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OSILODROSTAT for Treatment of Cushing’s Syndrome

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ChemSpider 2D Image | osilodrostat | C13H10FN3

OSILODROSTAT

LCI 699, LCI 699NX

Novartis Ag INNOVATOR

UNII-5YL4IQ1078, CAS 928134-65-0

Benzonitrile, 4-[(5R)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl]-3-fluoro-
4-[(5R)-6,7-Dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl]-3-fluorobenzonitrile
(R)-4-(6,7-Dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[l,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro- benzonitrile
  • Molecular FormulaC13H10FN3
  • Average mass227.237 Da
  • Originator Novartis
  • Class Antihypertensives; Fluorobenzenes; Imidazoles; Nitriles; Pyridines; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Aldosterone synthase inhibitors
  • Phase III Cushing syndrome
  • Phase I Liver disorders
  • Discontinued Heart failure; Hypertension; Solid tumours

Most Recent Events

  • 27 Feb 2016 Novartis plans the phase III LINC-4 trial for Cushing’s syndrome in Greece, Thailand, Poland, Turkey, Russia, Brazil, Belgium, Spain, Denmark, Switzerland and USA (PO) (NCT02697734)
  • 12 Jun 2015 Novartis plans a phase II trial for Cushing syndrome in Japan (NCT02468193)
  • 01 Apr 2015 Phase-I clinical trials in Liver disorders in USA (PO)

Osilodrostat phosphate
CAS: 1315449-72-9

MF, C13-H10-F-N3.H3-O4-P

MW, 325.2347

  • LCI 699AZA

An orally active aldosterone-synthase inhibitor.

for Treatment of Cushing’s Syndrome

4-((5R)-6,7-Dihydro-5H-pyrrolo(1,2-c)imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile dihydrogen phosphate

Aromatase inhibitor; Cytochrome P450 11B1 inhibitor

MORE SYNTHESIS COMING, WATCH THIS SPACE…………………..

 

SYNTHESIS

STR1

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 4(12), 1203-1207; 2013

REMIND ME,  amcrasto@gmail.com, +919323115463

Osilodrostat, as modulators of 11-β-hydroxylase, useful for treating a disorder ameliorated 11-β-hydroxylase inhibition eg Cushing’s disease, hypertension, congestive heart failure, metabolic syndrome, liver diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, migraine headaches, osteoporosis or prostate cancer.

Novartis is developing osilodrostat, an inhibitor of aldosterone synthase and aromatase, for treating Cushing’s disease. In July 2016, osilodrostat was reported to be in phase 3 clinical development.

The somatostatin analog pasireotide and the 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor osilodrostat (LCI699) reduce cortisol levels by distinct mechanisms of action. There exists a scientific rationale to investigate the clinical efficacy of these two agents in combination. This manuscript reports the results of a toxicology study in rats, evaluating different doses of osilodrostat and pasireotide alone and in combination. Sixty male and 60 female rats were randomized into single-sex groups to receive daily doses of pasireotide (0.3mg/kg/day, subcutaneously), osilodrostat (20mg/kg/day, orally), osilodrostat/pasireotide in combination (low dose, 1.5/0.03mg/kg/day; mid-dose, 5/0.1mg/kg/day; or high dose, 20/0.3mg/kg/day), or vehicle for 13weeks. Mean body-weight gains from baseline to Week 13 were significantly lower in the pasireotide-alone and combined-treatment groups compared to controls, and were significantly higher in female rats receiving osilodrostat monotherapy. Osilodrostat and pasireotide monotherapies were associated with significant changes in the histology and mean weights of the pituitary and adrenal glands, liver, and ovary/oviduct. Osilodrostat alone was associated with adrenocortical hypertrophy and hepatocellular hypertrophy. In combination, osilodrostat/pasireotide did not exacerbate any target organ changes and ameliorated the liver and adrenal gland changes observed with monotherapy. Cmax and AUC0-24h of osilodrostat and pasireotide increased in an approximately dose-proportional manner. In conclusion, the pasireotide and osilodrostat combination did not exacerbate changes in target organ weight or toxicity compared with either monotherapy, and had an acceptable safety profile; addition of pasireotide to the osilodrostat regimen may attenuate potential adrenal gland hyperactivation and hepatocellular hypertrophy, which are potential side effects of osilodrostat monotherapy.

The somatostatin analog pasireotide and the 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor osilodrostat (LCI699) reduce cortisol levels by distinct mechanisms of action. There exists a scientific rationale to investigate the clinical efficacy of these two agents in combination. This manuscript reports the results of a toxicology study in rats, evaluating different doses of osilodrostat and pasireotide alone and in combination. Sixty male and 60 female rats were randomized into single-sex groups to receive daily doses of pasireotide (0.3 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously), osilodrostat (20 mg/kg/day, orally), osilodrostat/pasireotide in combination (low dose, 1.5/0.03 mg/kg/day; mid-dose, 5/0.1 mg/kg/day; or high dose, 20/0.3 mg/kg/day), or vehicle for 13 weeks. Mean body-weight gains from baseline to Week 13 were significantly lower in the pasireotide-alone and combined-treatment groups compared to controls, and were significantly higher in female rats receiving osilodrostat monotherapy. Osilodrostat and pasireotide monotherapies were associated with significant changes in the histology and mean weights of the pituitary and adrenal glands, liver, and ovary/oviduct. Osilodrostat alone was associated with adrenocortical hypertrophy and hepatocellular hypertrophy. In combination, osilodrostat/pasireotide did not exacerbate any target organ changes and ameliorated the liver and adrenal gland changes observed with monotherapy. Cmax and AUC0–24h of osilodrostat and pasireotide increased in an approximately dose-proportional manner.

In conclusion, the pasireotide and osilodrostat combination did not exacerbate changes in target organ weight or toxicity compared with either monotherapy, and had an acceptable safety profile; addition of pasireotide to the osilodrostat regimen may attenuate potential adrenal gland hyperactivation and hepatocellular hypertrophy, which are potential side effects of osilodrostat monotherapy.

The somatostatin class is a known class of small peptides comprising the naturally occurring somatostatin- 14 and analogues having somatostatin related activity, e.g. as disclosed by A.S. Dutta in Small Peptides, Vol.19, Elsevier (1993). By “somatostatin analogue” as used herein is meant any straight-chain or cyclic polypeptide having a structure based on that of the naturally occurring somatostatin- 14 wherein one or more amino acid units have been omitted and/or replaced by one or more other amino radical(s) and/or wherein one or more functional groups have been replaced by one or more other functional groups and/or one or more groups have been replaced by one or several other isosteric groups. In general, the term covers all modified derivatives of the native somatostatin- 14 which exhibit a somatostatin related activity, e.g. they bind to at least one of the five somatostatin receptor (SSTR), preferably in the nMolar range. Commonly known somatostatin analogs are octreotide, vapreotide, lanreotide, pasireotide.

Pasireotide, having the chemical structure as follow:

Figure imgf000002_0001

Pasireotide is called cyclo[{4-(NH2-C2H4-NH-CO-0-)Pro}-Phg-DTrp-Lys-Tyr(4-Bzl)- Phe], wherein Phg means -HN-CH(C6H5)-CO- and Bzl means benzyl, in free form, in salt or complex form or in protected form.

Cushing’s syndrome is a hormone disorder caused by high levels of Cortisol in the blood. This can be caused by taking glucocorticoid drugs, or by tumors that produce Cortisol or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or CRH. Cushing’s disease refers to one specific cause of the syndrome: a tumor (adenoma) in the pituitary gland that produces large amounts of ACTH, which elevates Cortisol. It is the most common cause of Cushing’s syndrome, responsible for 70% of cases excluding glucocorticoid related cases. The significant decrease of Cortisol levels in Cushing’s disease patients on pasireotide support its potential use as a targeted treatment for Cushing’s disease (Colao et al. N Engl J Med 2012;366:32^12).

Compound A is potent inhibitor of the rate-limiting enzyme 1 1-beta-hydroxylase, the last step in the synthesis of Cortisol. WO 201 1/088188 suggests the potential use of compound A in treating a disease or disorder characterised by increased stress hormone levels and/or decreased androgen hormone levels, including the potential use of compound A in treating heart failure, cachexia, acute coronary syndrome, chronic stress syndrome, Cushing’s syndrome or metabolic syndrome.

Compound A, also called (R)-4-(6,7-Dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[l,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro- benzonitrile, has formula (II).

Figure imgf000003_0001

Compound A can be synthesized or produced and characterized by methods as described in WO2007/024945.

PRODUCT PATENT

WO2007024945, hold protection in the EU states until August 2026, and expire in the US in March 2029 with US154 extension

PAPER

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2013), 4(12), 1203-1207.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ml400324c?source=chemport&journalCode=amclct

Discovery and in Vivo Evaluation of Potent Dual CYP11B2 (Aldosterone Synthase) and CYP11B1 Inhibitors

Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, 100 Technology Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey 07936, United States
ACS Med. Chem. Lett., 2013, 4 (12), pp 1203–1207
DOI: 10.1021/ml400324c
*(E.L.M.) Tel: 617-871-7586. Fax: 617-871-7045. E-mail: erik.meredith@novartis.com.
Abstract Image

Aldosterone is a key signaling component of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and as such has been shown to contribute to cardiovascular pathology such as hypertension and heart failure. Aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) is responsible for the final three steps of aldosterone synthesis and thus is a viable therapeutic target. A series of imidazole derived inhibitors, including clinical candidate 7n, have been identified through design and structure–activity relationship studies both in vitro and in vivo. Compound 7n was also found to be a potent inhibitor of 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1), which is responsible for cortisol production. Inhibition of CYP11B1 is being evaluated in the clinic for potential treatment of hypercortisol diseases such as Cushing’s syndrome.

PATENT

WO-2016109361

silodrostat (LCI699; 4-[(5R)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[l,2-c]imidazol-5-yl]-3-fluoro-benzonitrile; CAS# 928134-65-0). Osilodrostat is a Ι Ι-β-hydroxylase inhibitor.

Osilodrostat is currently under investigation for the treatment of Cushing’s disease, primary aldosteronism, and hypertension. Osilodrostat has also shown promise in treating drug-resistant hypertension, essential hypertension, hypokalemia, hypertension, congestive heart failure, acute heart failure, heart failure, cachexia, acute coronary syndrome, chronic stress syndrome, Cushing’s syndrome, metabolic syndrome, hypercortisolemia, atrial fibrillation, renal failure, chronic renal failure, restenosis, sleep apnea, atherosclerosis, syndrome X, obesity, nephropathy, post-myocardial infarction, coronary heary disease, increased formation of collagen, cardiac or myocardiac fibrosis and/or remodeling following hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, Conn’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, renal dysfunction, liver diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, vascular diseases, retinopathy, neuropathy, insulinopathy, edema, endothelial dysfunction, baroreceptor dysfunction, migraine headaches, arrythmia, diastolic dysfunction, diastolic heart failure, impaired diastolic filling, systolic dysfunction, ischemia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, sudden cardia death, impaired arterial compliance, myocardial necrotic lesions, vascular damage, myocardial infarction, left ventricular hypertrophy, decreased ej ection fraction, cardiac lesions, vascular wall hypertrophy, endothelial thickening, fibrinoid, necrosis of coronary arteries, ectopic ACTH syndrome, change in adrenocortical mass, primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), Carney complex (CNC), anorexia nervosa, chronic alcoholic poisoning, nicotine withdrawal syndrome, cocaine withdrawal syndrome, posttraumatic stress syndrome, cognitive impairment after a stroke or cortisol-induced mineral corticoid excess, ventricular arrythmia, estrogen-dependent disorders, gynecomastia, osteoporosis, prostate cancer, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, endometrial hyperplasia, polycyctic ovarian disease, infertility, fibrocystic breast disease, breast cancer, and fibrocystic mastopathy. WO 2013109514; WO 2007024945; and WO 2011064376.

Osilodrostat

Osilodrostat is likely subject to extensive CYP45o-mediated oxidative metabolism. These, as well as other metabolic transformations, occur in part through polymorphically-expressed enzymes, exacerbating interpatient variability. Additionally, some metabolites of osilodrostat derivatives may have undesirable side effects. In order to overcome its short half-life, the drug likely must be taken several times per day, which increases the probability of patient incompliance and discontinuance. Adverse effects associated with osilodrostat include fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, headache, hypokalemia, muscle spasms, vomiting, abdominal discomfort, abdominal pain, arthralgia, arthropod bite, dizziness, increased lipase, and pruritis.

Scheme I

EXAMPLE 1

(R)-4-(6,7-dihvdro-5H-pyrrolo[l,2-elimidazol-5-yl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile

(osilodrostat)

[00144] 4-(bromomethyl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile: 3-Fluoro-4-methylbenzonitrile (40 g, 296 mmol), NBS (63.2 g, 356 mmol) and benzoyl peroxide (3.6 g, 14.8 mmol) were taken up in carbon tetrachloride (490 mL) and refiuxed for 16 h. The mixture was allowed to cool to room temperature and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated and purified via flash column chromatography (0-5% EtOAc/hexanes) to give 4-(bromomethyl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile (35.4 g, 56%).

[00145] 2-(l-trityl-lH-imidazol-4-yl)acetic acid: Trityl chloride (40 g, 143.88 mmol, 1.2 equiv) was added to a suspension of (lH-imidazol-4-yl) acetic acid hydrochloride (20 g, 123.02 mmol, 1.0 equiv) in pyridine (200 mL). This was stirred at 50 °C for 16 h. Then the mixture was cooled and concentrated under vacuum and the crude product was purified by recrystallization from ethyl acetate (1000 ml) to afford 42 g (90%) of 2-[l-(triphenylmethyl)-lH-imidazol-4-yl] acetic acid as an off-white solid. LCMS (ESI): m/z = 369.2 [M+H]+

Step 2

2 step 2

2-( 1 -trityl- lH-imidazol-4-yl)ethanol : 2-(l-Trityl-lH-imidazol-4-yl) acetic acid (42 g, 114.00 mmol, 1.0 equiv) was suspended in THF (420 mL) and cooled to 0 °C. To this was added BH3 (1M in THF, 228.28 mL, 2.0 equiv). The clear solution obtained was stirred at 0 °C for 60 min, then warmed to room temperature until LCMS indicated completion of the reaction. The solution was cooled again to 0 °C and quenched carefully with water (300 mL). The resulting solution was extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 100 mL) and the organic layers combined and dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated to give a sticky residue which was taken up in ethanolamine (800 mL) and heated to 90 °C for 2 h. The reaction was transferred to a separatory funnel, diluted with EtOAc (1 L) and washed with water (3 x 600 mL). The organic phase was dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated afford 35 g (87%) of 2-[l-(triphenylmethyl)-lH-imidazol-4-yl]ethanol as a white solid, which was used in the next step without further purification. LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 355.1 [M+H]+.

Step 3

3 step 3 4

4-(2-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethyl)-l-trityl-lH-imidazole: 2-(l-Trityl-lH-imidazol-4-yl) ethanol (35 g, 98.75 mmol, 1.00 equiv) was dissolved in DCM (210 mL). To this was added imidazole (19.95 g, 293.05 mmol, 3.00 equiv) and tert-butyldimethylsilylchloride (22.40 g, 149.27 mmol, 1.50 equiv). The mixture was stirred at room temperature until LCMS indicated completion of the reaction. Then the resulting solution was diluted with 500 mL of DCM. The resulting mixture was washed with water (3 x 300 mL). The residue was purified by a silica gel column, eluted with ethyl

acetate/petroleum ether (1 :4) to afford 40 g (77%) of 4-[2-[(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)oxy]ethyl]-l-(triphenylmethyl)-lH-imidazole as a white solid. LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 469.1 [M+H]+.

Step 4

4-((5-(2-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy )ethylVlH-iniidazol-l -vnmethylV3-fluorobenzonitrile: 4-(2-((tert-Butyldimethylsilanyl)oxy)ethyl)-l rityl-lH-irnidazole (40 g, 85.34 mmol, 1.00 equiv) and 4-(Bromomethyl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile (27.38 g, 127.92 mmol, 1.50 equiv) obtained as a product of step 0, were dissolved in MeCN (480 mL) and DCM (80 mL), and stirred at room temperature for 48 h. Et2NH (80 mL) and MeOH (480 mL) were then added and the solution was warmed 80 °C for 3 h. The solution was evaporated to dryness and the residue was purified via flash column chromatography (EtOAc/hexanes 1 :5 to EtOAc) to afford 4-((5-(2-((tert-Butyldimethylsilanyl)oxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l -yl)methyl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile (15 g, 50%). ¾ NMR (400 MHz, CDCh) δ: 7.67 (s, 1H), 7.43 (m, 2H), 6.98 (s, 1H), 6.88-6.79 (m, 1H), 5.34 (s, 2H), 3.79 (t, J= 8.0 Hz, 2H), 2.67 (t, J = 8.0 Hz, 2H), 0.88 (s, 9H), 0.02 (s, 6H). LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 360.1 [M+H]+.

Step 5

5 6

Methyl 2-(5-(2-(tert-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l -yl)-2-(4-cvano-2-fluorophenvDacetate: 4-((5-(2-((tert-Butyldimethylsilanyl)oxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l -yl)methyl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile (15 g, 41.72 mmol, 1.00 equiv) was dissolved in anhydrous THF (150 mL) and stirred at -78 °C, then a THF solution of LiHMDS (75 mL, 1.80 equiv, 1.0 M) was added dropwise over 15 min. After 30 min, methyl cyanoformate (4.3 g, 45.50 mmol, 1.10 equiv) was added dropwise over 10 min and the solution was stirred at -78 °C for 2 h. The excess LiHMDS was quenched with aqueous saturated NH4CI and the mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature. The mixture was then diluted with EtOAc and washed

with aqueous saturated NH4CI (200 mL). The organic layers was dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and evaporated. The crude residue was purified via flash column chromatography (EtOAc/PE 3: 10 to EtOAc) to give methyl 2-(5-(2-((tert-butyldimethylsilanyl)oxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl)-2-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenyl) acetate (15 g, 86%) as a light yellow solid.

¾ NMR (400 MHz, CDCL3) δ: 7.66 (s, 1H), 7.54-7.43 (m, 2H), 7.15 (t, J= 8.0 Hz 1H), 6.93 (s, 1H), 6.47 (s, 1H), 3.88-3.74 (m, 5H), 2.81-2.62 (m, 2H), 0.89 (s, 9H), 0.05 (s, 6H) . LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 418.2 [M+H]+.

Step 6

Methyl 2-(4-cvano-2-fluorophenyl)-2-(5-(2-hvdroxyethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl) acetate: Methyl 2-(5-(2-((tert-butyldimethylsilanyl)oxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl)-2-(4-cyano-2-fiuorophenyl)acetate (15 g, 35.92 mmol, 1.00 equiv) was added to a solution of HCl in 1,4-dioxane (89 mL, 4.0 M, 359.2 mmol) at 0 °C and the mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature and stirred for 2 h. The solution was concentrated to dryness to give the crude alcohol, methyl 2-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenyl )-2-(5-(2 -hydroxy ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl)acetate (10 g, 92%), which was used without further purification. LCMS: m/z = 304.0 [M+H]+.

Step 7

7 8

Methyl 2-(4-cvano-2-fluorophenyl)-2-(5-(2-(methylsulfonyloxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl) acetate: The crude methyl 2-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenyl )-2-(5-(2-hydroxyethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl)acetate (10 g, 32.97 mmol, 1.00 equiv) was dissolved in DCM (200 mL) and stirred at 0 °C, then Et3N (20 g, 197.65 mmol, 6.00 equiv) and

methanesulfonyl chloride (4.52 g, 39.67 mmol, 1.20 equiv) were added. After completion of the reaction, the solution was diluted with DCM and washed with aqueous saturated

NaHCC . The organic layer was dried over anhydrous Na2S04, filtered and evaporated to give the crude methyl 2-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenyl)-2-(5-(2-((methylsulfonyl)oxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl)acetate (11.43 g, 91%), which was used in the next step without further purification. LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 382.0 [M+H]+.

Step 8

Methyl 5-(4-cvano-2-fluorophenyl)-6.7-dihvdro-5H-pyrrolo[1.2-elimidazole-5-carboxylate: The crude methyl 2-(4-cyano-2 -fluorophenyl )-2-(5-(2- ((methylsulfonyl)oxy)ethyl)-lH-imidazol-l-yl)acetate (11.43 g, 29.97 mmol, 1.00 equiv) was dissolved in MeCN (550 mL) and then K2CO3 (12.44 g, 90.01 mmol, 3.00 equiv), Nal (13.50 g, 90.00 mmol, 3.00 equiv) and Et3N (9.09 g, 89.83 mmol, 3.00 equiv) were added. The reaction was stirred at 80 °C for 42 h. The mixture was filtered. The solids were washed with DCM. The filtrate was concentrated and purified by flash column chromatography (EtOAc) to give methyl 5-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[l,2-c]imidazole-5-carboxylate (4.2 g, 49% in 3 steps).

[00153] ¾ NMR (400 MHz, CDCb) δ: 7.61 (s, 1H), 7.47-7.47 (m, 2H), 6.88 (s, 1H), 6.79-6.75 (m, 1H), 4.17-4.12 (m, 1H), 3.87 (s, 3H), 3.78-3.70 (m, 1H), 3.08-3.02 (m, 1H), 2.84-2.71 (m, 2H). LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 286.0 [M+H]+.

Step 9

10

4-(6.7-dihvdro-5H-pyrrolo[1.2-elimidazol-5-yl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile: To a 40-mL sealed tube, was placed methyl 5-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenyl)-5H,6H,7H-pyrrolo[l,2-c]imidazole-5-carboxylate (1 g, 3.51 mmol, 1.00 equiv), DMSO (10 mL), water (5 mL). The final reaction mixture was irradiated with microwave radiation for 40 min at 140 °C. The resulting solution was diluted with 100 mL of EtOAc. The resulting mixture was washed with (3 x 20 mL) brine, dried over anhydrous Na2S04, filtered and concentrated. The residue was purified by a silica gel column, eluted with ethyl acetate/petroleum ether (4: 1) to afford 420 mg (44%) of 5-(4-cyano-2-fluorophenyl)-5H,6H,7H-pyrrolo[l,2-c]irnidazole-5-carboxylic acid as a light yellow solid.

¾ NMR (400 MHz, CDCL3) δ: 7.55-7.28 (m, 3H), 6.90-6.85 (m, 2H), 5.74-5.71 (m, 1H), 3.25-3.15 (m, 1H), 3.02-2.92 (m, 2H), 2.58-2.50 (m, 1H). LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 228.2 [M+H]+.

Step 10

10

(R)-4-(6 -dihvdro-5H-pyrrolo[1.2-elirnidazol-5-yl)-3-fluorobenzonitrile:

Resolution of the enantiomers of the title compound (300 mg) was performed by chiral HPLC: Column, Chiralpak IA2, 2*25cm, 20um; mobile phase, Phase A: Hex (50%, 0.1% DEA), Phase B: EtOH (50%) ; Detector, UV 254/220 nm to afford the (S)-enantiomer (RT = 17 min) and the (R)-enantiomer (97.6 mg, desired compound) (RT = 21 min).

 ¾ NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-<4) δ: 7.98-7.95 (m, 1H), 7.70-7.69 (m, 1H), 7.50 (s, 1H), 6.87 (t, J= 8.0 Hz, 1H), 6.70 (s, 1H), 5.79-5.76 (m, 1H), 3.15-3.06 (m, 1H), 2.92-2.74 (m, 2H), 2.48-2.43 (m, 1H). LCMS (ESI) : m/z = 228.1 [M+H]+.

PATENT

WO2013/153129

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2013153129A1?cl=en

PATENT

WO2007/024945

http://www.google.co.in/patents/WO2007024945A1?cl=en

PATENT

 EP 2815749

Aspect (iii) of the present invention relates to phosphate salt or nitrate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile according to Formula (III)

Figure imgb0004

abbreviated as ‘{drug3}’. In particular, the present invention relates to crystalline form of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3a}’; to crystalline Form A of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3b}’; to crystalline Form B of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3c}’; to crystalline Form C of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3d}’; to crystalline Form D of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3e}’; to crystalline Form E of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3f}’; to crystalline Form F of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3g}’; to crystalline Form G of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3h}’; to crystalline Form H of phosphate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3i}’; and to crystalline form of nitrate salt of 4-(R)-(6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-5-yl)-3-fluoro-benzonitrile, abbreviated as ‘{drug3j}’. {drug3a}, {drug3b}, {drug3c}, {drug3d}, {drug3e}, {drug3f}, {drug3g}, {drug3h}, {drug3i}, and {drug3j} are specific forms falling within the definition of {drug3}. Aspect (iii) of the invention is separate from aspects (i), (ii), (iv), (v), (vi), (vii), and (viii) of the invention. Thus, all embodiments of {drug3a}, {drug3b}, {drug3c}, {drug3d}, {drug3e}, {drug3f}, {drug3g}, {drug3h}, {drug3i}, and {drug3j}, respectively, are only related to {drug3}, but neither to {drug1}, nor to {drug2}, nor to {drug4}, nor to {drug5}, nor to {drug6}, nor to {drug7}, nor to {drug8}.

PAPER

Osilodrostat (LCI699), a potent 11β-hydroxylase inhibitor, administered in combination with the multireceptor-targeted somatostatin analog pasireotide: A 13-week study in rats

  • a Preclinical Safety, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ, USA
  • b Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, East Hanover, NJ, USA
  • c Novartis Oncology Development, Basel, Switzerland

doi:10.1016/j.taap.2015.05.004http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041008X15001684

CLIPS

STR1

STR1

WO2011088188A1 * Jan 13, 2011 Jul 21, 2011 Novartis Ag Use of an adrenal hormone-modifying agent
Reference
1 * BOSCARO M ET AL: “Treatment of Pituitary-Dependent Cushing’s Disease with the Multireceptor Ligand Somatostatin Analog Pasireotide (SOM230): A Multicenter, Phase II Trial“, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM, vol. 94, no. 1, January 2009 (2009-01), pages 115-122, XP002698507, ISSN: 0021-972X

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///////OSILODROSTAT, Novartis ,  osilodrostat, an inhibitor of aldosterone synthase and aromatase, treating Cushing’s disease,  July 2016, phase 3 clinical development, LCI 699, 928134-65-0, 1315449-72-9, PHASE 3, LCI 699NX, LCI 699AZA, CYP11B1 CYP11B2

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 29 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 29 year tenure till date Aug 2016, Around 30 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 25 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 13 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 212 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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