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Iobenguane I 131

FDA approves first treatment for rare adrenal tumors

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Azedra (iobenguane I 131) injection for intravenous use for the treatment of adults and adolescents age 12 and older with rare tumors of the adrenal gland (pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma) that cannot be surgically removed (unresectable), have spread beyond the original tumor site and require systemic anticancer therapy. This is the first FDA-approved drug for this use.

July 30, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Azedra (iobenguane I 131) injection for intravenous use for the treatment of adults and adolescents age 12 and older with rare tumors of the adrenal gland (pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma) that cannot be surgically removed (unresectable), have spread beyond the original tumor site and require systemic anticancer therapy. This is the first FDA-approved drug for this use.

“Many patients with these ultra-rare cancers can be treated with surgery or local therapies, but there are no effective systemic treatments for patients who experience tumor-related symptoms such as high blood pressure,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Patients will now have an approved therapy that has been shown to decrease the need for blood pressure medication and reduce tumor size in some patients.”

Pheochromocytomas are rare tumors of the adrenal glands. These glands are located right above the kidneys and make hormones including stress hormones called epinephrines and norepinephrines. Pheochromocytomas increase the production of these hormones, leading to hypertension (high blood pressure) and symptoms such as headaches, irritability, sweating, rapid heart rate, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, weakness, chest pain or anxiety. When this type of tumor occurs outside the adrenal gland, it is called a paraganglioma.

The efficacy of Azedra was shown in a single-arm, open-label, clinical trial in 68 patients that measured the number of patients who experienced a 50 percent or greater reduction of all antihypertensive medications lasting for at least six months. This endpoint was supported by the secondary endpoint, overall tumor response measured by traditional imaging criteria. The study met the primary endpoint, with 17 (25 percent) of the 68 evaluable patients experiencing a 50 percent or greater reduction of all antihypertensive medication for at least six months. Overall tumor response was achieved in 15 (22 percent) of the patients studied.

The most common severe side effects reported by patients receiving Azedra in clinical trials included low levels of white blood cells (lymphopenia), abnormally low count of a type of white blood cells (neutropenia), low blood platelet count (thrombocytopenia), fatigue, anemia, increased international normalized ratio (a laboratory test which measures blood clotting), nausea, dizziness, hypertension and vomiting.

As it is a radioactive therapeutic agent, Azedra includes a warning about radiation exposure to patients and family members, which should be minimized while the patient is receiving Azedra. The risk of radiation exposure is greater in pediatric patients. Other warnings and precautions include a risk of lower levels of blood cells (myelosuppression), underactive thyroid, elevations in blood pressure, renal failure or kidney injury and inflammation of lung tissue (pneumonitis). Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemias, which are cancers of the blood and bone marrow, were observed in patients who received Azedra, and the magnitude of this risk will continue to be studied. Azedra can cause harm to a developing fetus; women should be advised of the potential risk to the fetus and to use effective contraception after receiving Azedra. Radiation exposure associated with Azedra may cause infertility in males and females.

The FDA granted this application Fast TrackBreakthrough Therapy and Priority Review designations. Azedra also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted the approval of Azedra to Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm615155.htm?utm_campaign=07302018_PR_treatment%20for%20rare%20adrenal%20tumors&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Eloqua

Iobenguane I-131.png

Iobenguane (131I); Iobenguane I 131; Iobeguane I 131; 3-Iodobenzylguanidine; 131I-MIBG; Azedra

77679-27-7 CAS NUMBER

PATENT US 4584187

Guanidine, [[3-(iodo-131I)phenyl]methyl]-

  • [[3-(Iodo-131I)phenyl]methyl]guanidine
  • 131I-MIBG
  • Azedra
  • Iobenguane (131I)
  • Iobenguane I 131
  • Ultratrace Iobenguane 131I
  • [131I]-m-Iodobenzylguanidine
  • [131I]-m-Iodobenzylguanidine
  • m-Iodobenzylguanidine-131I
  • m-[131I]Iodobenzylguanidine
Molecular Formula: C8H10IN3
Molecular Weight: 279.095 g/mol
Image result for Iobenguane I 131Image result for Iobenguane I 131
(I 131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine sulfate)
Iobenguane sulfate; M-Iodobenzylguanidine hemisulfate; MIBG; 87862-25-7; 3-Iodobenzylguanidine hemisulfate; 3-Iodobenzyl-guanidine hemisulfate
Molecular Formula: C16H22I2N6O4S
Molecular Weight: 648.259 g/mol

AdreView
(iobenguane I 123) Injection for Intravenous Use

SYN

CN 106187824

DESCRIPTION

AdreView (iobenguane I 123 Injection) is a sterile, pyrogen-free radiopharmaceutical for intravenous injection. Each mL contains 0.08 mg iobenguane sulfate, 74 MBq (2 mCi) of I 123 (as iobenguane sulfate I 123) at calibration date and time on the label, 23 mg sodium dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate, 2.8 mg disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate and 10.3 mg (1% v/v) benzyl alcohol with a pH of 5.0 – 6.5. Iobenguane sulfate I 123 is also known as I 123 meta-iodobenzlyguanidine sulfate and has the following structural formula:

AdreView (iobenguane I 123) Structural Formula Illustration

Physical Characteristics

Iodine 123 is a cyclotron-produced radionuclide that decays to Te 123 by electron capture and has a physical half-life of 13.2 hours.

Iobenguane I-131 is a guanidine analog with specific affinity for tissues of the sympathetic nervous system and related tumors. The radiolabeled forms are used as antineoplastic agents and radioactive imaging agents. (Merck Index, 12th ed) MIBG serves as a neuron-blocking agent which has a strong affinity for, and retention in, the adrenal medulla and also inhibits ADP-ribosyltransferase.

Iobenguane i-131 is a Radioactive Diagnostic Agent. The mechanism of action of iobenguane i-131 is as a Radiopharmaceutical Activity.

Iobenguane I-131 is an I 131 radioiodinated synthetic analogue of the neurotransmitter norepinephrineIobenguane localizes to adrenergic tissue and, in radioiodinated forms, may be used to image or eradicate tumor cells that take up and metabolize norepinephrine.

Iobenguane, also known as metaiodobenzylguanidine or mIBG, or MIBG (tradename Adreview) is a radiopharmaceutical,[1] used in a scintigraphy method called MIBG scan. Iobenguane is a radiolabeled molecule similar to noradrenaline.

The radioisotope of iodine used for the label can be iodine-123 (for imaging purposes only) or iodine-131 (which must be used when tissue destruction is desired, but is sometimes used for imaging also).

Pheochromocytoma seen as dark sphere in center of the body (it is in the left adrenal gland). Image is by MIBG scintigraphy, with radiation from radioiodine in the MIBG. Two images are seen of the same patient from front and back. Note dark image of the thyroid due to unwanted uptake of iodide radioiodine from breakdown of the pharmaceutical, by the thyroid gland in the neck. Uptake at the side of the head are from the salivary glands. Radioactivity is also seen in the bladder, from normal renal excretion of iodide.

It localizes to adrenergic tissue and thus can be used to identify the location of tumors[2] such as pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. With I-131 it can also be used to eradicate tumor cells that take up and metabolize norepinephrine.

Thyroid precautions

Thyroid blockade with (nonradioactive) potassium iodide is indicated for nuclear medicine scintigraphy with iobenguane/mIBG. This competitively inhibits radioiodine uptake, preventing excessive radioiodine levels in the thyroid and minimizing the risk of thyroid ablation ( in the case of I-131). The minimal risk of thyroid carcinogenesis is also reduced as a result.

The FDA-approved dosing of potassium iodide for this purpose are as follows: infants less than 1 month old, 16 mg; children 1 month to 3 years, 32 mg; children 3 years to 18 years, 65 mg; adults 130 mg.[3] However, some sources recommend alternative dosing regimens.[4]

Not all sources are in agreement on the necessary duration of thyroid blockade, although agreement appears to have been reached about the necessity of blockade for both scintigraphic and therapeutic applications of iobenguane. Commercially available iobenguane is labeled with iodine-123, and product labeling recommends administration of potassium iodide 1 hour prior to administration of the radiopharmaceutical for all age groups,[5] while the European Associated of Nuclear Medicine recommends (for iobenguane labeled with either I-131 or I-123,) that potassium iodide administration begin one day prior to radiopharmaceutical administration, and continue until the day following the injection, with the exception of newborns, who do not require potassium iodide doses following radiopharmaceutical injection.[4]

Product labeling for diagnostic iodine-131 iobenguane recommends potassium iodide administration one day before injection and continuing 5 to 7 days following.[6] Iodine-131 iobenguane used for therapeutic purposes requires a different pre-medication duration, beginning 24–48 hours prior to iobenguane injection and continuing 10–15 days following injection.[7]

Alternative imaging modality for pheochromocytoma

The FDOPA PET/CT scan has proven to be nearly 100% sensitive for detection of pheochromocytomas, vs. 90% for MIBG scans.[8][9][10] Centers which offer FDOPA PET/CT, however, are rare.

Clinical trials

Iobenguane I 131 for cancers

Iobenguane I 131 (as Azedra) has had a clinical trial as a treatment for malignant, recurrent or unresectable pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, and the US FDA has granted it a Priority Review.[11]

PATENTS
Patent ID

Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US7658910 PREPARATION OF RADIOLABELLED HALOAROMATICS VIA POLYMER-BOUND INTERMEDIATES
2008-04-10
2010-02-09
US2008241063 Combination set of Meta-Iodobenzyl guanidine freezing crystal and making method thereof and method for making a radioactive iodine marker
2007-03-29
2008-10-02
US7273601 Preparation of radiolabelled haloaromatics via polymer-bound intermediates
2003-01-16
2007-09-25
US6461585 Preparation of radiolabelled haloaromatics via polymer-bound intermediates
2002-10-08
US2010274052 PREPARATION OF RADIOLABELLED HALOAROMATICS VIA POLYMER-BOUND INTERMEDIATES
2010-10-28
/////////////// Azedra, iobenguane I 131, fda 2018, Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Fast TrackBreakthrough Therapy,  Priority Review, orphan drug, Iobenguane (131I), Iobenguane I 131, Iobeguane I 131, 3-Iodobenzylguanidine, 131I-MIBG, Azedra
C1=CC(=CC(=C1)I)CN=C(N)N
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DR ANTHONY CRASTO

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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