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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

Read all about Organic Spectroscopy on ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY INTERNATIONAL 

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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FDA approves new treatment for certain advanced or metastatic breast cancers


FDA approves new treatment for certain advanced or metastatic breast cancers

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Verzenio (abemaciclib) to treat adult patients who have hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer that has progressed after taking therapy that alters a patient’s hormones (endocrine therapy). Verzenio is approved to be given in combination with an endocrine therapy, called fulvestrant, after the cancer had grown on endocrine therapy. It is also approved to be given on its own, if patients were previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy after the cancer had spread (metastasized). Continue reading

https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm578071.htm

Abemaciclib.svg

(abemaciclib)

September 28, 2017

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Verzenio (abemaciclib) to treat adult patients who have hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer that has progressed after taking therapy that alters a patient’s hormones (endocrine therapy). Verzenio is approved to be given in combination with an endocrine therapy, called fulvestrant, after the cancer had grown on endocrine therapy. It is also approved to be given on its own, if patients were previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy after the cancer had spread (metastasized).

“Verzenio provides a new targeted treatment option for certain patients with breast cancer who are not responding to treatment, and unlike other drugs in the class, it can be given as a stand-alone treatment to patients who were previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

Verzenio works by blocking certain molecules (known as cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6), involved in promoting the growth of cancer cells. There are two other drugs in this class that are approved for certain patients with breast cancer, palbociclib approved in February 2015 and ribociclib approved in March 2017.

Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health estimates approximately 252,710 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, and 40,610 will die of the disease. Approximately 72 percent of patients with breast cancer have tumors that are HR-positive and HER2-negative.

The safety and efficacy of Verzenio in combination with fulvestrant were studied in a randomized trial of 669 patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that had progressed after treatment with endocrine therapy and who had not received chemotherapy once the cancer had metastasized. The study measured the length of time tumors did not grow after treatment (progression-free survival). The median progression-free survival for patients taking Verzenio with fulvestrant was 16.4 months compared to 9.3 months for patients taking a placebo with fulvestrant.

The safety and efficacy of Verzenio as a stand-alone treatment were studied in a single-arm trial of 132 patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that had progressed after treatment with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy after the cancer metastasized. The study measured the percent of patients whose tumors completely or partially shrank after treatment (objective response rate). In the study, 19.7 percent of patients taking Verzenio experienced complete or partial shrinkage of their tumors for a median 8.6 months.

Common side effects of Verzenio include diarrhea, low levels of certain white blood cells (neutropenia and leukopenia), nausea, abdominal pain, infections, fatigue, low levels of red blood cells (anemia), decreased appetite, vomiting and headache.

Serious side effects of Verzenio include diarrhea, neutropenia, elevated liver blood tests and blood clots (deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism). Women who are pregnant should not take Verzenio because it may cause harm to a developing fetus.

The FDA granted this application Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapydesignations.

The FDA granted the approval of Verzenio to Eli Lilly and Company.

//////////Verzenio, abemaciclib, fda 2017, metastatic breast cancers, Eli Lilly ,  Priority Review,  Breakthrough Therapy designations, antibodies

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Tradipitant, традипитант , تراديبيتانت , 曲地匹坦 ,


LY686017.svgTradipitant.png

Tradipitant

VLY-686,  LY686017

традипитант
تراديبيتانت [Arabic]
曲地匹坦 [Chinese]
  • Molecular Formula C28H16ClF6N5O
  • Average mass 587.903 Da
622370-35-8  CAS
Methanone, [2-[1-[[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-5-(4-pyridinyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]-3-pyridinyl](2-chlorophenyl)-
(2-(1-(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)-5-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridin-3-yl)(2-chlorophenyl)methanone
[2-[1-[[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-5-(4-pyridinyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]-3-pyridinyl](2-chlorophenyl)methanone

PHASE 2, Gastroparesis; Pruritus

pyridine-containing NK-1 receptor antagonist ie tradipitant, useful for treating anxiety, pruritus and alcoholism.

Vanda Pharmaceuticals, under license from Eli Lilly, was developing tradipitant, a NK1 antagonist, for treating anxiety disorder, pruritus and alcohol dependence. The company was also investigating the drug for treating gastroparesis. In February 2017, tradipitant was reported to be in phase 2 clinical development for treating anxiety and pruritus.

  • Originator Eli Lilly
  • Developer Eli Lilly; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Vanda Pharmaceuticals
  • Class Antipruritics; Anxiolytics; Chlorobenzenes; Pyridines; Small molecules; Triazoles
  • Mechanism of Action Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists; Substance P inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase II Gastroparesis; Pruritus
  • Discontinued Alcoholism; Social phobia
  • The drug had been in phase II clinical trials at Lilly and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism for the treatment of alcoholism; however, no recent development has been reported for this research.
  • A phase II clinical trial for the treatment of social phobia has been completed by Lilly.

PATENT WO 2003091226

Albert Kudzovi Amegadzie, Kevin Matthew Gardinier, Erik James Hembre, Jian Eric Hong, Louis Nickolaus Jungheim, Brian Stephen Muehl, David Michael Remick, Michael Alan Robertson, Kenneth Allen Savin, Less «
Applicant Eli Lilly And Company

Image result for Eli Lilly And Company

Image result for tradipitant

SYNTHESIS

Condensation of 2-chloropyridine with thiophenol  in the presence of K2CO3 in DMF at 110ºC yields sulfide intermediate,

which is then oxidized by means of NaOCl in AcOH to give 2-(benzenesulfonyl)pyridine.

This is treated with (iPr)2NH and n-BuLi in THF at -60 to -70°C and subsequently couples with 2-chlorobenzaldehyde  in THF at -60 to -70°C to furnish (2-(phenylsulfonyl)pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone.

Ketone  couples with the enolate of 4-acetylpyridine (formed by treating 4-acetylpyridine (VII) with t-BuOK in DMSO) in the presence of LiOH in DMSO and subsequently is treated with PhCOOH in iPrOAc to give rise to pyridine benzoate derivative.

This finally couples with 1-azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene  (obtained by treating 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzylchloride with NaN3 ini DMSO) in the presence of K2CO3 in t-BuOH to afford the title compound Tradipitant.

Tradipitant (VLY-686 or LY686017) is an experimental drug that is a neurokinin 1 antagonist. It works by blocking substance P, a small signaling molecule. Originally, this compound was owned by Eli Lilly and named LY686017. VLY-686 was purchased by Vanda Pharmaceuticals from Eli Lilly and Company in 2012.[1] Vanda Pharmaceuticals is a U.S. pharmaceutical company that as of November 2015 only has 3 drugs in their product pipeline: tasimelteon, VLY-686, and iloperidone.[2]

Tachykinins are a family of peptides that are widely distributed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. These peptides exert a number of biological effects through actions at tachykinin receptors. To date, three such receptors have been characterized, including the NK-1 , NK-2, and NK-3 subtypes of tachykinin receptor.

The role of the NK-1 receptor subtype in numerous disorders of the central nervous system and the periphery has been thoroughly demonstrated in the art. For instance, NK-1 receptors are believed to play a role in depression, anxiety, and central regulation of various autonomic, as well as cardiovascular and respiratory functions. NK- 1 receptors in the spinal cord are believed to play a role in pain transmission, especially the pain associated with migraine and arthritis. In the periphery, NK-1 receptor activation has been implicated in numerous disorders, including various inflammatory disorders, asthma, and disorders of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract.

There is an increasingly wide recognition that selective NK-1 receptor antagonists would prove useful in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system and the periphery. While many of these disorders are being treated by new medicines, there are still many shortcomings associated with existing treatments. For example, the newest class of anti-depressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are increasingly prescribed for the treatment of depression; however, SSRIs have numerous side effects, including nausea, insomnia, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction. This could significantly affect patient compliance rate. As another example, current treatments for chemotherapy- induced nausea and emesis, such as the 5-HT3receptor antagonists, are ineffective in managing delayed emesis. The development of NK-1 receptor antagonists will therefore greatly enhance the ability to treat such disorders more effectively. Thus, the present invention provides a class of potent, non-peptide NK-1 receptor antagonists, compositions comprising these compounds, and methods of using the compounds.

Indications

Pruritus

It is being investigated by Vanda Pharmaceuticals for chronic pruritus (itchiness) in atopic dermatitis. In March 2015, Vanda announced positive results from a Phase II proof of concept study.[3] A proof of concept study is done in early stage clinical trials after there have been promising preclinical results. It provides preliminary evidence that the drug is active in humans and has some efficacy.[4]

Alcoholism

VLY-686 reduced alcohol craving in recently detoxified alcoholic patients as measured by the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire.[5] In a placebo controlled clinical trial of recently detoxified alcoholic patients, VLY-686 significantly reduced alcohol craving as measured by the Alcohol Urge Questionnaire. It also reduced the cortisol increase seen after a stress test compared to placebo. The dose given was 50 mg per day.

Social anxiety disorder

In a 12-week randomized trial of LY68017 in 189 patients with social anxiety disorder, 50 mg of LY68017 did not provide any statistically significant improvement over placebo.[6]

PATENT

WO03091226,

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2003091226A1?cl=en

PATENT

WO2008079600, 

The compound {2-[l-(3,5-bis-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]- pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone, depicted below as the compound of Formula I, was first described in PCT published application WO2003/091226.

Figure imgf000003_0001

(I)

Because the compound of Formula I is an antagonist of the NK-I subtype of tachykinin receptor, it is useful for the treatment of disorders associated with an excess of tachykinins. Such disorders include depression, including major depressive disorder; anxiety, including generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and social phobia or social anxiety disorder; schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, including bipolar disorder; neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia, including senile dementia of the Alzheimer’s type or Alzheimer’s disease; disorders of bladder function such as bladder detrusor hyper-reflexia and incontinence, including urge incontinence; emesis, including chemotherapy-induced nausea and acute or delayed emesis; pain or nociception; disorders associated with blood pressure, such as hypertension; disorders of blood flow caused by vasodilation and vasospastic diseases, such as angina, migraine, and Reynaud’s disease; hot flushes; acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases such as adult respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopneumonia, bronchospasm, chronic bronchitis, drivercough, and asthma; inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease; gastrointestinal disorders or diseases associated with the neuronal control of viscera such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome (including constipation-predominant, diarrhea- -?-

predominant, and mixed irritable bowel syndrome); and cutaneous diseases such as contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, and other eczematoid dermatitis.

In PCT published application, WO2005/042515, novel crystalline forms of the compound of Formula I, identified as Form IV and Form V, are identified. Also described in WO2005/042515 is a process for preparation of the compound of Formula I, comprising reacting (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2- hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone or a phosphate salt thereof with l-azidomethyl-3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzene in the presence of a suitable base and a solvent. Use of this procedure results in several shortcomings for synthesis on a commercial scale. For example, use of the solvent DMSO, with (2- chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone phosphate, requires a complex work-up that has a propensity to emulsify. This process also requires extraction with CH2CI2, the use of which is discouraged due to its potential as an occupational carcinogen, as well as the use of MgSC>4 and acid-washed carbon, which can generate large volumes of waste on a commercial scale. Conducting the reaction with (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone in isopropyl alcohol, as also described in WO2005/042515, is also undesirable due to the need to incorporate a free base step. Furthermore, variable levels of residual l-azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene, a known mutagen, are obtained from use of the procedures described in WO2005/042515.

An improved process for preparing the compound of Formula I would control the level of 1- azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene impurity, and improve the yield. We have discovered that use of the novel salt, (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate, as well as use of tert-butanol as the reaction solvent, improves reaction times and final yield, and decreases impurities in the final product. In addition, a novel process for the preparation of (2-chlorophenyl)- [2-(2- hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate, in which a pre-formed enolate of 4-acetyl pyridine is added to (2-phenylsulfonyl-pyridine-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone, results in an overall improved yield and improved purity, and is useful on a commercial scale.

EXAMPLES

Example 1 {2-[l-(3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)- methanone (Form IV)

Figure imgf000005_0001

Suspend (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl] methanone benzoate (204.7 g; 1.04 equiv; 445 mmoles) in t-butanol (614 mL) and treat the slurry with potassium carbonate (124.2 g; 898.6 mmoles). Heat to 7O0C with mechanical stirring for 1 hour. Add l-azidomethyl-3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzene (115.6 g; 1.00 equiv; 429.4 mmoles) in a single portion, then heat the mixture to reflux. A circulating bath is used to maintain a condenser temperature of 3O0C. After 18 hours at reflux, HPLC reveals that the reaction is complete (<2% l-azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzene remaining). The mixture is cooled to 7O0C, isopropanol (818 mL) is added, then the mixture is stirred at 7O0C for 1 hour. The mixture is filtered, and the waste filter cake is rinsed with isopropanol (409 mL). The combined filtrate and washes are transferred to a reactor, and the mechanically stirred contents are heated to 7O0C. To the dark purple solution, water (1.84 L) is added slowly over 35 minutes. The solution is cooled to 6O0C, then stirred for 1 hour, during which time a thin precipitate forms. The mixture is slowly cooled to RT, then the solid is filtered, washed with 1 : 1 isopropanol/water (614 mL), subsequently washed with isopropanol (410 mL), then dried in vacuo at 450C to produce 200.3 g of crude {2-[l-(3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone as a white solid. Crude {2-[l-(3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin- 3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone (200.3 g) and isopropyl acetate (600 mL) are charged to a 5L 3-neck jacketed flask, then the contents heated to 750C. After dissolution is achieved, the vessel contents are cooled to 550C, then the solution polish filtered through a 5 micron filter, and the filter rinsed with a volume of isopropyl acetate (200 mL). After the polish filtration operation is complete, the filtrates are combined, and the vessel contents are adjusted to 5O0C. After stirring for at least 15 minutes at 5O0C, 0.21 grams of {2-[l-(3,5-bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2- chlorophenyl)-methanone Form IV seed (d90 = 40 microns) is added, and the mixture stirred at 5O0C for at least 2 h. Heptanes (1.90 L) are then added over at least 2 h. After the heptanes addition is completed, the slurry is stirred for an hour at 5O0C, cooled to 230C at a rate less then 2O0C per hour, then aged at 230C for an hour prior to isolation. The mixture is then filtered in portions through the bottom outlet valve in the reactor into a 600 mL filter. The resulting wetcake is washed portionwise with a solution containing heptanes (420 mL) and isopropyl acetate (180 mL), which is passed directly through the 5L crystallization vessel. The wetcake is blown dry for 5 minutes with nitrogen, then transferred to a 500 mL plastic bottle. The product is dried at 5O0C for 4 h. to produce 190.3g of pure {2-[l-(3,5- bistrifluoromethylbenzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-lH-[l,2,3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)- methanone, Form IV in 75.0% yield with 100% purity, as determined by HPLC analysis. Particle size is reduced via pin or jet mill. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): 5.46 (s, 2H); 7.19 (m, 5H); 7.36 (dd, IH, J = 4.9, 7.8); 7.45 (s, 2H); 7.59 (m, IH); 7.83 (s, IH); 7.93 (dd, IH, J = 1.5, 7.8); 8.56 (dd, IH, J= 1.5, 4.9); 8.70 (d, 2H, J= 5.9).

Preparation 1-A (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate Charge powdered KOfBu (221.1 g, 1.93 moles, 1.40 eq.) to Reactor A, then charge DMSO (2 L) at

250C over 10 min. The KOfBu/DMSO solution is stirred for 30 min at 230C, then a solution of 4-acetyl pyridine (92 mL, 2.07 moles, 1.50 eq) in DMSO (250 mL) is prepared in reactor B. The contents of reactor B are added to Reactor A over 10 minutes, then the Reactor A enolate solution is stirred at 230C for Ih. In a separate 12-L flask (Reactor C), solid LiOH (84.26 g, 3.45 moles, 2.0 eq) is poured into a mixture of (2- phenylsulfonyl-pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone (500.0 g, 1.34 moles, 1.0 eq) and DMSO (2L), with stirring, at 230C. The enolate solution in reactor A is then added to Reactor C over a period of at least 15 minutes, and the red suspension warmed to 4O0C. The reaction is stirred for 3h, after which time HPLC analysis reveals less than 2% (2-phenylsulfonyl-pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone. Toluene (2.5 L) is charged, and the reactor temperature cooled to 3O0C. The mixture is quenched by addition of glacial acetic acid (316 mL, 5.52 moles, 4.0 eq), followed by 10 % NaCl (2.5 L). The biphasic mixture is transferred to a 22-L bottom-outlet Morton flask, and the aqueous layer is removed. The aqueous layer is then extracted with toluene (750 mL). The combined organic layers are washed with 10 % NaCl (750 mL), then concentrated to 4 volumes and transferred to a 12-L Morton flask and rinsed with isopropyl acetate (4 vol, 2 L). The opaque amber solution is warmed to 75 degrees to 750C over 40 min. Benzoic acid (171. Ig, 1.34 moles, 1.0 eq) is dissolved in hot isopropyl acetate (1.5 L), and charged to the crude free base solution over at least 30 min. The crude solution containing benzoate salt is stirred for 0.5 h at 750C then cooled to 23 0C. When solids are first observed, the cooling is stopped and the mixture is aged for an hour at the temperature at which crystals are first observed. Alternatively, if seed crystal is available, the mixture may be seeded with (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate (2.25g) at 750C, followed by stirring for 0.5 h at 750C, then cooling to 230C over at least 1.5 h. The mixture is then cooled to <5 0C, then filtered through paper on a 24cm single-plate filter. The filtercake is then rinsed with cold z-PrOAc (750 mL) to produce granular crystals of bright orange-red color. The wet solid is dried at 550C to produce 527.3 g (83% yield) with 99.9% purity. (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2- pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate. Anal. Calcd. for C26Hi9N2ClO4: C, 68.05; H, 4.17; N, 7.13. Found: C, 67.89; H, 4.15; N 6.05. HRMS: calcd for C19H13ClN2O2, 336.0666; found 336.0673.

The synthesis of(2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone benzoate proceeds optimally when the potassium enolate of 4-acetyl pyridine is pre-formed using KOfBu in DMSO. Pre-formation of the enolate allows the SNAR (nucleophilic aromatic substitution) reaction to be performed between room temperature and 4O0C, which minimizes the amount of degradation. Under these conditions, the SNAR is highly regioselective, resulting in a ratio of approximately 95:5 preferential C – acylation. In all cases, less polar solvents such as THF or toluene, or co-solvents of these solvents mixed with DMSO, results in a substantial increase of acylation at the oxygen in the SNAR, and leads to a lower yield of product. This is a substantial improvement over the procedures described in WO2005/042515 for synthesis of the free base or the phosphate salt, in which the SNAR is performed at 60-700C, resulting in a substantial increase in chemical impurity. Using the conditions described in WO2005/042515, when scaled to 2kg, results in maximum yields of 55%, with sub-optimal potency. In comparison, the improved conditions described herein can be run reproducibly from 0.4 to 2kg scale to give yields of 77-83%, with >99% purity. In addition, the reaction can be held overnight at 4O0C with minimal degradation, whereas holding the reaction for 1 h past completion at 60-70°C results in substantial aromatized impurity. The reaction may also be performed using sodium tert-amylate as the base, in combination with an aprotic solvent, such as DMSO or DMF.

The title compound exists as a mixture of tautomers and geometric isomers. It is understood that each of these forms is encompassed within the scope of the invention.

Figure imgf000008_0001

Preparation 1-B

(2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone toluate The procedure described in Preparation 1-A is followed, with the following exception. Solid toluic acid (1.0 eq) is added to the crude free base solution at 550C, then the solution cooled to 45 0C. The solution is stirred for one hour at 45 0C, then slowly cooled to 23 0C. When solids are first observed, the cooling is stopped and the mixture is aged for an hour at the temperature at which crystals are first observed. Alternatively, if seed crystal is available, the mixture may be seeded, aged for 3 h at 450C , then cooled to O0C over 4 h. The isolation slurry is filtered, and the wetcake washed with MeOH (3 volumes). The wetcake is dried at 5O0C to provide 14.0 g (76.4%) of (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy-2-pyridin-4-yl- vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone toluate as a light red powder.

As with the benzoate salt, the toluate salt can also exist as a mixture of tautomers and geometric isomers, each of which is encompassed within the scope of the invention. (2-chlorophenyl)-[2-(2-hydroxy- 2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone toluate . 13C NMR (125 MHz,DMS0-d6) δ 194.5, 167.8, 167.4, 155.5, 150.7 (2C), 147.4, 144.0, 143.4, 142.7, 138.6, 133.0, 130.8, 130.7, 130.5, 129.8(2C), 129.5(2C), 128.5, 128.0, 127.9, 119.9 (2C), 118.6, 92.6, 21.5.

Preparation 1-C

(2-phenylsulfonyl-pyridin-3-yl)-(2-chlorophenyl)methanone

A solution of 1.3 eq of diisopropylamine (based on 2-benzenesulfonyl pyridine) in 5 volumes of THF in a mechanically stirred 3 -necked flask is cooled to -70 to -75 0C. To this solution is added 1.05 eq of w-butyllithium (1.6M in hexanes) at such a rate as to maintain the temperature below -6O0C. The light yellow solution is stirred at -60 to -70 0C for 30 minutes. Once the temperature has cooled back down to – 60 to -650C, 1.0 eq of 2-benzene-sulfonyl pyridine, as a solution in 3 volumes of THF, is added at the fastest rate that will maintain the reaction temperature under -6O0C. A yellow suspension forms during the addition that becomes yellow-orange upon longer stirring. This mixture is stirred for 3 hours at -60 to – 750C, and then 1.06 eq of 2-chlorobenzaldehyde, as a solution in 1 volume of THF, is added dropwise at a sufficient rate to keep the temperature under -55 0C. The suspension gradually turns orange-red, thins out, and then becomes a clear red solution. The reaction mixture is allowed to stir at -60 to -7O0C for 1 hour, 3N aqueous HCl (7 volumes) is added over 20-30 minutes, and the temperature is allowed to exotherm to 0-100C. The color largely disappears, leaving a biphasic yellow solution. The solution is warmed to at least 1O0C, the layers are separated, and the aqueous layer is back-extracted with 10 volumes of ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers are washed with 10 volumes of saturated sodium bicarbonate solution and concentrated to about 2 volumes. Ethyl acetate (10 volumes) is added, and the solution is once again concentrated to 2 volumes. The thick solution is allowed to stand overnight and is taken to the next step with no purification of the crude alcohol intermediate. The crude alcohol intermediate is transferred to a 3 -necked flask with enough ethyl acetate to make the total solution about 10 volumes. The yellow solution is treated with 3.2 volumes of 10% aqueous (w/w) potassium bromide, followed by 0.07 eq of 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxide (TEMPO). The orange mixture is cooled to 0-50C and treated with a solution of 1.25 eq of sodium bicarbonate in 12% w/w sodium hypochlorite (9 volumes) and 5 volumes of water over 30-60 minutes while allowing the temperature to exotherm to a maximum of 2O0C. The mixture turns dark brown during the addition, but becomes yellow, and a thick precipitate forms. The biphasic light yellow mixture is allowed to stir at ambient temperature for 1-3 hours, at which time the reaction is generally completed. The biphasic mixture is cooled to 0-50C and stirred for 3 hours at that temperature. The solid is filtered off, washed with 4 volumes of cold ethyl acetate, followed by 4 volumes of water, and dried in vacuo at 450C to constant weight. Typical yield is 80-83% with a purity of greater than 98%. 1H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3-^) δ ppm 7.38 (td, ./=7.52, 1.28 Hz, 1 H) 7.47 (dd, ./=7.80, 1.30 Hz, 1 H) 7.51 (td, ./=7.79, 1.60 Hz, 1 H) 7.51 (t, ./=7.89 Hz, 2 H) 7.50 – 7.54 (m, J=7.75, 4.63 Hz, 1 H) 7.60 (t, J=7.43 Hz, 1 H) 7.73 (dd, J=7.75, 1.60 Hz, 1 H) 7.81 (dd, J=7.79, 1.56 Hz, 1 H) 8.00 (dd, ./=8.44, 1.10 Hz, 2 H) 8.76 (dd, ./=4.63, 1.61 Hz, 1 H).

Preparation 1-D 1 -azidomethyl-3,5-bistrifluoromethyl-benzene

Sodium azide (74.3 g, 1.14 mol) is suspended in water (125 mL), then DMSO (625 mL) is added. After stirring for 30 minutes, a solution consisting of 3,5-Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl chloride (255.3 g, 0.97 moles) and DMSO (500 mL) is added over 30 minutes. (The 3,5-Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl chloride is heated to 350C to liquefy prior to dispensing (MP = 30-320C)). The benzyl chloride feed vessel is rinsed with DMSO (50 mL) into the sodium azide solution, the mixture is heated to 4O0C, and then maintained for an hour at 4O0C, then cooled to 230C.

In Process Analysis: A drop of the reaction mixture is dissolved in d6-DMSO and the relative intensities of the methylene signals are integrated (NMR verified as a 0.35% limit test for 3,5- Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl Chloride). Work-up: After the mixture reaches 230C , it is diluted with heptanes (1500 mL), then water (1000 mL) is added, and the mixture exotherms to 350C against a jacket setpoint of 230C. The aqueous layer is removed (-2200 mL), then the organic layer (approximately 1700 mL) is washed with water (2 X 750 mL). The combined aqueous layers (-3700 mL) are analyzed and discarded.

The solvent is then partially removed via vacuum distillation with a jacket set point of 850C, pot temperature of 60-650C and distillate head temperature of 50-550C to produce 485g (94.5% yield) of 51 Wt% solution title compound as a clear liquid. Heptanes can be either further removed by vacuum distillation or wiped film evaporation technology. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): 4.58 (s, 2H); 7.81 (s, 2H); 7.90 (s, IH).

Preparation 1-E 2-benzene-sulfonyl pyridine Charge 2-chloropyridine (75 mL, 790 mmol), thiophenol (90 mL, 852 mmol), and DMF (450 mL) to a 2L flask. Add K2CO3 (134.6 g, 962 mmol), then heat to HO0C and stir for 18 hours. Filter the mixture, then rinse the waste cake with DMF (195 mL). The combined crude sulfide solution and rinses are transferred to a 5-L flask, and the waste filtercake is discarded. Glacial acetic acid (57 mL, 995 mmol) is added to the filtrate, then the solution is heated to 4O0C, and 13 wt % NaOCl solution (850 mL, 1.7 mol) is added over 2 hours. After the reaction is complete, water (150 mL) is added, then the pH of the mixture adjusted to 9 with 20 % (w/v) NaOH solution (250 mL). The resulting slurry is cooled to <5 0C, stirred for 1.5 h, then filtered, and the cake washed with water (3 x 200 mL). The product wetcake is dried in a 550C vacuum oven to provide 2-benzene-sulfonyl pyridine (149 g, 676 mmol) in 86 % yield: 1H NMR (500 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.66 (d, J = 5.5 Hz, IH), 8.19 (d, J = 1.1 Hz, IH), 8.05 (m, 2H), 7.92 (ddd, J= 9.3, 7.7, 1.6 Hz, IH), 7.60 (m, IH), 7.54 (m, 2H), 7.44 (m, IH); IR (KBr) 788, 984, 1124, 1166, 1306, 1424, 1446, 1575, 3085 cm“1; MS (TOF) mlz 220.0439 (220.0427 calcd for C11H10NO2S, MH); Anal, calcd for C11H9NO2S: C, 60.26; H, 4.14; N, 6.39; S, 14.62. Found: C, 60.40; H, 4.02; N, 6.40; S, 14.76.

As noted above, use of the improved process of the present invention results in an improved habit of the crystalline Form IV compound of Formula I. The improved habit reduces surface area of the crystal, improves the filtration, and washing, and improves the efficiency of azide mutagen rejection. These improvements are described in greater detail below.

In patent application WO2005/042515, the polish filtration is carried out in 7 volumes (L/kg) of isopropanol near its boiling point (65-83 0C), a process that is difficult and hazardous to execute in commercial manufacturing because of the high risk of crystallization on the filter and/or vessel transfer lines due to supersaturation. In the preferred crystallization solvent, isopropyl acetate, the polish filtration is conducted in four volumes of isopropyl acetate at temperatures from 45 to 55 0C. This temperature range is 35 to 45 0C lower than the boiling point of isopropyl acetate, which provides a key safety advantage.

PATENT

WO 2005042515

PATENT

WO 2017031215

EXAMPLES

Example 1: Preparation of Compound (I) via Negishi Coupling Route

Example 1 provides a scheme including preparations 1A-1D, described below, for the synthesis of the compound of Formula (I) and intermediates used in the route. An overview of the scheme is as follows:

80 on ma s ale

Example 1A: Preparation of Compound (I)

Zinc dust (200 mg, 3.06 mmol) combined with 2.0 mL of dimethylformamide was treated with 0.010 mL of 1,2-dibromoethane and heated to 65°C for 3 minutes. The mixture was cooled to ambient temperature and treated with 0.010 mL of trimethylsilyl chloride. After 5 minutes, 1.26 mL of 1M zinc chloride in diethyl ether was added to the mixture followed by Compound (Ila) (600 mg, 1.20 mmol). The mixture was heated to 65°C and further treated with 0.020 mL each of 1,2-dibromoethane and trimethylsilyl chloride. After 2.5 hours, via HPLC chromatogram, the reaction showed some formation of the zincate and was allowed to stir at ambient temperature for 16 hours. At this time

tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) (70 mg, 0.06 mmol), Compound (Ilia) (357 mg, 1.20 mmol) were added to the reaction and the mixture heated to 65°C. HPLC analysis showed the formation of Compound (I) in the reaction.

IB: Preparation of Comp

To a solution of Compound (IV) (8.00 g, 18 mmol) in 40 mL of 1,2-dichloroethane was added a solution of iodine monochloride (10.7 g, 65.9 mmol) in 40 mL of 1,2-dichloroethane resulting in a slurry. The slurry was heated to 75°C for 4 hours then cooled to ambient temperature. The solids were collected by filtration, washed with heptane, then combined with 90 mL of ethyl acetate and 80 mL of saturated sodium thiosulfate solution. The organic phase was washed with saturated sodium chloride solution and dried with sodium sulfate. The mixture was concentrated to yield 7.80 g (87%) of Compound (Ila) as a yellow solid. The product could be further purified by silica gel chromatography. Thus 2.0 g of yellow solid was dissolved in dichloromethane and charged onto a silica gel column. The product was eluted using tert-butyl methyl ether to provide 1.87 g (93% recovery) of Compound (Ila) as a white powder. Analytical data: Iodine monochloride complex: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 8.80 (2 H), 8.05 (1 H), 7.77 (2 H), 7.59 (2 H), 5.86 (2 H).

Uncomplexed: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 8.71 (2 H), 8.03 (1 H), 7.74 (2 H), 7.44 (2 H), 5.86 (2 H).

It was observed that the iodination proceeded smoothly as a suspension in 1,2-dichloroethane with IC1 (4.0 equiv) at 75°C. An ICl-Compound (Ila) complex was initially isolated by filtration. Compound (Ila) was then obtained in approximately 85% yield by treatment of the ICl-Compound (Ila) complex with sodium thiosulfate. This protocol provided a viable means of isolation of Compound (Ila) without the use of DMF.

Example 1C: Preparation of silyl substituted triazole (Compound IV)

A mixture of Compound (V) (8.07 g, 30.0 mmol) and Compound (VI) (5.12 g, 29.2 mmol) was heated to 100°C for 18 hours. To the mixture was added 40 mL of heptane and the reaction was allowed to cool with rapid stirring. After 1 hour the solids were collected by filtration and washed with heptane then dried to 9.30 g (72%) of Compound (IV) as a tan solid. Analytical data: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 8.66 (2 H), 8.04 (1 H), 7.67 (2 H), 7.32 (2 H), 5.72 (2 H), 0.08 (9 H).

It was further found that combining Compound (V) and Compound (VI) (neat) and heating at 95 – 105°C afforded a 92: 8 mixture of regioisomers as shown below:

Crystallization of the mixture from heptane afforded Compound (IV) in 62-72% yield, thus obviating the need for chromatography to isolate Compound (IV).

Example ID: Preparation of starting material Compound (VI)

Zinc bromide (502 g, 2.23 mole) was added in approximately 100 g portions to 2.0 L of tetrahydrofuran cooled to between 0 and 10°C. To this cooled solution was added 4-bromopyridine hydrochloride (200 g, 1.02 mol), triphenylphosphine (54 g, 0.206 mol), and palladium (II) chloride (9.00 g, 0.0508 mol). Triethylamine (813 g, 8.03 mol) was then added at a rate to maintain the reaction temperature at less than 10°C, and finally

trimethylsilylacetylene (202 g, 2.05 mol) was added. The mixture was heated to 60°C for 4.5 hours. The reaction was cooled to -5°C and combined with 2.0 L of hexanes and treated with 2 L of 7.4 M NH4OH. Some solids were formed and were removed as much as possible with the aqueous phase. The organic phase was again washed with 2.0 L of 7.4 M NH4OH, followed by 2 washes with 500 mL of water, neutralized with 1.7 L of 3 M hydrochloric acid, dried with sodium sulfate, and concentrate to a thick slurry. The slurry was combined with 1.0 L of hexanes to give a precipitate. The precipitate was removed by filtration and the filtrate was concentrated to 209 g of dark oil. The product was purified by distillation (0.2 torr, 68°C) to give 172 g (96%) of Compound (VI) as colorless oil. Analytical data: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, DMDO-de) δ 8.57 (2 H), 7.40 (2 H), 0.23 (9 H).

EXAMPLE 2 – Preparation of Compound (Ilia)

Example 2 provides a morpholine amide route for the synthesis of Compound (Ilia). In this approach, morpholine amide (Compound VII) was prepared from 2-chlorobenzoyl chloride (Preparation 2A). Metallation of 2-bromopyridine with LDA (1.09 equiv.) in THF at -70°C followed by addition of (Compound VII) afforded Compound (Ilia) in 37% yield after crystallization from IP A/heptane (Preparation 2B). This sequence provides a direct route to Compound (Ilia), and a means to isolate Compound (Ilia) without the use of

chromatography. Compound (Ilia) may then be used to form Compound (I) as shown in Example 1A above (Preparation 2C).

Preparation 2A: Preparation of Compound (VII)

Toluene (1.5 L) was added to Compound (IX) (150 g, 0.86 mol) and cooled to 10°C. Morpholine (82 mL, 0.94 mol) was added to the clear solution over 10 minutes. The resulting white slurry was stirred for 20 minutes then pyridine (92 mL, 1.2 mol) was added dropwise over 20 minutes. The cloudy white mixture was stirred in a cold bath for 1 hour. Water (600 mL) was added in a single portion and the cold bath removed. The mixture was stirred for 20 minutes and the layers are separated. The organic layer was washed with a mixture of 1 N HC1 and water (2: 1, 500 mL:250 mL). The pH of the aqueous layer was ~ 2. The organic layer was washed with a mixture of saturated NaHCCb and water (1 : 1, 100 mL: 100 mL). The pH of the aqueous layer was ~ 9. The layers were separated. The organic layer was concentrated in vacuo to an oil. The oil was dissolved in IPA (70 mL) and heated at 60°C for 30 min. The clear solution was allowed to cool to 30°C, then heptane (700 mL, 4.7 v) was added dropwise. The resulting slurry was stirred at RT for 2 hours then cooled to 0°C for 1 hour. The slurry was filtered at RT, washed with heptane then dried under vacuum at 30°C overnight. Compound (VII) (156.2 g, 81%) was obtained as a white solid. Analytical data: ¾ NMR (500 MHz, CDCh) δ 7.42-7.40 (m, 1 H), 7.35-7.29 (m, 3 H), 3.91-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.80-3.76 (m, 3 H), 3.71 (ddd, J= 11.5, 6.8, 3.3 Hz, 1 H), 3.60 (ddd, J = 11.2, 6.4, 3.4 Hz, 1 H), 3.28 (ddd, J= 13.4, 6.3, 3.2 Hz, 1 H), 3.22 (ddd, J= 13.7, 6.8, 3.3 Hz, 1 H); LRMS (ES+) calcd for CnHi3F6ClN02 (M+H)+ 226.1, found 225.9 m/z.

Preparation 2B: Preparation of Compound (Ilia)

THF (75 mL) was added to diisopropyl amine (4.9 mL, 34.8 mmol) and cooled to a

temperature of -70°C under N2 atmosphere. 2.5 M w-BuLi in hexanes (13.9 mL, 34.8 mmol) was added in a single portion (a 30-40°C exotherm) to the clear solution and cooled back to -70°C. Compound (VIII) (5.0 g, 31.6 mmol) was added neat to the LDA solution (a 2 to 5°C exotherm) followed by a THF (10 mL) rinse, keeping T< -65°C. This clear yellow solution was stirred at -70°C for 15 min. Compound (VII) (7.1 g, 31.6 mmol) in THF (30 mL) was added keeping T< -65°C. The resulting clear orange solution was stirred at -70°C for 3 hours. MeOH (3 mL) was added to quench reaction mixture and the cold bath was removed. 5 N HC1 (25 mL) was added to the reaction solution. MTBE (25 mL) was added, and the layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with water (25 mL X 2). The organic layer was dried over MgS04 and filtered. The organic layer was concentrated in vacuo to an orange oil. The oil was dissolved in IPA (15 mL, 3 vol) at ambient temperature. Heptane (25 mL) was added dropwise and the resulting slurry was stirred at RT for 1 hour. The slurry was cooled to 0°C for 1 hour and filtered. The filter cake was rinsed with chilled heptane (20 mL) and dried under vacuum at 30°C overnight. Compound (Ilia) (4.25 g, 45%) was obtained as a yellow solid.

Several reactions were run at different temperatures and with different addition rates of Compound (VII). If the reaction temperature was maintained below -65°C and Compound (VII) was added in <5 min, it was found that the reaction worked well. If the temperature was increased and/or the addition time of Compound (VII) was increased, then yields suffered, and the work-up was complicated by emulsions.

Preparation 2C: Preparation of Compound (I)

Compound (Ilia) may then reacted with Compound (Ila) to produce Compound (I) as shown in Preparation 1A.

EXAMPLE 3

Example 3 describes a new route for the synthesis of an intermediate free base, which may be used to form Compound (I) as described further below.

Example 3A: Preparation of starting material (Compound X) from 2-Chloronicotinonitrile

A mixture of NaH (40.0 g, 1 mol, 60% dispersion in mineral oil) and 2-chloronicotinonitrile (69.3 g, 500 mmol) in THF (1 L) was heated to reflux. A solution of 4-acetylpyridine (60.6 g, 500 mmol) in THF (400 mL) was added over a period of 40 min. The resulting dark brown mixture was stirred at reflux for ~ 2 h. The heating mantle was then removed, and AcOH (58 mL, 1 mol) was added. EtOAc (1 L) and H2O (1 L) were then added, and the layers were separated. The organic layer was concentrated to afford an oily solid. CH3CN (500 mL) was added, and the mixture was stirred for 30 min. H2O (1 L) was then added. The mixture was stirred for 1 h then filtered. The solid was rinsed with 2: 1

CH3CN-H2O (900 mL) and hexanes (400 mL) then dried under vacuum at 45°C overnight to afford 61.4 g (55% yield) of Compound (X) as yellow solid. Compound (X) exists as an approximate 95:5 enol-ketone mixture in CDCI3. Analytical data for enol: IR (CHCI3): 3024, 2973, 2229, 1631, 1597, 1579, 1550, 1497; ¾ NMR (500 MHz, CDCI3) δ 8.69 (dd, J= 4.4,

1.7 Hz, 2H), 8.55 (dd, J = 5.2, 1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.97 (dd, J= 7.9, 1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.70 (dd, J= 4.6, 1.5 Hz, 2H, 7.17 (dd, J = 7.8, 5.0 Hz, 1H), 6.59 (s, 1H); LRMS (ES+) calcd for C13H10N3O (M+H)+ 224.1, found 224.0 m/z.

Preparation 3B: Preparation of Compound (XI)

Preparation 3B(1):

(X) (XI)

Compound (XI) may be prepared using Compound (X).

Preparation 3B(2):

Alternatively, the following procedure for the conversion of nitrile into an acid which may also yield compound (XI). A mixture of Compound (X) (1 eq) and NaOH (1.5 eq) in 1 : 1 fhO-EtOH (3.5 mL/g of Compound (X)) was heated at 65°C overnight. The reaction mixture was cooled to RT then added to CH2C12 (12.5 mL/g of Compound (X)) and H20 (12.5 mL/g of Compound (X)). Cone. HC1 (2.5 mL/g of Compound (X)) was then added, and the layers were separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with CH2CI2 (10 mL/g of Compound (X)). The combined organic extracts were washed with H2O (12.5 ml/g of Compound (X)), dried (MgS04), filtered and concentrated to afford Compound (XI).

Preparation 3C

Compound Compound (XI) may then be converted into a Stage C intermediate free base, with observed 87% conversion in Grignard reaction as shown above. A complete synthesis route for Com ound (I) starting from compound Compound (XI) is depicted below.

Detailed experimental procedures for the synthesis of benzoate salt and final step are given in

International Patent Application Publication WO 2008/079600 Al .

References

  1.  “Company Overview of Eli Lilly & Co., Worldwide License to Develop and Commercialize VLY-686”. Bloomberg Business. Retrieved 16 November 2015.
  2.  [1]
  3.  “Vanda Pharmaceuticals Announces Tradipitant Phase II Proof of Concept Study Results for Chronic Pruritus in Atopic Dermatitis”. PR Newswire. Retrieved 16 November 2015.
  4.  Schmidt, B (2006). “Proof of principle studies”. Epilepsy Res. 68 (1): 48–52. doi:10.1016/j.eplepsyres.2005.09.019. PMID 16377153.
  5.  George, DT; Gilman, J; Hersh, J; et al. (2008). “Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism as a possible therapy for alcoholism.”. Science. 6: 1536–1539. doi:10.2147/SAR.S70350. PMC 4567173Freely accessible. PMID 26379454.
  6.  Tauscher, J; Kielbasa, W; Iyengar, S; et al. (2010). “Development of the 2nd generation neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist LY686017 for social anxiety disorder”. European Neuropsychopharmacology. 20 (2): 80–87. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2009.10.005. PMID 20018493.

George, D.T.; Gilman, J.; Hersh, J.; Thorsell, A.; Herion, D.; Geyer, C.; Peng, X.; Kielbasa, W.; Rawlings, R.; Brandt, J.E.; Gehlert, D.R.; Tauscher, J.T.; Hunt, S.P.; Hommer, D.; Heilig, M. Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism as a possible therapy for alcoholism, Science 2008, 319(5869): 1536

Gackenheimer, S.L.; Gehlert, D.R.In vitro and in vivo autoradiography of the NK-1 antagonist (3H)-LY686017 in guinea pig brain39th Annu Meet Soc Neurosci (October 17-21, Chicago) 2009, Abst 418.16

Tonnoscj, K.; Zopey, R.; Labus, J.S.; Naliboff, B.D.; Mayer, E.A.
The effect of chronic neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism on sympathetic nervous system activity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) Dig Dis Week (DDW) (May 30-June 4, Chicago) 2009, Abst T1261

Kopach, M.E.; Kobierski, M.E.; Coffey, D.S.; et al.  
Process development and pilot-plant synthesis of (2-chlorophenyl)[2-(phenylsulfonyl)pyridin-3-yl]methanone
Org Process Res Dev 2010, 14(5): 1229

1 to 7 of 7
Patent ID Patent Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2016060250 NOVEL INTERMEDIATE AND PROCESS USEFUL IN THE PREPARATION OF -(2-CHLOROPHENYL)-METHANONE 2015-11-10 2016-03-03
US2015320866 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITION COMPRISING ANTIEMETIC COMPOUNDS AND POLYORTHOESTER 2013-12-13 2015-11-12
US2014206877 NOVEL INTERMEDIATE AND PROCESS USEFUL IN THE PREPARATION OF -(2-CHLOROPHENYL)-METHANONE 2014-03-27 2014-07-24
US2012225904 New 7-Phenyl-[1, 2, 4]triazolo[4, 3-a]Pyridin-3(2H)-One Derivatives 2010-11-09 2012-09-06
US2010056795 NOVEL INTERMEDIATE AND PROCESS USEFUL IN THE PREPARATION OF -(2-CHLOROPHENYL)-METHANONE 2010-03-04
US7381826 Crystalline forms of {2-[1-(3, 5-bis-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-5-pyridin-4-yl-1H-[1, 2, 3]triazol-4-yl]-pyridin-3-yl}-(2-chlorophenyl)-methanone 2007-04-05 2008-06-03
US7320994 Triazole derivatives as tachykinin receptor antagonists 2005-10-27 2008-01-22
Tradipitant
LY686017.svg
Legal status
Legal status
  • Investigational
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
Chemical and physical data
Formula C28H16ClF6N5O
Molar mass 587.90 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)

TRADIPITANT

Overview

Tradipitant

Tradipitant is being evaluated in a Phase II study in treatment resistant pruritus in atopic dermatitis.

Tradipitant is an NK-1 receptor antagonist licensed from Eli Lilly in 2012. Tradipitant has demonstrated proof-of-concept in alcohol dependence in a study published by the NIH1. In that study tradipitant was shown to reduce alcohol cravings and voluntary alcohol consumption among patients with alcohol dependence. NK-1R antagonists have been evaluated in a number of indications including chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), alcohol dependence, anxiety, depression, and pruritus.

The NK-1R is expressed throughout different tissues of the body, with major activity found in neuronal tissue. Substance P (SP) and NK-1R interactions in neuronal tissue regulate neurogenic inflammation locally and the pain perception pathway through the central nervous system. Other tissues, including endothelial cells and immune cells, have also exhibited SP and NK-1R activity2. The activation of NK-1R by the natural ligand SP is involved in numerous physiological processes, including the perception of pain, behavioral stressors, cravings, and the processes of nausea and vomiting1,2,3. An inappropriate over-expression of SP either in nervous tissue or peripherally could result in pathological conditions such as substance dependence, anxiety, nausea/vomiting, and pruritus1,2,3,4. An NK-1R antagonist may possess the ability to reduce this over-stimulation of the NK-1R, and as a result address the underlying pathophysiology of the symptoms in these conditions.

References

  1. George DT, Gilman J, Hersh J, Thorsell A, Herion D, Geyer C, Peng X, Keilbasa W, Rawlings R, Brandt JE, Gehlert DR, Tauscher JT, Hunt SP, Hommer D, Heilig M. Neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism as a possible therapy for alcoholism. Science. 2008; 319(5869):1536-9
  2. Almeida TA, Rojo J, Nieto PM, Pinto FM, Hernandez M, et al. Tachykinins and tachykinin receptors: structure and activity relationships. Current Medicinal Chemistry. 2004;11:2045-2081.
  3. Hargreaves R, Ferreira JC, Hughes D, Brands J, Hale J, Mattson B, Mill S. Development of aprepitant, the first neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2011; 1222:40-48.
  4. Stander S, Weisshaar E, Luger A. Neurophysiological and neurochemical basis of modern pruritus treatment. Experimental Dermatology. 2007;17:161-69.

///////////////////tradipitant, PHASE 2, VLY-686,  LY686017, традипитант , تراديبيتانت , 曲地匹坦 , VANDA, ELI LILLY, Gastroparesis Pruritus

LY 2922470


str1

LY 2922470

as per WO2013025424A1

Figure imgf000004_0001
LY 2922470

Picture credit….

SCHEMBL14695980.png

(3S)-3-[4-[[5-[(8-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-quinolin-1-yl)methyl]thiophen-2-yl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic acid

Benzenepropanoic acid, 4-​[[5-​[(3,​4-​dihydro-​8-​methoxy-​1(2H)​-​quinolinyl)​methyl]​-​2-​thienyl]​methoxy]​-​β-​1-​propyn-​1-​yl-​, (βS)​-

Glucose Lowering Agents, Signal Transduction Modulators

CAS 1423018-12-5
Molecular Formula: C28H29NO4S
Molecular Weight: 475.59916 g/mol

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01867216

  • Phase I Type 2 diabetes mellitus

Eli Lilly

Eli Lilly And Company

Antihyperglycaemics

  • 28 Jan 2014 Eli Lilly completes a phase I trial in Type-2 diabetes mellitus in USA (NCT01867216)
  • 30 Jun 2013 Phase-I clinical trials in Type-2 diabetes mellitus in USA (PO)
  • 14 Jun 2013 Eli Lilly plans a phase I trial for Type-2 diabetes mellitus in USA (NCT01867216)

PATENT

WO 2013025424

https://www.google.com/patents/US20130045990?cl=de

Also published as CA2843474A1, CA2843474C, CN103687856A, CN103687856B, EP2744806A1, US8431706, WO2013025424A1, Less «
Inventors Chafiq Hamdouchi
Original Assignee Eli Lilly And Company

Figure US20130045990A1-20130221-C00001

Figure US20130045990A1-20130221-C00004

Figure US20130045990A1-20130221-C00005

Preparation 18-Methoxyquinoline

Add potassium hydroxide (435 g, 7.76 mol) to a solution of 8-hydroxy quinoline (250 g, 1.724 mol) in THF (10 L) at ambient temperature and stir. Add methyl iodide (435 g, 2.58 mol) dropwise and stir overnight. Filter the reaction mixture and wash the solid with THF (2 L). Concentrate the solution to dryness; add water; extract with dichloromethane (2×3 L); combine the organic layers; and wash with brine. Collect the organic layers and dry over sodium sulfate. Remove the solids by filtration. Collect the filtrate and concentrate under reduced pressure to give a red oil, which solidifies on standing, to give the title compound (281 g, 102%), which can be used without further purification. ESI (m/z) 160(M+H).

Preparation 2

8-Methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline

Add sodium cyanoborohydride (505 g, 8.11 mol) in EtOH (1 L) to a solution of 8-methoxy quinoline (425 g, 2.673 mol) in EtOH (9 L), and stir. Cool the reaction mixture to an internal temperature of 0° C. and add HCl (35%, 1.12 L, 10.962 mol) dropwise over 60 min so that the internal temperature did not rise above 20° C. Allow the reaction mixture to warm to ambient temperature and then heat to reflux for 2.5 hours. Cool to ambient temperature and stir overnight. Add ammonium hydroxide (25%, 1 L); dilute with water (15 L); and extract the mixture with dichloromethane (3×10 L). Combine the organic layers and dry over sodium sulfate. Remove the solids by filtration. Collect the filtrate and concentrate under reduced pressure to give a residue. Purify the residue by silica gel flash chromatography, eluting with ethyl acetate: hexane (1:10) to give the title compound (357 g, 82%). ESI (m/z) 164(M+H).

Preparation 3

Methyl-5-methylthiophene-2-carboxylate

Add thionyl chloride (153 ml, 2.1 mol) dropwise over 20 min to a solution of 5-methylthiophene-2-carboxylic acid (100 g, 0.703 mol) in MeOH (1 L) at 0° C. and stir. After the addition is complete, heat the reaction mixture to reflux for 3.5 hours. Cool and concentrate in vacuo to give a thick oil. Dilute the oil with EtOAc (500 ml) and sequentially wash with water (300 ml) then brine (300 ml). Dry the organic layer over sodium sulfate. Remove the solids by filtration. Collect the filtrate and concentrate under reduced pressure to give the title compound (106 g, 97%), which is used without further purification. ESI (m/z) 156(M+H).

Preparation 4

Methyl 5-(bromomethyl)thiophene-2-carboxylate

Add freshly recrystallised NBS (323.8 g, 1.81 mol) to a solution of methyl-5-methylthiophene-2-carboxylate (258 g, 1.65 mol) in chloroform (2.6 L) at room temperature, and stir. Add benzoyl peroxide (3.99 g, 0.016 mol) and heat the reaction mixture to reflux for 7 hours. Cool the reaction mixture to ambient temperature and filter through diatomaceous earth. Wash the filter cake with chloroform (250 ml). Collect the organic layers and remove the solvent to give the title compound (388 g, 100%), which is used without further purification. ESI (m/z) 236(M+H).

Preparation 5

Methyl-5-[8-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-quinolin-1-yl)methyl]thiophene-2-carboxylate

Add methyl-5-(bromoethyl)thiophene-2-carboxylate (432.5 g, 1.84 mol) in EtOH (500 ml) to a solution of 8-methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (300 g 1.84 mol) in EtOH (1 L) and stir. Add DIPEA (641 ml, 3.67 mol) dropwise and stir at room temperature overnight. After completion of the reaction, remove the EtOH in vacuo, and add water (5 L). Extract the aqueous with EtOAc (3×3 L); combine the organic layers; and dry over sodium sulfate. Filter the solution and concentrate under reduced pressure to give a residue. Purify the residue by silica gel flash chromatography eluting with ethyl acetate: hexane (6:94) to give the title compound (325 g, 56%). ESI (m/z) 318(M+H).

Preparation 6

[5-[(8-Methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-quinolin-1-yl)methyl]-2-thienyl]methanol

Add DIBAL-H (1 M in toluene 2.7 L, 2.66 mol) slowly via a cannula over a period of 1.5 h to a stirred solution of methyl-5-(8-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)methyl)thiophene-2-carboxylate (281 g, 0.886 mol) in THF (4 L) at −70° C. Monitor the reaction via thin layer chromatography (TLC) for completion. After completion of the reaction, allow the reaction mixture to warm to 20° C. and add a saturated solution of ammonium chloride. Add a solution of sodium potassium tartrate (1.3 Kg in 5 L of water), and stir overnight. Separate the organic layer; extract the aqueous phase with EtOAc (2×5 L); then combine the organic layers; and dry the combined organic layers over sodium sulfate. Remove the solids by filtration. Remove the solvent from the filtrate under reduced pressure to give the title compound as a white solid (252 g, 98%). ESI (m/z) 290(M+H).

Preparation 7

Ethyl(3S)-3-[4-[[5-[(8-methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-quinolin-1-yl)methyl]-2-thienyl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoate

Add tributylphosphine (50% solution in EtOAc, 543 ml, 1.34 mol) to a solution of ADDP (282.5 g, 1.5 eq) in THF (3 L) and cool the mixture to an internal temperature of 0° C., then stir for 15 minutes. Add (S)-ethyl 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)hex-4-ynoate (173.5 g, 0.747 mol) in THF (3 L) dropwise over 15 min; then add 5-((8-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)methyl)thiophene-2-yl)methanol (216 g, 0747 mol) in THF (5 L) dropwise. Allow the reaction mixture to warm to ambient temperature and stir overnight. Filter the reaction mixture through diatomaceous earth and wash the filter cake with ethyl acetate (2 L). Concentrate the organic filtrate to dryness. Add water (4 L); extract with ethyl acetate (3×5 L); combine the organic layers; and dry the combined organic layers over sodium sulfate. Remove the solids by filtration and concentrate under reduced pressure to give an oil. Purify the residue by silica gel flash chromatography by eluting with ethyl acetate: hexane (6:94) to give the title compound (167 g, 44%). ESI (m/z) 504(M+H).

Example 1

(3S)-3-[4-[[5-[(8-Methoxy-3,4-dihydro-2H-quinolin-1-yl)methyl]-2-thienyl]methoxy]phenyl]hex-4-ynoic acid

Figure US20130045990A1-20130221-C00006

Add a solution of potassium hydroxide (49.76 g, 0.88 mol) in water (372 ml) to a solution of (S)-ethyl-3-(4-((5-8-methoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-1(2H)-yl)methyl)thiophen-2-yl)methoxy) phenyl)hex-4-ynoate (149 g, 0.296 mol) in EtOH (1.49 L) at room temperature and stir overnight. Concentrate the reaction mixture to dryness and add water (1.3 L). Extract the resulting solution with EtOAc (2×300 ml) and separate. Adjust the pH of the aqueous layer to pH=6 with 2 N HCl. Collect the resulting solids. Recrystallise the solids from hot MeOH (298 ml, 2 vol) to give the title compound (91 g, 65%). ESI (m/z) 476(M+H).

Abstract

GPR40 agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: From the laboratory to the patient
251st Am Chem Soc (ACS) Natl Meet (March 13-17, San Diego) 2016, Abst MEDI 260

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Presenter

Chafiq Hamdouchi

Chafiq Hamdouchi

Senior Research Advisor at Eli Lilly and Company

https://www.linkedin.com/in/chafiq-hamdouchi-4988126

Summary

Dr. Hamdouchi earned his bachelor’s degree and doctorate in organic chemistry from Louis Pasteur University, Strasbourg-France.
Following two postdoctoral fellowships, sponsored by the National Science Foundation-USA and Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia-Spain, he joined Eli Lilly and Company in 1995.
Throughout his 20 years of career at Lilly, he has contributed to a sustainable drug discovery portfolio from preclinical hypothesis to clinical proof-of-concept that spans the oncology, neuroscience and endocrinology therapeutic areas. He has led multidisciplinary (chemistry, pharmacology, ADMET, PK, medical) scientific teams in USA, Europe and Asia to deliver a number of compounds that achieved first human dose.
He is a co-inventor of six innovative molecules being pursued in clinical development for the treatment of Diabetes, Cancer and Neurodegenerative Diseases.
He has an extensive patent and publication record and deep experience in conducting drug discovery and development in Asia through effective partnership and mentorship.

SEE AT…………ONE ORGANIC CHEMIST ONE DAY BLOG

LINK……http://oneorganichemistoneday.blogspot.in/2016/03/chafiq-hamdouchi-senior-research.html

Patent ID Date Patent Title
US8431706 2013-04-30 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroqinoline derivative useful for the treatment of diabetes

References

GPR40 agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: From the laboratory to the patient
251st Am Chem Soc (ACS) Natl Meet (March 13-17, San Diego) 2016, Abst MEDI 260

//////Phase 1, LY2922470, LY 2922470, Eli Lilly, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, 1423018-12-5, Chafiq Hamdouchi

 

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OLANZEPINE VISITED PART 1/3


Olanzapine3Dan2.gif

Olanzapine

Olanzapine, LY170053
CAS : 132539-06-1
 2-Methyl-4-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-10H-thieno[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine
2-Methyl-4-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-10Hthieno[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine
Manufacturers’ Codes: LY-170053
Trademarks: Zyprexa (Lilly)
Molecular Formula: C17H20N4S
Molecular Weight: 312.43
Percent Composition: C 65.35%, H 6.45%, N 17.93%, S 10.26%
Properties: Crystals from acetonitrile, mp 195°. Practically insol in water.
Melting point: mp 195°
Therap-Cat: Antipsychotic.
Keywords: Antipsychotic; Other Tricyclics; Serotonin-Dopamine Antagonist.

Olanzapine (sold under the brand names Zyprexa, Zypadhera and Lanzek or in combination with fluoxetine, Symbyax) is anatypical antipsychotic. It is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.[4]

Olanzapine is structurally similar to clozapine and quetiapine, but is classified as a thienobenzodiazepine. The olanzapine formulations are manufactured and marketed by the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly and Company; the drug went generic in 2011. Sales of Zyprexa in 2008 were $2.2B in the US, and $4.7B worldwide.[5]

Zyprexa (olanzapine) 10 mg tablets (AU)

Olanzapine has a higher affinity for 5-HT2A serotonin receptors than D2 dopamine receptors, which is a common property of all atypical antipsychotics, aside from the benzamide antipsychotics such as amisulpride. Olanzapine also had the highest affinity of any second-generation antipsychotic towards the P-glycoprotein in one in vitro study.[60] P-glycoprotein transports a number of drugs across a number of different biological membranes including the blood-brain barrier, which could mean that less brain exposure to olanzapine results from this interaction with the P-glycoprotein.[61]

Olanzapine is a potent antagonist of the muscarinic M3 receptor,[65] which may underlie its diabetogenic side effects.[64][66] Additionally, olanzapine also exhibits a relatively low affinity for serotonin 5-HT1, GABAA, beta-adrenergic receptors, and benzodiazepine binding sites.[67] [27]

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Dosage forms

Olanzapine is marketed in a number of countries, with tablets ranging from 2.5 to 20 milligrams. Zyprexa (and generic olanzapine) is available as an orally-disintegrating “wafer” which rapidly dissolves in saliva. It is also available in 10 milligram vials for intramuscular injection.[4]

Research

Olanzapine has been investigated for use as an antiemetic, particularly for the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). A 2007 study demonstrated its successful potential for this use, achieving a complete response in the acute prevention of nausea and vomiting in 100% of patients treated with moderately and highly-emetogenic chemotherapy, when used in combination with palonosetron and dexamethasone.[85]

Olanzapine has been considered as part of an early psychosis approach for schizophrenia. The Prevention through Risk Identification, Management, and Education (PRIME) study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and Eli Lilly, tested the hypothesis that olanzapine might prevent the onset of psychosis in people at very high risk forschizophrenia. The study examined 60 patients with prodromalschizophrenia, who were at an estimated risk of 36–54% of developing schizophrenia within a year, and treated half with olanzapine and half with placebo.[86] In this study, patients receiving olanzapine did not have a significantly lower risk of progressing to psychosis. Olanzapine was effective for treating the prodromal symptoms, but was associated with significant weight gain.[87]

1H NMR PREDICT

Olanzapine NMR spectra analysis, Chemical CAS NO. 132539-06-1 NMR spectral analysis, Olanzapine H-NMR spectrum

13C NMR PREDICT

Olanzapine NMR spectra analysis, Chemical CAS NO. 132539-06-1 NMR spectral analysis, Olanzapine C-NMR spectrum

OLA 1

OLA 2

COSY

OLA COSY

HMBC

OLA HMBC

…………………………………..WILL BE UPDATED

UV

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IR

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1H NMR

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13C NMR

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MASS

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INTERMEDIATE/S USED IN SYNTHESIS AND REFERENCE

LEK PHARMACEUTICALS D.D. Patent: WO2005/90359 A2, 2005 ; Location in patent: Page/Page column 21 ;

Apotex Pharmachem Inc. Patent: US2008/319189 A1, 2008 ; Location in patent: Page/Page column 2 ;

LEK PHARMACEUTICALS D.D. Patent: WO2005/90359 A2, 2005 ; Location in patent: Page/Page column 21 ;

Leyva-Perez, Antonio; Cabrero-Antonino, Jose R.; Corma, Avelino Tetrahedron, 2010 , vol. 66, # 41 p. 8203 – 8209

SEE

WATSON PHARMACEUTICALS, INC. Patent: WO2004/94390 A1, 2004 ; Location in patent: Page 15 ;

WO2006/6180 A1, ; Page/Page column 11 ;

Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, , vol. 31, # 4 p. 378 – 382

Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, , vol. 31, # 4 p. 378 – 382

WO2006/6180 A1, ; Page/Page column 11 ;

US5605897 A1, ;

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PATENT

http://www.google.com.na/patents/EP1730153B1?cl=en

Figure 2 shows the NMR spectrum of the solvate according to the invention. The peaks were assigned as follows (1H NMR; CDCl3, 300 MHz) :

Chemical shift δ Assignement
1.20 (3H, d) CH3 – isopropanol
2.30 (3H, s) 4′-CH3
2.34 (3H, s) 2- CH3
2.20-2.40 (2H, br s) H – water
2.49 (4H, m) 3′-CH2
3.52 (4H, m) 2′-CH2
4.03 (0.5H, dq) CH – isopropanol
5.02 (H, broad s) 10-NH
6.29 (H, broad s) 3-CH
6.29-7.05 (4H, m) 6, 7, 8, 9-H
  • Olanzapine has shown to have high activity with regard to the central nervous system and is also useful for the treatment of schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorders, acute mania, mild anxiety states and psychosis.
  • Various polymorphic and pseudopolymorphic forms, such as solvates, of olanzapine have become known. Some of them are useful for conversion to other desirable forms.
  • The British patent GB 1 533 235 discloses antipsychotically effective thienobenzodiazepines by a generic formula which also covers olanzapine.
  • US patent 5,229,382 discloses olanzapine explicitly. The described process for its synthesis involves a crystallization from acetonitrile.
  • EP-B-733 635 claims crystalline form II olanzapine, and this polymorphic form is said to be more stable than the material obtained according to US 5,229,382 which is designated “form I olanzapine”. Both the form I and the form II of olanzapine are characterized by e. g. X-ray data. The preparation of the more stable form II of olanzapine is effected by dissolving technical grade olanzapine in ethyl acetate and crystallization from the resulting solution by any conventional process such as seeding, cooling, scratching the glass of the reaction vessel or other common techniques.
  • WO 02/18390 discloses the monohydrate form I and the dihydrate form I of olanzapine, a process for production thereof and a process for production of form I of olanzapine which comprises the steps of stirring olanzapine monohydrate form I or crude olanzapine or form II of olanzapine in methylene chloride at reflux, cooling, filtering and drying. It is also described that a repeating of the process described in US 5,229,382 Example 1, subexample 4 did not lead to formation of form I of olanzapine.
  • WO 03/101997 relates to processes for preparation of form I of olanzapine by regulation of the pH-value of the solution.
  • WO 03/055438 discloses the preparation of form I olanzapine by crystallization from ethanol and subsequent conversion of the obtained ethanol solvate.
  • US patent 5,637,584 discloses the (mono)methylene chloride solvate form of olanzapine and a method for its conversion to the polymorphic form I of olanzapine.
  • EP-B-733 634 discloses three specific solvates of olanzapine, namely the methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol solvates and a process for production of form II olanzapine by drying such a solvate.
  • WO 03/097650 describes two new, mixed solvate forms, the water/methylene chloride solvate and the water/DMSO solvate, methods for preparing them, and their transformation to polymorphic form I.
  • WO 2004/006933 discloses a process for the preparation of form I olanzapine, as well as various pseudopolymorphic forms, namely the isopropanol solvate, and the acetonitrile/methylene chloride/water and acetonitrile/water mixed solvates of olanzapine, and the polymorphic form A.

Preparation of the water-isopropanol mixed solvate of olanzapine Example 1

  • A mixture of 4-amino-2-methyl-10H-thieno[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine hydrochloride (26.6 g), 1-methylpiperazine (92 ml), dimethylsulfoxide (120 ml) and toluene (120 ml) was refluxed for 4 hours. The solution was cooled to 95°C and 200 ml were distilled off under vacuum. The residue was cooled to room temperature, isopropanol (180 ml) was added, and the solution was further cooled to 0°C and water (36 ml) was added to initialize crystallization. After the crystallization was completed, the precipitate was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (20 ml). The wet product was suspended in isopropanol (200 ml) and heated to reflux to obtain a clear solution. Ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid disodium salt (3 g) was added and the suspension was stirred for one hour. Undissolved material was removed by hot filtration. The clear solution was cooled to 25°C and water (6 ml) was added to start crystallization. The suspension was cooled to 0°C and after completion of the crystallization the product was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (10 ml). The product was dried at room temperature under vacuum to a constant weight. Yield: 22.84 g. Loss on drying (140°C): 13.6%. Water content (Karl Fischer): 5.12%.

Example 2

  • A mixture of 4-amino-2-methyl-10H-thieno[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine hydrochloride (26.6 g), 1-methylpiperazine (92 ml), dimethylsulfoxide (36 ml) and toluene (120 ml) was refluxed for 4 hours. The solution was cooled to 95°C and 80 ml were distilled off under vacuum. The residue was cooled to room temperature, and isopropanol (180 ml) was added. The solution was further cooled to 0°C and water (36 ml) was added to initialize crystallization. After the crystallization was completed, the precipitate was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (20 ml). The wet product was suspended in isopropanol (200 ml) and heated to reflux to obtain a clear solution. Ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid disodium salt (3 g) was added and the suspension was stirred for one hour. Undissolved material was removed by hot filtration. The clear solution was cooled to 35 °C and water (6 ml) was added to start crystallization. The suspension was cooled to 0°C, upon finalization of the crystallization, the product was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (10 ml). The product was dried at room temperature under vacuum to a constant weight. Yield: 21.98 g. Loss on drying (140°C): 13.2 %. Water content (Karl Fischer): 5.09%. Assay of isopropanol (GC): 8.55 %.

Example 3

  • A mixture of 4-amino-2-methyl-10H-thieno[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine hydrochloride (26.6 g), 1-methylpiperazine (92 ml), dimethylsulfoxide (36 ml) and toluene (120 ml) was refluxed for 4 hours. The solution was cooled to 95°C and 120 ml were distilled off under vacuum. The residue was cooled to room temperature, and isopropanol (180 ml) was added. The solution was further cooled to 0°C and water (36 ml) was added to initialize crystallization. After completion of the crystallization, the precipitate.was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (20 ml). The wet product was suspended in isopropanol (200 ml) and heated to reflux to obtain a clear solution. Ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid disodium salt (3 g) was added and the suspension was stirred for one hour. Undissolved material was removed by hot filtration. The clear solution was cooled to 35°C and water (6 ml) was added to start crystallization. The suspension was cooled to 0°C, upon completion of the crystallization, the product was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (10 ml). The product was dried at room temperature under vacuum to a constant weight. Yield: 24.35 g. Loss on drying (140°C): 13.5%. Water content (Karl Fischer): 5.05%.

Example 4

  • Anhydrous olanzapine (10 g) was suspended in isopropanol (108 ml) and heated to reflux to obtain a clear solution. The solution was slowly cooled. Water (6 ml) was added at 57°C to start crystallization. The suspension was cooled to 0°C, upon finalization of the crystallization, the product was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (5 ml). The product was dried at room temperature under vacuum to a constant weight. Yield: 10.97 g. Loss on drying (140°C): 13.3%. Water content (Karl Fischer): 5.13%.

Example 5

  • 60 g of olanzapine obtained from mother liquors was suspended in isopropanol (650 ml) and heated to reflux to obtain a clear solution. Ethylenediaminotetraacetic acid disodium salt (7.9 g) was added and the suspension was stirred for one hour. Undissolved material was removed by hot filtration. The clear solution was cooled to 25°C and water (16 ml) was added to start crystallization. The suspension was cooled to 0°C and, upon completion of the crystallization, the product was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (50 ml). The product was dried at room temperature under vacuum to a constant weight. Yield: 57.64 g. Loss on drying (140°C): 13.5%. Water content (Karl Fischer): 5.26%.

Example 6

  • The solution of 2,4-bis(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-propylidene-3H-[1,5]benzodiazepine (41.86 g, 0.11 mmol) (prepared according to WO 2004/065390 ), pyridinium p-toluenesulfonate (55.29 g, 0.22 mmol) and sulfur (11.99 g, 0.374 mmol) in benzonitrile (1100 mL) was stirred at 140°C for 11 h, cooled to 90°C and concentrated to an oily residue. The residue was diluted with dichloromethane and isopropanol (250 mL, 1 : 1). The precipitate was filtered off and washed with dichloromethane and isopropanol (20 ml, 1 : 1). The filtrate was extracted with HCl (250 ml, 2 M). The organic phase was further extracted with HCl (2 X 100 ml, 1 M). The combined aqueous phases were cooled in an ice bath and made alkaline by using 5 M NaOH. The obtained turbid solution was left in a refrigerator over night resulting in a suspension. This was separated by filtration and washed with isopropanol (2 X 25 ml). The wet material was suspended in isopropanol (215 ml) and heated to reflux to obtain a clear solution. The solution was hot filtered. Water (6.5 ml) was added to induce crystallization. The obtained’suspension was cooled to 0°C, and upon completion of crystallisation, the product was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (10 ml). The product was dried at room temperature under vacuum to a constant weight. Yield: 18.61 g. Loss on drying (140°C): 12.8 %. Water content (Karl Fischer): 5.29 %.

Example 7

  • The solution of 2,4-bis(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-propylidene-3H-[1,5]benzodiazepine (3.805 g, 10 mmol) (prepared according to WO 2004/065390 ), pyridinium p-toluenesulfonate (5.026 g, 20 mmol) and sulfur (1.122 g, 35 mmol) in benzonitrile (100 ml.) was stirred at 140°C for 8.5 h, cooled to 90°C and concentrated to an oily residue. The residue was diluted with isopropanol (50 ml) and dimethyl sulfoxide (5 ml). The precipitate was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (5 ml). Water (10 ml) and sodium hydroxide (1.00 g, 25 mmol) were added to the filtrate. The mixture was stirred at room temperature until the sodium hydroxide had dissolved. The turbid solution was left in a refrigerator over night resulting in a suspension. This was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (5 mL). The wet material was suspended in isopropanol (25 mL) and the suspension was heated to reflux. Then solids were hot filtered. Water (0.75 mL) was added to the filtrate to induce crystallization. The resulting suspension was cooled to 0°C, and upon completion of crystallisation, the product was filtered off and washed with isopropanol (1 mL). The product was then dried at room temperature under vacuum to a constant weight. Yield: 0.738 g.

………………………………..

PAPER

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2210/12/8

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Scheme 1

Synthesis of compounds 8a, 8b, and 8c. Reagents and conditions: (i) 1-fluoro-2-nitrobenzene, NaH, THF, rt, 20 h, 60%; (ii) SnCl2, EtOH, 80°C, 1 h, 80%; (iiia) N-methylhomopiperazine (5 equiv), no solvent, microwave heating, 80°C, 4 h,65%; (iiib) N-methylhomopiperazine (5 equiv), no solvent, microwave heating, 120°C, 3 h, 55%; (iiic) N-methylpiperazine (10 equiv), N-methylpiperazine hydrochloride (10 equiv), DMSO, 110–120°C, 20 h, 56%.

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References

  1. Burton, Michael E.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Schentag, Jerome J.; Evans, William E. (May 1, 2005). Applied Pharmacokinetics & Pharmacodynamics: Principles of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (4th ed.). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 815. ISBN 978-0-7817-4431-7.
  2. “PRODUCT INFORMATION OLANZAPINE SANDOZ® 2.5mg/5mg/7.5mg/10mg/15mg/20mg FILM-COATED TABLETS” (PDF). TGA eBusiness Services. Sandoz Pty Ltd. 8 June 2012. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
  3. “Zyprexa, Zyprexa Relprevv (olanzapine) dosing, indications, interactions, adverse effects, and more”. Medscape Reference. WebMD. Retrieved 26 November 2013.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b c “Olanzapine Prescribing Information” (PDF). Eli Lilly and Company. 2009-03-19. Retrieved 2009-09-06.
  5. “Lilly 2008 Annual Report” (PDF). Lilly. 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-06.
  6. National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (25 March 2009). “Schizophrenia: Full national clinical guideline on core interventions in primary and secondary care”. Retrieved 25 November 2009.
  7. Duggan L, Fenton M, Dardennes RM, El-Dosoky A, Indran S (2005). Duggan, Lorna, ed. “Olanzapine for schizophrenia”. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2): CD001359.doi:10.1002/14651858.CD001359.pub2. PMID 10796640.
  8.  “Psychosis and schizophrenia in adults: treatment and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE”. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.
  9. Barnes TR (2011). “Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia: recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology”. J. Psychopharmacol. (Oxford) 25 (5): 567–620. doi:10.1177/0269881110391123.PMID 21292923.
  10. Hasan A, Falkai P, Wobrock T, Lieberman J, Glenthoj B, Gattaz WF, Thibaut F, Möller HJ (2013). “World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia, part 2: update 2012 on the long-term treatment of schizophrenia and management of antipsychotic-induced side effects”. World J. Biol. Psychiatry 14 (1): 2–44. doi:10.3109/15622975.2012.739708. PMID 23216388.
  11. Abou-Setta, AM; Mousavi, SS; Spooner, C; Schouten, JR; Pasichnyk, D; Armijo-Olivo, S; Beaith, A; Seida, JC; Dursun, S; Newton, AS; Hartling, L (August 2012).PMID 23035275. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  12.  Zhang JP, Gallego JA, Robinson DG, Malhotra AK, Kane JM, Correll CU (July 2013).“Efficacy and safety of individual second-generation vs. first-generation antipsychotics in first-episode psychosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis”. Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol. 16 (6): 1205–18. doi:10.1017/S1461145712001277.PMC 3594563. PMID 23199972.
  13. Citrome L (August 2012). “A systematic review of meta-analyses of the efficacy of oral atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of adult patients with schizophrenia”. Expert Opin Pharmacother 13 (11): 1545–73. doi:10.1517/14656566.2011.626769.PMID 21999805.
  14. Lepping P, Sambhi RS, Whittington R, Lane S, Poole R (May 2011). “Clinical relevance of findings in trials of antipsychotics: systematic review”. Br J Psychiatry 198 (5): 341–5.doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.109.075366. PMID 21525517.
  15. Désaméricq G, Schurhoff F, Meary A et al. (February 2014). “Long-term neurocognitive effects of antipsychotics in schizophrenia: a network meta-analysis”. Eur. J. Clin. Pharmacol. 70 (2): 127–34. doi:10.1007/s00228-013-1600-y. PMID 24145817.
  16.  Leucht S, Cipriani A, Spineli L et al. (September 2013). “Comparative efficacy and tolerability of 15 antipsychotic drugs in schizophrenia: a multiple-treatments meta-analysis”.Lancet 382 (9896): 951–62. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60733-3. PMID 23810019.
  17.  Osser DN, Roudsari MJ, Manschreck T (2013). “The psychopharmacology algorithm project at the Harvard South Shore Program: an update on schizophrenia”. Harv Rev Psychiatry 21 (1): 18–40. doi:10.1097/HRP.0b013e31827fd915. PMID 23656760.
  18.  [+http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg185/chapter/1-recommendations “Bipolar disorder: the assessment and management of bipolar disorder in adults, children and young people in primary and secondary care | 1-recommendations | Guidance and guidelines | NICE”].
  19. Yatham LN, Kennedy SH, O’Donovan C et al. (December 2006). “Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder: update 2007”. Bipolar Disord 8 (6): 721–39. doi:10.1111/j.1399-5618.2006.00432.x. PMID 17156158.
  20. Selle V, Schalkwijk S, Vázquez GH, Baldessarini RJ (March 2014). “Treatments for acute bipolar depression: meta-analyses of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of anticonvulsants, lithium and antipsychotics”. Pharmacopsychiatry 47 (2): 43–52.doi:10.1055/s-0033-1363258. PMID 24549862.
  21. Maglione M, Maher AR, Hu J et al. (2011). “Off-Label Use of Atypical Antipsychotics: An Update”. PMID 22132426.
  22. Review of olanzapine in the management of bipolar disorders Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2007 October; 3(5): 579–587.
  23. Scott, Lisa (Winter 2006). “Genetic and Neurological Factors in Stuttering”. Stuttering Foundation of America.
  24. “Important Safety Information for Olanzapine”. Zyprexa package insert. Eli Lilly & Company. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-11-23. Retrieved 2007-12-03.Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death compared to placebo. […] ZYPREXA (olanzapine) is not approved for the treatment of elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis.
  25. “Doctors ‘ignoring drugs warning'”. BBC News. 17 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-22.
  26. L-Z\In re Zyprexa\Documents Leak\Injunction Memo & Order\FINAL INJUNCTION MEMO 2.13.07.wpd
  27. EFF.org
  28. Press Releases: January, 2007 | Electronic Frontier Foundation
  29.  Eli Lilly was Concerned by Zyprexa Side-Effects from 1998,[dead link] The Times (London), January 23, 2007
  30. Navari RM, Einhorn LH, Loehrer PJ, Passik SD, Vinson J, McClean J, Chowhan N, Hanna NH, Johnson CS (2007). “A phase II trial of olanzapine, dexamethasone, and palonosetron for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: A Hoosier oncology group study”. Supportive Care in Cancer 15 (11): 1285–91. doi:10.1007/s00520-007-0248-5. PMID 17375339.
  31. McGlashan TH, Zipursky RB, Perkins D, Addington J, Miller TJ, Woods SW, Hawkins KA, Hoffman R, Lindborg S, Tohen M, Breier A (2003). “The PRIME North America randomized double-blind clinical trial of olanzapine versus placebo in patients at risk of being prodromally symptomatic for psychosis”. Schizophrenia Research 61 (1): 7–18.doi:10.1016/S0920-9964(02)00439-5. PMID 12648731.
  32. McGlashan TH, Zipursky RB, Perkins D, Addington J, Miller T, Woods SW, Hawkins KA, Hoffman RE, Preda A, Epstein I, Addington D, Lindborg S, Trzaskoma Q, Tohen M, Breier A (2006). “Randomized, Double-Blind Trial of Olanzapine Versus Placebo in Patients Prodromally Symptomatic for Psychosis”. American Journal of Psychiatry 163 (5): 790–9.

Literature References:

Serotonin (5-HT2) and dopamine (D1/D2) receptor antagonist with anticholinergic activity. Prepn: J. K. Chakrabarti et al., EP 454436; eidem, US 5229382 (1991, 1993 both to Lilly). PRODUCT PATENT

Comparative pharmacology: N. A. Moore et al., Curr. Opin. Invest. Drugs 2, 281 (1993). HPLC determn in human plasma: J. T. Catlow et al., J. Chromatogr. B 668, 85 (1995).

Clinical evaluation in schizophrenia: D. S. Baldwin, S. A. Montgomery, Int. Clin. Psychopharmacol. 10, 239 (1995); in mania of bipolar disorder: M. Tohen et al., Am. J. Psychiatry 156, 702 (1999).

Review of pharmacology and clinical experience: B. C. Lund, P. J. Perry, Expert Opin. Pharmacother. 1, 305-323 (2000).

External links

P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent.
P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent.
P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent.




COCK WILL TEACH YOU NMR

COCK SAYS MOM CAN TEACH YOU NMR

DRUG APPROVALS BY DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO …..FOR BLOG HOME CLICK HERE
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EDIVOXETINE REVISITED


Edivoxetine structure.png

EDIVOXETINE, LY 2216684

(1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(oxan-4-yl)ethanol

UNII-3W9N3F4JOO, 1194508-25-2, Edivoxetine [USAN], Edivoxetine (USAN/INN), Edivoxetine [USAN:INN], 3W9N3F4JOO
Molecular Formula:C18H26FNO4
Molecular Weight:339.401743 g/mol

Edivoxetine (INN; LY-2216684) is a drug which acts as a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and is currently under development by Eli Lilly for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and as an antidepressant treatment.[1][2] It was in phase IIIclinical trials, in 2012, for major depressive disorder, but failed to get approval.[1][3]

 

Effectiveness

In a study published in 2010, edivoxetine failed to prove superiority over placebo, as measured by Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. However, effectiveness could be observed using the Self-Rated Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology.[4]

In a study published in 2011, using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and the Sheehan Disability Scale, edivoxetine showed superiority over placebo, with higher response and remission rates.[5]

In December 2013, Eli Lilly announced that the clinical development of edivoxetine will be stopped due to lack of efficacy compared to SSRI alone in three separate clinical trials.[6]

Side effects

Side effects significantly associated with edivoxetine are headache, nausea, constipation, dry mouth and insomnia.[4]

The above mention studies report increases of the cardiac rhythm, and one also increases of diastolic and systolic blood pressures.[4][5]

Figure

Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/op5003825

There is a growing trend in Ireland toward greater collaboration between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. This is an activity encouraged at a national policy level as a means of providing researchers from academic institutions the opportunity to gain important first-hand experience in a commercial research environment, while also providing industry access to expertise and resources to develop new and improved processes for timely medicines. The participating company benefits in terms of its growth, the evolution of its strategic research and development, and the creation of new knowledge that it can use to generate commercial advantage. The research institute benefits in terms of developing skill sets, intellectual property, and publications, in addition to access to identified current industry challenges. A case study is provided describing the collaborative partnership between a synthetic chemistry research team at University College Cork (UCC) and Eli Lilly and Company.

Department of Chemistry and School of Pharmacy, Analytical and Biological Chemistry Research Facility, Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre,University College Cork, Cork, Ireland

University College Cork

Systematic (IUPAC) name
(1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)ethanol
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number 1194508-25-2
1194374-05-4 (hydrochloride)
ATC code None
PubChem CID 11186829
ChemSpider 9361913
Chemical data
Formula C18H26FNO4 
Molecular mass 339.402 g/mol

References

  1.  Jun Yan (March 2012). “Pipeline for new antidepressants flowing slowly”. Psychiatric News (American Psychiatric Association) 47 (5): 1b-29. Retrieved 2012-04-27.
  2.  “Statement on a nonproprietary name adopted by the USAN council – Edivoxetine” (Press release). American Medical Association. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-12.
  3.  Chancellor D (November 2011). “The depression market”. Nature Reviews. Drug Discovery 10 (11): 809–10. doi:10.1038/nrd3585. PMID 22037032.
  4.  Dubé S, Dellva MA, Jones M, Kielbasa W, Padich R, Saha A, Rao P (April 2010). “A study of the effects of LY2216684, a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, in the treatment of major depression”. Journal of Psychiatric Research 44 (6): 356–363. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2009.09.013. PMID 19909980.
  5.  Pangallo P, Dellva MA, D’Souza DN, Essink B, Russell J, Goldberger C (June 2011). “A randomized, double-blind study comparing LY2216684 and placebo in the treatment of major depressive disorder”. Journal of Psychiatric Research 45 (6): 748–755. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2011.03.014. PMID 21511276.
  6.  https://investor.lilly.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=811751
H-NMR spectral analysis
(1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(oxan-4-yl)ethanol NMR spectra analysis, Chemical CAS NO. 1194508-25-2 NMR spectral analysis, (1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(oxan-4-yl)ethanol H-NMR spectrum
CAS NO. 1194508-25-2, (1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(oxan-4-yl)ethanol H-NMR spectral analysis
C-NMR spectral analysis
(1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(oxan-4-yl)ethanol NMR spectra analysis, Chemical CAS NO. 1194508-25-2 NMR spectral analysis, (1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(oxan-4-yl)ethanol C-NMR spectrum
CAS NO. 1194508-25-2, (1R)-2-(5-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)-1-[(2S)-morpholin-2-yl]-1-(oxan-4-yl)ethanol C-NMR spectral analysis

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MAHABALIPURAM, INDIA

Mahabalipuram – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahabalipuram

Mahabalipuram, also known as Mamallapuram is a town in Kancheepuram district in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. It is around 60 km south from the city of …Shore Temple – ‎Seven Pagodas – ‎Pancha Rathas – ‎

Map of mahabalipuram.

.

Krishna’s Butter Ball in Mahabalipuram, India. The surface below the rock is …


http://www.weather-forecast.com/locations/Mamallapuram


Come to Mahabalipuram (also known as Mammallapuram), an enchanting beach that is located on the east coast of India.
Moonraikers Restaurant, Mamallapuram
 

Hotel Mamalla Bhavan – Mahabalipuram Chennai – Food, drink and entertainment

.

A carving at the Varaha Temple, Mahabalipuram

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EU approves Lilly diabetes drug Trulicity, dulaglutide


EU approves Lilly diabetes drug Trulicity

Regulators in Europe have given the green light to Eli Lilly’s Trulicity, its once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist for type 2 diabetes.

Read more at: http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/14-11-25/EU_approves_Lilly_diabetes_drug_Trulicity.aspx

Dulaglutide is a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 agonist) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that can be used once weekly.[1][2]GLP-1 is a hormone that is involved in the normalization of level of glucose in blood (glycemia). The FDA approved dulaglutide for use in the United States in September 2014.[3] The drug is manufactured by Eli Lilly under the brand name Trulicity.[3]

Mechanism of action

Dulaglutide binding to glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor, slows gastric emptying and increases insulin secretion by beta cells in the pancreas. Simultaneously the compound reduces the elevated glucagon secretion by alpha cells of the pancreas, which is known to be inappropriate in the diabetic patient. GLP-1 is normally secreted by L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal.[4]

Medical uses[

The compound is indicated for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control. Dulaglutide is not indicated in the treatment of subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus or patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. Dulaglutide can be used either stand-alone or in combination with other medicines for type 2 diabetes, in particular metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, and insulin taken concomitantly with meals.[5]

Side effects

The most common side effects include gastrointestinal disorders, such as dyspepsia, decreased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea.[6] Some patients may experience serious adverse reactions: acute pancreatitis (symptoms include persistent severe abdominal pain, sometimes radiating to the back and accompanied by vomiting),hypoglycemia, renal impairment (which may sometimes require hemodialysis). The risk of hypoglycemia is increased if the drug is used in combination with sulfonylureas orinsulin.[7][8]

Contraindications

The compound is contraindicated in subjects with hypersensitivity to active principle or any of the product’s components. As a precautionary measure patients with a personal or family history of medullary thyroid carcinoma or affected by multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2 should not take dulaglutide, because for now it is unclear whether the compound can increase the risk of these cancers.[9]

References

  1. JCourtney Aavang Tibble, Tricia Santos Cavaiola, Robert R Henry (2013). “Longer Acting GLP-1 Receptor Agonists and the Potential for Improved Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Review of Current Literature”. Expert Rev Endocrinol Metab 8 (3): 247–259.doi:10.1586/eem.13.20.
  2.  “Lilly’s Once-Weekly Dulaglutide Shows Non-Inferiority to Liraglutide in Head-to-Head Phase III Trial for Type 2 Diabetes”. Eli Lilly. Feb 25, 2014.
  3.  “FDA approves Trulicity to treat type 2 diabetes” (Press release). FDA. Sep 18, 2014.
  4.  Nadkarni P, Chepurny OG, Holz GG (2014). “Regulation of glucose homeostasis by GLP-1”. Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci 121: 23–65. doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-800101-1.00002-8.PMC 4159612. PMID 24373234. Retrieved 2014-09-29.
  5.  Terauchi Y, Satoi Y, Takeuchi M, Imaoka T (July 2014). “Monotherapy with the once weekly GLP-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide for 12 weeks in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: dose-dependent effects on glycaemic control in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study”. Endocr. J. PMID 25029955. Retrieved 2014-09-29.
  6.  Nauck M, Weinstock RS, Umpierrez GE, Guerci B, Skrivanek Z, Milicevic Z (August 2014). “Efficacy and safety of dulaglutide versus sitagliptin after 52 weeks in type 2 diabetes in a randomized controlled trial (AWARD-5)”. Diabetes Care 37 (8): 2149–58.doi:10.2337/dc13-2761. PMID 24742660.
  7.  Amblee A (April 2014). “Dulaglutide for the treatment of type 2 diabetes”. Drugs Today50 (4): 277–89. doi:10.1358/dot.2014.50.4.2132740. PMID 24918645.
  8.  Monami M, Dicembrini I, Nardini C, Fiordelli I, Mannucci E (February 2014). “Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials”. Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract. 103 (2): 269–75. doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2014.01.010.PMID 24485345.
  9. Samson SL, Garber A (April 2013). “GLP-1R agonist therapy for diabetes: benefits and potential risks”. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes 20 (2): 87–97.doi:10.1097/MED.0b013e32835edb32. PMID 23403741. Retrieved 2014-09-30.
Identifiers
CAS number 923950-08-7
ATC code None
Chemical data
Formula C2646H4044N704O836S18 
Mol. mass 59669.81 g/mol

CHMP backs B-MS HCV drug and Lilly Lantus biosimilar


CHMP backs B-MS HCV drug and Lilly Lantus biosimilar

World News | June 29, 2014

Kevin Grogan

 

 

The latest set of opinions from advisors to the European Medicines Agency include recommendations to approve six new medicines, including Bristol-Myers Squibb’s new hepatitis C drug and Eli Lilly’s biosimilar of the Sanofi diabetes blockbuster Lantus.

LY2189265 (dulaglutide), a glucagon-like peptide-1 analog as once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes.


DULAGLUTIDE
PRONUNCIATION doo” la gloo’ tide
THERAPEUTIC CLAIM Treatment of type II diabetes
CHEMICAL NAMES
1. 7-37-Glucagon-like peptide I [8-glycine,22-glutamic acid,36-glycine] (synthetic
human) fusion protein with peptide (synthetic 16-amino acid linker) fusion protein with immunoglobulin G4 (synthetic human Fc fragment), dimer
2. [Gly8,Glu22,Gly36]human glucagon-like peptide 1-(7-37)-peptidyltetraglycyl-Lseryltetraglycyl-L-seryltetraglycyl-L-seryl-L-alanyldes-Lys229-[Pro10,Ala16,Ala17]human immunoglobulin heavy constant γ4 chain H-CH2-CH3 fragment, (55-55′:58-58′)-bisdisulfide dimer

 

STRUCTURAL FORMULA
Monomer
HGEGTFTSDV SSYLEEQAAK EFIAWLVKGG GGGGGSGGGG SGGGGSAESK 50
YGPPCPPCPA PEAAGGPSVF LFPPKPKDTL MISRTPEVTC VVVDVSQEDP 100
EVQFNWYVDG VEVHNAKTKP REEQFNSTYR VVSVLTVLHQ DWLNGKEYKC 150
KVSNKGLPSS IEKTISKAKG QPREPQVYTL PPSQEEMTKN QVSLTCLVKG 200
FYPSDIAVEW ESNGQPENNY KTTPPVLDSD GSFFLYSRLT VDKSRWQEGN 250
VFSCSVMHEA LHNHYTQKSL SLSLG 275
Disulfide bridges location
55-55′ 58-58′ 90-150 90′-150′ 196-254 196′-254′
MOLECULAR FORMULA C2646H4044N704O836S18
MOLECULAR WEIGHT 59.67 kDa

MANUFACTURER Eli Lilly and Company
CODE DESIGNATION LY2189265
CAS REGISTRY NUMBER 923950-08-7

http://www.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/usan/dulaglutide.pdf

LY2189265 (dulaglutide), a glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, is a biologic entity being studied as a once-weekly treatment for type 2 diabetes.

Dulaglatuide works by stimulating cells to release insulin only when blood sugar levels are high.

Gwen Krivi, Ph.D., vice president, product development, Lilly Diabetes, said of the drug, “We believe dulaglutide, if approved, can bring significant benefits to people with type 2 diabetes.”

In fact, it might help to control both diabetics’ blood sugar and their high blood pressure.

Eli Lilly CEO John Lechleiter believes the drug has the potential to be a blockbuster. Lilly could be ready to seek approval by 2013.

For more information on dulaglutide clinical studies, click here.

PRESS RELEASES

Data Preseted at 49th EASD Annual Meeting Show Treatment with Lilly’s Investigational Dulaglutide Resulted in Improved Patient-Reported Health Outcomes – September 26, 2013

Lilly’s Investigational GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Dulaglutide, Showed Superior Glycemic Control Versus Comparators in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes – June 22, 2013

Lilly Announces Positive Results of Phase III Trials of Dulaglutide in Type 2 Diabetes – April 16, 2013

Lilly Diabetes Announces Positive Results of Phase III Trials of Dulaglutide in Type 2 Diabetes
 – October 22, 2012

Lilly Diabetes Presents Phase II Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Data on Investigational GLP-1 Analog Candidate, Dulaglutide, in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes at the 27th American Society of Hypertension Scientific Meeting – May 22, 2012

Ixchelsis, a start-up company that has come out of Pfizer’s former R D site at Sandwich, UK, is progressing a treatment for premature ejaculation boosted by the backing of Eli Lilly.


 

Lilly, through its venture fund set up with TVM Capital Life Science, has
invested in Ixchelsis, made up of former Pfizer scientists and headed by Gary
Muirhead. The company is based on an oxytocin receptor antagonist called IX-01
originally discovered at Sandwich which the investors say “has the potential to
be the best-in-class pharmacological approach for the treatment of
PE”.

Ixchelsis, which is based at the Sandwich site, now called Discovery
Park, will collaborate with the autonomous early phase virtual drug discovery
arm of Lilly, known as Chorus. Dr Muirhead told PharmaTimes that the
TVM model will fund through to the agreed exit point, which is completion of
proof-of-concept and this requires about $14 million.

read all at

http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/13-08-08/Lilly_backs_Ixchelsis_a_start-up_born_at_Pfizer.aspx

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Lilly and Incyte Corp, investigational JAK inhibitor Baricitinib for rheumatoid arthritis


File:Baricitinib.svgChemSpider 2D Image | Baricitinib | C16H17N7O2S

Baricitinib

NDA submitted jan 2016

2-[1-ethylsulfonyl-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)pyrazol-1-yl]azetidin-3-yl]acetonitrile,

3-Azetidineacetonitrile, 1-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-1Hpyrazol-1-yl]-

2-(3-(4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl)acetonitrile

3-Azetidineacetonitrile, 1-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-

2-(3-(4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-1-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl)acetonitrile

For the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and diabetic kidney disease

Incyte Corporation INNOVATOR

http://www.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/usan/baricitinib.pdf

MF C16H17N7O2S
MW 371.4
SPONSOR Eli Lilly and Company
CODE  LY3009104, INCB028050
CAS  1187594-09-7

 

UPDATE……..APPROVED PMDA 2017

WO 2009114512

2-[3-(4-{7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl}-1H-pyrazol- 1-yl)-1-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl]acetonitrile (baricitinib)  FREE FORM

m.p. 193–195 °C;

IR: 3203, 3113, 2998, 2847, 2363, 1584, 1328, 1137 cm–1.

Anal. calcd for C16H17N7 O2 S: C, 51.74; H, 4.61; N, 26.40; found: C, 51.91; H, 4.49; N, 26.57%. MS (m/z): 372 [M + H]+;

1 H NMR (300 MHz, DMSO-d6 ): δ 1.25 (t, J = 7.3 Hz, 3H), 3.23 (m, J = 7.3 Hz, 2H), 3.69 (s, 2H), 4.24 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2H), 4.61 (d, J = 9.0 Hz, 2H), 7.08 (s, 1H), 7.62 (s, 1H), 8.47 (s, 1H), 8.71 (s, 1H), 8.92 (s, 1H), 12.12 (s, 1H);

13C NMR (125 MHz, DMSO-d6 ): δ 7.4, 24.9, 39.3, 43.4, 58.5, 99.9, 113.0, 116.6, 126.9, 129.5, 139.9, 149.3, 150.9, 152.2.

REF  Journal of Chemical Research, Volume 40, Number 4, April 2016,  pp. 205-208(4)

 

 

ChemSpider 2D Image | {1-(Ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-3-azetidinyl}acetonitrile phosphate (1:1) | C16H20N7O6PS

Baricitinib phosphate

{1-(Ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-3-azetidinyl}acetonitrile phosphate (1:1)

Cas 1187595-84-1, C16H20N7O6PS, 469.41

 

  • Originator Incyte Corporation
  • Developer Eli Lilly; Incyte Corporation
  • Class Acetonitriles; Antipsoriatics; Antirheumatics; Azetidines; Pyrazoles; Pyrimidines; Pyrroles; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Janus kinase 1 inhibitors; Janus kinase-2 inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Preregistration Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Phase II Atopic dermatitis; Diabetic nephropathies; Psoriasis; Systemic lupus erythematosus

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Jul 2016 Eli Lilly completes a phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in China (PO) (NCT02758613)
  • 09 Jun 2016 Efficacy and adverse events data from the RA-BEYOND phase III trial in Rheumatoid arthritis presented at the 17thAnnual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR-2016)
  • 09 Jun 2016 Final efficacy and safety data from the phase III trials, RA-BEAM and RA-BEGIN in Rheumatoid arthritis were presented at the 17th Annual Congress of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR – 2016)

The Janus kinase (JAK) is a family of four tyrosine receptor kinases that play a pivotal role in cytokine receptor signalling pathways via their interaction with signal transducers and
activators of transcription proteins. The four JAK family members are Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) and tyrosine kinase (TYK2), whose
lengths range from 120 to 140 kDa. It has been shown that JAK2 activation may be critical for tumour growth and progression,indicating its selection as a therapeutic target. Moreover, since JAK3 is required for immune cell development, targeting JAK3 could be a useful strategy for generating a novel class of immunosuppressant drugs. JAK1 and TYK2 have been implicated in disease and immune suppression.

Over the past decade there have been extensive efforts to identify and design novel small-molecule JAK inhibitors with varied profiles of subtype selectivity to address unmet medical needs  Ruxolitinib is a Janus kinase inhibitor with selectivity for subtypes JAK1 and JAK2. It was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment
of intermediate or high-risk myelofibrosis in November 2011.
Selective inhibitors of JAK are viewed as having considerable potential as disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Tofacitinib, which was the first oral non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, was approved for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at the end of 2012. Baricitinib and filgotinib are beingmevaluated in phase III and phase II clinical trials respectively for
the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Baricitinib (also known as LY3009104 or INCB028050) is a novel and potent small molecule inhibitor of the Janus kinase family of enzymes with selectivity for JAK1 and JAK2. In in vitro studies baricitinib inhibited JAK1 and JAK2 in the low nanomolar range, while it demonstrated low inhibitory activity for JAK3 and moderate activity for TYK2.9–13 The data from two phase III studies showed that baricitinib can achieve impressive responses in RA patients who have not responded well to established therapies.
Therefore, improvement in the preparation of baricitinib is of practical significance.

1 L. Tan, K. Akahane, R. McNally, K.M.S.E. Reyskens, S.B. Ficarro, S. Liu,
G.S. Herter-Sprie, S. Koyama, M.J. Pattison, K. Labella, L. Johannessen,
E.A. Akbay, K. Wong, D.A. Frank, J.A. Marto, T.A. Look, J.S.C. Arthur,
M.J. Eck and N.S. Gray, J. Med. Chem., 2015, 58, 6589.

2 J.J. Kulagowski, W. Blair, R.J. Bull, C. Chang, G. Deshmukh, H.J. Dyke,
C. Eigenbrot, N. Ghilardi, P. Gibbons, T.K. Harrison, P.R. Hewitt, M.
Liimatta, C.A. Hurley, A. Johnson, T. Johnson, J.R. Kenny, P.B. Kohli, R.J.
Maxey, R. Mendonca, K. Mortara, J. Murray, R. Narukulla, S. Shia, M.
Steffek, S. Ubhayakar, M. Ultsch, A. Abbema, S.I. Ward, B. Waszkowycz
and M. Zak, J. Med. Chem., 2012, 55, 5901.
3 J.F. Kadow, Y. Ueda, N.A. Meanwell, T.P. Connolly, T. Wang, C. Chen, K.
Yeung, J. Zhu, J.A. Bender, Z. Yang, D. Parker, P. Lin, R.J. Colonno, M.
Mathew, D. Morgan, M. Zheng, C. Chien and D. Grasela, J. Med. Chem.,
2012, 55, 2048.
4 Q. Su, S. Ioannidis, C. Chuaqui, L. Almeida, M. Alimzhanov, G. Bebernitz,
K. Bell, M. Block, T. Howard, S. Huang, D. Huszar, J.A. Read, C.R. Costa,
J. Shi, M. Su, M. Ye and M. Zinda, J. Med. Chem., 2014, 57, 144.
5 J.D. Clark, M.E. Flanagan and J. Telliez, J. Med. Chem., 2014, 57, 5023.
6 P. Norman, Expert. Opin. Investig. Drugs, 2014, 23, 1067.
7 L.J. Farmer, M.W. Ledeboer, T. Hoock, M.J. Arnost, R.S. Bethiel, Y.L.
Bennani, J.J. Black, C.L. Brummel, A. Chakilam, W.A. Dorsch, B. Fan,
J.E. Cochran, S. Halas, E.M. Harrington, J.K. Hogan, D. Howe, H. Huang,
D.H. Jacobs, L.M. Laitinen, S. Liao, S. Mahajan, V. Marone, G. Martinez-
Botella, P. McCarthy, D. Messersmith, M. Namchuk, L. Oh, M.S. Penney,
A.C. Pierce, S.A. Raybuck, A. Rugg, F.G. Salituro, K. Saxena, D. Shannon,
D. Shlyakter, L. Swenson, S. Tian, C. Town, J. Wang, T. Wang, M.W.
Wannamaker, R.J. Winquist and H.J. Zuccola, J. Med. Chem., 2015, 58,
7195.
8 S.C. Meyer and R.L. Levine, Clin. Cancer. Res., 2014, 20, 2051.

Baricitinib (formerly INCB28050, LY3009104)[1] is an oral JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor.

Baricitinib is in Phase III development by Eli Lilly and Incyte as a potential treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.[2] It is in Phase II development as a potential treatment for psoriasis and diabetic nephropathy. The related compound in JAK inhibitor is Tofacitinib, currently approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the United States.

Baricitinib.png

The companies announced 52-week data from a Phase IIb study of baricitinib at the European Congress of Rheumatology meeting in Madrid which showed that clinical improvements previously observed at week 24 were sustained for the full year in RA patients. Specifically, 49% of patients were ACR50 responders (ie a 50% improvement in their condition) after 52 weeks compared to 41% at week 24. For the full year, 21% reached ACR70 compared with 27% after 24 weeks.

To date, baricitinib, an orally administered selective JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor,  has demonstrated “an acceptable safety profile and side effects have generally been straightforward to manage”, said Oxford University’s Peter Taylor. He added that “these encouraging findings support further investigation of this new drug in RA”.

Baricitinib is already in Phase III for RA and in Phase II for psoriasis and diabetic nephropathy.

WO2009114512, also to Incyte, discloses azetidine and cyclobutane derivatives of the general structure shown below as JAK inhibitors.

Baricitinib (also known as LY3009104 or INCB28050) is in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and diabetic kidney disease. Baricitinib is shown below.

About Baricitinib

Baricitinib is a once-daily, oral, selective JAK1 and JAK2 inhibitor. There are four known JAK enzymes: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2. JAK-dependent cytokines have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, suggesting that JAK inhibitors may be useful for the treatment of a broad range of inflammatory conditions. Baricitinib demonstrates approximately 100-fold greater potency of inhibition against JAK1 and JAK2 than JAK 3 in kinase assays.

In December 2009, Lilly and Incyte announced an exclusive worldwide license and collaboration agreement for the development and commercialization of baricitinib and certain follow-on compounds for patients with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Baricitinib is currently in Phase 3 clinical development for rheumatoid arthritis and Phase 2 development for psoriasis and diabetic nephropathy.

About Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune diseasei characterized by inflammation and progressive destruction of joints.ii More than 23 million people worldwide suffer from RA.iii Approximately three times as many women as men have the disease. Patients and physicians indicate there remains an important opportunity to improve patient care. Current treatment of RA includes the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, oral disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs such as methotrexate, and injectable biological response modifiers that target selected mediators implicated in the pathogenesis of RA.iv

About Baricitinib Phase 3 Trials

Lilly and Incyte have conducted four pivotal Phase 3 clinical trials of baricitinib in patients with moderately-to-severely active rheumatoid arthritis to support regulatory submission in most countries. An additional Phase 3 study was initiated to support clinical development in China and remains ongoing. The clinical trial program includes a wide range of patients including those who are methotrexate naïve, inadequate responders to methotrexate, inadequate responders to conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, or inadequate responders to TNF inhibitors. Patients completing any of the five Phase 3 studies can enroll in a long-term extension study. For additional information on this clinical trial program, please visit http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

About Incyte

Incyte Corporation is a Wilmington, Delaware-based biopharmaceutical company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of proprietary therapeutics for oncology and inflammation. For additional information on Incyte, please visit the Company’s web site at http://www.incyte.com.

About Eli Lilly and Company

Lilly is a global healthcare leader that unites caring with discovery to make life better for people around the world. We were founded more than a century ago by a man committed to creating high-quality medicines that meet real needs, and today we remain true to that mission in all our work. Across the globe, Lilly employees work to discover and bring life-changing medicines to those who need them, improve the understanding and management of disease, and give back to communities through philanthropy and volunteerism. To learn more about Lilly, please visit us at http://www.lilly.com and newsroom.lilly.com/social-channels.

SOURCE: Eli Lilly

http://pipelinereview.com/

Biological Activity

Baricitinib (formerly INCB28050, LY3009104) is a selective orally bioavailable JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor. Baricitinib preferentially inhibits JAK1 and JAK2, with 10-fold selectivity over Tyk2 and 100-fold over JAK3. INCB-28050 (baricitinib) inhibits intracellular signaling of multiple proinflammatory cytokines including IL-6 at concentrations <50 nM. Baricitinib also inhibits pSTAT3 stimulated by IL-23 with IC50 of 20 nM in isolated naive T-cells. Baricitinib (INCB028050) was also effective in multiple murine models of arthritis, with no evidence of suppression of humoral immunity or adverse hematologic effects. Baricitinib reduces levels of pSTAT3 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the peripheral blood of rAIA animals. INCB28050 (Baricitinib) (10 mg/mL, p.o.) improves a composite score of joint damage by 47% in the murine CIA model.

Conversion of different model animals based on BSA (Value based on data from FDA Draft Guidelines)
Species Mouse Rat Rabbit Guinea pig Hamster Dog
Weight (kg) 0.02 0.15 1.8 0.4 0.08 10
Body Surface Area (m2) 0.007 0.025 0.15 0.05 0.02 0.5
Km factor 3 6 12 8 5 20
Animal A (mg/kg) = Animal B (mg/kg) multiplied by Animal B Km
Animal A Km

For example, to modify the dose of resveratrol used for a mouse (22.4 mg/kg) to a dose based on the BSA for a rat, multiply 22.4 mg/kg by the Km factor for a mouse and then divide by the Km factor for a rat. This calculation results in a rat equivalent dose for resveratrol of 11.2 mg/kg.

 

str1

str2

As shown in Scheme 1, Rodgers et al. have reported the first synthetic route to baricitinib.

ref J.D. Rodgers, S. Shepard, T.P. Maduskuie, H. Wang, N. Falahatpisheh, M. Rafalski, A.G. Arvanitis, L. Sorace, R.K. Jalluri, J.S. Fridman and K. Vaddi, 2007, US20070135461.

tert-Butyl 3-oxoazetidine- 1-carboxylate (1) was employed as the starting material. This was transformed to compound 2 by a Horner–Emmons reaction, followed by deprotection of the N-Boc group in acidic conditions. The intermediate 4 was obtained by the sulfonamidation reaction of compound 3 with ethanesulfonyl chloride. The other part of baricitinib was acquired by utilising 4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (5) as the starting material. Compound 5 reacted with [2-(chloromethoxy)ethyl] trimethylsilane (SEM-Cl) to afford the intermediate 6, which was converted by reaction with 7 via the intermediate 8 to 4-(1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-7-{[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl}-7Hpyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (9) via a Suzuki coupling reaction and a hydrolysis reaction. After the nucleophilic addition reaction and deprotection of the SEM group, baricitinib was obtained through eight steps. This synthetic route had drawbacks of high cost, low overall yield and the requirement of strict operating conditions.

 

PATENT

WO2009114512

EXAMPLES

Example 1. {l-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l- yl]azetidin-3-yl}acetonitrile trifluoroacetic acid salt

Figure imgf000060_0001

Step 1. tert-butyl 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine-l-carboxylate

0I \t

Figure imgf000061_0001

To a suspension of sodium hydride (60% dispersion in mineral oil, 0.257 g, 6.42 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (32 mL) at 0 0C under a nitrogen atmosphere was added diethyl cyanomethylphosphonate (1.19 g, 6.72 mmol) (purchased from Aldrich). The reaction was then stirred for 45 minutes at room temperature. A solution of tert-butyl 3-oxoazetidine-l- carboxylate (1.00 g, 5.84 mmol) (purchased from Alfa Aesar) in tetrahydrofuran (8.8 mL) was introduced dropwise and the mixture was stirred for 16 hours. Brine and ethyl acetate were added and the layers separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with three portions of ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to afford product, used without further purification in Step 2 (1.12 g, 99%). 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3): δ 5.38 (p, IH), 4.73-4.68 (m, 2H), 4.64-4.59 (m, 2H), 1.46 (s, 9H).

Step 2. tert-butyl 3-(cyanomethyl)’3-[4-(7-[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl-7H-pyrrolo[2,3- djpyrim idin-4-yl) – 1 H-pyrazol-1 -yl]azetidine-l -carboxylate

Figure imgf000061_0002

To a solution of 4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7-[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (4.61 g, 14.6 mmol) (prepared according to the method of WO 2007/070514 in Example 65, Step 2) and tert-butyl 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine-l- carboxylate (2.84 g, 14.6 mmol) in acetonitrile (100 mL) was added 1,8- diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (2.19 mL, 14.6 mmol). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 16 hours. The acetonitrile was removed in vacuo and the residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate. This solution was sequentially washed with IN HCl and brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated. The residue was purified by flash column chromatography, eluting with 80% ethyl acetate/hexanes to afford desired product (5.36 g, 72%).

1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3): δ 8.86 (s, IH), 8.44 (s, IH), 8.34 (s, IH), 7.42 (d, IH), 6.80 (d, IH), 5.68 (s, 2H), 4.54 (d, 2H), 4.29 (d, 2H), 3.59-3.51 (m, 2H), 3.33 (s, 2H), 1.47 (s, 9H), 0.96-0.89 (m, 2H), -0.06 (s, 9H); LCMS (M+H)+: 510.2.

Step 3. 3-[4-(7-[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH- pyrazol- 1 -yl] azetidin-3-ylacetonitrile

Figure imgf000062_0001

To a solution of tert-butyl 3-(cyanomethyl)-3-[4-(7-[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl- 7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidine-l-carboxylate (5.36 g, 10.5 mmol) in 1,4-dioxane (100 mL) was added 4.00 M of hydrogen chloride in 1,4-dioxane (40 mL, 160 mmol) and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 16 hours. The reaction was poured into saturated sodium bicarbonate solution sufficient to neutralize. The product was extracted with three portions of ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated to afford product which was used without further purification (3.0 g, 69%). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): δ 8.85 (s, IH), 8.42 (s, IH), 8.32 (s, IH), 7.41 (d, IH), 6.80 (d, IH), 5.68 (s, 2H), 4.30 (d, 2H), 3.88 (d, 2H), 3.58-3.51 (m, 2H), 3.42 (s, 2H), 0.96-0.89 (m, 2H), -0.06 (s, 9H); LCMS (M+H)+: 410.2. Step 4. l-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7-[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl-7H-pyrrolo[2,3- d]pyritnidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3-ylacetonitrile

Figure imgf000063_0001

To a solution of 3-[4-(7-[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl-7H-pyrrolo[2,3- d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3-ylacetonitrile (0.100 g, 0.244 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (2 mL) containing N,N-diisopropylethylamine (0.085 mL, 0.49 mmol) was added ethanesulfonyl chloride (0.023 mL, 0.24 mmol). After stirring for 1.5 hours, the reaction mixture was poured into dilute HCl and extracted with three portions of ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, decanted and concentrated to afford product, used without further purification in Step 5 (111 mg, 91%).

1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3): δ 8.86 (s, IH), 8.63 (s, IH), 8.35 (s, IH), 7.45 (d, IH), 6.83 (d, IH), 5.68 (s, 2H), 4.63 (d, 2H), 4.26 (d, 2H), 3.54 (t, 2H), 3.42 (s, 2H), 3.09 (q, 2H), 1.41 (t, 3H), 0.92 (t, 2H), -0.06 (s, 9H); LCMS (M+H)+: 502.1.

Step 5. l-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3- ylacetonitrile trifluoroacetate salt

To a solution of l-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7-[2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy]methyl-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3-ylacetonitrile (0.111 g, 0.22 mmol) in methylene chloride (3 mL) was added trifluoroacetic acid (2 mL) and the solution was stirred for 1.5 hours. The solvents were removed in vacuo and the residue was dissolved in methanol (3 mL) and ethylenediamine (0.1 mL) was added. After stirring for 3 hours, the volume was reduced in vacuo and the product was purified by preparative-HPLC/MS, (SunFire Cl 8 column, eluting with a gradient Of MeCNZH2O containing 0.1% TFA) to afford the product as the trifluoroacetic acid salt (50 mg, 47%). 1H NMR (400 MHz, d6-dmso): δ 12.55 (br d, IH), 9.03 (s, IH), 8.83 (s, IH), 8.56 (s, IH), 7.79-7.75 (m, IH), 7.24-7.19 (m, IH), 4.59 (d, 2H), 4.26 (d, 2H), 3.71 (s, 2H), 3.25 (q, 2H), 1.24 (t, 3H); LCMS (M+H)+: 372.1.

Alternatively, the deprotection and sulfonylation steps could be performed in the reverse order, as in Example 2.

Example 66. tert-Butyl 3-oxoazetidine-l-carboxylate (7).

A solution of tert-buty\ 3-hydroxyazetidine-l-carboxylate (24, 50 g, 289 mmol) in ethyl acetate (400 mL) was cooled to 0 0C. The resulting solution was then treated with solid TEMPO (0.5 g, 3.2 mmol, 0.011 equiv) and a solution of potassium bromide (KBr, 3.9 g, 33.2 mmol, 0.115 equiv) in water (60 mL) at 0 – 5 0C. While keeping the reaction temperature between 0 – 5 0C a solution of saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 450 mL) and an aqueous sodium hypochlorite solution (NaClO, 10 – 13 % available chlorine, 450 mL) were added. Once the solution of sodium hypochlorite was added, the color of the reaction mixture was changed immediately. When additional amount of sodium hypochlorite solution was added, the color of the reaction mixture was gradually faded. When TLC showed that all of the starting material was consumed, the color of the reaction mixture was no longer changed. The reaction mixture was then diluted with ethyl acetate (EtOAc, 500 mL) and two layers were separated. The organic layer was washed with water (500 rnL) and the saturated aqueous sodium chloride solution (500 mL) and dried over sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). The solvent was then removed under reduced pressure to give the crude product, tert-butyl 3-oxoazetidine-l-carboxylate (7, 48 g, 49.47 g theoretical, 97% yield), which was found to be sufficiently pure and was used directly in the subsequent reaction without further purification. For crude 7: 1H NMR (CDCl3, 300 MHz), δ 4.65 (s, 4H), 1.42 (s, 9H) ppm.

Example 67. tert-Buty\ 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine-l-carboxylate (9). Diethyl cyanomethyl phosphonate (8, 745 g, 4.20 mol, 1.20 equiv) and anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (THF, 9 L) was added to a four-neck flask equipped with a thermowell, an addition funnel and the nitrogen protection tube at room temperature. The solution was cooled with an ice-methanol bath to -14 0C and a 1.0 M solution of potassium tert-butoxide (^-BuOK) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (THF, 3.85 L, 3.85 mol, 1.1 equiv) was added over 20 min while keeping the reaction temperature below -5 0C. The resulting reaction mixture was stirred for 3 h at -10 0C and a solution of l-terf-butoxycarbonyl-3-azetidinone (7, 600 g, 3.50 mol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (THF, 2 L) was added over 2 h while keeping the internal temperature below -5 0C. The reaction mixture was stirred at -5 to -10 0C over 1 h and then slowly warmed up to room temperature and stirred at room temperature for overnight. The reaction mixture was then diluted with water (4.5 L) and saturated aqueous sodium chloride solution (NaCl, 4.5 L) and extracted with ethyl acetate (EtOAc, 2 x 9 L). The combined organic layers were washed with brine (6 L) and dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate (Na2SO4). The organic solvent was removed under reduced pressure and the residue was diluted with dichloromethane (CH2Cl2, 4 L) before being absorbed onto silica gel (Siθ2, 1.5 Kg). The crude product, which was absorbed on silica gel, was purified by flash column chromatography (SiO2, 3.5 Kg, 0 – 25% EtOAc/hexanes gradient elution) to afford tert-butyl 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine-l-carboxylate (9, 414.7 g, 679.8 g theoretical, 61% yield) as white solid. For 9: 1H NMR (CDCl3, 300MHz), δ 5.40 (m, IH), 4.70 (m, 2H), 4.61 (m, 2H), 1.46 (s, 9H) ppm; Ci0H14N2O2 (MW, 194.23), LCMS (EI) mle 217 (M+ + Na).

Figure imgf000133_0001

C8H13NO3 MoI Wt 171 19

Figure imgf000133_0002

2

Figure imgf000133_0003

11 step 3 10

C7H10N2O2S C5H7CIN2 MoI Wt 186 23 MoI Wt 130 58

Example 68. 2-(l-(Ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile (11).

A solution of tert-buty\ 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine-l-carboxylate (9, 100Og, 5.2 mol) in acetonitrile (7 L) and a 3 N aqueous HCl solution (7 L) was stirred at room temperature for 18 h. When HPLC showed that all the starting material (9) was consumed, the reaction mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure to dryness. The residue, which contains the crude desired deprotection product (10), was then suspended in acetonitrile (12 L) and the resulting suspension was cooled to O – 5 0C. Diisopropyethylamine (DIEA, 3.14 L, 18.03 mol, 3.5 equiv) was then slowly added while keeping the internal temperature below 5 0C. The resulting homogeneous solution was allowed to cool down to O 0C and ethane sulfonyl chloride (EtSO2Cl, 730 mL, 7.73 mol, 1.5 equiv) was added over 1 h while keeping the internal temperature below 5 0C. The resulting reaction mixture was allowed to gradually warm to room temperature and stirred at room temperature for overnight. When HPLC showed that the reaction was complete, the reaction mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure to a volume of approximately 2 L. The bath temperature of the rotary evaporator is set to not exceed 45 0C. The concentrated residue was then diluted with dichloromethane (CH2CI2, 10 L) and the resulting dichloromethane solution was washed with aqueous sodium chloride solution (10 L). The aqueous phase was back extracted with dichloromethane (CH2CI2, 5 L). The combined organic layers were dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate

(Na2SO^ and the residue was absorbed onto silica gel (SiO2, 1 Kg) under reduced pressure. The bath temperature of the rotary evaporator was set to not exceed 45 0C. The material was then loaded onto a silica gel column (SiO2, 2.5 Kg) and eluted with 20 – 60 % ethyl acetate in heptane to afford 2-(l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile (11, 882 g, 968.4 g theoretical, 91 % yield) as off-white solids. For 11: 1H NMR (CDCl3, 300 MHz) δ 5.46 (m, IH), 4.77 (m, 2H), 4.70 (m, 2H), 3.05 (q, 2H), 1.39 (t, 3H) ppm; C7Hi0N2O2S (MW, 186.23), LCMS (EI) mle 187 (M+ + H).

Example 69. 2-(l-(Ethylsulfonyl)-3-(4-(7-((2-(trimethyIsiIyl)ethoxy)methyl)-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-</]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl)azetidin-3-yl)acetonitrile (12).

Method A. To a suspension of 4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7-((2-

(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy)methyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-^pyrimidine (5, 440 g, 1.395 mol) and 2-(l- (ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile (11, 312.4 g, 1.68 mol, 1.2 equiv) in acetonitrile (4.4 L) was added DBU (249.8 mL, 1.67 mol, 1.2 equiv) drop wise to keep the reaction temperature between 15 – 25 0C. After adding DBU, the reaction mixture became homogeneous, but a precipitate appeared in 30 min. The reaction mixture was stirred for 3 h at room temperature. When ΗPLC showed that the reaction was deemed complete, the reaction mixture was quenched with water (11 L). The resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature for additional 30 min and then filtered. The solid cake was washed with water (4 L), MTBE (2 L) and dried in vacuum oven at 35 0C for 24 h to afford crude 2-(l –

(ethylsulfonyl)-3-(4-(7-((2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy)methyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-(i]pyrimidin-4-yl)- lH-pyrazol-l-yl)azetidin-3-yl)acetonitrile (12, 681 g, 699.8 g theoretical, 97.3 % yield) as white solids, which was found to be sufficiently pure for the subsequent reaction without further purification. For 12: 1HNMR (CDCl3, 300 MHz), δ 8.86 (s, IH), 8.45 (s, IH), 8.35 (s, IH), 7.43 (d, IH), 6.80 (d, IH), 5.68 (s, 2H), 4.65 (d, 2H), 4.27 (d, 2H), 3.55 (s, 2H), 3.4 (t, 2H), 3.07 (m, 2H), 1.42 (m, 3H), 0.92 (m, 2H), -0.05 (s, 9H) ppm; C22H3IN7O3SSi (MW, 501.68), LCMS (EI) mle 502 (M+ + H).

Figure imgf000135_0001

12

C15H21N5OSi C22H31N7O3SSi MoI Wt 315 45 MoI Wt 501 68

Figure imgf000135_0002

Phosphate salt

C16H17N7O2S C16H20N7O6PS

MoI Wt 371 42 MoI Wt 469 41

Example 72. tert-Butyl 3-(cyanomethyl)-3-(4-(7-((2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy)methyl)-7H- pyrroIo[2,3-rf]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl)azetidine-l-carboxyIate (15).

To a suspension of tert-butyl 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine-l-carboxylate (9, 417.2 g, 2.15 mol, 1.05 equiv) and 4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7-((2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxy)methyl)-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-<f]pyrimidine (5, 645 g, 2.04 mol) in acetonitrile (4.9 L) was added DBU (30.5 mL, 0.204 mol, 0.1 equiv) drop wise at room temperature. The resulting reaction mixture was then stirred at room temperature for 3 h. After about 1 h, a clear, brown solution was obtained. When LCMS showed that no starting material remained, silica gel (SiO2, 1 Kg) was added and the mixture was concentrated to dryness under reduced pressure. This material, which contains the crude desired product (15), was then loaded onto a pre-packed silica column (Siθ2, 2.5 Kg) and the column was eluted with 60 – 80% of ethyl acetate/heptane. The fractions containing the pure desired product (15) were combined and concentrated under reduced pressure to give the desired product as thick oil which was then stirred in heptane at room temperature until crystallization occurred. The solids were collected by filtration and washed with heptane to afford tert-buty\ 3-(cyanomethyl)-3-(4-(7-((2- (trimethylsilyl)ethoxy)methyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-ύ(]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl)azetidine- 1-carboxylate (15, 1014.9 g, 1039.7 g theoretical, 97.6% yield) as white solids. For 15: 1H NMR (DMSO-^6, 300 MHz) δ 8.93 (s, IH), 8.77 (s, IH), 8.47 (s, IH), 7.80 (d, IH, J= 3.8 Hz), 7.20 (d, IH, J = 3.7 Hz), 5.63 (s, 2H), 4.50 (d, 2H, J= 9.3 Hz), 4.21 (d, 2H, J= 9.3 Hz), 3.66 (s, 2H), 3.52 (t, 2H, J= 7.8 Hz), 1.40 (s, 9H), 0.82 (t, 2H, J= 8.1 Hz), -0.12 (s, 9H) ppm; C25H35N7O3Si (MW, 509.68), LCMS (EI) m/e 510 (M+ + H) and 532 (M+ + Na).

Figure imgf000138_0001

15

C15H21N5OSi C25H35N7O3Si MoI Wt 31545 MoI Wt 509 68

Figure imgf000138_0002

16 12

C20H27N7OSi C22H31N7O3SSi MoI Wt 409 56 MoI Wt 501 68

Figure imgf000138_0003

14 phosphate

C16H17N7O2S C16H20N7O6PS

Figure imgf000138_0004

MoI Wt 371 42 MoI Wt 46941

Example 77. (4-(l-(3-(Cyanomethyl)-l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl)-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)- 7H-pyrrolo[2,3-</]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate (20).

To a suspension of [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-</|pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate (19, 10.0 g, 33.4 mmol) and 2-(l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile (11, 6.22 g, 33.4 mmol, 1.0 equiv) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, 20 mL) was added DBU (254 mg, 1.67 mmol, 0.05 equiv) drop wise to keep the reaction temperature between 15 – 25 0C. After adding DBU, the reaction mixture became homogeneous within 90 min. The reaction mixture was stirred for 3 h at room temperature. When ΗPLC showed that the reaction was deemed complete, the reaction mixture was quenched with water (120 mL) and acetonitrile (80 mL). The resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature for an additional 30 min. The solids were collected by filtration, washed with a mixture of acetonitrile and water (2/3 by volume, 2 x 20 mL), and dried in vacuum oven at 40 – 45 0C for 24 h to afford crude (4-(l-(3-(cyanomethyl)-l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl)-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-</)pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate (20, 14.5 g, 16.2 g theoretical, 89.5 % yield) as white solids, which was found to be sufficiently pure (> 98.0% by ΗPLC) for the subsequent reaction without further purification. For 20: 1FTNMR (CDCl3, 300 MHz), δ 8.87 (s, IH), 8.43 (s, IH), 8.37 (s, IH), 7.51 (d, IH, J= 3.6 Hz), 6.76 (d, IH, J= 3.6 Hz), 6.26 (s, 2H),

4.64 (d, 2H, J = 9.6 Hz), 4.25 (d, 2H, J = 9.6 Hz), 3.41 (s, 2H), 3.09 (q, 2H, J= 7.6 Hz), 1.42 (t, 3H, J= 7.6 Hz), 1.17 (s, 9H) ppm; C22H27N7O4S (MW, 485.56), LCMS (EI) mle 486 (M+ + H).

Figure imgf000143_0001

C15H17N5O2 C22H27N7O4S MoI Wl 299 33 MoI Wt 48556

Figure imgf000143_0002

14 phosphate

C16H17N7O2S C16H20N7O6PS MoI Wt 371 42 MoI Wt 46941

str1

PAPER

A highly efficient method for the synthesis of baricitinib was developed. The starting material tert-butyl 3-oxoazetidine-1-carboxylate was converted to intermediate 2-(1-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile via the Horner–Emmons reaction, deprotection of the N-Boc-group and a final sulfonamidation reaction. Then the nucleophilic addition reaction was carried out smoothly to afford the borate intermediate in the presence of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene under reflux. Finally, the desired compound baricitinib was obtained by the Suzuki coupling reaction of 4-chloro-7-H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine with the above borate intermediate. All compounds were characterised by IR, MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The overall yield in this synthetic route was as high as 49%. Moreover, this procedure is straightforward to carry out, has low cost and is suitable for industrial production.

 

str1

In order to improve the procedure, we designed a novel synthetic route for the synthesis of baricitinib (Scheme 2). Similarly, we also applied tert-butyl 3-oxoazetidine-1-carboxylate (1) as the starting material. First, we optimised the preparation of compound 4. In the Horner–Emmons reaction, NaH was used as the base instead of t-BuOK, which led to a yield as high as 84%. Then the deprotection of the N-Boc group was carried out smoothly under trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) cleavage conditions to afford compound 3, which was reacted with ethanesulfonyl chloride without further purification. Next, the nucleophilic addition reaction between compound 4 and 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2- dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazole (11) proceeded successfully in the presence of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (DBU). With the intermediate compound 12 in hand, we optimised the conditions of the Suzuki coupling reaction with compound 5. Several coupling systems were evaluated, such as Pd(PPh3 )4 – K2 CO3 –t-butanol/H2 O, Pd(PPh3 )4 –Na2 CO3 –t-butanol/H2 O and Pd(OAc)2 –K2 CO3 –dioxane/H2 O. The Pd(PPh3 )4 –CsF–t-butanol/ toluene/H2 O system afforded the most satisfactory yield. Finally, baricitinib was obtained efficiently and the overall yield was as high as 49% based on tert-butyl 3-oxoazetidine-1-carboxylate (1)

 PATENT

WO2016088094

Baricitinib is a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor. It is chemically designated as { 1 (ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3-yl}acetonitrile, having the structure as depicted in Formula I.

Formula I

U.S. Patent No. 8,158,616 discloses processes for the preparation of baricitinib of Formula I and [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II.

Formula II

U.S. Patent No. 8, 158,616 involves a three-step process for the preparation of [4- (lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II as depicted in Scheme 1 below:

Scheme 1

Formula V

Formula VI

Formula II Formula VII

The process disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 8, 158,616 involves the use of sodium hydride as a base for reacting 4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine of Formula III with chloromethyl pivalate of Formula IV, and the use of a protected pyrazole borolane derivative of Formula VI for the conversion of (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7- yl)methyl 2,2-dimethylpropanoate of Formula V into [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II.

The use of sodium hydride is not suitable on an industrial scale due to its inflammable and hazardous nature. The use of a protected pyrazole borolane derivative of Formula VI increases the cost of the manufacturing process, as an additional deprotection step is required for obtaining [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II.

Thus, there exists a need for the development of an economical and industrially advantageous process for the preparation of [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II that avoids the use of sodium hydride and involves a lesser number of steps.

The present invention provides a convenient, economical, and industrially advantageous two-step process for the preparation of [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II. The process of the present invention involves the use of an alkali or alkaline earth metal hydroxide, carbonate, or bicarbonate as a base for reacting 4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine of Formula III with chloromethyl pivalate of Formula IV, and the use of an unprotected pyrazole borolane of Formula VIII for the conversion of (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl 2,2-dimethylpropanoate of Formula V into [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II. The process of the present invention provides [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II in high yield.

A first aspect of the present invention provides a process for the preparation of [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II,

Formula II

comprising the steps of:

i) reacting 4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine of Formula III

Formula III

with chloromethyl pivalate of Formula IV

Formula IV

in the presence of an alkali or alkaline earth metal hydroxide, carbonate, bicarbonate as a base to obtain (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7- yl)methyl 2,2-dimethylpropanoate of Formula V; and

ii) reacting the (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl 2,2- dimethylpropanoate of Formula V with 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2 dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazole of Formula VIII

Formula VIII

to obtain the [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II.

A second aspect of the present invention provides a process for the preparation of baricitinib of Formula I,

Formula I

comprising the steps of:

i) reacting 4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine of Formula III

Formula III

with chloromethyl pivalate of Formula IV

Formula IV

in the presence of an alkali or alkaline earth metal hydroxide, carbonate, or bicarbonate base to obtain (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl 2,2-dimethylpropanoate of Formula V;

Formula V

ii) reacting the (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl 2,2- dimethylpropanoate of Formula V with 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2- dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazole of Formula VIII

Formula VIII

to obtain [4-( lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II; and

Formula II

iii) reacting the [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate of Formula II with [l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene]acetonitrile of Formula IX

Formula IX

to obtain baricitinib of Formula I.

EXAMPLES

Example 1 : Preparation of (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolor2.3-dlpyrimidin-7-yl)methyl 2.2-dimethylpropanoate (Formula V)

4-Chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (25 g; Formula III), potassium carbonate (27 g), and chloromethyl pivalate (27 g; Formula IV) were added to a reaction vessel containing N,N-dimethylformamide (100 mL) at ambient temperature. The reaction mixture was stirred for 14 hours. The progress of the reaction was monitored by thin layer chromatography. Water (250 mL) was added to the reaction mixture, and then the mixture was stirred for 2 hours. The reaction mixture was filtered, then washed with water (50 mL), and then dried under reduced pressure at 40°C to 45°C for 12 hours to obtain (4-chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl 2,2-dimethylpropanoate.

Yield: 98.85%

Example 2: Preparation of r4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolor2.3-dlpyrimidin-7-yllmethyl pivalate (Formula II)

(4-Chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl 2,2-dimethylpropanoate (10 g; Formula V), water (50 mL), and potassium carbonate (15.5 g) were added into a reaction vessel at ambient temperature. 4-(4,4,5,5-Tetramethyl-l,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazole (8.7 g; Formula VIII), 1,4-dioxane (100 mL), and

tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) (0.08 g) were added to the reaction mixture. The reaction mixture was heated to a temperature of 80°C to 85°C, and then stirred at the same temperature for 14 hours. The progress of the reaction was monitored by thin layer chromatography. On completion, ethyl acetate (100 mL) was added to the reaction mixture. The contents were stirred for 1 hour, then filtered through a Hyflo®, and then washed with ethyl acetate (40 mL). The organic layer was separated, and then concentrated under reduced pressure to obtain [4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]methyl pivalate.

Yield: 82.27%

PATENT

WO-2015145286

WO-2016125080

WO-2015166434

WO-2014028756

WO-2016141891

WO-2014194195

PATENT

CN-105566332

https://www.google.com/patents/CN105566332A?cl=en

 

PATENT

WO-2016125080

The present invention provides processes for the preparation of baricitinib of Formula I and an intermediate of Formula V. The present invention also provides the of the intermediate of Formula V for the preparation of baricitinib.

Formula V

Background of the Invention

Baricitinib is a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor. It is chemically designated as (ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3 yl}acetonitrile, having the structure as depicted in Formula I.

Formula I

U.S. Patent No. 8,158,616 discloses a process for the preparation of baricitinib comprising the reaction of 2-(l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile of Formula II with 4-(lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl methyl pivalate of Formula

III to provide an intermediate of Formula IV, followed by deprotection of the intermediate of Formula IV to obtain baricitinib of Formula I, as depicted in Scheme I below:

Scheme I

Formula IV

The process disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 8, 158,616 requires a deprotection step in the last stage of the synthesis, which adds to the cost of the overall synthesis.

Thus, there exists a need for an alternate, cost-effective, and industrially advantageous process for the preparation of baricitinib.

EXAMPLES

Example 1 : Preparation of 3-(cvanomethylene)azetidine hydrochloride (Formula VIP

Aqueous hydrochloric acid (6N, 10 mL) and montmorillonite K-10 (2 g) were added into a reaction vessel at ambient temperature. The contents were stirred for 1 hour, and then filtered under reduced pressure to obtain activated montmorillonite K-10. The activated montmorillonite K-10 was added into another reaction vessel containing tert-butyl 3-(cyanomethylidene)azetidine-l-carboxylate (2 g; Formula VI) and methanol (20

mL) at ambient temperature. The reaction mixture was refluxed for about 12 hours to about 15 hours. On completion, the reaction mixture was filtered under reduced pressure followed by recovery of methanol under reduced pressure at about 40°C to about 45°C to obtain 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine hydrochloride.

Yield: 75%

Example 2: Preparation of 2-(l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile (Formula ID

N,N-Diisopropylethylamine (4.5 mL) was added into a reaction vessel containing acetonitrile (50 mL) and 3-(cyanomethylene)azetidine hydrochloride (1.5 g; Formula VII) at about 0°C to about 10°C. The reaction mixture was stirred for about 10 minutes.

Ethanesulfonyl chloride (2.22 g) was added into the reaction mixture at about 0°C to about 5°C over about 5 minutes. The temperature of the reaction mixture was raised to about 20°C to about 25 °C, and then the reaction mixture was stirred for about 16 hours. On completion of the reaction, acetonitrile was recovered from the reaction mixture under reduced pressure at about 40°C to about 45°C to obtain an oily residue. Dichloromethane (50 mL) was added into the residue. The contents were washed with a saturated sodium chloride solution (30 mL), followed by complete recovery of dichloromethane under reduced pressure at about 40°C to obtain 2-(l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile .

Yield: 98.59%

Example 3: Preparation of { l-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(4.4.5.5-tetramethyl-1.3.2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yllazetidin-3-yl}acetonitrile (Formula V)

1,4-Dioxane (20 mL) was added into a reaction vessel containing a solution of potassium carbonate (4.5 g) in water (30 mL) at about 20°C to about 25 °C. 2-(l-(Ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-ylidene)acetonitrile (2 g; Formula II) and 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazole (2.30 g; Formula VIII) were added into the reaction mixture at about 20°C to about 25 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred at about 20°C to about 25 °C for about 16 hours to about 18 hours. On completion of the reaction, 1,4-dioxane was recovered from the reaction mixture under reduced pressure at about 45 °C to obtain a residue. Ethyl acetate (20 mL) was added into the residue, and the contents were stirred for about 5 minutes. The organic and aqueous layers were separated. The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure at about 45 °C to obtain { l-(ethylsulfonyl)- 3-[4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3-yl}acetonitrile.

Yield: 85.78%

Mass: 381.4 [M + H]+

Example 4: Preparation of baricitinib (Formula I)

4-Chloro-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine (0.8 g; Formula IX) was added into a reaction vessel containing a solution of potassium carbonate (2.1 g) in water (30 mL) at about 20°C to about 25°C. A solution of { l-(ethylsulfonyl)-3-[4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-l,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)-lH-pyrazol-l-yl]azetidin-3-yl}acetonitrile (2.0 g; Formula V) in 1,4-dioxane (30 mL) was added into the reaction mixture at about 20°C to about 25 °C, followed by the addition of tetrakis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(0) (0.1 g). The reaction mixture was stirred at about 80°C to about 85°C for about 5 hours. On completion of the reaction, 1,4-dioxane was recovered from the reaction mixture under reduced pressure at about 45°C to obtain a residue. Ethyl acetate (50 mL) was added into the residue, and then the contents were stirred for about 5 minutes. The organic and aqueous layers were separated. The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure at about 45°C to obtain baricitinib.

Yield: 99.0%

 

Patent

WO-2016141891

Figure 8 is a crystalline form II 1 the H NMR FIG.

 

PATENT

WO-2015166434

Figure 4: Infra-red (IR) spectrum of the crystalline form of baricitinib.

Example: Preparation of crystalline form of baricitinib

(4-( 1 -(3-(Cyanomethyl)- 1 -(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl)- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate (8 g), methanol (40 mL), tetrahydrofuran (160 mL), and 1M sodium hydroxide (18.4 mL) were added into a reaction vessel at 20°C to 25°C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 3 hours. Progress of the reaction was monitored by thin layer chromatography. On completion, the reaction mixture was quenched with water (80 mL). The pH was adjusted to 7.0 to 7.5 by adding IN hydrochloric acid. Half of the solvent was recovered at a temperature of 40°C to 50°C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 20°C to 25°C for 18 hours, and then cooled to 5°C to 10°C. The solids were filtered, washed with a mixture of acetonitrile (50 mL) and water (100 mL), and then dried at 40°C to 50°C under reduced pressure for 24 hours to obtain the crystalline form of baricitinib.

Yield: 70%

 

PATENT

Figure 1 : X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD) pattern of the crystalline form of baricitinib. BELOW

str1 str2

Figure 2: Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) thermogram of the crystalline form of baricitinib.str3

Figure 3 : Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) of the crystalline form of baricitinib.str4

Figure 4: Infra-red (IR) spectrum of the crystalline form of baricitinib.

The crystalline form of baricitinib is further characterized by a DSC having endotherms at about 180.63°C and about 207.98°C.

The crystalline form of baricitinib has a water content of about 3%, as determined by TGA.

The crystalline form of baricitinib is also characterized by an XRPD pattern as depicted in Figure 1, a DSC thermogram as depicted in Figure 2, a TGA as depicted in Figure 3, and an IR spectrum as depicted in Figure 4.

The preparation of the crystalline form of baricitinib is carried out by reacting (4-(l-(3-(cyanomethyl)-l-(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl)-lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate with a base in the presence of one or more solvents at a temperature of about 15°C to 50°C, stirring the reaction mixture for about 30 minutes to about 10 hours, partially recovering the solvent(s) from the reaction mixture at a temperature of about 35°C to about 60°C under reduced pressure, stirring the contents at about 15°C to 35°C for about 5 hours to about 24 hours, filtering the solid, washing the solid with a mixture of acetonitrile and water, and drying.

The (4-( 1 -(3 -(cyanomethyl)- 1 -(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3 -yl)- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate may be obtained by following the process disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 8, 158,616.

Example: Preparation of crystalline form of baricitinib

(4-( 1 -(3-(Cyanomethyl)- 1 -(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3-yl)- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H-pyrrolo [2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate (8 g), methanol (40 mL), tetrahydrofuran (160 mL), and 1M sodium hydroxide (18.4 mL) were added into a reaction vessel at 20°C to 25°C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 3 hours. Progress of the reaction was monitored by thin layer chromatography. On completion, the reaction mixture was quenched with water (80 mL). The pH was adjusted to 7.0 to 7.5 by adding IN hydrochloric acid. Half of the solvent was recovered at a temperature of 40°C to 50°C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 20°C to 25°C for 18 hours, and then cooled to 5°C to 10°C. The solids were filtered, washed with a mixture of acetonitrile (50 mL) and water (100 mL), and then dried at 40°C to 50°C under reduced pressure for 24 hours to obtain the crystalline form of baricitinib.

Yield: 70%

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2015145286A1?cl=en

EXAMPLES

Comparative Examples

Example 1 : Repetition of the process according to Example 78. Method B of U.S. Patent No. 8.158.616

4-( 1 -(3 -(Cyanomethyl)- 1 -(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3 -yl)- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate (1 g), methanol (5 mL), tetrahydrofuran (20 mL), and 1M sodium hydroxide (2.3 mL) were added into a reaction vessel at 20°C to 25 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 3 hours. Progress of the reaction was monitored by thin layer chromatography. On completion, the reaction mixture was quenched by adding water (20 mL). The pH was adjusted to 7.0 to 7.5 by adding IN hydrochloric acid, and the contents were stirred for 1.5 hours. No solid material was obtained. Example 2: Repetition of the process according to Example 78. Method C of U.S. Patent No. 8.158.616

4-( 1 -(3 -(Cyanomethyl)- 1 -(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3 -yl)- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate (2 g), lithium hydroxide monohydrate (0.51 g), acetonitrile (8 mL), and 2-propanol (2 mL) were added into a reaction vessel at 20°C to 25°C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 45°C to 50°C for 6 hours. Progress of the reaction was monitored by thin layer chromatography. On completion, the reaction mixture was cooled to 20°C to 25°C. The pH was adjusted to 6.0 to 7.0 by adding IN hydrochloric acid, and the contents were stirred overnight. No solid material was obtained.

Working Example:

Preparation of an amorphous form of baricitinib

4-( 1 -(3 -(Cyanomethyl)- 1 -(ethylsulfonyl)azetidin-3 -yl)- lH-pyrazol-4-yl)-7H- pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-yl)methyl pivalate (1 g), methanol (5 mL), tetrahydrofuran (20 mL), and 1M sodium hydroxide (2.3 mL) were added into a reaction vessel at 20°C to 25 °C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 3 hours. Progress of the reaction was monitored by thin layer chromatography. On completion, the reaction mixture was quenched by adding water (20 mL). The pH was adjusted to 7.0 to 7.5 by adding IN hydrochloric acid, followed by completely recovering the solvent under reduced pressure at 40°C to 50°C. A sticky material was obtained. Water (10 mL) was added to the sticky material at 20°C to 25°C. The contents were stirred for 10 minutes. A solid material was precipitated out. The solid material was filtered, washed with water (20 mL), and then dried under reduced pressure at 40°C to 45°C for 24 hours to obtain the amorphous form of baricitinib.

Yield: 81%.

The amorphous form of baricitinib may be used in a pharmaceutical composition with one or more pharmaceutically acceptable carriers, diluents, or excipients, and optionally other therapeutic ingredients. The pharmaceutical composition may be used for the treatment of JAK-associated diseases.

PATENT

CN 105693731

https://www.google.com/patents/CN105693731A?cl=en

A process for prepn. of Baricitinib crystal form A is disclosed.  The process comprises recrystn. of Baricitinib with DMF and water or alc., or ether to get the white powder Baricitinib crystal form A.  The obtained crystal form A has high high-temp. stability, high-humidity stability, and light stability with XRPD spectrum at 2θ (±> 0.2) of 12.46, 13.921, 14.94, 15.359, 16.26, 16.639, 17.36, 19.08, 20.321, 21.961, 22.381, 24.118, 25.42, 27.441, 28.381, 29.321, 29.799, 32.675, 33.14, 33.563, 33.923, and 41.6.  The Baricitinib crystal form A can be applied in the drugs for prevention and …………
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Crystalline forms of 1 ethylsulfonyl 3 4 7H pyrrolo 2 3 d pyrimidin 4 yl …

priorart.ip.com/IPCOM/000244270

Nov 27, 2015 – Crystalline forms of baricitinib were found and are described … on their appearance temperature As follows the polymorph observed at room …

Mp. 213.8 °C (DSC).
IR (KBr): 3203, 3116, 2256, 1583, 1328, 1138 cm-1.
HNMR (DMSO-d6, 400 MHz): δ 12.17 (bs, 1H), 8.95 (s, 1H), 8.73 (s, 1H), 8.50 (s, 1H), 7.64
(d, J=3.2 Hz, 1H), 7.10 (d, J=3.4 Hz, 1H), 4.62 (d, J=9.0 Hz, 2H), 4.26 (d, J=9.1 Hz,
2H), 3.72 (s, 2H), 3.26 (q, J=7.3 Hz, 2H), 1.26 (t, J=7.3 Hz, 3H) ppm.
CNMR (DMSO-d6, 100 MHz): δ 152.39, 151.10, 149.55, 140.10, 129.80, 127.13, 122.42,
116.86, 113.25, 100.14, 58.74, 56.26, 43.50, 27.03, 7.63 ppm.
HSQC (optimized for JC-H = 145 Hz): 8.95-129.80, 8.73-151.10, 8.50-140.10, 7.64-127.13,
7.10-100.14, 4.62-58.74, 4.26-58.74, 3.72-27.03, 3.26-43.50, 1.26-7.63.
HMBC (optimized for JC-H = 8 Hz): 12.17-(127.13, 113.25, 100.14), 8.95-(140.10, 122.42,
56.26), 8.73-(152.39, 149.55, 113.25), 8.50-(129.80, 122.42), 7.64-(152.39, 113.25,
100.14), 7.10-(152.39, 127.13, 113.25), (4.62, 4.26)-(58.74, 56.26, 27.03), 3.72-
(116.86, 58.74, 56.26), 3.26-7.63, 1.26-43.50.
Calcd. C16H17N7O2S (M 371.42):
C 51.74%; H 4.61%; N 26.40%; S 8.63%.
Found C 51.62%; H 4.59%; N 26.28%; S 8.78%.

References

  1.  “Baricitinib” (pdf). Statement on a nonproprietary name adopted by the USAN council. American Medical Association.
  2.  “Lilly, Incyte Treatment Shows Positive Results”. http://www.insideindianabusiness.com. 9 Dec 2014. Retrieved 2 Mar 2015.
Patent Submitted Granted
AZETIDINE AND CYCLOBUTANE DERIVATIVES AS JAK INHIBITORS [US8158616] 2009-09-17 2012-04-17
AZETIDINE AND CYCLOBUTANE DERIVATIVES AS JAK INHIBITORS [US2013225556] 2013-03-29 2013-08-29
JANUS KINASE INHIBITORS FOR TREATMENT OF DRY EYE AND OTHER EYE RELATED DISEASES [US2010113416] 2010-05-06
METHOD OF TREATING MUSCULAR DEGRADATION [US2013310340] 2013-05-15 2013-11-21
METHOD OF SELECTING THERAPEUTIC INDICATIONS [US2014170157] 2012-06-15 2014-06-19
CYCLODEXTRIN-BASED POLYMERS FOR THERAPEUTIC DELIVERY [US2014357557] 2014-05-30 2014-12-04
Azetidine and cyclobutane derivatives as JAK inhibitors [US8420629] 2011-12-09 2013-04-16
BIOMARKERS AND COMBINATION THERAPIES USING ONCOLYTIC VIRUS AND IMMUNOMODULATION [US2014377221] 2013-01-25 2014-12-25

 

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PHOSHATE SEE……http://www.medchemexpress.com/product_pdf/HY-15315A/Baricitinib%20phosphate-NMR-HY-15315A-08874-2013.pdf

Baricitinib.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
2-[1-ethylsulfonyl-3-[4-(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)pyrazol-1-yl]azetidin-3-yl]acetonitrile
Clinical data
Legal status
  • Investigational
Identifiers
CAS Number 1187594-09-7
ATC code None
PubChem CID: 44205240
ChemSpider 26373084
ChEMBL CHEMBL2105759
PDB ligand ID 3JW (PDBe, RCSB PDB)
Chemical data
Formula C16H17N7O2S
Molecular mass 371.42 g/mol

SEE………http://apisynthesisint.blogspot.in/2016/01/baricitinib.html

//////////LY3009104, INCB028050, LY 3009104, INCB 028050, nda, baricitinib

CCS(=O)(=O)N1CC(C1)(CC#N)N2C=C(C=N2)C3=C4C=CNC4=NC=N3

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