “effector functions” such as opsonization, complement-dependent cytotoxicityantibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent phagocytosis. These effector functions are contained in the Fc region of antibodies, but is also dependent on binding of the Fab region to antigen. Effector functions also require the use of complement proteins in serum or Fc-receptor on cell membranes. Ansuvimab has been found to be capable of killing cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.[3] Other functional killing tests have not been performed.

History

Ansuvimab is a monoclonal antibody that is being evaluated as a treatment for Ebola virus disease.[9] Its discovery was led by the laboratory of Nancy Sullivan at the United States National Institute of Health Vaccine Research Center and J. J. Muyembe-Tamfum from the Institut National pour la Recherche Biomedicale (INRB) in the Democratic Republic of Congo, working in collaboration with the Institute of Biomedical Research and the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases.[3][10] Ansuvimab was isolated from the blood of a survivor of the 1995 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in KikwitDemocratic Republic of Congo roughly ten years later.[3]

In 2018, a Phase 1 clinical trial of ansuvimab was conducted by Martin Gaudinski within the Vaccine Research Center Clinical Trials Program that is led by Julie E. Ledgerwood.[5][4][11] Ansuvimab is also being evaluated during the 2018 North Kivu Ebola outbreak.[12]

Ansuvimab has also shown success with lowering the mortality rate from ~70% to about 34%. In August 2019, Congolese health authorities, the World Health Organization, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health promoted the use of ansuvimab, alongside REGN-EB3, a similar Regeneron-produced monoclonal antibody treatment, over other treatments yielding higher mortality rates, after ending clinical trials during the outbreak.[13][14]

Discovery

A 2016 paper describes the efforts of how ansuvimab was originally developed as part of research efforts lead by Dr. Nancy Sullivan at the United States National Institute of Health Vaccine Research Center and Dr. J. J. Muyembe-Tamfum from the Institut National de Recherche Biomedicale (INRB) in the Democratic Republic of Congo.[3][10] This collaborative effort also involved researchers from Institute of Biomedical Research and the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases.[3][10] A survivor from the 1995 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in KikwitDemocratic Republic of Congo donated blood to the project that began roughly ten years after they had recovered.[3] Memory B cells isolated from the survivor’s blood were immortalized, cultured and screened for their ability to produce monoclonal antibodies that reacted with the glycoprotein of Ebola virus. Ansuvimab was identified from one of these cultures and the antibody heavy and light chain gene sequences were sequenced from the cells.[3] These sequences were then cloned into recombinant DNA plasmids and purified antibody protein for initial studies was produced in cells derived from HEK 293 cells.[3]

Ansuvimab and mAb100 combination

In an experiment described in the 2016 paper, rhesus macaques were infected with Ebola virus and treated with a combination of ansuvimab and another antibody isolated from the same subject, mAb100. Three doses of the combination were given once a day starting 1 day after the animals were infected. The control animal died and the treated animals all survived.[3]

Ansuvimab monotherapy

In a second experiment described in the 2016 paper, rhesus macaques were infected with Ebola virus and only treated with ansuvimab. Three doses of ansuvimab were given once a day starting 1 day or 5 days after the animals were infected. The control animals died and the treated animals all survived.[3] Unpublished data referred to in a publication of the 2018 Phase I clinical trial results of ansuvimab, reported that a single infusion of ansuvimab provided full protection of rhesus macaques and was the basis of the dosing used for human studies.[5][4]

Development

Ansuvimab was developed by the Vaccine Research Center with support of the United States National Institutes of Health and the Defense Advanced Projects Agency. The heavy and light chain sequences of ansuvimab mAb were cloned into CHO cell lines to enable large-scale production of antibody product for use in humans.[4][5]

Human safety testing

In early 2018,[9] a Phase 1 clinical trial of ansuvimab’s safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics was conducted by Dr. Martin Gaudinski within the Vaccine Research Center Clinical Trials Program that is led by Dr. Julie E. Ledgerwood.[5][4][11] The study was performed in the United States at the NIH Clinical Center and tested single dose infusions of ansuvimab infused over 30 minutes. The study showed that ansuvimab was safe, had minimal side effects and had a half-life of 24 days.[5][4]

Ridgeback Biotherapeutics

A license for ansuvimab was obtained by Ridgeback Biotherapeutics in 2018, from the National Institutes of HealthNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.[15] Ansuvimab was given orphan drug status in May 2019 and March 2020.[16][17][18]

Experimental use in the Democratic Republic of Congo

During the 2018 Équateur province Ebola outbreak, ansuvimab was requested by the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) Ministry of Public Health. Ansuvimab was approved for compassionate use by the World Health Organization MEURI ethical protocol and at DRC ethics board. Ansuvimab was sent along with other therapeutic agents to the outbreak sites.[19][20][11] However, the outbreak came to a conclusion before any therapeutic agents were given to patients.[11]

Approximately one month following the conclusion of the Équateur province outbreak, a distinct outbreak was noted in Kivu in the DRC (2018–20 Kivu Ebola outbreak). Once again, ansuvimab received approval for compassionate use by WHO MEURI and DRC ethic boards and has been given to many patients under these protocols.[11] In November 2018, the Pamoja Tulinde Maisha (PALM [together save lives]) open-label randomized clinical control trial was begun at multiple treatment units testing ansuvimab, REGN-EB3 and remdesivir to ZMapp. Despite the difficulty of running a clinical trial in a conflict zone, investigators have enrolled 681 patients towards their goal of 725. An interim analysis by the Data Safety and Monitoring Board (DSMB) of the first 499 patient found that ansuvimab and REGN-EB3 were superior to the comparator ZMapp. Overall mortality of patients in the ZMapp and remdesivir groups were 49% and 53% compared to 34% and 29% for ansuvimab and REGN-EB3. When looking at patients who arrived early after disease symptoms appeared, survival was 89% for ansuvimab and 94% for REGN-EB3. While the study was not powered to determine whether there is any difference between REGN-EB3 and ansuvimab, the survival difference between those two therapies and ZMapp was significant. This led to the DSMB halting the study and PALM investigators dropping the remdesivir and ZMapp arms from the clinical trial. All patients in the outbreak who elect to participate in the trial will now be given either ansuvimab or REGN-EB3.[21][22][13][12]

In October 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved atoltivimab/maftivimab/odesivimab (Inmazeb, formerly REGN-EB3) with an indication for the treatment of infection caused by Zaire ebolavirus.[23]

FDA approves ansuvimab-zykl for Ebola virus infection

DECEMBER 21, 2020 BY JANICE REICHERThttps://www.antibodysociety.org/antibody-therapeutic/fda-approves-ansuvimab-zykl-for-ebola-virus-infection/embed/#?secret=zWW0Sr0BdW

On December 21, 2020, the US Food and Drug Administration approved Ebanga (ansuvimab-zykl) for the treatment for Zaire ebolavirus (Ebolavirus) infection in adults and children. Ebanga had been granted US Orphan Drug designation and Breakthrough Therapy designations. Ansuvimab is a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes the virus.

The safety and efficacy of Ebanga were evaluated in the multi-center, open-label, randomized controlled PALM trial. In this study, 174 participants (120 adults and 54 pediatric patients) with confirmed Ebolavirus infection received Ebanga intravenously as a single 50 mg/kg infusion and 168 participants (135 adults and 33 pediatric patients) received an investigational control. The primary efficacy endpoint was 28-day mortality. Of the 174 patients who received Ebanga, 35.1% died after 28 days, compared to 49.4% of the 168 patients who received a control.

Ebanga is the 12th antibody therapeutic to be granted a first approval in the US or EU during 2020.

The Antibody Society maintains a comprehensive table of approved monoclonal antibody therapeutics and those in regulatory review in the EU or US. The table, which is located in the Web Resources section of the Society’s website, can be downloaded in Excel format.

References

  1. Jump up to:a b c d “FDA Approves Treatment for Ebola Virus”U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 21 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. Jump up to:a b “Ridgeback Biotherapeutics LP Announces the Approval of Ebanga for Ebola” (Press release). Ridgeback Biotherapeutics LP. 22 December 2020. Retrieved 23 December 2020– via Business Wire.
  3. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j k l Corti D, Misasi J, Mulangu S, Stanley DA, Kanekiyo M, Wollen S, et al. (March 2016). “Protective monotherapy against lethal Ebola virus infection by a potently neutralizing antibody”Science351 (6279): 1339–42. Bibcode:2016Sci…351.1339Cdoi:10.1126/science.aad5224PMID 26917593.
  4. Jump up to:a b c d e f Clinical trial number NCT03478891 for “Safety and Pharmacokinetics of a Human Monoclonal Antibody, VRC-EBOMAB092-00-AB (MAb114), Administered Intravenously to Healthy Adults” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  5. Jump up to:a b c d e f Gaudinski MR, Coates EE, Novik L, Widge A, Houser KV, Burch E, et al. (March 2019). “Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity of the therapeutic monoclonal antibody ansuvimab targeting Ebola virus glycoprotein (VRC 608): an open-label phase 1 study”Lancet393 (10174): 889–898. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30036-4PMC 6436835PMID 30686586.
  6. Jump up to:a b Misasi J, Gilman MS, Kanekiyo M, Gui M, Cagigi A, Mulangu S, et al. (March 2016). “Structural and molecular basis for Ebola virus neutralization by protective human antibodies”Science351 (6279): 1343–6. Bibcode:2016Sci…351.1343Mdoi:10.1126/science.aad6117PMC 5241105PMID 26917592.
  7. ^ Côté M, Misasi J, Ren T, Bruchez A, Lee K, Filone CM, et al. (August 2011). “Small molecule inhibitors reveal Niemann-Pick C1 is essential for Ebola virus infection”Nature477 (7364): 344–8. Bibcode:2011Natur.477..344Cdoi:10.1038/nature10380PMC 3230319PMID 21866101.
  8. ^ Carette JE, Raaben M, Wong AC, Herbert AS, Obernosterer G, Mulherkar N, et al. (August 2011). “Ebola virus entry requires the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1”Nature477 (7364): 340–3. Bibcode:2011Natur.477..340Cdoi:10.1038/nature10348PMC 3175325PMID 21866103.
  9. Jump up to:a b “NIH begins testing Ebola treatment in early-stage trial”National Institutes of Health (NIH). 2018-05-23. Retrieved 2018-10-15.
  10. Jump up to:a b c Hayden EC (2016-02-26). “Ebola survivor’s blood holds promise of new treatment”Naturedoi:10.1038/nature.2016.19440ISSN 1476-4687.
  11. Jump up to:a b c d e “NIH VideoCast – CC Grand Rounds: Response to an Outbreak: Ebola Virus Monoclonal Antibody (mAb114) Rapid Clinical Development”videocast.nih.gov. Retrieved 2019-08-09.
  12. Jump up to:a b Kingsley-Hall A. “Congo’s experimental mAb114 Ebola treatment appears successful: authorities | Central Africa”http://www.theafricareport.com. Retrieved 2018-10-15.
  13. Jump up to:a b McNeil DG (12 August 2019). “A Cure for Ebola? Two New Treatments Prove Highly Effective in Congo”The New York Times. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  14. ^ Molteni M (12 August 2019). “Ebola is Now Curable. Here’s How The New Treatments Work”Wired. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  15. ^ “Ridgeback Biotherapeutics LP announces licensing of mAb114, an experimental Ebola treatment, from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases” (Press release). Ridgeback Biotherapeutics LP. Retrieved 2019-08-17 – via PR Newswire.
  16. ^ “Ansuvimab Orphan Drug Designations and Approvals”accessdata.fda.gov. 8 May 2019. Retrieved 24 December 2020.
  17. ^ “Ansuvimab Orphan Drug Designations and Approvals”accessdata.fda.gov. 30 March 2020. Retrieved 24 December 2020.
  18. ^ “Ridgeback Biotherapeutics LP Announces Orphan Drug Designation for mAb114”(Press release). Ridgeback Biotherapeutics LP. Retrieved 2019-08-17 – via PR Newswire.
  19. ^ Check Hayden, Erika (May 2018). “Experimental drugs poised for use in Ebola outbreak”Nature557 (7706): 475–476. Bibcode:2018Natur.557..475Cdoi:10.1038/d41586-018-05205-xISSN 0028-0836PMID 29789732.
  20. ^ WHO: Consultation on Monitored Emergency Use of Unregistered and Investigational Interventions for Ebola virus Disease. https://www.who.int/emergencies/ebola/MEURI-Ebola.pdf
  21. ^ Mole B (2019-08-13). “Two Ebola drugs boost survival rates, according to early trial data”Ars Technica. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  22. ^ “Independent monitoring board recommends early termination of Ebola therapeutics trial in DRC because of favorable results with two of four candidates”National Institutes of Health (NIH). 2019-08-12. Retrieved 2019-08-17.
  23. ^ “FDA Approves First Treatment for Ebola Virus”U.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) (Press release). 14 October 2020. Retrieved 14 October 2020.  This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

External links

  • “Ansuvimab”Drug Information Portal. U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Monoclonal antibody
TypeWhole antibody
SourceHuman
TargetZaire ebolavirus
Clinical data
Trade namesEbanga
Other namesAnsuvimab-zykl, mAb114
License dataUS DailyMedAnsuvimab
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
Drug classMonoclonal antibody
ATC codeNone
Legal status
Legal statusUS: ℞-only [1]
Identifiers
CAS Number2375952-29-5
DrugBankDB16385
UNIITG8IQ19NG2
KEGGD11875
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC6368H9924N1724O1994S44
Molar mass143950.15 g·mol−1

//////////Ansuvimab-zykl , EBANGA, FDA 2020, 2020 APPROVALS, MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, Orphan Drug designation, , Breakthrough Therapy designation , Ridgeback Biotherapeutics, 

Eptinezumab エプチネズマブ;


Fig. 4.7

Eptinezumab

エプチネズマブ;

(Heavy chain)
EVQLVESGGG LVQPGGSLRL SCAVSGIDLS GYYMNWVRQA PGKGLEWVGV IGINGATYYA
SWAKGRFTIS RDNSKTTVYL QMNSLRAEDT AVYFCARGDI WGQGTLVTVS SASTKGPSVF
PLAPSSKSTS GGTAALGCLV KDYFPEPVTV SWNSGALTSG VHTFPAVLQS SGLYSLSSVV
TVPSSSLGTQ TYICNVNHKP SNTKVDARVE PKSCDKTHTC PPCPAPELLG GPSVFLFPPK
PKDTLMISRT PEVTCVVVDV SHEDPEVKFN WYVDGVEVHN AKTKPREEQY ASTYRVVSVL
TVLHQDWLNG KEYKCKVSNK ALPAPIEKTI SKAKGQPREP QVYTLPPSRE EMTKNQVSLT
CLVKGFYPSD IAVEWESNGQ PENNYKTTPP VLDSDGSFFL YSKLTVDKSR WQQGNVFSCS
VMHEALHNHY TQKSLSLSPG K
(Light chain)
QVLTQSPSSL SASVGDRVTI NCQASQSVYH NTYLAWYQQK PGKVPKQLIY DASTLASGVP
SRFSGSGSGT DFTLTISSLQ PEDVATYYCL GSYDCTNGDC FVFGGGTKVE IKRTVAAPSV
FIFPPSDEQL KSGTASVVCL LNNFYPREAK VQWKVDNALQ SGNSQESVTE QDSKDSTYSL
SSTLTLSKAD YEKHKVYACE VTHQGLSSPV TKSFNRGEC
(Disulfide bridge: H22-H95, H138-H194, H214-L219, H220-H’220, H223-H’223, H255-H315, H361-H419, H’22-H’95, H’138-H’194, H’214-L’219, H’255-H’315, H’361-H’419, L22-L89, L139-L199, L’22-L’89, L’139-L’199)

Formula
C6352H9838N1694O1992S46
cas
1644539-04-7
Mol weight
143281.2247

Antimigraine, Anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide (GCRP) antibody

Immunoglobulin G1, anti-(calcitonin gene-related peptide) (human-oryctolagus cuniculus monoclonal ALD403 heavy chain), disulfide with human-oryctolagus cuniculus monoclonal ALD403 kappa-chain, dimer

Approved 2020 fda

ALD403, UNII-8202AY8I7H

Humanized anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) IgG1 antibody for the treatment of migraine.

Eptinezumab, sold under the brand name Vyepti, is a medication for the preventive treatment of migraine in adults.[2] It is a monoclonal antibody that targets calcitonin gene-related peptides (CGRP) alpha and beta.[3][4] It is administered by intravenous infusion every three months.[2]

Image result for Eptinezumab

Eeptinezumab-jjmr was approved for use in the United States in February 2020.[5]

Image result for Eptinezumab

References

  1. ^ “Alder BioPharmaceuticals Initiates PROMISE 2 Pivotal Trial of Eptinezumab for the Prevention of Migraine”. Alder Biopharmaceuticals. 28 November 2016.
  2. Jump up to:a b “Vyeptitm (eptinezumab-jjmr) injection, for intravenous use” (PDF). U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Retrieved 24 February2020.
  3. ^ Dodick DW, Goadsby PJ, Silberstein SD, Lipton RB, Olesen J, Ashina M, et al. (November 2014). “Safety and efficacy of ALD403, an antibody to calcitonin gene-related peptide, for the prevention of frequent episodic migraine: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, exploratory phase 2 trial”. The Lancet. Neurology13 (11): 1100–1107. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(14)70209-1PMID 25297013.
  4. ^ “International Nonproprietary Names for Pharmaceutical Substances (INN)” (PDF)WHO Drug Information. WHO. 31 (1). 2017.
  5. ^ “Vyepti: FDA-Approved Drugs”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Retrieved 24 February 2020.

External links

Image result for Eptinezumab

Eptinezumab
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Humanized
Target CALCACALCB
Clinical data
Trade names Vyepti
Other names ALD403,[1] eeptinezumab-jjmr
License data
Routes of
administration
IV
Drug class Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist
ATC code
  • None
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
Formula C6352H9838N1694O1992S46
Molar mass 143283.20 g·mol−1

Biologics license application submitted for eptinezumab, an anti-CGRP antibody for migraine prevention

Alder BioPharmaceuticals has submitted a biologics license application (BLA) for eptinezumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), for migraine prevention. If the US Food and Drug Administration grants approval, Alder will be on track to launch the drug in Q1 2020. The BLA included data from the PROMISE 1 and PROMISE 2 studies, which evaluated the effects of eptinezumab in episodic migraine patients (n=888) or chronic migraine patients (n=1,072), respectively.  In PROMISE 1, the primary and key secondary endpoints were met, and the safety and tolerability were similar to placebo, while in PROMISE 2, the primary and all key secondary endpoints were met, and the safety and tolerability was consistent with earlier eptinezumab studies.

Alder announced one-year results from the PROMISE 1 study in June 2018, which indicated that, following the first quarterly infusion, episodic migraine patients treated with 300 mg eptinezumab experienced 4.3 fewer monthly migraine days (MMDs) from a baseline of 8 MMDs, compared to 3.2 fewer MMDs for placebo from baseline (p= 0.0001). At one year after the third and fourth quarterly infusions, patients treated with 300 mg eptinezumab experienced further gains in efficacy, with a reduction of 5.2 fewer MMDs compared to 4.0 fewer MMDs for placebo-treated patients.  In addition, ~31% of episodic migraine patients achieved, on average per month, 100% reduction of migraine days from baseline compared to ~ 21% for placebo. New 6-month results from the PROMISE 2 study were also released in June 2018.  These results indicated that, after the first quarterly infusion, chronic migraine patients dosed with 300 mg of eptinezumab experienced 8.2 fewer MMDs, from a baseline of 16 MMDs, compared to 5.6 fewer MMDs for placebo from baseline (p <.0001). A further reduction in MMDs was seen following a second infusion; 8.8 fewer MMDs for patients dosed with 300 mg compared to 6.2 fewer MMDs for those with placebo. In addition, ~ 21% of chronic migraine patients achieved, on average, 100% reduction of MMDs from baseline compared to 9% for placebo after two quarterly infusions of 300 mg of eptinezumab.

If approved, eptinezumab would become the fourth antibody therapeutic for migraine prevention on the US market, following the approval of erenumab-aooe (Aimovig; Novartis), galcanezumab-gnlm (Emgality; Eli Lilly & Company) and fremanezumab-vfrm (Ajovy; Teva Pharmaceuticals) in 2018.

//////////Eptinezumab, Monoclonal antibody, Peptide, エプチネズマブ  , fda 2020, approvals 2020

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