New Drug Approvals

Home » Phase2 drugs » DANOPREVIR (ITMN-191) …..a peptidomimetic inhibitor of the NS3/4A protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV)

DANOPREVIR (ITMN-191) …..a peptidomimetic inhibitor of the NS3/4A protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV)

DRUG APPROVALS BY DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO .....FOR BLOG HOME CLICK HERE

PAYPAL DONATIONS

ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

Read all about Organic Spectroscopy on ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY INTERNATIONAL 

Categories

Blog Stats

  • 1,310,010 hits

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,782 other followers

add to any

Share

Danoprevir (ITMN-191) Chemical Structure

Danoprevir

Danoprevir(ITMN-191) is a peptidomimetic inhibitor of the NS3/4A protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with IC50 of 0.2-3.5 nM, inhibition effect for HCV genotypes 1A/1B/4/5/6 is ~10-fold higher than 2B/3A. Phase 2.

Array BioPharma (Originator)

RG7227
ITMN-191
RO5190591

2H-Isoindole-2-carboxylic acid, 4-fluoro-1,3-dihydro-, (2R,6S,12Z,13aS,14aR,16aS)-
14a-[[(cyclopropylsulfonyl)amino]carbonyl]-6-[[(1,1-dimethylethoxy)carbonyl]amino]-
1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,13a,14,14a,15,16,16a-hexadecahydro-5,16-
dioxocyclopropa[e]pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]diazacyclopentadecin-2-yl ester

2. (2R,6S,12Z,13aS,14aR,16aS)-14a-[(cyclopropylsulfonyl)carbamoyl]-6-{[(1,1-
dimethylethoxy)carbonyl]amino}-5,16-dioxo-
1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,13a,14,14a,15,16,16a-hexadecahydrocyclopropa[e]pyrrolo[1,2-
a][1,4]diazacyclopentadecin-2-yl 4-fluoro-1,3-dihydro-2H-isoindole-2-carboxylate
Treatment of hepatitis C

MOLECULAR FORMULA C35H46FN5O9S

MOLECULAR WEIGHT 731.8

MANUFACTURER Genentech

CODE DESIGNATION R05190591

CAS REGISTRY NUMBER 850876-88-9, 916881-67-9

Danoprevir(ITMN-191) is a peptidomimetic

ITMN-191 (R-7227), a macrocyclic protease inhibitor, is in phase II clinical evaluation for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection as monotherapy and in combination with Pegasys(R) (pegylated interferon alpha-2a) and Copegus(R) (ribavirin). The product candidate is also being evaluated in combination with R-7128 in treatment-naive patients infected with HCV genotype 1.

Danoprevir (ITMN-191; RG-7227), under development by InterMune Inc and Roche Holding AG, is a promising, potent NS3/4A protease inhibitor for the oral treatment of HCV infection. Preclinical data demonstrated that danoprevir binds with high affinity and dissociates slowly from the HCV NS3 protease, allowing high liver drug exposure with only modest plasma drug exposure.

In 2006, originator InterMune and licensee Roche entered into an exclusive worldwide collaboration agreement to develop and commercialize products from InterMune’s hepatitis C (HCV) protease inhibitor program, including ITMN-191. In 2010, the licensing agreement was terminated. Also in 2010, Roche acquired worldwide development and commercialization rights to R-7227 from InterMune. Preclinical pharmacokinetic results support the exploration of twice-daily oral dosing in HCV.

A phase Ib, ‘IFN-free’ clinical trial demonstrated that danoprevir, combined with the HCV polymerase inhibitor RG-7128 (Pharmasset Inc/Roche Holding AG), was effective in reducing HCV-RNA levels in a large proportion of treatment-naïve patients with HCV infection and in approximately half of previously non-responsive patients with HCV-1 infection, without resistance or safety concerns. In a phase IIb trial in treatment-naïve patients with HCV-1 infection, danoprevir plus pegylated IFNalpha2a and ribavirin resulted in undetectable levels of HCV-RNA in the majority of patients, without any evidence of viral resistance; however, the high-dose danoprevir arm was prematurely terminated because of grade 4 ALT elevations. Phase I trials have also demonstrated that ritonavir boosting improved the pharmacokinetic profile of danoprevir; therefore, at the time of publication, a phase IIb trial to evaluate ritonavir-boosted, low-dose danoprevir in combination with RG-7128 was planned. (source:

inhibitor of the NS3/4A protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with IC50 of 0.2-3.5 nM, inhibition effect for HCV genotypes 1A/1B/4/5/6 is ~10-fold higher than 2B/3A. Phase 2.

SODIUM SALT

HERAPEUTIC CLAIM Treatment of hepatitis C

CHEMICAL NAMES

1. 2H-Isoindole-2-carboxylic acid, 4-fluoro-1,3-dihydro-, (2R,6S,12Z,13aS,14aR,16aS)-
14a-[[(cyclopropylsulfonyl)amino]carbonyl]-6-[[(1,1-dimethylethoxy)carbonyl]amino]-
1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,13a,14,14a,15,16,16a-hexadecahydro-5,16-dioxocyclopropa
[e]pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]diazacyclopentadecin-2-yl ester, sodium salt (1:1)

2. sodium (cyclopropylsulfonyl){[(2R,6S,12Z,13aS,14aR,16aS)-6-{[(1,1-dimethylethoxy)
carbonyl]amino}-2-{[(4-fluoro-1,3-dihydro-2H-isoindol-2-yl)carbonyl]oxy}-5,16-dioxo-
1,2,3,6,7,8,9,10,11,13a,14,15,16,16a-tetradecahydrocyclopropa[e]pyrrolo[1,2-
a][1,4]diazacyclopentadecine-14a(5H)-yl]formyl}azanide

MOLECULAR FORMULA C35H45FN5NaO9S

MOLECULAR WEIGHT 753.8

SPONSOR Genentech

CODE DESIGNATION

  • Danoprevir sodium
  • ITMN-191
  • R 7227 sodium
  • R7227
  • RO 5190591-001
  • RO5190591-001
  • UNII-217RJI972K

CAS REGISTRY NUMBER 916826-48-7

DANOPREVIR SODIUM

The HCV protease mediates the cleavage of the HCV polyprotein to release the functional proteins that are essential for viral propagation. The inhibition of the HCV protease activity is expected to block HCV replication in infected host cells. Numberous HCV protease inhibitors have been identified. Non- limiting examples of HCV protease inhibitors are described in U.S. Patent Application Pub. Nos. 20040106559, 20040180815, 20040266668, 2004038872, 20050090432, 20050267018, 20070054842, 20070281885, 2007299078, 20080032936, 20080125444, 20080279821, 20090111757, 20090148407, 20090202480, 20090269305, 20090285773, 20090285774, 20100081700, 20100144608, 2010018355, 20100183551, 20100221217, 20100260710, 20100286185 and 20110135604, and U.S. Patent Nos. 6608027, 6767991, 7091184, 7119072, 7544798, 7642235 and 7829665, as well as WO2007014919, WO2007014926, WO2008046860, WO2008095058,

………………………………

danoprevir

patents and journal ref

1. WO 2005037214..

2. WO 2005095403

3. WO 2007015824..

4. WO 2008128921

5. WO 2009080542

6. WO 2009142842

7. WO 2010015545

8. WO 2013079424

9. WO 2012062685

10.WO 2013106631

11. Concise asymmetric synthesis of a (1R,2S)-1-amino-2-vinylcyclopropanecarboxylic acid-derived sulfonamide and ethyl ester
Org Biomol Chem 2013, 11(39): 6796http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2013/ob/c3ob41394b/unauth#!divAbstract

12.J. Med. Chem., Article ASAP,DOI: 10.1021/jm400164c

13.  Discovery of novel urea-based hepatitis C protease inhibitors with high potency against protease-inhibitor-resistant mutants.

Kazmierski WM, Hamatake R, Duan M, Wright LL, Smith GK, Jarvest RL, Ji JJ, Cooper JP, Tallant MD, Crosby RM, Creech K, Wang A, Li X, Zhang S, Zhang YK, Liu Y, Ding CZ, Zhou Y, Plattner JJ, Baker SJ, Bu W, Liu L.

J Med Chem. 2012 Apr 12;55(7):3021-6. doi: 10.1021/jm201278q. Epub 2012 Apr 3.

14 . Discovery of novel P3-oxo inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS3/4A serine protease.

Duan M, Kazmierski W, Crosby R, Gartland M, Ji J, Tallant M, Wang A, Hamatake R, Wright L, Wu M, Zhang YK, Ding CZ, Li X, Liu Y, Zhang S, Zhou Y, Plattner JJ, Baker SJ.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2012 Apr 15;22(8):2993-6. doi: 10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.02.039. Epub 2012 Feb 22.

……………….

J. Med. Chem., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/jm400164c

(2R,6S,13aS,14aR,16aS,Z)-6-(tert-Butoxycarbonylamino)-14a-(cyclopropylsulfonylcarbamoyl)-5,16-dioxo-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,13a,14,14a,15,16,16a-hexadecahydrocyclopropa[e]pyrrolo[1,2-a][1,4]diazacyclopentadecin-2-yl 4-fluoroisoindoline-2-carboxylate (49)

1H NMR (500 MHz, acetone-d6) δ 10.70 (br s, 1 H), 8.34 (d, 1 H), 7.39–7.33 (m, 1 H), 7.20 (d, 1 H), 7.10–7.02 (m, 2 H), 6.13 (d, 1 H), 5.70 (q, 1 H), 5.44 (br s, 1 H), 4.99 (t, 1H), 4.78–4.59 (m, 5 H), 4.18–4.08 (m, 1 H), 3.88–3.81 (m, 1 H), 2.86–2.78 (m, 3 H), 2.71–2.60 (m, 1 H), 2.52–2.35 (m, 3 H), 1.92–1.81 (m, 2 H), 1.75 (t, 1 H), 1.61–1.14 (m, 17 H), 1.04–0.95 (m, 2 H). 13C NMR (DMSO-d6, 100 MHz) δ174.0, 172.3, 170.8, 157.5 (d, J = 244 Hz), 155.8, 154.0, 140.9 (d, J = 64.8 Hz), 130.6, 130.2, 129.6, 123.8 (d, J = 55.7 Hz), 119.6, 114.4 (d, J = 18.3 Hz), 78.4, 74.7, 59.7, 53.4, 52.7, 52.4, 49.4 (d, J = 37.1 Hz), 44.6, 34.9, 31.8, 30.4, 28.8, 28.6, 27.0, 25.7, 22.6, 4.8. APCI MS m/z730.4 (M – 1).
………………………………………………………..
Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2012 Apr 15;22(8):2993-6. doi: 10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.02.039. Epub 2012 Feb 22.
Full-size image (27 K)
…………………………..
PICK UP 12 REF COMPD FROM LIST= DANOPREVIR
Figure US20110183895A1-20110728-C00029
NMR AND SYN
Example 58 Synthesis of Compound 12-RefCompound 11-Ref (0.18 mmol) was dissolved in 10 mL anhydrous dichloromethane, EDCI (69.8 mg, 0.36 mmol, 2 eq.) was added and stirred at room temperature overnight until completed. The reaction mixture was worked out and concentrated.The obtained solid was dissolved in 10 mL of anhydrous dichloromethane, DBU (61.0 mg, 0.40 mmol) and RSO2NH(0.363 mmol, R=cyclopropyl) were added and stirred at room temperature overnight until completed. The reaction mixture was worked out and purified by flash column to obtain the product 12-Ref (62 mg; Yield: 53%).1H-NMR for the product 12-Ref (CDCl3, 500 MHz): δ 10.28-10.29 (d, 1H), 6.87-7.07 (m, 3H), 5.72-5.74 (m, 1H), 5.48 (br , 1H), 4.99-5.03 (m, 2H), 4.58-4.79 (m, 5H), 4.42 (m, 1H), 4.21 (m, 1H), 3.83-3.85 (m, 1H), 2.90-2.93 (m, 1H), 2.48-2.57 (m, 3H), 2.27-2.30 (m, 1H), 1.88-1.97 (m, 2H), 1.67-1.79 (m, 2H), 1.45-1.58 (m, 6H), 1.34 -1.40 (m, 2H), 1.27 (s, 4H), 1.24 (s, 5H), 1.08-1.15 (m, 2H), 0.91-0.94 (m, 1H). ESI-MS (M+H+): m/z calculated 732.3, founded 732.5.
………………………..
SYNTHESIS

For certain NS3 inhibitors shown in this section, additional chemical transformations are utilized to obtain the final products. The preparations of two such examples are described for compounds 153 and 154 below:

Figure US07829665-20101109-C00109

(2R,6S,13aS,14aR,16aS,Z)-6-(tert-botoxycarbonylamino)-2-(4-fluoroisoindoline-2-carbonyloxy)-5,16-dioxo-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,13a,14,14a,15,16,16a-hexadecahydrocyclopropa[e]pyrrolo[1,2-α][1,4]dizacyclopentadecine-14a-carboxylic acid (0.10 g, 0.16 mmol) and TEA (0.024 mL, 0.18 mmol) in THF (5 mL) was added ethyl carbonochlridate (0.016 mL, 0.17 mmol) at 0° C. The reaction was stirred at 0° C. for 2 hrs. Sodium boronhydride (0.012 g, 0.32 mmol) was added and the reaction was stirred at rt for 3 days. Water (5 mL) and ethyl acetate (10 mL) were added. The organic layer was separated, washed with brine and dried over sodium sulfate. After removal of solvent, the residue was purified by column chromatography (ethyl acetate) to give the product (0.060 g, 61.4%) as white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, d6-DMSO) δ 8.47 (b, 1H), 7.35 (m, 1H), 7.10-7.20 (m, 2H), 7.03 (m, 1H), 5.47 (m, 1H), 5.28 (b, 1H), 4.98 (m, 1H), 4.67 (b, 4H), 4.56 (m, 1H), 4.46 (m, 1H), 4.26 (m, 1H), 3.92 (m, 1H), 3.66 (m, 2H), 3.16 (m, 1H), 2.67 (m, 1H), 2.21 (m, 2H), 1.80 (m, 1H), 1.68 (m, 1H), 1.30 (m, 8H), 1.11-1.20 (m, 9H), 0.85 (m, 1H), 0.77 (m, 1H).

Figure US07829665-20101109-C00110

A solution of oxalyl chloride 90.045 mL, 0.089 mmol) in DCM (5 mL) at −78° C. was added a solution of DMSO (0.015 g, 0.020 mmol) in DCM (2 mL) dropwise over 2 ninytes. The reaction was stirred at −78° C. for 10 minutes and the a solution of (2R,6S,13aS,14aR,16aS,Z)-6-(tert-botoxycarbonylamino)-14a-(hydroxymethyl)-5,16-dioxo-1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,13a,14,14a,15,16,16a-hexadecahydrocyclopropa[e]pyrrolo[1,2-α][1,4]dizacyclopentadecin-2-yl-4-fluoroisoindoline-2-carboxylate (0.050 g, 0.081 mmol) in DCM (2 mL) was added. After stirred at −78° C. for 40 min, TEA (0.051 mL, 0.37 mmol) was added. The reaction was warmed to rt, water (5 mL) was added. The organic layer was separated, washed with brine and dried over sodium sulfate. After removal of solvent, the residue was dissolved in MeOH (5 mL) and ammonium hydroxide (0.085 g, 2.45 mmol) and acetic acid (0.014 mL, 0.25 mmol) were added. The reaction stirred at rt for 3 minutes. NaCNBH3 90.015 g, 0.245 mmol) was added and stirred at rt for 30 minutes. The MeOH was removed. DCM (20 mL) and saturated sodium bicarbonate (5 mL) was added. The organic layer was separated, washed with brine and dried over sodium sulfate. After removal of solvent, the residue was dissolved in DCM (5 mL). TEA (0.017 mL, 0.122 mmol) was added and followed by the cyclopropanesulfonyl chloride (0.015 g, 0.098 mmol). The reaction was stirred at rt for 5 hrs. The solvent was removed. The residue was purified by column chromatography (ethyl acetate) to give the product (0.017 g, 28.2%) as white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, d6-DMSO) δ 8.52 (m, 1H), 7.35 (m, 1H), 7.02-7.20 (m, 4H), 5.56 (m, 1H), 4.99 (m, 1H), 4.97 (m, 1H), 4.67 (m, 2H), 4.66 (s, 2H), 4.46 (m, 1H), 4.24 (m, 1H), 3.92 (m, 1H), 3.67 (m, 1H), 3.46 (m, 1H), 2.74 (m, 1 h), 2.67 (m, 1H), 2.22 (m, 2H), 1.84 (m, 1H), 1.68 (m, 1H), 1.08-1.36 (m, 20H), 0.89 (m, 2H), 0.81 (m, 2H).

………………………………………..

Hoffmann-La Roche and Genentech’s danoprevir/r (RG7227) is a twice-daily, ritonavir-boosted HCV protease inhibitor with activity against HCV genotypes 1, 4 and 6. DAUPHINE, an ongoing phase II trial in 421 treatment-naive people with HCV genotypes 1 and 4, is comparing doses (200, 100, and 50 mg danoprevir, boosted with 100 mg ritonavir, twice-daily) and response-guided therapy with danoprevir/r plus PEG-IFN/RBV. At 12 weeks after treatment completion, HCV RNA was undetectable in 86% of the highest-dosing arm, 77% of the 100 mg arm, and 65% of the 50 mg arm.

Response to treatment in the 200 mg dosing arm did not differ according to HCV subtype or IL28B genotype; at 12 weeks after treatment completion, 88% of people with HCV subtype 1a and an IL28B non-CC genotype had undetectable HCV RNA. Across all dosing arms, HCV RNA remained undetectable 12 weeks after treatment completion in 100% of people with HCV genotype 4.

In the response-guided therapy arm, 76% of early responders (who were treated for 12 weeks) and 67% of late responders (treated for 24 weeks) maintained undetectable HCV RNA 12 weeks after treatment completion, bringing the overall total to 72%.

One death occurred during the trial—from sudden heart attack, in a participant with preexisting diabetes and hypertension—it was considered unrelated to study drugs. Adverse events were reported in virtually all study participants. Side effects from ritonavir, which is used to boost danoprevir levels, increased the likelihood of more than one serious adverse event among people in the danoprevir/r arms (range 4–9% vs. 1% for placebo). The rate of danoprevir/r-related treatment discontinuations was similar to the rate of PEG-IFN/RBV-associated discontinuations (3–7%, and 3–8%, respectively).

Common side effects (experienced by more than 15% of study participants) included fatigue, fever, chills, weakness, nausea, diarrhea, itching, rash, hair loss, headache, aching muscles and joints, insomnia, cough, and appetite loss. Diarrhea was the only side effect associated with danoprevir/r. Adding danoprevir/r did not increase rates of rash or anemia (known side effects of other HCV protease inhibitors). Most grade 3 and grade 4 lab abnormalities were neutropenia, reported in 22% to 38% of study participants.

Interferon-free DAA Combinations

Danoprevir/r and Mericitabine, plus Ribavirin (HCV Genotypes 1 and 4)

Roche’s phase IIb study, INFORM-SVR, is combining response-guided therapy with danoprevir/r, a twice-daily ritonavir-boosted HCV protease inhibitor, and mericitabine, a twice-daily nucleoside polymerase inhibitor, with or without ribavirin for 12 to 24 weeks in non-cirrhotic people with HCV genotype 1. The original study design was modified after high relapse rates were observed in the 12-week treatment and ribavirin-free arms. Treatment was extended to 24 weeks, and ribavirin was given to all participants.

The majority of INFORM-SVR participants were male, had HCV genotype 1a, and non-CC genotypes. Of the 64 people treated for 24 weeks with all three drugs, 41% experienced SVR-12. People with HCV genotype 1b were more likely to achieve SVR-12 (71% versus 26% in HCV genotype 1a). In contrast, SVR-12 was more likely among people with non-CC genotypes (32% for CC versus 44% for non-CC), although only 4 people had HCV genotype 1b and CC genotype. Breakthrough rates were higher in people who did not receive ribavirin, and in HCV genotype 1a versus 1b. Resistance to danoprevir/r was observed in all patients who experienced viral breakthrough; mericitabine resistance was found in one person.

Almost all participants had more than one adverse event; a total of 567 mild-to-moderate events were reported among 83 people. The most common side effects, occurring in >10% of people were headache, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, colds, insomnia, itching, weakness, dizziness, irritability, shortness of breath, cough, upset stomach, painful joints, and vomiting. As for laboratory abnormalities, one person experienced grade 3 anemia, four people had grade 3 lipid elevations, and one case each of grade 3 elevations in phosphate and lipase were observed.

A single serious adverse event, multiple myeloma, occurred 53 days after treatment completion and one person discontinued due to pain in the back of the throat (it was not specified whether or not this was a treatment-related adverse event).


  • Everson G, Cooper C, Shiffman ML, et al. Rapid and sustained achievement of undetectable HCV RNA during treatment with ritonavir-boosted danoprevir/PEG-IFNa-2A/RBV in HCV genotype 1 or 4 patients: Dauphine week 36 interim analysis (Abstract 1177). Paper presented at: 47th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver; 2012 April 18–22; Barcelona, Spain. Available from: http://mobile.ilcapp.eu/EASL_161/poster_24544/program.aspx. (Accessed 2012 June 25)
  • Gane EJ, Pockros P, Zeuzem S, et al. Interferon-free treatment with combination of mericitabine and danoprevir/r with or without ribavirin in treatment-naïve HCV genotype-1 infected patients (Abstract 1412). 47th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver; 2012 April 18–22; Barcelona, Spain. Available from:http://mobile.ilcapp.eu/EASL_161/poster_24848/program.aspx. (Accessed 2012 June 25)

Non- limiting examples of suitable HCV protease inhibitors include ACH-1095

(Achillion), ACH-1625 (Achillion), ACH-2684 (Achillion), AVL-181 (Avila), AVL-192 (Avila), BI-201335 (Boehringer Ingelheim), BMS-650032 (BMS), boceprevir, danoprevir, GS- 9132 (Gilead), GS-9256 (Gilead), GS-9451 (Gilead), IDX-136 (Idenix), IDX-316 (Idenix), IDX- 320 (Idenix), MK-5172 (Merck), narlaprevir, PHX-1766 (Phenomix), telaprevir, TMC-435 (Tibotec), vaniprevir, VBY708 (Virobay), VX-500 (Vertex), VX-813 (Vertex), VX-985 (Vertex), or a combination thereof. Non-limiting examples of suitable HCV polymerase inhibitors include ANA-598 (Anadys), BI-207127 (Boehringer Ingelheim), BILB-1941 (Boehringer Ingelheim), BMS-791325 (BMS), filibuvir, GL59728 (Glaxo), GL60667 (Glaxo), GS-9669 (Gilead), IDX-375 (Idenix), MK-3281 (Merck), tegobuvir, TMC-647055 (Tibotec), VCH-759 (Vertex & ViraChem), VCH-916 (ViraChem), VX-222 (VCH-222) (Vertex & ViraChem), VX-759 (Vertex), GS-6620 (Gilead), IDX-102 (Idenix), IDX-184 (Idenix), INX-189 (Inhibitex), MK-0608 (Merck), PSI-938 (Pharmasset), RG7128 (Roche), TMC64912 (Medivir), GSK625433 (Glaxo SmithKline), BCX-4678 (BioCryst), ALS-2200 (Alios BioPharma/Vertex), ALS-2158 (Alios BioPharma/Vertex), or a combination thereof. A polymerase inhibitor may be a nucleotide polymerase inhibitor, such as GS-6620 (Gilead), IDX-102 (Idenix), IDX-184 (Idenix), INX-189 (Inhibitex), MK-0608 (Merck), PSI-938 (Pharmasset), RG7128 (Roche), TMC64912 (Medivir), ALS-2200 (Alios BioPharma/Vertex), ALS-2158 (Alios BioPharma/Vertex), or a combination therefore. A polymerase inhibitor may also be a non- nucleoside polymerase inhibitor, such as ANA-598 (Anadys), BI-207127 (Boehringer Ingelheim), BILB-1941 (Boehringer Ingelheim), BMS-791325 (BMS), filibuvir, GL59728 (Glaxo), GL60667 (Glaxo), GS-9669 (Gilead), IDX-375 (Idenix), MK-3281 (Merck), tegobuvir, TMC-647055 (Tibotec), VCH-759 (Vertex & ViraChem), VCH-916 (ViraChem), VX-222 (VCH-222) (Vertex & ViraChem), VX-759 (Vertex), or a combination thereof. Non-limiting examples of suitable NS5A inhibitors include GSK62336805 (Glaxo SmithKline), ACH-2928 (Achillion), AZD2836 (Astra-Zeneca), AZD7295 (Astra-Zeneca), BMS-790052 (BMS), BMS- 824393 (BMS), GS-5885 (Gilead), PPI-1301 (Presidio), PPI-461 (Presidio), or a combination thereof. Non-limiting examples of suitable cyclophilin inhibitors include alisporovir (Novartis & Debiopharm), NM-811 (Novartis), SCY-635 (Scynexis), or a combination thereof. Non-limiting examples of suitable HCV entry inhibitors include ITX-4520 (iTherx), ITX-5061 (iTherx), or a combination thereof.

WO 2007015824WO 2003053349WO 2005095403WO 2005037214WO 2005095403WO 2005037214WO 2003053349WO 2007015824WO 2008128921

US8048862 14 Apr 2009 1 Nov 2011 Intermune, Inc. Macrocyclic inhibitors of hepatitis C virus replication
US8119592 10 Oct 2006 21 Feb 2012 Intermune, Inc. Compounds and methods for inhibiting hepatitis C viral replication
US8232246 30 Jun 2009 31 Jul 2012 Abbott Laboratories Anti-viral compounds
US8299021 19 Apr 2012 30 Oct 2012 Intermune, Inc. Macrocyclic inhibitors of hepatitis C virus replication
US8420596 10 Sep 2009 16 Apr 2013 Abbott Laboratories Macrocyclic hepatitis C serine protease inhibitors
WO2013106631A1 11 Jan 2013 18 Jul 2013 Abbvie Inc. Processes for making hcv protease inhibitors

Danoprevir Clinical Trial Information( data from http://clinicaltrials.gov)

NCT Number Recruitment Conditions Sponsor
/Collaborators
Start Date Phases
NCT01331850 Completed Hepatitis C, Chronic Hoffmann-La Roche 2011-05 Phase 2
NCT01531647 Completed Healthy Volunteer Hoffmann-La Roche 2012-01 Phase 1
NCT01588002 Completed Healthy Volunteer Hoffmann-La Roche 2012-04 Phase 1
NCT01592318 Active, not recruiting Healthy Volunteer Hoffmann-La Roche 2012-05 Phase 1
NCT01749150 Recruiting Hepatitis C, Chronic Hoffmann-La Roche 2013-04 Phase 2

peacock  animation

WANT TO KNOW ABOUT VIR SERIES CLICK

click

http://drugsynthesisint.blogspot.in/p/vir-series-hep-c-virus-22.html

AND

http://medcheminternational.blogspot.in/p/vir-series-hep-c-virus.html


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Paypal Donate

DR ANTHONY CRASTO

Follow New Drug Approvals on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,782 other followers

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 29 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 29 year tenure till date Aug 2016, Around 30 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 25 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 13 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 212 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

Personal Links

View Full Profile →

bloglovin

Follow my blog with Bloglovin The title of your home page You could put your verification ID in a comment Or, in its own meta tag Or, as one of your keywords Your content is here. The verification ID will NOT be detected if you put it here.
%d bloggers like this: