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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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Biafungin, CD 101, a Novel Echinocandin for Vulvovaginal candidiasis


STR1

str1

str1as  CH3COOH salt

UNII-W1U1TMN677.png

CD 101

Several structural representations above

Biafungin™; CD 101 IV; CD 101 Topical; CD101; SP 3025, Biafungin acetate, Echinocandin B

UNII-G013B5478J FRE FORM,

CAS 1396640-59-7 FREE FORM

MF, C63-H85-N8-O17, MW, 1226.4035

Echinocandin B,

1-((4R,5R)-4-hydroxy-N2-((4”-(pentyloxy)(1,1′:4′,1”-terphenyl)-4-yl)carbonyl)-5-(2-(trimethylammonio)ethoxy)-L-ornithine)-4-((4S)-4-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-L-allothreonine)-

Treat and prevent invasive fungal infections; Treat and prevent systemic Candida infections; Treat candidemia

2D chemical structure of 1631754-41-0

Biafungin acetate

CAS 1631754-41-0 ACETATE, Molecular Formula, C63-H85-N8-O17.C2-H3-O2, Molecular Weight, 1285.4472,

C63 H85 N8 O17 . C2 H3 O2
1-[(4R,5R)-4-hydroxy-N2-[[4”-(pentyloxy)[1,1′:4′,1”-terphenyl]-4-yl]carbonyl]-5-[2-(trimethylammonio)ethoxy]-L-ornithine]-4-[(4S)-4-hydroxy-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-L-allothreonine]-, acetate (1:1)

UNII: W1U1TMN677

CD101 – A novel echinocandin antifungal C. albicans (n=351) MIC90 = 0.06 µg/mL C. glabrata (n=200) MIC90 = 0.06 µg/mL  Echinocandins have potent fungicidal activity against Candida species

  • Originator Seachaid Pharmaceuticals
  • Developer Cidara Therapeutics
  • Class Antifungals; Echinocandins; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Glucan synthase inhibitors

 

BIAFUNGIN, CD 101

Watch this space as I add more info…………….

U.S. – Fast Track (Treat candidemia);
U.S. – Fast Track (Treat and prevent invasive fungal infections);
U.S. – Orphan Drug (Treat and prevent invasive fungal infections);
U.S. – Orphan Drug (Treat candidemia);
U.S. – Qualified Infectious Disease Program (Treat candidemia);
U.S. – Qualified Infectious Disease Program (Treat and prevent invasive fungal infections)

Fungal infections have emerged as major causes of human disease, especially among the immunocompromised patients and those hospitalized with serious underlying disease. As a consequence, the frequency of use of systemic antifungal agents has increased significantly and there is a growing concern about a shortage of effective antifungal agents. Although resistance rates to the clinically available antifungal agents remains low, reports of breakthrough infections and the increasing prevalence of uncommon fungal species that display elevated MIC values for existing agents is worrisome. Biafungin (CD101, previously SP 3025) is a novel echinocandin that displays chemical stability and long-acting pharmacokinetics that is being developed for once-weekly or other intermittent administration (see posters #A-693 and A- 694 for further information). In this study, we test biafungin and comparator agents against a collection of common Candida and Aspergillus species, including isolates resistant to azoles and echinocandins.

The echinocandins are an important class of antifungal agents, but are administered once daily by intravenous (IV) infusion. An echinocandin that could be administered once weekly could facilitate earlier hospital discharges and could expand usage to indications where daily infusions are impractical. Biafungin is a highly stable echinocandin for once-weekly IV administration. The compound was found to have a spectrum of activity and potency comparable to other echinocandins. In chimpanzees single dose pharmacokinetics of IV and orally administered biafungin were compared to IV anidulafungin, which has the longest half-life (T1/2 ) of the approved echinocandins.

Background  Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a highly prevalent mucosal infection  VVC is caused by Candida albicans (~85%) and non-albicans (~15%)  5-8% of women have recurrent VVC (RVVC) which is associated with a negative impact on work/social life  Oral fluconazole prescribed despite relapse, potential DDIs and increased risk to pregnant women  No FDA-approved therapy for RVVC and no novel agent in >20 years

str1

Cidara Therapeutics 6310 Nancy Ridge Drive, Suite 101 San Diego, CA 92121

The incidence of invasive fungal infections, especially those due to Aspergillus spp. and Candida spp., continues to increase. Despite advances in medical practice, the associated mortality from these infections continues to be substantial. The echinocandin antifungals provide clinicians with another treatment option for serious fungal infections. These agents possess a completely novel mechanism of action, are relatively well-tolerated, and have a low potential for serious drug–drug interactions. At the present time, the echinocandins are an option for the treatment of infections due Candida spp (such as esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, and candidemia). In addition, caspofungin is a viable option for the treatment of refractory aspergillosis. Although micafungin is not Food and Drug Administration-approved for this indication, recent data suggests that it may also be effective. Finally, caspofungin- or micafungin-containing combination therapy should be a consideration for the treatment of severe infections due to Aspergillus spp. Although the echinocandins share many common properties, data regarding their differences are emerging at a rapid pace. Anidulafungin exhibits a unique pharmacokinetic profile, and limited cases have shown a potential far activity in isolates with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to caspofungin and micafungin. Caspofungin appears to have a slightly higher incidence of side effects and potential for drug–drug interactions. This, combined with some evidence of decreasing susceptibility among some strains ofCandida, may lessen its future utility. However, one must take these findings in the context of substantially more data and use with caspofungin compared with the other agents. Micafungin appears to be very similar to caspofungin, with very few obvious differences between the two agents.

Echinocandins are a new class of antifungal drugs[1] that inhibit the synthesis of glucan in the cell wall, via noncompetitive inhibition of the enzyme 1,3-β glucan synthase[2][3] and are thus called “penicillin of antifungals”[4] (a property shared with papulacandins) as penicillin has a similar mechanism against bacteria but not fungi. Beta glucans are carbohydrate polymers that are cross-linked with other fungal cell wall components (The bacterial equivalent is peptidoglycan). Caspofungin, micafungin, and anidulafungin are semisynthetic echinocandin derivatives with clinical use due to their solubility, antifungal spectrum, and pharmacokinetic properties.[5]

List of echinocandins:[17]

  • Pneumocandins (cyclic hexapeptides linked to a long-chain fatty acid)
  • Echinocandin B not clinically used, risk of hemolysis
  • Cilofungin withdrawn from trials due to solvent toxicity
  • Caspofungin (trade name Cancidas, by Merck)
  • Micafungin (FK463) (trade name Mycamine, by Astellas Pharma.)
  • Anidulafungin (VER-002, V-echinocandin, LY303366) (trade name Eraxis, by Pfizer)

History

Discovery of echinocandins stemmed from studies on papulacandins isolated from a strain of Papularia sphaerosperma (Pers.), which were liposaccharide – i.e., fatty acid derivatives of a disaccharide that also blocked the same target, 1,3-β glucan synthase – and had action only on Candida spp. (narrow spectrum). Screening of natural products of fungal fermentation in the 1970s led to the discovery of echinocandins, a new group of antifungals with broad-range activity against Candida spp. One of the first echinocandins of the pneumocandin type, discovered in 1974, echinocandin B, could not be used clinically due to risk of high degree of hemolysis. Screening semisynthetic analogs of the echinocandins gave rise to cilofungin, the first echinofungin analog to enter clinical trials, in 1980, which, it is presumed, was later withdrawn for a toxicity due to the solvent system needed for systemic administration. The semisynthetic pneumocandin analogs of echinocandins were later found to have the same kind of antifungal activity, but low toxicity. The first approved of these newer echinocandins was caspofungin, and later micafungin and anidulafungin were also approved. All these preparations so far have low oral bioavailability, so must be given intravenously only. Echinocandins have now become one of the first-line treatments for Candida before the species are identified, and even as antifungal prophylaxis in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

CIDARA THERAPEUTICS DOSES FIRST PATIENT IN PHASE 2 TRIAL OF CD101 TOPICAL TO TREAT VULVOVAGINAL CANDIDIASIS

SAN DIEGO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Jun. 9, 2016– Cidara Therapeutics, Inc. (Nasdaq:CDTX), a biotechnology company developing novel anti-infectives and immunotherapies to treat fungal and other infections, today announced that the first patient has been dosed in RADIANT, a Phase 2 clinical trial comparing the safety and tolerability of the novel echinocandin, CD101, to standard-of-care fluconazole for the treatment of acute vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). RADIANT will evaluate two topical formulations of CD101, which is Cidara’s lead antifungal drug candidate.

“There have been no novel VVC therapies introduced for more than two decades, so advancing CD101 topical into Phase 2 is a critical step for women with VVC and for Cidara,” said Jeffrey Stein, Ph.D., president and chief executive officer of Cidara. “Because of their excellent safety record and potency against Candida, echinocandin antifungals are recommended as first line therapy to fight systemic Candida infections. CD101 topical will be the first echinocandin tested clinically in VVC and we expect to demonstrate safe and improved eradication of Candida with rapid symptom relief for women seeking a better option over the existing azole class of antifungals.”

RADIANT is a Phase 2, multicenter, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, dose-ranging trial designed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of CD101 in women with moderate to severe episodes of VVC. The study will enroll up to 125 patients who will be randomized into three treatment cohorts. The first cohort will involve the treatment of 50 patients with CD101 Ointment while a second cohort of 50 patients will receive CD101 Gel. The third cohort will include 25 patients who will be treated with oral fluconazole.

The primary endpoints of RADIANT will be the safety and tolerability of a single dose of CD101 Ointment and multiple doses of CD101 Gel in patients with acute VVC. Secondary endpoints include therapeutic efficacy in acute VVC patients treated with CD101. Treatment evaluations and assessments will occur on trial days 7, 14 and 28.

The RADIANT trial will be conducted at clinical trial centers across the United States. More information about the trial is available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT02733432.

About VVC and RVVC

Seventy-five percent of women worldwide suffer from VVC in their lifetime, and four to five million women in the United Statesalone have the recurrent form of the infection, which is caused by Candida. Many women will experience recurrence after the completion of treatment with existing therapies. Most VVC occurs in women of childbearing potential (the infection is common in pregnant women), but it affects women of all ages. In a recent safety communication, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration(FDA) advised caution in the prescribing of oral fluconazole for yeast infections during pregnancy based on a published study concluding there is an increased risk of miscarriage. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines recommend using only topical antifungal products to treat pregnant women with vulvovaginal yeast infections. Vaginal infections are associated with a substantial negative impact on day-to-day functioning and adverse pregnancy outcomes including preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased infant mortality in addition to predisposition to HIV/AIDS. According to the CDC, certain species of Candida are becoming increasingly resistant to existing antifungal medications. This emerging resistance intensifies the need for new antifungal agents.

About CD101 Topical

CD101 topical is the first topical agent in the echinocandin class of antifungals and exhibits a broad spectrum of fungicidal activity against Candida species. In May 2016, the FDA granted Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) and Fast Track Designation to CD101 topical for the treatment of VVC and the prevention of RVVC.

About Cidara Therapeutics

Cidara is a clinical-stage biotechnology company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of novel anti-infectives for the treatment of diseases that are inadequately addressed by current standard-of-care therapies. Cidara’s initial product portfolio comprises two formulations of the company’s novel echinocandin, CD101. CD101 IV is being developed as a once-weekly, high-exposure therapy for the treatment and prevention of serious, invasive fungal infections. CD101 topical is being developed for the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and the prevention of recurrent VVC (RVVC), a prevalent mucosal infection. In addition, Cidara has developed a proprietary immunotherapy platform, Cloudbreak™, designed to create compounds that direct a patient’s immune cells to attack and eliminate pathogens that cause infectious disease. Cidara is headquartered inSan Diego, California. For more information, please visit www.cidara.com.

REF http://ir.cidara.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=253962&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=2176474

CLIP

Cidara Therapeutics raises $42 million to develop once-weekly anti-fungal therapy

Cidara Therapeutics (formerly K2 Therapeutics) grabbed $42 million in a private Series B funding round Wednesday to continue developing its once-weekly anti-fungal therapy. Just in June 2014, the company completed a $32 million Series A financing led by 5AM Ventures, Aisling Capital, Frazier Healthcare and InterWest Partners, which was the fourth largest A round in 2014 for innovative startups[1]. FierceBiotech named the company as one of 2014 Fierce 15 biotech startups.

Cidara has an impressive executive team. The company was co-founded by Kevin Forrest, former CEO of Achaogen (NASDAQ: AKAO), and Shaw Warren. Jeffrey Stein, former CEO of Trius Therapeutics (NASDAQ: TSRX) and Dirk Thye, former president of Cerexa, have joined Cidara as CEO and CMO, respectively. Trius successfully developed antibiotic tedizolid and was acquired in 2013 by Cubist Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: CBST) for $818 million.

Cidara’s lead candidate, biafungin (SP3025), was acquired from Seachaid Pharmaceuticals for $6 million. Biafungin’s half-life is much longer than that of similar drugs known as echinocandins (e.g., caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin), which may allow it to be developed as a once-weekly therapy, instead of once daily. The company is also developing a topical formulation of biafungin, namely topifungin. Cidara intends to file an IND and initiate a Phase I clinical trial in the second half of 2015.

Merck’s Cancidas (caspofungin), launched in 2001, was the first of approved enchinocandins. The drug generated annual sales of $596 million in 2008. The approved echinocandins must be administered daily by intravenous infusion. Biafungin with improved pharmacokinetic characteristics has the potential to bring in hundreds of millions of dollars per year.

[1] Nat Biotechnol. 2015, 33(1), 18.

CLIP

Biafungin is a potent and broad-spectrum antifungal agent with excellent activity against wild-type and troublesome azole- and echinocandin-resistant strains of Candida spp. The activity of biafungin is comparable to anidulafungin. • Biafungin was active against both wild-type and itraconazole-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp. from four different species. • In vitro susceptibility testing of biafungin against isolates of Candida and Aspergillus may be accomplished by either CLSI or EUCAST broth microdilution methods each providing comparable results. • The use of long-acting intravenous antifungal agents that could safely be given once a week to select patients is desirable and might decrease costs with long-term hospitalizations. Background: A novel echinocandin, biafungin, displaying long-acting pharmacokinetics and chemical stability is being developed for once-weekly administration. The activities of biafungin and comparator agents were tested against 173 fungal isolates of the most clinically common species. Methods: 106 CAN and 67 ASP were tested using CLSI and EUCAST reference broth microdilution methods against biafungin (50% inhibition) and comparators. Isolates included 27 echinocandin-resistant CAN (4 species) with identified fks hotspot (HS) mutations and 20 azole nonsusceptible ASP (4 species). Results: Against C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis, the activity of biafungin (MIC50, 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 μg/ml, respectively by CLSI method) was comparable to anidulafungin (AND; MIC50, 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 μg/ml, respectively) and caspofungin (CSP; MIC50, 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 μg/ml, respectively; Table). C. krusei strains were very susceptible to biafungin, showing MIC90 values of 0.06 μg/ml by both methods. Biafungin (MIC50/90, 1/2 μg/ml) was comparable to AND and less potent than CSP against C. parapsilosis using CLSI methodology. CLSI and EUCAST methods displayed similar results for most species, but biafungin (MIC50, 0.06 μg/ml) was eight-fold more active than CSP (MIC50, 0.5 μg/ml) against C. glabrata using the EUCAST method. Overall, biafungin was two- to four-fold more active against fks HS mutants than CSP and results were comparable to AND. Biafungin was active against A. fumigatus (MEC50/90, ≤0.008/0.015 μg/ml), A. terreus (MEC50/90, 0.015/0.015 μg/ml), A. niger (MEC50/90, ≤0.008/0.03 μg/ml) and A. flavus (MEC50/90, ≤0.008/≤0.008 μg/ml) using CLSI method. EUCAST results for ASP were also low for all echinocandins and comparable to CLSI results. Conclusions: Biafungin displayed comparable in vitro activity with other echinocandins against common wild-type CAN and ASP and resistant subsets that in combination with the long-acting profile warrants further development of this compound. 1. Arendrup MC, Cuenca-Estrella M, Lass-Florl C, Hope WW (2013). Breakpoints for antifungal agents: An update from EUCAST focussing on echinocandins against Candida spp. and triazoles against Aspergillus spp. Drug Resist Updat 16: 81-95. 2. Castanheira M, Woosley LN, Messer SA, Diekema DJ, Jones RN, Pfaller MA (2014). Frequency of fks mutations among Candida glabrata isolates from a 10-year global collection of bloodstream infection isolates. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 58: 577-580. 3. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (2008). M27-A3. Reference Method for Broth Dilution Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Yeasts: third edition. Wayne, PA: CLSI. 4. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (2008). M38-A2. Reference Method for Broth Dilution Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Filamentous Fungi: Second Edition. Wayne, PA: CLSI. 5. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (2012). M27-S4. Reference Method for Broth Dilution Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Yeasts: 4th Informational Supplement. Wayne, PA: CLSI. 6. European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (2014). Breakpoint tables for interpretation of MICs and zone diameters. Version 4.0, January 2014. Available at: http://www.eucast.org/clinical_breakpoints/. Accessed January 1, 2014. 7. Pfaller MA, Diekema DJ (2010). Epidemiology of invasive mycoses in North America. Crit Rev Microbiol 36: 1-53. 8. Pfaller MA, Diekema DJ, Andes D, Arendrup MC, Brown SD, Lockhart SR, Motyl M, Perlin DS (2011). Clinical breakpoints for the echinocandins and Candida revisited: Integration of molecular, clinical, and microbiological data to arrive at species-specific interpretive criteria. Drug Resist Updat 14: 164-176. ABSTRACT Activity of a Novel Echinocandin Biafungin (CD101) Tested against Most Common Candida and Aspergillus Species, Including Echinocandin- and Azole-resistant Strains M CASTANHEIRA, SA MESSER, PR RHOMBERG, RN JONES, MA PFALLER JMI Laboratories, North Liberty, Iowa, USA C

PATENT

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2015035102A2?cl=en

BIAFUNGIN ACETATE IS USED AS STARTING MATERIAL

Example 30b: Synthesis of Compound 31

Step a. Nitration of Biafungin Acetate

To a stirring solution of biafungin (1 00 mg, 0.078 mmol) in glacial acetic acid(1 .5 ml_) was added sodium nitrite (1 1 mg, 0.159 mmol) and the reaction was stirred at ambient temperature for 20 hours. The mixture was applied directly to reversed phase H PLC (Isco CombiFlash Rf; 50g RediSep C1 8 column, 5 to 95% acetonitrile in Dl water containing 0.1 % formic acid: 15 minute gradient). The pure fractions were pooled and lyophilized to yield 85 mg of the desired product as a light yellow solid, formate salt. 1 H-NMR (300 M Hz, Methanol-d4) δ 8.58 (d, 1 H, J = 1 1 .7 Hz), 8.47 (t, 2H, J = 8.7Hz), 8.05 (d, 1 H, J = 2.1 Hz), 7.99 (d, 2H, J = 9.3 Hz), 7.82 (d, 2H, J = 8.7 Hz), 7.79-7.60 (m, 12H), 7.1 7 (d, 1 H, J = 8.7 Hz), 7.03 (d, 2H, J = 9 Hz), 5.48 (d, 1 H, J = 6 Hz), 5.08 (dd, 1 H, J = 1 .2, 5.7 Hz), 4.95-4.73 (m, 5H), 4.68-4.56 (m, 2H), 4.53 (d, 1 H, J = 5.7 Hz), 4.48-4.39 (m, 2H), 4.31 -3.79 (m, 6H), 4.04 (t, 2H, J = 5.7 Hz), 3.72-3.44 (m,3H), 3.1 8 (s, 9H), 2.60-1 .99 (m, 5H), 1 .83 (m, 2H, J = 8.7 Hz), 1 .56-1 .35 (m, 5H), 1 .28 (d, 6H, J = 4.2 Hz), 1 .09 (d, 3H, J = 1 0.2 Hz), 0.99 (t, 3H, J = 8.7 Hz) ; LC/MS, [M/2+H]+: 635.79, 635.80 calculated.

Step b. Reduction of Nitro-Biafungin To Amino-Biafungin

To a stirring solution of Nitro-Biafungin (1 00 mg, 0.075 mmol) in glacial acetic acid(1 .5 ml_) was added zinc powder (50 mg, 0.77 mmol) and the reaction was stirred at ambient temperature for 1 hour. The mixture was filtered and applied directly to reversed phase HPLC (Isco CombiFlash Rf, 50g Redisep C18 column; 5 to 95% acetonitrile in Dl water containing 0.1 % formic acid: 15 minute gradient). The pure fractions were pooled and lyophilized to yield 55 mg of the desired product as a white solid, formate salt. 1 H-NMR (300 MHz, Methanol-d4) 5 8.47 (bs, 1 H), 7.99 (d, 2H, J = 1 0.8Hz), 7.82 (d, 2H, J = 7.5 Hz), 7.80-7.67 (m, 6H), 7.62 (d, 2H, J = 8.7 Hz), 7.03 (d, 2H, J = 7.5 Hz), 6.77 (d, 1 H, J = 1 .9 Hz), 6.68 (d, 1 H, J = 8.2 Hz), 6.55 (dd, 2H, J = 8.2, 1 .9 Hz), 5.43 (d, 1 H, J = 2.5 Hz), 5.05 (d, 1 H, J = 3 Hz), 4.83-4.73 (m, 2H), 4.64- 4.56 (m, 2H), 4.43-4.34 (m, 2H), 4.31 -4.15 (m, 4H), 4.03-4.08 (m, 1 H), 4.1 1 -3.89 (m, 8H), 3.83 (d, 1 H, J = 1 0.8 Hz), 3.68-3.47 (m, 3H), 3.1 7 (s, 9H), 2.57-2.42 (m, 2H), 2.35-2.27 (m, 1 H), 2.14-1 .98 (m, 2H), 1 .83 (m, 2H, J = 6 Hz), 1 .56-1 .38 (m, 4H), 1 .28 (dd, 6H, J = 6.5, 2 Hz), 1 .09 (d, 3H, J = 7 Hz), 0.986 (t, 3H, J = 7 Hz); High Res LC/MS: [M+H]+ 1241 .61 63; 1241 .6136 calculated.

Step c. Reaction of Amino-Biafungin with lnt-2 to Produce Compound 31

To a stirring solution of Amino-Biafungin (50 mg, 0.04 mmol) in DM F (1 ml_) was added formyl-Met-Leu-Phe- -Ala-OSu (lnt-2) (36 mg, 0.06 mmol) and DI PEA (7 uL, 0.04 mmol). The reaction was stirred at ambient temperature for 1 8 hours. The mixture was applied directly to reversed phase HPLC (Isco CombiFlash Rf; 50g Redisep C1 8 column; 5 to 95% acetonitrile in Dl water containing 0.1 % formic acid: 15 minute gradient). The pure fractions were pooled and lyophilized to yield 26 mg of a white solid as a formate salt. 1 H-NMR (300 M Hz, Methanol-d4) 5 8.55 (bs, 1 H), 8.44 (t, 1 H, J = 10 Hz), 8.1 8 (d, 1 H, J = 6 Hz), 8.1 1 (s, 1 H), 7.99 (d, 2H, J = 1 0 Hz), 7.84-7.70 (m, 6H), 7.63 (d, 2H, J = 7.8 Hz), 7.32-7.1 9 (m, 6H), 7.03 (d, 4H, J = 9 Hz), 6.87 (d, 1 H, J = 8.1 Hz), 5.44 (d, 1 H, J = 1 0.5 Hz), 5.05 (d, 1 H, J = 4.5 Hz), 4.83-4.74 (m, 2H), 4.66-4.50 (m, 6H), 4.45-4.29 (m, 10H), 4.1 9-3.82 (m, 1 0H), 3.67-3.57 (m, 6H), 3.1 7 (s, 9H), 2.64-2.46 (m, 6 H), 2.14-1 .92 (m, 6H), 1 .84 (m, 4H, J = 6 Hz), 1 .62-1 .40 (m, 8H), 1 .32-1 .22 (m, 6H), 1 .09 (d, 3H, J = 9 Hz), 0.99 (t, 3H, J = 7.5 Hz), 0.88 (m, 6H, J = 6.8 Hz) ; High Res LC/MS, [M/2+H]+ 865.4143, 865.4147 calculated.

REFERENCES

  1. Denning, DW (June 2002). “Echinocandins: a new class of antifungal.”. The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy 49 (6): 889–91. doi:10.1093/jac/dkf045. PMID 12039879.
  2.  Morris MI, Villmann M (September 2006). “Echinocandins in the management of invasive fungal infections, part 1”. Am J Health Syst Pharm 63 (18): 1693–703.doi:10.2146/ajhp050464.p1. PMID 16960253.
  3. Morris MI, Villmann M (October 2006). “Echinocandins in the management of invasive fungal infections, Part 2”. Am J Health Syst Pharm 63 (19): 1813–20.doi:10.2146/ajhp050464.p2. PMID 16990627.
  4. ^ Jump up to:a b “Pharmacotherapy Update – New Antifungal Agents: Additions to the Existing Armamentarium (Part 1)”.
  5.  Debono, M; Gordee, RS (1994). “Antibiotics that inhibit fungal cell wall development”.Annu Rev Microbiol 48: 471–497. doi:10.1146/annurev.mi.48.100194.002351.

17 Eschenauer, G; Depestel, DD; Carver, PL (March 2007). “Comparison of echinocandin antifungals.”. Therapeutics and clinical risk management 3 (1): 71–97. PMC 1936290.PMID 18360617.

///////////Biafungin™,  CD 101 IV,  CD 101 Topical,  CD101,  SP 3025, PHASE 2, CIDARA, Orphan Drug, Fast Track Designation, Seachaid Pharmaceuticals,  Qualified Infectious Disease Product, QIDP, UNII-G013B5478J, 1396640-59-7, 1631754-41-0, Vulvovaginal candidiasis, Echinocandin B, FUNGIN

FREE FORM

CCCCCOc1ccc(cc1)c2ccc(cc2)c3ccc(cc3)C(=O)N[C@H]4C[C@@H](O)[C@H](NC(=O)[C@@H]5[C@@H](O)[C@@H](C)CN5C(=O)[C@@H](NC(=O)C(NC(=O)[C@@H]6C[C@@H](O)CN6C(=O)C(NC4=O)[C@@H](C)O)[C@H](O)[C@@H](O)c7ccc(O)cc7)[C@@H](C)O)OCC[N+](C)(C)C

AND OF ACETATE

CCCCCOc1ccc(cc1)c2ccc(cc2)c3ccc(cc3)C(=O)N[C@H]4C[C@@H](O)[C@H](NC(=O)[C@@H]5[C@@H](O)[C@@H](C)CN5C(=O)[C@@H](NC(=O)C(NC(=O)[C@@H]6C[C@@H](O)CN6C(=O)[C@@H](NC4=O)[C@@H](C)O)[C@H](O)[C@@H](O)c7ccc(O)cc7)[C@@H](C)O)OCC[N+](C)(C)C.CC(=O)[O-]

Three antifungal drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, caspofungin, anidulafungin, and micafungin, are known to inhibit β-1 ,3-glucan synthase which have the structures shown below.

caspofungin

Anidulafungin

Other exemplary p-1 ,3-glucan synthase inhibitors include,

echinocandin B

cilofungin

pneumocandin A0

pneumocandin B0

L-705589

L-733560

A-174591

or a salt thereof,

Biafungin


or a salt thereof,

Amino-biafungin


or a salt thereof,

Amino-AF-053

ASP9726

Yet other exemplary p-1 ,3-glucan synthase inhibitors include, without limitation:

Papulacandin B

Ergokonin

//////////////

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Oliceridine


TRV130.svg

Oliceridine.png

Oliceridine

N-[(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]-2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethan-1-amine

[(3-Methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9- yl]ethyl})amine

Phase III

A mu-opioid receptor ligand potentially for treatment of acute postoperative pain.

TRV-130; TRV-130A

CAS No.1401028-24-7

Molecular Formula: C22H30N2O2S
Molecular Weight: 386.5508 g/mol
  • Originator Trevena

Trevena, Inc.

  • Class Analgesics; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Beta arrestin inhibitors; Opioid mu receptor agonists
  • Orphan Drug Status No
  • On Fast track Postoperative pain
    • Phase III Postoperative pain
    • Phase II Pain

    Most Recent Events

    • 09 Mar 2016Trevena intends to submit NDA to US FDA in 2017
    • 22 Feb 2016Oliceridine receives Breakthrough Therapy status for Pain in USA
    • 19 Jan 2016Phase-III clinical trials in Postoperative pain in USA (IV) (NCT02656875)

Oliceridine (TRV130) is an opioid drug that is under evaluation in human clinical trials for the treatment of acute severe pain. It is afunctionally selective μ-opioid receptor agonist developed by Trevena Inc. Oliceridine elicits robust G protein signaling, with potencyand efficacy similar to morphine, but with far less β-arrestin 2 recruitment and receptor internalization, it displays less adverse effectsthan morphine.[1][2][3]

In 2015, the product was granted fast track designation in the U.S. for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain. In 2016, the compound was granted FDA breakthrough therapy designation for the management of moderate to severe acute pain.

Oliceridine (TRV130) is an intravenous G protein biased ligand that targets the mu opioid receptor. Trevena is developing TRV130 for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain where intravenous therapy is preferred, with a clinical development focus in acute postoperative pain

TRV 130 HCl is a novel μ-opioid receptor (MOR) G protein-biased ligand; elicits robust G protein signaling(pEC50=8.1), with potency and efficacy similar to morphine, but with far less beta-arrestin recruitment and receptor internalization.

NMR

STR1

Oliceridine (TRV130) – Mu Opioid Biased Ligand for Acute Pain

Target Indication Lead
Optimization
Preclinical
Development
Phase
1
Phase
2
Phase
3
Ownership
Oliceridine (TRV130) Mu-receptor Moderate to
Severe Pain
intravenous Trevena Logo

Oliceridine (TRV130) is an intravenous G protein biased ligand that targets the mu opioid receptor. Trevena is developing TRV130 for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain where intravenous therapy is preferred, with a clinical development focus in acute postoperative pain.

Recent TRV130 News

Opioid receptors (ORs) mediate the actions of morphine and morphine-like opioids, including most clinical analgesics. Three molecularly and pharmacologically distinct opioid receptor types have been described: δ, κ and μ. Furthermore, each type is believed to have sub-types. All three of these opioid receptor types appear to share the same functional mechanisms at a cellular level. For example, activation of the opioid receptors causes inhibition of adenylate cyclase, and recruits β-arrestin.

When therapeutic doses of morphine are given to patients with pain, the patients report that the pain is less intense, less discomforting, or entirely gone. In addition to experiencing relief of distress, some patients experience euphoria. However, when morphine in a selected pain-relieving dose is given to a pain-free individual, the experience is not always pleasant; nausea is common, and vomiting may also occur. Drowsiness, inability to concentrate, difficulty in mentation, apathy, lessened physical activity, reduced visual acuity, and lethargy may ensue.

There is a continuing need for new OR modulators to be used as analgesics. There is a further need for OR agonists as analgesics having reduced side effects. There is a further need for OR agonists as analgesics having reduced side effects for the treatment of pain, immune dysfunction, inflammation, esophageal reflux, neurological and psychiatric conditions, urological and reproductive conditions, medicaments for drug and alcohol abuse, agents for treating gastritis and diarrhea, cardiovascular agents and/or agents for the treatment of respiratory diseases and cough.

 PAPER

Structure activity relationships and discovery of a g protein biased mu opioid receptor ligand, ((3-Methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl)a2((9R)-9-(pyridin-2-y1)-6-oxaspiro-(4.5)clecan-9-yl)ethylpamine (TRV130), for the treatment of acute severe pain
J Med Chem 2013, 56(20): 8019

Structure–Activity Relationships and Discovery of a G Protein Biased μ Opioid Receptor Ligand, [(3-Methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro-[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine (TRV130), for the Treatment of Acute Severe Pain

Trevena, Inc., 1018 West 8th Avenue, Suite A, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406, United States
J. Med. Chem., 2013, 56 (20), pp 8019–8031
DOI: 10.1021/jm4010829
Publication Date (Web): September 24, 2013
Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society
*Phone: 610-354-8840. Fax: 610-354-8850. E-mail: dchen@trevenainc.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

The concept of “ligand bias” at G protein coupled receptors has been introduced to describe ligands which preferentially stimulate one intracellular signaling pathway over another. There is growing interest in developing biased G protein coupled receptor ligands to yield safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs. The classical μ opioid morphine elicited increased efficacy and duration of analgesic response with reduced side effects in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, suggesting that G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonists would be more efficacious with reduced adverse events. Here we describe our efforts to identify a potent, selective, and G protein biased μ opioid receptor agonist, TRV130 ((R)-30). This novel molecule demonstrated an improved therapeutic index (analgesia vs adverse effects) in rodent models and characteristics appropriate for clinical development. It is currently being evaluated in human clinical trials for the treatment of acute severe pain.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm4010829

[(3-Methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl] ethyl})amine ((R)-30)

Using a procedure described in method A, (R)-39e was converted to (R)-30 as a TFA salt. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 11.70 (brs, 1H), 9.14 (d, J = 66.6, 2H), 8.72 (d, J = 4.3, 1H), 8.19 (td,J = 8.0, 1.4, 1H), 7.70 (d, J = 8.1, 1H), 7.63 (dd, J = 7.0, 5.8, 1H), 7.22 (d, J = 5.5, 1H), 6.78 (d,J = 5.6, 1H), 4.08 (m, 2H), 3.80 (m, 4H), 3.69 (dd, J = 11.2, 8.7, 1H), 2.99 (d, J = 4.8, 1H), 2.51 (t, J = 9.9, 1H), 2.35 (m, 3H), 2.18 (td, J = 13.5, 5.4, 1H), 1.99 (d, J = 14.2, 1H), 1.82 (m, 2H), 1.65 (m, 1H), 1.47 (m, 4H), 1.14 (m, 1H), 0.73 (dt, J = 13.2, 8.9, 1H). LC-MS (API-ES) m/z = 387.0 (M + H).

Patent

WO 2012129495

http://www.google.com/patents/WO2012129495A1?cl=en

Scheme 1: Synthesis of Spirocyclic Nitrile

NCCH2C02CH3 AcOH, NH4OAc

Figure imgf000050_0001
Figure imgf000050_0002

1-5 1-6 1-7

Chiral HPLC separation n=1-2

R= phenyl, substituted phenyl, aryl,

Figure imgf000050_0003

s

Scheme 2: Converting the nitrile to the opioid receptor ligand (Approach 1)

Figure imgf000051_0001

2-4

Scheme 3: Converting the nitrile to the opioid receptor ligand (Approach 2)

Figure imgf000051_0002

1-8B 3-1 3-2 n=1-2

In some embodiments, the same scheme is applied to 1 -7 and 1 -8A. Scheme 4: Synthesis of Non-Spirocyclic Nitrile

Figure imgf000052_0001

4-1 4-2 4-3

KOH, ethylene glycol R= phenyl, substituted phenyl, aryl,

substituted aryl, pyridyl, substituted pyridyl, heat heteroaryl, substituted heteroaryl,

Figure imgf000052_0002

carbocycle, heterocycle and etc.

In some embodiments, 4-1 is selected from the group consisting of

Figure imgf000052_0003

4-1 A 4-1 B 4-1 C 4-1 D 4-1 E

Scheme 5: Synthesis of Other Spirocyclic Derived Opioid Ligands

Figure imgf000053_0001

5-1 5-2 5-3

Scheme 6: Allyltrimethylsilane Approach to Access the Quaternary Carbon Center

RMgX, or RLi

Figure imgf000053_0002

Scheme 7: N-linked Pyrrazole Opioid Receptor Ligand

Figure imgf000054_0001
Figure imgf000055_0001

[(3-Methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9- yl]ethyl})amine

Figure imgf000144_0001

Into a vial were added 2-[(9R)-9-(Pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethan-l -amine (500 mg, 1.92 mmole), 18 mL CH2C12 and sodium sulfate (1.3 g, 9.6 mmole). The 3- methoxythiophene-2-carboxaldehyde (354 mg, 2.4 mmole) was then added, and the misture was stirred overnight. NaBH4 (94 mg, 2.4 mmole) was added to the reaction mixture, stirred for 10 minutes, and then MeOH (6.0 mL) was added, stirred l h, and finally quenched with water. The organics were separated off and evaporated. The crude residue was purified by a Gilson prep HPLC. The desired fractions collected and concentrated and lyophilized. After lyophilization, residue was partitioned between CH2C12 and 2N NaOH, and the organic layers were collected. After solvent was concentrated to half of the volume, 1.0 eq of IN HC1 in Et20 was added,and majority of solvent evaporated under reduced pressure. The solid obtained was washed several times with Et20 and dried to provide [(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2- yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine monohydrochloride (336 mg, 41% yield, m/z 387.0 [M + H]+ observed) as a white solid. The NMR for Compound 140 is described herein.

Example 15: Synthesis of [(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9- (pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine (Compound 140).

Methyl 2-cyano-2-[6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-ylidene]acetate (mixture of E and Z isomers)

Figure imgf000141_0001

A mixture of 6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-one (13.74 g, 89.1 mmol), methylcyanoacetate (9.4 ml, 106.9 mmol), ammonium acetate (1.79 g, 26.17.mmol) and acetic acid (1.02 ml, 17.8 mmol) in benzene (75 ml) was heated at reflux in a 250 ml round bottom flask equipped with a Dean-Stark and a reflux condenser. After 3h, TLC (25%EtOAc in hexane, PMA stain) showed the reaction was completed. After cooling, benzene (50 ml) was added and the layer was separated, the organic was washed by water (120 ml) and the aqueous layer was extracted by CH2CI2 (3 x 120 ml). The combined organic was washed with sat’d NaHCCb, brine, dried and concentrated and the residual was purified by flash chromatography (340 g silica gel column, eluted by EtOAc in hexane: 5% EtOAc, 2CV; 5-25%, 14CV; 25-40%,8 CV) gave a mixture of E and Z isomers: methyl 2-cyano-2-[6- oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-ylidene]acetate ( 18.37 g, 87.8 % yield, m/z 236.0 [M + H]+ observed) as a clear oil. -cyano-2-[9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetate

Figure imgf000141_0002

A solution of 2-bromopyridine (14.4 ml, 150 mmo) in THF (75 ml) was added dropwise to a solution of isopropylmagnesium chloride (75 ml, 2M in THF) at 0°C under N2, the mixture was then stirred at rt for 3h, copper Iodide(2.59 g, 13.6 mmol) was added and allowed to stir at rt for another 30 min before a solution of a mixture of E and Z isomers of methyl 2-cyano-2-[6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-ylidene]acetate (16 g, 150 mmol) in THF (60 ml) was added in 30 min. The mixture was then stirred at rt for 18h. The reaction mixture was poured into a 200 g ice/2 N HC1 (100 ml) mixture. The product was extracted with Et20 (3×300 ml), washed with brine (200 ml), dried (Na2S04) and concentrated. The residual was purified by flash chromatography (100 g silica gel column, eluted by EtOAc in hexane: 3% 2CV; 3-25%, 12 CV; 25-40% 6CV gave methyl 2-cyano-2-[9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetate (15.44 g, 72% yield, m/z 315.0 [M + H]+ observed) as an amber oil .

-[9-(Pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetonitrile

Figure imgf000142_0001

Ethylene glycol (300 ml) was added to methyl 2-cyano-2-[9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6- oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetate( 15.43 g, 49 mmol) followed by potassium hydroxide (5.5 g , 98 mmol), the resulting mix was heated to 120oC, after 3 h, the reaction mix was cooled and water (300 ml) was added, the product was extracted by Et20(3 x 400 ml), washed with water(200 ml), dried (Na2S04) and concentrated, the residual was purified by flash chromatography (340 g silica gel column, eluted by EtOAc in hexane: 3% 2CV; 3-25%, 12 CV; 25-40% 6CV to give 2-[9-(Pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9- yl]acetonitrile (10.37 g, 82% yield, m/z 257.0 [M + H]+ observed).

-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetonitrile

Figure imgf000142_0002

racemic 2-[9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetonitrile was separated by chiral HPLC column under the following preparative-SFC conditions: Instrument: SFC-80 (Thar, Waters); Column: Chiralpak AD-H (Daicel); column temperature: 40 °C; Mobile phase: Methanol /CO2=40/60; Flow: 70 g/min; Back pressure: 120 Bar; Cycle time of stack injection: 6.0min; Load per injection: 225 mg; Under these conditions, 2-[9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetonitrile (4.0 g) was separated to provide the desired isomer, 2-[(9R)-9-(Pyridin-2-yI)-6- oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetonitrile (2.0 g, >99.5% enantiomeric excess) as a slow- moving fraction. The absolute (R) configuration of the desired isomer was later determined by an X-ray crystal structure analysis of Compound 140. [0240] -[(9R)-9-(Pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethan-l-amine

Figure imgf000143_0001

LAH (1M in Et20, 20ml, 20 mmol) was added to a solution of 2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)- 6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]acetonitrile (2.56 g, 10 mmol) in Et20 (100 ml, 0.1M ) at OoC under N2. The resulting mix was stirred and allowed to warm to room temperature. After 2 h, LCMS showed the reaction had completed. The reaction was cooled at OoC and quenched with water ( 1.12 ml), NaOH (10%, 2.24 ml) and another 3.36 ml of water. Solid was filtered and filter pad was washed with ether (3 x 20 ml). The combined organic was dried and concentrated to give 2-[(9R)-9-(Pyridin-2-yl)-6- oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethan-l -amine (2.44 g, 94% yield, m/z 260.6 [M + H]+ observed) as a light amber oil.

Alternatively, 2-[(9R)-9-(Pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethan-l -amine was prepared by Raney-Nickel catalyzed hydrogenation.

An autoclave vessel was charged with 2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4,5]decan-9- yl] acetonitrile and ammonia (7N solution in methanol). The resulting solution was stirred at ambient conditions for 15 minutes and treated with Raney 2800 Nickel, slurried in water. The vessel was pressurized to 30 psi with nitrogen and agitated briefly. The autoclave was vented and the nitrogen purge repeated additional two times. The vessel was pressurized to 30 psi with hydrogen and agitated briefly. The vessel was vented and purged with hydrogen two additional times. The vessel was pressurized to 85-90 psi with hydrogen and the mixture was warmed to 25-35 °C. The internal temperature was increased to 45-50 °C over 30-60 minutes. The reaction mixture was stirred at 45-50 °C for 3 days. The reaction was monitored by HPLC. Once reaction was deemed complete, it was cooled to ambient temperature and filtered through celite. The filter cake was washed with methanol (2 x). The combined filtrates were concentrated under reduced pressure at 40-45 °C. The resulting residue was co-evaporated with EtOH (3 x) and dried to a thick syrupy of 2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethan-l -amine.

References

  1.  Chen XT, Pitis P, Liu G, Yuan C, Gotchev D, Cowan CL, Rominger DH, Koblish M, Dewire SM, Crombie AL, Violin JD, Yamashita DS (October 2013). “Structure-Activity Relationships and Discovery of a G Protein Biased μ Opioid Receptor Ligand, [(3-Methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]({2-[(9R)-9-(pyridin-2-yl)-6-oxaspiro-[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethyl})amine (TRV130), for the Treatment of Acute Severe Pain”. J. Med. Chem. 56 (20): 8019–31.doi:10.1021/jm4010829. PMID 24063433.
  2.  DeWire SM, Yamashita DS, Rominger DH, Liu G, Cowan CL, Graczyk TM, Chen XT, Pitis PM, Gotchev D, Yuan C, Koblish M, Lark MW, Violin JD (March 2013). “A G protein-biased ligand at the μ-opioid receptor is potently analgesic with reduced gastrointestinal and respiratory dysfunction compared with morphine”. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 344 (3): 708–17.doi:10.1124/jpet.112.201616. PMID 23300227.
  3.  Soergel DG, Subach RA, Sadler B, Connell J, Marion AS, Cowan C, Violin JD, Lark MW (October 2013). “First clinical experience with TRV130: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in healthy volunteers”. J Clin Pharmacol 54(3): 351–7. doi:10.1002/jcph.207. PMID 24122908.

External links

Patent ID Date Patent Title
US2015246904 2015-09-03 Opioid Receptor Ligands And Methods Of Using And Making Same
US8835488 2014-09-16 Opioid receptor ligands and methods of using and making same
US2013331408 2013-12-12 Opioid Receptor Ligands and Methods of Using and Making Same
Oliceridine
TRV130.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
N-[(3-methoxythiophen-2-yl)methyl]-2-[(9R)-9-pyridin-2-yl-6-oxaspiro[4.5]decan-9-yl]ethanamine
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
IV
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number 1401028-24-7
ATC code none
PubChem CID 66553195
ChemSpider 30841043
UNII MCN858TCP0
ChEMBL CHEMBL2443262
Synonyms TRV130
Chemical data
Formula C22H30N2O2S
Molar mass 386.55 g·mol−1

////////TRV-130; TRV-130A, Oliceridine, Phase III, Postoperative pain, trevena, mu-opioid receptor ligand, fast track designation, breakthrough therapy designation

COc1ccsc1CNCC[C@]2(CCOC3(CCCC3)C2)c4ccccn4

Pacritinib


 

Pacritinib skeletal.svg

Pacritinib

A Jak2 inhibitor potentially for the treatment of acute myeloid Leukemia and myelofibrosis.

ONX-0803; SB-1518
CAS No. 937272-79-2

472.57868 g/mol, C28H32N4O3

S*Bio Pte Ltd. and concert innovator

11-(2-pyrrolidin-1-ylethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triazatetracyclo(19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12))heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene

(16E)-11-[2-(1-Pyrrolidinyl)ethoxy]-14,19-Dioxa-5,7,27-triazatetracyclo[19.3.1.12,6.18,12]heptacosa-1(25),2,4,6(27),8,10,12(26),16,21,23-decaene

11-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triaza-tetracyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene

SB-1518|||(16E)-11-[2-(1-Pyrrolidinyl)ethoxy]-14,19-dioxa-5,7,27-triazatetracyclo[19.3.1.12,6.18,12]heptacosa-1(25),2,4,6(27),8,10,12(26),16,21,23-decaene

Pacritinib (SB1518) is a potent and selective inhibitor of Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) and Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-3 (FLT3) with IC50s of 23 and 22 nM, respectively.

 

 

Pacritinib (INN[1]) is a macrocyclic Janus kinase inhibitor that is being developed for the treatment of myelofibrosis. It mainly inhibits Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). The drug is in Phase III clinical trials as of 2013.[2] The drug was discovered in Singapore at the labs of S*BIO Pte Ltd. It is a potent JAK2 inhibitor with activity of IC50 = 23 nM for the JAK2WT variant and 19 nM for JAK2V617F with very good selectivity against JAK1 and JAK3 (IC50 = 1280 and 520 nM, respectively).[3][4] The drug is acquired by Cell Therapeutics, Inc. (CTI) and Baxter international and could effectively address an unmet medical need for patients living with myelofibrosis who face treatment-emergent thrombocytopenia on marketed JAK inhibitors.[5]

Pacritinib is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and the JAK2 mutant JAK2V617F with potential antineoplastic activity. Oral JAK2 inhibitor SB1518 competes with JAK2 for ATP binding, which may result in inhibition of JAK2 activation, inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, and so caspase-dependent apoptosis. JAK2 is the most common mutated gene in bcr-abl-negative myeloproliferative disorders; the JAK2V617F gain-of-function mutation involves a valine-to-phenylalanine modification at position 617. The JAK-STAT signaling pathway is a major mediator of cytokine activity.

Pacritinib is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and the JAK2 mutant JAK2V617F with potential antineoplastic activity. Oral JAK2 inhibitor SB1518 competes with JAK2 for ATP binding, which may result in inhibition of JAK2 activation, inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, and so caspase-dependent apoptosis. JAK2 is the most common mutated gene in bcr-abl-negative myeloproliferative disorders; the JAK2V617F gain-of-function mutation involves a valine-to-phenylalanine modification at position 617. The JAK-STAT signaling pathway is a major mediator of cytokine activity.

Pacritinib.png

STR1

The compound 11-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triaza-tetracyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene (Compound I) was first described in PCT/SG2006/000352 and shows significant promise as a pharmaceutically active agent for the treatment of a number of medical conditions and clinical development of this compound is underway based on the activity profiles demonstrated by the compound.

Figure US20110263616A1-20111027-C00002

  • In the development of a drug suitable for mass production and ultimately commercial use acceptable levels of drug activity against the target of interest is only one of the important variables that must be considered. For example, in the formulation of pharmaceutical compositions it is imperative that the pharmaceutically active substance be in a form that can be reliably reproduced in a commercial manufacturing process and which is robust enough to withstand the conditions to which the pharmaceutically active substance is exposed.
  • In a manufacturing sense it is important that during commercial manufacture the manufacturing process of the pharmaceutically active substance be such that the same material is reproduced when the same manufacturing conditions are used. In addition it is desirable that the pharmaceutically active substance exists in a solid form where minor changes to the manufacturing conditions do not lead to major changes in the solid form of the pharmaceutically active substance produced. For example it is important that the manufacturing process produce material having the same crystalline properties on a reliable basis and also produce material having the same level of hydration.
  • In addition it is important that the pharmaceutically active substance be stable both to degradation, hygroscopicity and subsequent changes to its solid form. This is important to facilitate the incorporation of the pharmaceutically active substance into pharmaceutical formulations. If the pharmaceutically active substance is hygroscopic (“sticky”) in the sense that it absorbs water (either slowly or over time) it is almost impossible to reliably formulate the pharmaceutically active substance into a drug as the amount of substance to be added to provide the same dosage will vary greatly depending upon the degree of hydration. Furthermore variations in hydration or solid form (“polymorphism”) can lead to changes in physico-chemical properties, such as solubility or dissolution rate, which can in turn lead to inconsistent oral absorption in a patient.
  • Accordingly, chemical stability, solid state stability, and “shelf life” of the pharmaceutically active substance are very important factors. In an ideal situation the pharmaceutically active substance and any compositions containing it, should be capable of being effectively stored over appreciable periods of time, without exhibiting a significant change in the physico-chemical characteristics of the active substance such as its activity, moisture content, solubility characteristics, solid form and the like.
  • In relation to 11-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triaza-tetracyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene initial studies were carried out on the hydrochloride salt and indicated that polymorphism was prevalent with the compound being found to adopt more than one crystalline form depending upon the manufacturing conditions. In addition it was observed that the moisture content and ratio of the polymorphs varied from batch to batch even when the manufacturing conditions remained constant. These batch-to-batch inconsistencies and the exhibited hygroscopicity made the hydrochloride salt less desirable from a commercial viewpoint.
  • Accordingly it would be desirable to develop one or more salts of 11-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triaza-tetracyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene which overcome or ameliorate one or more of the above identified problems.

PATENT

str1

US 2011263616

http://www.google.com/patents/US20110263616

11-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26triaza-tetra-cyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene (Compound I) which have been found to have improved properties. In particular the present invention relates to the maleate salt of this compound. The invention also relates to pharmaceutical compositions containing this salt and methods of use of the salt in the treatment of certain medical conditions.

 

PATENT

http://www.google.com/patents/US8415338

Representative Procedure for the Synthesis of Compounds Type (XVIIId) [3-(2-Chloro-pyrimidin-4-yl)-phenyl]-methanol (XIIIa2)

Compound (XIIIa2) was obtained using the same procedure described for compound (XIIIa1); LC-MS (ESI positive mode) m/z 221 ([M+H]+).

4-(3-Allyloxymethyl-phenyl)-2-chloro-pyrimidine (XVa2)

Compound (XVa2) was obtained using the same procedure described for compound (XVa1); LC-MS (ESI positive mode) m/z 271 ([M+H]+).

[4-(3-Allyloxymethyl-phenyl)-pyrimidin-2-yl]-[3-allyloxymethyl-4-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl]-amine (XVIId1)

Compound (XVIId1) was obtained using the same procedure described for compound (XVIIb1); LC-MS (ESI positive mode) m/z 501.

Macrocycle Example 3 Compound 13

Compound (13) was obtained using the same procedure described for compound (1) HPLC purity at 254 nm: 99%; LC-MS (ESI positive mode) m/z 473 ([M+H]+); 1H NMR (MeOD-d4) δ 8.79 (d, 1H), 8.46 (d, 1H), 8.34-8.31 (m, 1H), 7.98-7.96 (m, 1H), 7.62-7.49 (m, 2H), 7.35 (d, 1H), 7.15-7.10 (m, 1H), 7.07-7.02 (m, 1H), 5.98-5.75 (m, 2H, 2×=CH), 4.67 (s, 2H), 4.67 (s, 2H), 4.39-4.36 (m, 2H), 4.17 (d, 2H), 4.08 (d, 2H), 3.88-3.82 (m, 2H), 3.70 (t, 2H), 2.23-2.21 (m, 2H), 2.10-2.07 (m, 2H).

PAPER

J MC 2011, 54 4638

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm200326p

Abstract Image

Discovery of the activating mutation V617F in Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2V617F), a tyrosine kinase critically involved in receptor signaling, recently ignited interest in JAK2 inhibitor therapy as a treatment for myelofibrosis (MF). Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of a series of small molecule 4-aryl-2-aminopyrimidine macrocycles and their biological evaluation against the JAK family of kinase enzymes and FLT3. The most promising leads were assessed for their in vitro ADME properties culminating in the discovery of 21c, a potent JAK2 (IC50 = 23 and 19 nM for JAK2WT and JAK2V617F, respectively) and FLT3 (IC50 = 22 nM) inhibitor with selectivity against JAK1 and JAK3 (IC50 = 1280 and 520 nM, respectively). Further profiling of 21c in preclinical species and mouse xenograft and allograft models is described. Compound 21c(SB1518) was selected as a development candidate and progressed into clinical trials where it is currently in phase 2 for MF and lymphoma.

str1

Discovery of the Macrocycle 11-(2-Pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triaza-tetracyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene (SB1518), a Potent Janus Kinase 2/Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-3 (JAK2/FLT3) Inhibitor for the Treatment of Myelofibrosis and Lymphoma

S*BIO Pte. Ltd., 1 Science Park Road, #05-09, The Capricorn, Singapore Science Park II, Singapore 117528
J. Med. Chem., 2011, 54 (13), pp 4638–4658
DOI: 10.1021/jm200326p
Publication Date (Web): May 23, 2011
Copyright © 2011 American Chemical Society
Tel: (0065) 6827-5021. Fax: (0065) 6827-5005. E-mail: anthony_william@sbio.com.

(21c)

The title compound was synthesized from 21a and pyrrolidine (yield, 83%; mixture of trans/cis85:15 by NMR). LC-MS (ESI positive mode) m/z 473 ([M + H]+). HRMS: theoretical C28H32N4O3MW, 472.2474; found, 473.2547. 1H NMR (MeOD-d4): δ 8.79 (d, 1H), 8.46 (d, 1H), 8.34–8.31 (m, 1H, CH), 7.98–7.96 (m, 1H), 7.62–7.49 (m, 2H), 7.35 (d, 1H), 7.15–7.10 (m, 1H), 7.07–7.02 (m, 1H), 5.98–5.75 (m, 2H), 4.67 (s, 2H), 4.67 (s, 2H), 4.39–4.36 (m, 2H), 4.17 (d, 2H), 4.08 (d, 2H), 3.88–3.82 (m, 2H), 3.70 (t, 2H), 2.23–2.21 (m, 2H), 2.10–2.07 (m, 2H); chloride content (titration) 7.7% (1.18 equivs); water content (Karl Fischer) 6.1% (1.85 equivs); Anal. Calcd. for C28H32N4O3·1.18HCl·1.85H2O: C, 61.46; H, 6.46; N, 10.24; Cl, 7.65. Found: C, 61.99; H, 6.91; N, 10.25; Cl, 7.45.

References

2“JAK-Inhibitoren: Neue Wirkstoffe für viele Indikationen”. Pharmazeutische Zeitung (in German) (21). 2013.

3William, A. D.; Lee, A. C. -H.; Blanchard, S. P.; Poulsen, A.; Teo, E. L.; Nagaraj, H.; Tan, E.; Chen, D.; Williams, M.; Sun, E. T.; Goh, K. C.; Ong, W. C.; Goh, S. K.; Hart, S.; Jayaraman, R.; Pasha, M. K.; Ethirajulu, K.; Wood, J. M.; Dymock, B. W. (2011). “Discovery of the Macrocycle 11-(2-Pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triaza-tetracyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene (SB1518), a Potent Janus Kinase 2/Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase-3 (JAK2/FLT3) Inhibitor for the Treatment of Myelofibrosis and Lymphoma”. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 54 (13): 4638–58. doi:10.1021/jm200326p. PMID 21604762.

4Poulsen, A.; William, A.; Blanchard, S. P.; Lee, A.; Nagaraj, H.; Wang, H.; Teo, E.; Tan, E.; Goh, K. C.; Dymock, B. (2012). “Structure-based design of oxygen-linked macrocyclic kinase inhibitors: Discovery of SB1518 and SB1578, potent inhibitors of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)”. Journal of Computer-Aided Molecular Design 26 (4): 437–50. doi:10.1007/s10822-012-9572-z. PMID 22527961.

5http://www.pmlive.com/pharma_news/baxter_licenses_cancer_drug_from_cti_in_$172m_deal_519143

US8153632 * Nov 15, 2006 Apr 10, 2012 S*Bio Pte Ltd. Oxygen linked pyrimidine derivatives
US8415338 * Apr 4, 2012 Apr 9, 2013 Cell Therapeutics, Inc. Oxygen linked pyrimidine derivatives
US20110294831 * Dec 9, 2009 Dec 1, 2011 S*Bio Pte Ltd. 11-(2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triaza-tetracyclo[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene citrate salt
Patent Submitted Granted
OXYGEN LINKED PYRIMIDINE DERIVATIVES [US8153632] 2009-03-19 2012-04-10
ANTIVIRAL JAK INHIBITORS USEFUL IN TREATING OR PREVENTING RETROVIRAL AND OTHER VIRAL INFECTIONS [US2014328793] 2012-11-30 2014-11-06
OXYGEN LINKED PYRIMIDINE DERIVATIVES [US2013172338] 2013-02-20 2013-07-04
METHOD OF SELECTING THERAPEUTIC INDICATIONS [US2014170157] 2012-06-15 2014-06-19
CYCLODEXTRIN-BASED POLYMERS FOR THERAPEUTIC DELIVERY [US2014357557] 2014-05-30 2014-12-04
11-(2-PYRROLIDIN-1-YL-ETHOXY)-14,19-DIOXA-5,7,26-TRIAZA-TETRACYCLO[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]HEPTACOSA-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-DECAENE MALEATE SALT [US2011263616] 2011-10-27
11-(2-PYRROLIDIN-1-YL-ETHOXY)-14,19-DIOXA-5,7,26-TRIAZA-TETRACYCLO[19.3.1.1(2,6).1(8,12)]HEPTACOSA-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-DECAENE CITRATE SALT [US2011294831] 2011-12-01
BIOMARKERS AND COMBINATION THERAPIES USING ONCOLYTIC VIRUS AND IMMUNOMODULATION [US2014377221] 2013-01-25 2014-12-25
Oxygen linked pyrimidine derivatives [US8415338] 2012-04-04 2013-04-09

 

 

Pacritinib
Pacritinib skeletal.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(16E)-11-[2-(1-Pyrrolidinyl)ethoxy]-14,19-dioxa-5,7,26-triazatetracyclo[19.3.1.12,6.18,12]heptacosa-1(25),2(26),3,5,8,10,12(27),16,21,23-decaene
Clinical data
Legal status
  • Investigational
Routes of
administration
Oral
Identifiers
ATC code None
PubChem CID: 46216796
ChemSpider 28518965
ChEMBL CHEMBL2035187
Synonyms SB1518
Chemical data
Formula C28H32N4O3
Molecular mass 472.58 g/mol

str1

Map of S*Bio Pte Ltd
S*Bio Pte Ltd 
Address: 1 Science Park Rd, Singapore 117528
Phone:+65 6827 5000
Image
S*BIO Pte Ltd. provides research and clinical development services for small molecule drugs for the treatment of cancer in Singapore. The company’s products include JAK2 inhibitors, such as SB1518 for leukemia/myelofibrosis, lymphoma, and polycythemia; and SB1578 for RA/psoriasis. The company also offers SB939, a histone deacetylases for MDS/AML+combo, prostate cancer, sarcoma, pediatric tumor, and myelofibrosis; SB2602, a mTOR inhibitor; SB2343, a mTOR/PI3K inhibitor; and SB1317, a CDK/Flt3 inhibitor. The company was founded in 2000 and is based in Singapore. S*BIO Pte Ltd. operates as a subsidiary of Chiron Corporation Limited.
Highlights
• Principle lead and inventor of 3 clinical stage candidates,
1) SB1518 (Pacritinib)-A selective JAK2 inhibitor for myleofibrosis into phase 2,
2) SB1317 (TG02)-A mutikinase inhibitor CDK, JAK2, FLT3, and ERK5 into phase 1 and
3) SB1578-A more selective JAK2 inhibitor than pracritinib for autoimmune diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Psoriasis into phase 1

SEE……..http://apisynthesisint.blogspot.in/2016/01/pacritinib.html

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c1cc2cc(c1)-c3ccnc(n3)Nc4ccc(c(c4)COC/C=C/COC2)OCCN5CCCC5

C1CCN(C1)CCOC2=C3COCC=CCOCC4=CC=CC(=C4)C5=NC(=NC=C5)NC(=C3)C=C2

Ciraparantag, Aripazine


Ciraparantag
PER977, Aripazine
CAS Number:1438492-26-2
Chemical Name:N1,N1-[piperazine-1,4-diylbis(propane-1,3-diyl)]bis-L-argininamide

(2S,2’S)-N,N’-(Piperazine-1,4-diyldipropane-3,1-diyl)bis(2-amino-5-carbamimidamidopentanamide)

2S,2’S)-N,N’-(piperazine-1,4-diylbis(propane-3,1-diyl))bis(2-amino-5-guanidinopentanamide)

C22H48N12O2
Mw: 512.40232
Mechanism of Action: an intravenously administered anticoagulant Reversal Agent

Blood coagulation factor modulators; Factor Xa inhibitors
Indication: Anticoagulant Reversal
Development Stage: Phase II
Developer:Perosphere, Inc..Perosphere Inc.

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase IIHaemorrhage

Most Recent Events

  • 02 Apr 2015Ciraparantag receives Fast Track designation for Haemorrhage [IV] (In volunteers) in USA
  • 05 Nov 2014Efficacy and adverse events data from a phase I/II trial in Haemorrhage released by Perosphere
  • 06 Oct 2014Aripazine is available for licensing as of 06 Oct 2014. http://www.perosphere.com/

Aripazine(PER977, ciraparantag)

Ciraparantag, also known as PER977, is a A Small Molecule Reversal Agent for New Oral Anticoagulants and Heparins. PER977 is water-soluble, cationic molecule that is designed to bind specifically to unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin through noncovalent hydrogen bonding and charge–charge interactions.

PER-977 is an intravenous heparin neutralizer in phase II clinical trials at Perosphere to reverse edoxaban’s induced anticoagulation.

In April 2015, fast track designation was assigned in the U.S. as an investigational anticoagulant reversal agent.

WO 2013082210

http://www.google.com/patents/WO2013082210A1?cl=en

In one scheme, the compound of Formula V (DAP)

Figure imgf000025_0001

is synthesized by reacting excess equivalents (e.g., at least about two equivalents) of compound 1

Figure imgf000025_0002

with one equivalent of compound 2

Figure imgf000025_0003

in the presence of a peptide coupling reagent, to obtain a compound 3

Figure imgf000026_0001

wherein PI is a protecting group and P2 is a protecting group or is a hydrogen.

the coupling involved reacting compound 1, wherein PI was Boc and P2 was a hydrogen (depicted as Boc-Arg-OH HCl below), with compound 2 as depicted below:

Figure imgf000027_0001

The resultant crude product was more than 95% pure by thin layer

chromatography (TLC).

Subsequently, the deprotection step was carried out as depicted below:

Figure imgf000027_0002

The deprotected product was purified by preparative HPLC using 1% acetic acid buffer. Product purity of >98% was observed. Residual TFA was removed by low quantity of DOWEX resin. The molecular weight of DAP (the compound of Formula V) is 512.4, and the compound synthesized according to the above scheme exhibited the following primary peak by mass spectroscopy: [M+H]+=513.4.

References

1: Dzik WH. Reversal of oral factor Xa inhibitors by prothrombin complex concentrates: a re-appraisal. J Thromb Haemost. 2015 Jun;13 Suppl 1:S187-94. doi: 10.1111/jth.12949. PubMed PMID: 26149022.

2: Crowther M, Crowther MA. Antidotes for Novel Oral Anticoagulants: Current Status and Future Potential. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2015 Aug;35(8):1736-45. doi: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.114.303402. Epub 2015 Jun 18. PubMed PMID: 26088576.

3: Sullivan DW Jr, Gad SC, Laulicht B, Bakhru S, Steiner S. Nonclinical Safety Assessment of PER977: A Small Molecule Reversal Agent for New Oral Anticoagulants and Heparins. Int J Toxicol. 2015 Jun 15. pii: 1091581815590667. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26079256.

4: Mo Y, Yam FK. Recent advances in the development of specific antidotes for target-specific oral anticoagulants. Pharmacotherapy. 2015 Feb;35(2):198-207. doi: 10.1002/phar.1532. Epub 2015 Feb 3. PubMed PMID: 25644580.

5: Yates SW. Interrupting anticoagulation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. P T. 2014 Dec;39(12):858-80. PubMed PMID: 25516695; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4264672.

6: Vanden Daelen S, Peetermans M, Vanassche T, Verhamme P, Vandermeulen E. Monitoring and reversal strategies for new oral anticoagulants. Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther. 2015 Jan;13(1):95-103. doi: 10.1586/14779072.2015.987126. Epub 2014 Nov 28. PubMed PMID: 25431993.

7: Costin J, Ansell J, Laulicht B, Bakhru S, Steiner S. Reversal agents in development for the new oral anticoagulants. Postgrad Med. 2014 Nov;126(7):19-24. doi: 10.3810/pgm.2014.11.2829. Review. PubMed PMID: 25387210.

8: Ansell JE, Bakhru SH, Laulicht BE, Steiner SS, Grosso M, Brown K, Dishy V, Noveck RJ, Costin JC. Use of PER977 to reverse the anticoagulant effect of edoxaban. N Engl J Med. 2014 Nov 27;371(22):2141-2. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1411800. Epub 2014 Nov 5. PubMed PMID: 25371966.

9: Hankey GJ. Intracranial hemorrhage and novel anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation: what have we learned? Curr Cardiol Rep. 2014 May;16(5):480. doi: 10.1007/s11886-014-0480-9. Review. PubMed PMID: 24643903.

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Defibrotide


Image result for DEFIBROTIDE SODIUM

Defibrotide sodium is an oligonucleotide mixture with profibrinolytic properties. The chemical name of defibrotide sodium is polydeoxyribonucleotide, sodium salt. Defibrotide sodium is a polydisperse mixture of predominantly single-stranded (ss) polydeoxyribonucleotide sodium salts derived from porcine intestinal tissue having a mean weighted molecular weight of 13-20 kDa, and a potency of 27-39 and 28-38 biological units per mg as determined by two separate assays measuring the release of a product formed by contact between defibrotide sodium, plasmin and a plasmin substrate. The primary structure of defibrotide sodium is shown below.

str1

DEFITELIO (defibrotide sodium) injection is a clear, light yellow to brown, sterile, preservative-free solution in a single-patient-use vial for intravenous use. Each milliliter of the injection contains 80 mg of defibrotide sodium and 10 mg of Sodium Citrate, USP, in Water for Injection, USP. Hydrochloric Acid, NF, and/or Sodium Hydroxide, NF, may have been used to adjust pH to 6.8-7.8.

Defibrotide is the sodium salt of a mixture of single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides derived from porcine mucosal DNA. It has been shown to have antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-ischemic properties (but without associated significant systemic anticoagulant effects). It is marketed under the brand names Dasovas (FM), Noravid, and Prociclide in a variety of countries, but is currently not approved in the USA. The manufacturer is Gentium.

Defibrotide is used to treat or prevent a failure of normal blood flow (occlusive venous disease, OVD) in the liver of patients who have had bone marrow transplants or received certain drugs such as oral estrogens, mercaptopurine, and many others.

In 2012, an IND was filed in Japan seeking approval of the compound for the treatment of veno-occlusive disease.

Approved 3/30/3016 US FDA, defibrotide sodium, (NDA) 208114

Image result for DEFIBROTIDE SODIUM

To treat adults and children who develop hepatic veno-occlusive disease with additional kidney or lung abnormalities after they receive a stem cell transplant from blood or bone marrow called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Polydeoxyribonucleotides from bovine lung or other mamalian organs with molecular weight between 15,000 and 30,000 Da

CAS 83712-60-1

Defibrotide is a polydisperse mixture of oligonucleotides produced by random, chemical cleavage (depolymerisation) of porcine DNA. It is predominantly single stranded, of varying base sequence, lengths and conformations; unfolded, folded or combined. The mean oligonucleotide length is 50 bases with a mean molecular weight of 17 ± 4 kDa. No individually defined component is at more than femtomolar concentration. The only meaningful scientific information that can be obtained about the biochemical nature of defibrotide (aside from determination of percentage of each nucleobase) is a measurement of its average length and its average percentage double stranded character. Therefore, it can be established that this active substance is of highly heterogenic nature.

Image result for DEFIBROTIDE SODIUM

 

Defibrotide (Defitelio, Gentium)[1] is a deoxyribonucleic acid derivative (single-stranded) derived from cow lung or porcine mucosa. It is an anticoagulant with a multiple mode of action (see below).

It has been used with antithrombin III.[2]

Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc announced that the FDA has accepted for filing with Priority Review its recently submitted New Drug Application (NDA) for defibrotide. AS ON OCT 2015

Defibrotide is an investigational agent proposed for the treatment of patients with hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), with evidence of multi-organ dysfunction (MOD) following hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT).

Priority Review status is designated for drugs that may offer major advances in treatment or provide a treatment where no adequate therapy exists. Based on timelines established by the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA), FDA review of the NDA is expected to be completed by March 31, 2016.

“The FDA’s acceptance for filing and Priority Review status of the NDA for defibrotide is an important milestone for Jazz and reflects our commitment to bringing meaningful medicines to patients who have significant unmet needs,” said Karen Smith, M.D., Ph.D., Global Head of Research and Development and Chief Medical Officer of Jazz Pharmaceuticals. “We look forward to continuing to work closely with the FDA to obtain approval for defibrotide for patients with hepatic VOD with evidence of MOD in the U.S. as quickly as possible, as there are no other approved therapies for treating this rare, often fatal complication of HSCT.”

The NDA includes safety and efficacy data from three clinical studies of defibrotide for the treatment of hepatic VOD with MOD following HSCT, as well as a retrospective review of registry data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. The safety database includes over 900 patients exposed to defibrotide in the clinical development program for the treatment of hepatic VOD.

The compound was originally developed under a collaboration between Sanofi and Gentium. In December 2001, Gentium entered into a license and supply agreement with Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, pursuant to which the latter gained exclusive rights to distribute, market and sell the product for the treatment of VOD in the U.S. This agreement was expanded in 2005 to include all of North America, Central America and South America.

Defibrotide was granted orphan drug designations from the FDA in July 1985, May 2003 and January 2007 for the treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), for the treatment of VOD and for the prevention of VOD, respectively. Orphan drug was also received in the E.U. for the prevention and treatment of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) in 2004 and for the prevention of graft versus host disease (GvHD) in 2013.

Pharmacokinetics

Defibrotide is available as an oral, intravenous, and intramuscular formulation. Its oral bioavailability is in the range of 58-70% of theparenteral forms. T1/2 alpha is in the range of minutes while T1/2 beta is in the range of hours in studies with oral radiolabelleddefibrotide. These data suggest that defibrotide, in spite of its macromolecular nature, is absorbed well after oral administration. Due to the drug’s short half-life, it is necessary to give the daily dose divided in 2 to 4 doses (see below).

In 2014, Jazz Pharmaceuticals (parent of Gentium) acquired the rights of the product in U.S. and in the Americas

Mode of action

The drug appears to prevent the formation of blood clots and to help dissolve blood clots by increasing levels of prostaglandin I2, E2, and prostacyclin, altering platelet activity, increasing tissue plasminogen activator (tPA-)function, and decreasing activity of tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor. Prostaglandin I2 relaxes the smooth muscle of blood vessels and prevents platelets from adhering to each other. Prostaglandin E2 at certain concentrations also inhibits platelet aggregation. Moreover, the drug provides additional beneficial anti-inflammatory and antiischemic activities as recent studies have shown. It is yet unclear, if the latter effects can be utilized clinically (e.g., treatment of ischemic stroke).

Unlike heparin and warfarin, defibrotide appears to have a relatively mild anticoagulant activity, which may be beneficial in the treatment of patients at high risk of bleeding complications. Nevertheless, patients with known bleeding disorders (e.g., hemophilia A) or recent abnormal bleedings should be treated cautiously and under close medical supervision.

The drug was marketed under the brand names Dasovas (FM), Noravid, and Prociclide in a variety of countries. It is currently not approved in the USA. The manufacturer is Gentium.

Defibrotide also received fast track designation from the FDA for the treatment of severe VOD in recipients of stem cell transplants. In 2011, the compound was licensed to Medison Pharma by Gentium in Israel and Palestine. The license covers the management of named-patient sales program and local registration, authorization, marketing, reimbursement and medical affairs for the treatment of peripheral vascular disease.

Usual indications

Defibrotide is used to treat or prevent a failure of normal blood flow (Veno-occlusive disease, VOD) in the liver of patients having had bone marrow transplants or received certain drugs such as oral estrogens, mercaptopurine, and many others. Without intensive treatment, VOD is often a fatal condition, leading to multiorgan failure. It has repeatedly been reported that defibrotide was able to resolve the condition completely and was well tolerated.

Other indications are: peripheral obliterative arterial disease, thrombophlebitis, and Raynaud’s phenomenon. In very high doses, defibrotide is useful as treatment of acute myocardial infarction. The drug may also be used for the pre- and postoperative prophylaxis of deep venous thrombosis and can replace the heparin use during hemodialytic treatments.

It has been investigated for use in treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.[3]

Potential indications in the future

Other recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that defibrotide used in conjunction with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (rhG-CSF) significantly increases the number of Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cells (Stem cells). The benefit of this increase in stem cells may be crucial for a variety of clinical indications, including graft engineering procedures and gene therapy programs. This would expand the clinical usefulness of defibrotide to a complete distinct area.

Very recently (since early 2006) combination therapy trials (phase I/II) with defibrotide plus melphalan, prednisone, and thalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma have been conducted. The addition of defibrotide is expected to decrease the myelosuppressive toxicity of melphalan. However, is too early for any definitive results at that stage.

Cautions and contraindications

  • The efficacy of the drug has been reported to be poorer in patients with diabetes mellitus.
  • Pregnancy: The drug should not be used during pregnancy, because adequate and well controlled human studies do not exist.
  • Lactation: No human data is available. In order to avoid damage to the newborn, the nursing mother should discontinue either the drug or breastfeeding, taking into account the importance of treatment to the mother.
  • Known Bleeding Disorders or Bleeding Tendencies having occurred recently: Defibrotide should be used cautiously. Before initiation of treatment, the usual coagulation values should be obtained as baseline and regularly controlled under treatment. The patient should be observed regularly regarding local or systemic bleeding events.

Side-effects

Increased bleeding and bruising tendency, irritation at the injection site, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, low blood pressure. Serious allergic reactions have not been observed so far.

Drug interactions

Use of heparin with defibrotide may increase the aPTT, reflecting reduced ability of the body to form a clot. Nothing is known about the concomitant application of other anticoagulants than heparin and dextran containing plasma-expanders, but it can be anticipated that the risk of serious bleeding will be increased considerably.

 

PATENT

WO 2001078761

G-CSF (CAS registry number 143011-2-7/Merck Index, 1996, page 4558) is a haematopoietic growth factor which is indispensable in the proliferation and differentiation of the progenitor cells of granulocytes; it is a 18-22 kDa glycoprotein normally produced in response to specific stimulation by a variety of cells, including monocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. The term defibrotide (CAS registry number 83712-60-1) normally identifies a polydeoxyribonucleotide obtained by extraction (US 3,770,720 and US 3,899,481) from animal and/or vegetable tissue; this polydeoxyribonucleotide is normally used in the form of a salt of an alkali metal, generally sodium. Defibrotide is used principally for its anti- thrombotic activity (US 3,829,567) although it may be used in different applications, such as, for example, the treatment of acute renal insufficiency (US 4,694,134) and the treatment of acute myocardial ischaemia (US 4,693,995). United States patents US 4,985,552 and US 5,223,609, finally, describe a process for the production of defibrotide which enables a product to be obtained which has constant and well defined physico-chemical characteristics and is also free from any undesired side-effects

 

 

References

  1.  “Jazz Pharma Acquiring Gentium for $1B”. Gen. Eng. Biotechnol. News (paper) 34 (2). January 15, 2014. p. 10.
  2.  Haussmann U, Fischer J, Eber S, Scherer F, Seger R, Gungor T (June 2006). “Hepatic veno-occlusive disease in pediatric stem cell transplantation: impact of pre-emptive antithrombin III replacement and combined antithrombin III/defibrotide therapy”. Haematologica 91 (6): 795–800. PMID 16769582.
  3.  Coccheri S, Andreozzi GM, D’Addato M, Gensini GF (June 2004). “Effects of defibrotide in patients with chronic deep insufficiency. The PROVEDIS study”. Int Angiol 23 (2): 100–7.PMID 15507885.

External links

WO2003101468A1 * Jun 2, 2003 Dec 11, 2003 Guenther Eissner Method for the protection of endothelial and epithelial cells during chemotherapy
US4985552 Jul 5, 1989 Jan 15, 1991 Crinos Industria Farmacobiologica S.P.A. Process for obtaining chemically defined and reproducible polydeoxyribonucleotides
US5223609 May 26, 1992 Jun 29, 1993 Crinos Industria Farmacobiologica S.P.A. Process for obtaining chemically defined and reproducible polydeoxyribonucleotides
Cited Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO1999026639A1 * 24 Nov 1998 3 Jun 1999 Allegheny University Of The He Methods for mobilizing hematopoietic facilitating cells and hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood
EP0317766A1 * 20 Oct 1988 31 May 1989 Crinos Industria Farmacobiologica S.p.A. A method for preventing blood coaguli from being formed in the extra-body circuit of dialysis apparatus and composition useful thereof
EP0416678A1 * 10 Aug 1990 13 Mar 1991 Crinos Industria Farmacobiologica S.p.A. Topical compositions containing Defibrotide
US5199942 * 26 Sep 1991 6 Apr 1993 Immunex Corporation Method for improving autologous transplantation
US5977083 * 5 Jun 1995 2 Nov 1999 Burcoglu; Arsinur Method for using polynucleotides, oligonucleotides and derivatives thereof to treat various disease states
Reference
1 * CARLO-STELLA, C. (1) ET AL: “Defibrotide significantly enhances peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization induced by recombinant human granulocyte colony – stimulating factor ( rhG – CSF.” BLOOD, ( NOVEMBER 16, 2000 ) VOL. 96, NO. 11 PART 1, PP. 553A. PRINT. MEETING INFO.: 42ND ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEMATOLOGY SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, USA DECEMBER 01-05, 2000 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEMATOLOGY. , XP002176349
2 * GURSOY A: “PREPARATION, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF DEFIBROTIDE LIPOSOMES” PHARMAZIE,DD,VEB VERLAG VOLK UND GESUNDHEIT. BERLIN, vol. 48, no. 7, 1 July 1993 (1993-07-01), pages 549-550, XP000372658 ISSN: 0031-7144
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO2005017160A2 * 12 Aug 2004 24 Feb 2005 Childrens Hosp Medical Center Mobilization of hematopoietic cells
WO2009115465A1 * 13 Mar 2009 24 Sep 2009 Gentium Spa Synthetic phosphodiester oligonucleotides and therapeutical uses thereof
EP2103689A1 * 19 Mar 2008 23 Sep 2009 Gentium S.p.A. Synthetic phosphodiester oligonucleotides and therapeutical uses thereof
US7417026 12 Aug 2004 26 Aug 2008 Children’s Hospital Medical Center Mobilization of hematopoietic cells
US7915384 5 Jan 2009 29 Mar 2011 Children’s Hospital Medical Center Chimeric peptides for the regulation of GTPases
US8242246 28 Feb 2011 14 Aug 2012 Children’s Hospital Medical Center Chimeric peptides for the regulation of GTPases
US8674075 13 Aug 2012 18 Mar 2014 Children’s Medical Center Corporation Chimeric peptides for the regulation of GTPases
US8980862 12 Nov 2010 17 Mar 2015 Gentium S.P.A. Defibrotide for use in prophylaxis and/or treatment of Graft versus Host Disease (GVHD)
Defibrotide
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com International Drug Names
Pregnancy
category
  • X
Legal status
  • Rx only (where available)
Routes of
administration
oral, i.m., i.v.
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 58 – 70% orally (i.v. and i.m. = 100%)
Biological half-life t1/2-alpha = minutes; t1/2-beta = a few hours
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number 83712-60-1 Yes
ATC code B01AX01
DrugBank DB04932 Yes
UNII 438HCF2X0M Yes
KEGG D07423 Yes

///////////Approved,  3/30/3016,  US FDA, defibrotide sodium, NDA 208114, FDA 2016

Updates……….

FDA approves first treatment for rare disease in patients who receive stem cell transplant from blood or bone marrow

For Immediate Release

March 30, 2016

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Defitelio (defibrotide sodium) to treat adults and children who develop hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with additional kidney or lung abnormalities after they receive a stem cell transplant from blood or bone marrow called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This is the first FDA-approved therapy for treatment of severe hepatic VOD, a rare and life-threatening liver condition.

HSCT is a procedure performed in some patients to treat certain blood or bone marrow cancers. Immediately before an HSCT procedure, a patient receives chemotherapy. Hepatic VOD can occur in patients who receive chemotherapy and HSCT. Hepatic VOD is a condition in which some of the veins in the liver become blocked, causing swelling and a decrease in blood flow inside the liver, which may lead to liver damage. In the most severe form of hepatic VOD, the patient may also develop failure of the kidneys and lungs. Fewer than 2 percent of patients develop severe hepatic VOD after HSCT, but as many as 80 percent of patients who develop severe hepatic VOD do not survive.

“The approval of Defitelio fills a significant need in the transplantation community to treat this rare but frequently fatal complication in patients who receive chemotherapy and HSCT,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

The efficacy of Defitelio was investigated in 528 patients treated in three studies: two prospective clinical trials and an expanded access study. The patients enrolled in all three studies had a diagnosis of hepatic VOD with liver or kidney abnormalities after HSCT. The studies measured the percentage of patients who were still alive 100 days after HSCT (overall survival). In the three studies, 38 to 45 percent of patients treated with Defitelio were alive 100 days after HSCT. Based on published reports and analyses of patient-level data, the expected survival rates 100 days after HSCT would be 21 to 31 percent for patients with severe hepatic VOD who received only supportive care or interventions other than Defitelio.

The most common side effects of Defitelio include abnormally low blood pressure (hypotension), diarrhea, vomiting, nausea and nosebleeds (epistaxis). Serious potential side effects of Defitelio that were identified include bleeding (hemorrhage) and allergic reactions. Defitelio should not be used in patients who are having bleeding complications or who are taking blood thinners or other medicines that reduce the body’s ability to form clots.

The FDA granted the Defitelio application priority review status, which facilitates and expedites the development and review of certain drugs in light of their potential to benefit patients with serious or life-threatening conditions. Defitelio also received orphan drug designation, which provides incentives such as tax credits, user fee waivers and eligibility for exclusivity to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

Defitelio is marketed by Jazz Pharmaceuticals based in Palo Alto, California

Odalasvir


Odalasvir structure.svg

ACH-3102 , Odalasvir

Odalasvir
ACH-0143102; ACH-3102
CAS : 1415119-52-6
Dimethyl N, N ‘- (tricyclo [8.2.2.24,7] hexadeca-1 (12), 4,6, 10,13,15-hexaene-5,11-diylbis {1H-benzimidazole-5,2-diyl [(2S, 3aS, 7aS) -octahydro-1H-indole-2,1-diyl] [(1S) -1 – (1-methylethyl) -2-oxoethylene]}) biscarbamate

Carbamic acid, N,N’-(tricyclo(8.2.2.24,7)hexadeca-4,6,10,12,13,15-hexaene-5,11-diylbis(1H-benzimidazole-6,2-diyl((2S,3aS,7aS)-octahydro-1H-indole-2,1-diyl)((1S)-1-(1-methylethyl)-2-oxo-2,1-ethanediyl)))bis-, C,C’-dimethyl ester

Dimethyl N,N’-(1,4(1,4)-dibenzenacyclohexaphane-12,42-diylbis(1hbenzimidazole-5,2-diyl((2S,3aS,7aS)-octahydro-1H-indole-2,1-diyl)((2S)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-1,2-diyl)))biscarbamate

2D chemical structure of 1415119-52-6
Mechanism of Action: HCV NS5A Protein inhibitor
Indication: Hepatitis C
Developer: Achillion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Achillion Pharmaceuticals, Inc

  • C60-H72-N8-O6
  • 1001.2788

Odalasvir[1] is an investigational new drug in development for the treatment hepatitis C.

Achillion Pharmaceuticals Inc’s Odalasvir (ACH-3102) is an investigational new drug in development for the treatment hepatitis C. Achillion’s ongoing study tests its NS5A inhibitor, ACH-3102, with Sovaldi in previously untreated genotype 1 hepatitis C patients over six and eight weeks of therapy. The main goal is to achieve a cure, or sustained virological response, 12 weeks after the completion of therapy.

Odalasvir is a hepatitis C virus (HCV NS5A) inhibitor in phase II clinical studies at Achillion for the treatment of hepatitis C.

In 2012, fast track designation was assigned to the compound in the U.S. for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

WILL BE UPDATED………….

WO 2012166716

http://www.google.com/patents/US20120302538

Figure US20120302538A1-20121129-C00189

General Considerations

All nonaqueous reactions were performed under an atmosphere of dry argon gas using oven-dried glassware and anhydrous solvents. The progress of reactions and the purity of target compounds were determined using one of the following two HPLC methods: (1) Waters AQUITY HPLC BEH C18 1.7 μm 2.1×50 mm column with an isocratic elution of 0.24 min at 90:10 water:acetonitrile containing 0.05% formic acid followed by a 4.26-min linear gradient elution from 90:10 to 10:90 at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with UV (PDA), ELS, and MS (SQ in APCI mode) detection (method 1); and (2) Waters AQUITY HPLC BEH C18 1.7 μm 2.1×50 mm column with an isocratic elution of 0.31 min at 95:5 water:acetonitrile containing 0.05% formic acid followed by a 17.47-min linear gradient elution from 95:5 to 5:95 at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min with UV (PDA), ELS, and MS (SQ in APCI mode) detection (method 2).

Target compounds were purified via preparative reverse-phase HPLC using a YMC Pack Pro C18 5 μm 150×20 mm column with an isocratic elution of 0.35 min at 95:5 water:acetonitrile containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid followed by a 23.3-min linear gradient elution from 95:5 to 5:95 at a flow rate of 18.9 mL/min with UV and mass-based fraction collection.

Figure US20120302538A1-20121129-C00020
Example 1
Synthesis of Compound 10

Compound 10 was prepared via bromination of [2.2]paracyclophane as outlined previously (Reich, H. J.; Cram, D. J. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1969, 91, 3527-3533; Reich, H. J.; Cram, D. J. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1969, 91, 3534-3543). Compounds 1, 2, 6, 8, and 10 can be obtained from commercial sources. Compounds 3-7 and 9 were prepared using general synthetic methods known in the art.

Example 2Synthesis of Compound 11

A deoxygenated (argon) mixture of 9 (284.2 mg), 10 (52.3 mg), K3PO4 (248.1 mg), and PdCl2dppf.CH2Cl2 (7.4 mg) in dioxane/water (5.5 mL/0.55 mL) was irradiated in a microwave for 2 h at 80° C. The resulting mixture was evaporated under reduced pressure and the remaining solid was extracted with DCM. This crude material was purified by PTLC (20 cm×20 cm×2000 μm glass plates; eluted with 45:50:5 v/v/v DCM:EtOAc:MeOH, Rf 0.28) to give 75.3 mg of 11. The purity of 11 was determined via analytical reverse-phase HPLC using a 3.5-min gradient elution of increasing concentrations of ACN in water (10-90%) containing 0.05% formic acid with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min on a Waters AQUITY HPLC BEH C18 1.7 μm 2.1×50 mm column with UV (PDA), ELS, and MS (SQ in APCI mode) detection. HPLC: tR 1.57 min (98% purity). MS m/z calculated for C56H64N8O6 ([M]+), 945. found, 946 ([M+1]+).

 

SEE ALSO

US 2012302538

http://www.google.com/patents/US20120302538

……………

see

US 20150023913

http://www.google.com/patents/US20150023913

…………..

see

WO 2015005901

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=7B94F69052D90AA41E2DAED2AE82A5C0.wapp1nA?docId=WO2015005901&recNum=76&maxRec=2577841&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Odalasvir
Odalasvir structure.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
Dimethyl N,N′-(1,4(1,4)-Dibenzenacyclohexaphane-12,42-diylbis(1hbenzimidazole-5,2-diyl((2S,3aS,7aS)-octahydro-1H-indole-2,1-diyl)((2S)-3-methyl-1-oxobutan-1,2-diyl)))biscarbamate
Clinical data
Legal status
  • Investigational
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number 1415119-52-6
ATC code None
Chemical data
Formula C60H72N8O6
Molecular mass 1001.28 g/mol

सुकून उतना ही देना प्रभू, जितने से जिंदगी चल जाये। औकात बस इतनी देना, कि औरों का भला हो जाये।
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09b37-misc2b027LIONEL MY SON
He was only in first standard in school when I was hit by a deadly one in a million spine stroke called acute transverse mylitis, it made me 90% paralysed and bound to a wheel chair, Now I keep him as my source of inspiration and helping millions, thanks to millions of my readers who keep me going and help me to keep my son happy
सुकून उतना ही देना प्रभू, जितने से
जिंदगी चल जाये।
औकात बस इतनी देना,
कि औरों का भला हो जाये।

 

//////////

Evofosfamide


TH-302.svg

Evofosfamide, HAP-302 , TH-302

Evofosfamide
TH-302.svg
Names
IUPAC name

(1-Methyl-2-nitro-1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl N,N’-bis(2-bromoethyl)phosphorodiamidate
Other names

TH-302; HAP-302
Identifiers
918633-87-1 Yes
ChemSpider 10157061 Yes
Jmol-3D images Image
PubChem 11984561
Properties
C9H16Br2N5O4P
Molar mass 449.04 g·mol−1
6 to 7 g/l

 

TH-302 is a nitroimidazole-linked prodrug of a brominated derivative of an isophosphoramide mustard previously used in cancer drugs

evofosfamide (first disclosed in WO2007002931), useful for treating cancer.

Threshold Pharmaceuticals and licensee Merck Serono are codeveloping evofosfamide, the lead in a series of topoisomerase II-inhibiting hypoxia-activated prodrugs and a 2-nitroimidazole-triggered bromo analog of ifosfamide, for treating cancer, primarily soft tissue sarcoma and pancreatic cancer (phase 3 clinical, as of April 2015).

In November 2014, the FDA granted Fast Track designation to the drug for the treatment of previously untreated patients with metastatic or locally advanced unresectable soft tissue sarcoma.

 

Evofosfamide (INN,[1] USAN;[2] formerly known as TH-302) is an investigational hypoxia-activated prodrug that is in clinical development for cancer treatment. The prodrug is activated only at very low levels of oxygen (hypoxia). Such levels are common in human solid tumors, a phenomenon known as tumor hypoxia.[3]

Evofosfamide is being evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of multiple tumor types as a monotherapy and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents and other targeted cancer drugs
Discovered at Threshold, TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug (HAP) designed to exploit low oxygen levels in hypoxic tumor regions. Therapeutics that specifically target resistant hypoxic zones could provide significant additional antitumor activity and clinical benefit over current chemotherapeutic and radiation therapies.

Evofosfamide (TH-302) was developed by Threshold Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Threshold).[4] The company is located in South San Francisco, CA, USA.

In 2012, Threshold signed a global license and co-development agreement for evofosfamide with Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, which includes an option for Threshold to co-commercialize eofosfamide in the United States. Threshold is responsible for the development of evofosfamide in the soft tissue sarcoma indication in the United States. In all other cancer indications, Threshold and Merck KGaA are developing evofosfamide together.[5] From 2012 to 2013, Merck KGaA paid 110 million US$ for upfront payment and milestone payments to Threshold. Additionally, Merck KGaA covers 70% of all evofosfamide development expenses.[6]
Discovered at Threshold, TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug (HAP) designed to exploit low oxygen levels in hypoxic tumor regions. Therapeutics that specifically target resistant hypoxic zones could provide significant additional antitumor activity and clinical benefit over current chemotherapeutic and radiation therapies.

History

Date Event
Jun 2005 Threshold files evofosfamide (TH-302) patent applications in the U.S.[49]
Jun 2006 Threshold files a evofosfamide (TH-302) patent application in the EU and in Japan[50]
Sep 2011 Threshold starts a Phase 3 trial (TH-CR-406) of evofosfamide in combination with doxorubicin in patients with soft tissue sarcoma
Feb 2012 Threshold signs an agreement with Merck KGaA to co-develop evofosfamide
Apr 2012 A Phase 2b trial (TH-CR-404) of evofosfamide in combination with gemcitabine in patients with pancreatic cancer meets primary endpoint

SEE

WO2007002931

http://www.google.com/patents/WO2007002931A2?cl=en

Example 8

Synthesis of Compounds 25, 26 [0380] To a solution of 2-bromoethylammmonium bromide (19.4 g) in DCM (90 mL) at – 1O0C was added a solution OfPOCl3 (2.3 mL) in DCM (4 mL) followed by addition of a solution of TEA (14.1 mL) in DCM (25 mL). The reaction mixture was filtered, the filtrate concentrated to ca. 30% of the original volume and filtered. The residue was washed with DCM (3×25 mL) and the combined DCM portions concentrated to yield a solid to which a mixture of THF (6 mL) and water (8 mL) was added. THF was removed in a rotary evaporator, the resulting solution chilled overnight in a fridge. The precipitate obtained was filtered, washed with water (10 mL) and ether (30 mL), and dryed in vacuo to yield 2.1 g of:

Isophosphoramide mustard

can be synthesized employing the method provided in Example 8, substituting 2- bromoethylammmonium bromide with 2-chloroethylammmonium chloride. Synthesis of Isophosphoramide mustard has been described (see for example Wiessler et al., supra).

The phosphoramidate alkylator toxin:

was transformed into compounds 24 and 25, employing the method provided in Example 6 and the appropriate Trigger-OH.

Example 25

Synthesis of l-N-methyl-2-nitroimidazole-5-carboxylis acid

A suspension of the nitro ester (39.2 g, 196.9 rnmol) in IN NaOH (600 mL) and water (200 mL) was stirred at rt for about 20 h to give a clear light brown solution. The pH of the reaction mixture was adjusted to about 1 by addition of cone. HCl and the reaction mixture extracted with EA (5 x 150 mL). The combined ethyl acetate layers were dried over MgS O4 and concentrated to yield l-N-methyl-2-nitroimidazole-5-carboxylis acid (“nitro acid”) as a light brown solid (32.2 g, 95%). Example 26

Synthesis of l-N-methyl-2-nitroimidazole-5-carboxylis acid

A mixture of the nitro acid (30.82 g, 180.23 mmol) and triethylamine (140 niL, 285 mmol) in anhydrous THF (360 mL) was stirred while the reaction mixture was cooled in a dry ice-acetonitrile bath (temperature < -20 0C). Isobutyl chloroformate (37.8 mL, 288 mmol) was added drop wise to this cooled reaction mixture during a period of 10 min and stirred for 1 h followed by the addition of sodium borohydride (36 g, 947 mmol) and dropwise addition of water during a period of 1 h while maintaining a temperature around or less than O0C. The reaction mixture was warmed up to O0C. The solid was filtered off and washed with THF. The combined THF portions were evaporated to yield l-N-methyl-2- nitroimidazole-5-methanol as an orange solid (25 g) which was recrystallized from ethyl acetate.

……………………………………….

WO-2015051921

EXAMPLE 1

1

N-Formylsarcosine ethyl ester 1 (1 ,85 kg) was dissolved in toluene (3,9 kg) and ethyl formate (3,28 kg) and cooled to 10 °C. A 20 wt-% solution of potassium tert-butoxide (1 ,84 kg) in tetrahydrofuran (7,4 kg) was added and stirring was continued for 3h. The reaction mixture was extracted 2x with a solution of sodium chloride in water (10 wt-%) and the combined water extracts were washed lx with toluene.

Aqueous hydrogen chloride (25% wt-%; 5,62 kg) was added to the aqueous solution, followed by ethylene glycol (2,36 kg). The reaction mixture was heated to 55-60 °C for lh before only the organic solvent residues were distilled off under vacuum.

Aqueous Cyanamide (50 wt-%, 2,16 kg) was then added at 20 °C, followed by sodium acetate (3,04 kg). The resulting reaction mixture was heated to 85-90 °C for 2h and cooled to 0-5 °C before a pH of ~ 8-9 was adjusted via addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide (32% wt-%; 4,1 kg). Compound 3 (1,66 kg; 75%) was isolated after filtration and washing with water.

Ή-NMR (400 MHz, d6-DMSO): δ= 1,24 (3H, t, J= 7,1 Hz); 3,53 (3H, s); 4,16 (2H, q, J= 7,0 Hz) ; 6,15 (s, 2 H); 7,28 (s, 1H).

HPLC (Rt = 7,7 min): 97,9% (a/a).

REFERENCES

 

1

Threshold Pharmaceuticals Form 8-K from 3 Nov 2014

 

DHAKA BANGLADESH

 

.

Steamers and ferries in Sadarghat Port

Kawran Bazar

.

Dry fish sellers at the Karwan Dry Fish Market (Bazar), Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Sage Therapeutics receives fast track designation for status epilepticus therapy


Allopregnanolone.png

SAGE-547
 ALLOPREGNANOLONE

Sage Therapeutics (Originator)

Sage Therapeutics

For Epilepsy, status epilepticus

SGE-102; SAGE-547; allopregnanolone; allosteric GABA A receptor modulators (CNS disorders),

Sage Therapeutics receives fast track designation for status epilepticus therapy
Ligand Pharmaceuticals announced that its partner Sage Therapeutics has received fast track designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the Captisol-enabled SAGE-547 to treat status epilepticus.

read at

http://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/news/newssage-therapeutics-receives-fast-track-designation-for-status-epilepticus-therapy-4324543?WT.mc_id=DN_News

 

Chemical Name:   (3α)-Allopregnanolone
Synonyms:   (+)-3α-Hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one; (3α,5α)-3-Hydroxypregnan-20-one; 3α,5α-THP; 3α,5α-Tetrahydroprogesterone; 3α-Hydroxy-5α-dihydroprogesterone; 3α-Hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one; 3α-Hydroxy-5α-pregnane-20-one; 5α-Pregnan-3α-ol-20-one; 5α-Pregnane-3α-ol-20-one; Allopregnan-3α-ol-20-one; Allopregnanolone; Allotetrahydroprogesterone;
CAS Number:   516-54-1
Applications:   (3α)-Allopregnanolone acts as a GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator. (3α)-Allopregnanolone is a metabolite of Progesterone (P755900). (3α)-Allopregnanolone is a neuroactive steroid present in the blood and also the brain.
References:   Puja, G. et al.: Neuron, 4, 759 (1990); Belelli, D. et ael. Neurosteroid, 6, 565 (2006); Viapiano, M. et al.: Neurochem. Res., 23, 155 (1998);
Mol. Formula:   C21H34O2
Appearance:   White Solid
Melting Point:   174-176°C
Mol. Weight:   318.49

SAGE-547 is a GABA(A) receptor modulator in phase I/II clinical trials at Sage Therapeutics as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of adults with super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE).

In 2014, orphan drug designation was assigned in the U.S for the treatment of status epilepticus. In July 2014, fast track designation was received in the U.S. for the treatment of adults with super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE).

July 22, 2014

SAGE Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel medicines to treat life-threatening, rare central nervous system (CNS) disorders, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted fast track designation to the SAGE-547 development program. SAGE-547 is an allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors in development for the treatment of adult patients with refractory status epilepticus who have not responded to standard regimens (super-refractory status epilepticus, or SRSE). SAGE is currently evaluating SAGE-547 in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial for the treatment of SRSE. Preliminary data indicate that the first four patients enrolled in the clinical trial met the key efficacy endpoint, in that each was successfully weaned off his or her anesthetic agent while SAGE-547 was being administered. There have also been no reported drug-related serious adverse events in these four patients to date.

“The fast track designation for SAGE-547 recognizes the significant unmet need that exists in the treatment of super-refractory status epilepticus,” said Jeff Jonas, MD, chief executive officer of SAGE Therapeutics. “The receipt of orphan drug designation earlier this year for status epilepticus and the fast track designation are both significant regulatory milestones for SAGE-547, and we will continue to work closely with the FDA to advance our lead compound and the additional programs in our pipeline for the treatment of life-threatening CNS disorders.”

Fast track designation is granted by the FDA to facilitate the development and expedite the review of drug candidates that are intended to treat serious or life-threatening conditions and that demonstrate the potential to address unmet medical needs.

About SAGE-547

SAGE-547 is an allosteric modulator of both synaptic and extra-synaptic GABAA receptors. GABAA receptors are widely regarded as validated drug targets for a variety of CNS disorders, with decades of research and multiple approved drugs targeting these receptor systems. SAGE-547 is an intravenous agent in Phase 1/2 clinical development as an adjunctive therapy, a therapy combined with current therapeutic approaches, for the treatment of SRSE.

About Status Epilepticus (SE)

SE is a life-threatening seizure condition that occurs in approximately 150,000 people each year in the U.S., of which 30,000 SE patients die.1 We estimate that there are 35,000 patients with SE in the U.S. that are hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) each year. An SE patient is first treated with benzodiazepines, and if no response, is then treated with other, second-line, anti-seizure drugs. If the seizure persists after the second-line therapy, the patient is diagnosed as having refractory SE (RSE), admitted to the ICU and placed into a medically induced coma. Currently, there are no therapies that have been specifically approved for RSE; however, physicians typically use anesthetic agents to induce the coma and stop the seizure immediately. After a period of 24 hours, an attempt is made to wean the patient from the anesthetic agents to evaluate whether or not the seizure condition has resolved. Unfortunately, not all patients respond to weaning attempts, in which case the patient must be maintained in the medically induced coma. At this point, the patient is diagnosed as having SRSE. Currently, there are no therapies specifically approved for SRSE.

About SAGE Therapeutics

SAGE Therapeutics (NASDAQ: SAGE) is a biopharmaceutical company committed to developing and commercializing novel medicines to treat life-threatening, rare CNS disorders. SAGE’s lead program, SAGE-547, is in clinical development for super-refractory status epilepticus and is the first of several compounds the company is developing in its portfolio of potential seizure medicines. SAGE’s proprietary chemistry platform has generated multiple new compounds that target GABAA and NMDA receptors, which are broadly accepted as impacting many psychiatric and neurological disorders. SAGE Therapeutics is a public company launched in 2010 by an experienced team of R&D leaders, CNS experts and investors. For more information, please visitwww.sagerx.com.

Allopregnanolone
Allopregnanolone.png
Identifiers
PubChem 262961
ChemSpider 17216124 Yes
ChEMBL CHEMBL38856 
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C21H34O2
Molar mass 318.49 g/mol

 

Allopregnanolone (3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one or 3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone), generally abbreviated as ALLO or as 3α,5α-THP, is an endogenous inhibitory pregnane neurosteroid.[1] It is synthesized from progesterone, and is a potent positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor.[1] Allopregnanolone has effects similar to those of other potentiators of the GABAA receptor such as the benzodiazepines, including anxiolytic, sedative, and anticonvulsant activity.[1]

The 21-hydroxylated derivative of this compound, tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), is an endogenous inhibitory neurosteroid with similar properties to those of allopregnanolone, and the 3β-methyl analogue of allopregnanolone, ganaxolone, is under development to treat epilepsy and other conditions.[1]

Biosynthesis

The biosynthesis of allopregnanolone starts with the conversion of progesterone into 5α-dihydroprogesterone by 5α-reductase type I. After that, 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase converts this intermediate into allopregnanolone.[1]

Depression, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction are frequently-seen side effects of 5α-reductase inhibitors such as finasteride, and are thought to be caused, in part, by interfering with the normal production of allopregnanolone.[2]

Mechanism

Allopregnanolone acts as a potent positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor.[1] While allopregnanolone, like other inhibitory neurosteroids such as THDOC, positively modulates all GABAA receptor isoforms, those isoforms containing δ subunits exhibit the greatest potentiation.[1] Allopregnanolone has also been found to act as a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA-ρ receptor, though the implications of this action are unclear.[3][4] In addition to its actions on GABA receptors, allopregnanolone, like progesterone, is known to be a negative allosteric modulator of nACh receptors,[5] and also appears to act as a negative allosteric modulator of the 5-HT3 receptor.[6] Along with the other inhibitory neurosteroids, allopregnanolone appears to have little or no action at other ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA, AMPA, kainate, and glycine receptors.[7]

Unlike progesterone, allopregnanolone is inactive at the nuclear progesterone receptor (nPR).[7] However, allopregnanolone can be intracellularly oxidized into 5α-dihydroprogesterone, which is an agonist of the nPR, and thus/in accordance, allopregnanolone does appear to have indirect nPR-mediated progestogenic effects.[8] In addition, allopregnanolone has recently been found to be an agonist of the newly-discovered membrane progesterone receptors (mPR), including mPRδ, mPRα, and mPRβ, with its activity at these receptors about a magnitude more potent than at the GABAA receptor.[9][10] The action of allopregnanolone at these receptors may be related, in part, to its neuroprotective and antigonadotropic properties.[9][11] Also like progesterone, recent evidence has shown that allopregnanolone is an activator of the pregnane X receptor.[7][12]

Similarly to many other GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators, allopregnanolone has been found to act as an inhibitor of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs),[13] including α1 subtypes Cav1.2 and Cav1.3.[14] However, the threshold concentration of allopregnanolone to inhibit L-VGCCs was determined to be 3 μM (3,000 nM), which is far greater than the concentration of 5 nM that has been estimated to be naturally produced in the human brain.[14] Thus, inhibition of L-VGCCs is unlikely of any actual significance in the effects of endogenous allopregnanolone.[14] Also, allopregnanolone, along with several other neurosteroids, has been found to activate the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor (GPBAR1, or TGR5).[15] However, it is only able to do so at micromolar concentrations, which, similarly to the case of the L-VGCCs, are far greater than the low nanomolar concentrations of allopregnanolone estimated to be present in the brain.[15]

Function

Allopregnanolone possesses a wide variety of effects, including, in no particular order, antidepressant, anxiolytic, stress-reducing, rewarding,[16] prosocial,[17] antiaggressive,[18] prosexual,[17] sedative, pro-sleep,[19] cognitive and memory-impairing, analgesic,[20] anesthetic, anticonvulsant, neuroprotective, and neurogenic effects.[1]

Fluctuations in the levels of allopregnanolone and the other neurosteroids seem to play an important role in the pathophysiology of mood, anxiety, premenstrual syndrome, catamenial epilepsy, and various other neuropsychiatric conditions.[21][22][23]

Increased levels of allopregnanolone can produce paradoxical effects, including negative mood, anxiety, irritability, and aggression.[24][25][26] This appears to be because allopregnanolone possesses biphasic, U-shaped actions at the GABAA receptor – moderate level increases (in the range of 1.5–2 nM/L total allopregnanolone, which are approximately equivalent to luteal phase levels) inhibit the activity of the receptor, while lower and higher concentration increases stimulate it.[24][25] This seems to be a common effect of many GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators.[26][21] In accordance, acute administration of low doses of micronized progesterone (which reliably elevates allopregnanolone levels), have been found to have negative effects on mood, while higher doses have a neutral effect.[27]

Therapeutic applications

Allopregnanolone and the other endogenous inhibitory neurosteroids have very short half-lives, and for this reason, have not been pursued for clinical use themselves. Instead, synthetic analogs with improved pharmacokinetic profiles, such as ganaxolone, have been synthesized and are being investigated. However, exogenous progesterone, such as oral micronized progesterone (OMP), reliably elevates allopregnanolone levels in the body with good dose-to-serum level correlations.[28] Due to this, it has been suggested that OMP could be described as a prodrug of sorts for allopregnanolone.[28] As a result, there has been some interest in using OMP to treat catamenial epilepsy,[29] as well as other menstrual cycle-related and neurosteroid-associated conditions.

……………………………………….

http://www.google.com/patents/WO2006037016A2?cl=en

Materials and Methods

[0181] The materials and methods used for the follwing experiments have been described in Griffin L.D., et al, Nature Medicine 10: 704-711 (2004). This reference is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

Example 1: Allopregnanolone Treatment of Niemann Pick type-C Mice Substantially Reduces Accumulation of the Gangliosides GMl, GM2, and GM3 in the Brain [0182] Mice were given a single injection of allopregnanolone, prepared in 20% βcyclodextrin in phosphate buffered saline, at a concentration of 25 mg/kg. The injection was on day 7 of life (P7, postnatal day 7). Concentrations of gangliosides GMl, GM2, GM3, were measured as well as other lipids such as ceramides and cerebrosides.

…………………………………………….

WO-2014031792 OR EQ

http://www.google.com/patents/US20140057885?cl=en

…………………………………….

WO-2013112605

http://www.google.com/patents/WO2013112605A2?cl=en

References

  1. Reddy DS (2010). “Neurosteroids: endogenous role in the human brain and therapeutic potentials”. Prog. Brain Res. 186: 113–37. doi:10.1016/B978-0-444-53630-3.00008-7. PMC 3139029. PMID 21094889.
  2. Römer B, Gass P (December 2010). “Finasteride-induced depression: new insights into possible pathomechanisms”. J Cosmet Dermatol 9 (4): 331–2. doi:10.1111/j.1473-2165.2010.00533.x. PMID 21122055.
  3. Morris KD, Moorefield CN, Amin J (October 1999). “Differential modulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type C receptor by neuroactive steroids”. Mol. Pharmacol. 56 (4): 752–9. PMID 10496958.
  4. Li W, Jin X, Covey DF, Steinbach JH (October 2007). “Neuroactive steroids and human recombinant rho1 GABAC receptors”. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 323 (1): 236–47. doi:10.1124/jpet.107.127365. PMID 17636008.
  5. Bullock AE, Clark AL, Grady SR, et al. (June 1997). “Neurosteroids modulate nicotinic receptor function in mouse striatal and thalamic synaptosomes”. J. Neurochem. 68 (6): 2412–23. PMID 9166735.
  6. Wetzel CH, Hermann B, Behl C, et al. (September 1998). “Functional antagonism of gonadal steroids at the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor”. Mol. Endocrinol. 12 (9): 1441–51. doi:10.1210/mend.12.9.0163. PMID 9731711.
  7. Mellon SH (October 2007). “Neurosteroid regulation of central nervous system development”. Pharmacol. Ther. 116 (1): 107–24. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2007.04.011. PMC 2386997. PMID 17651807.
  8. Rupprecht R, Reul JM, Trapp T, et al. (September 1993). “Progesterone receptor-mediated effects of neuroactive steroids”. Neuron 11 (3): 523–30. PMID 8398145.
  9. Thomas P, Pang Y (2012). “Membrane progesterone receptors: evidence for neuroprotective, neurosteroid signaling and neuroendocrine functions in neuronal cells”. Neuroendocrinology 96 (2): 162–71. doi:10.1159/000339822. PMC 3489003. PMID 22687885.
  10. Pang Y, Dong J, Thomas P (January 2013). “Characterization, neurosteroid binding and brain distribution of human membrane progesterone receptors δ and {epsilon} (mPRδ and mPR{epsilon}) and mPRδ involvement in neurosteroid inhibition of apoptosis”. Endocrinology 154 (1): 283–95. doi:10.1210/en.2012-1772. PMC 3529379. PMID 23161870.
  11. Sleiter N, Pang Y, Park C, et al. (August 2009). “Progesterone receptor A (PRA) and PRB-independent effects of progesterone on gonadotropin-releasing hormone release”. Endocrinology 150 (8): 3833–44. doi:10.1210/en.2008-0774. PMC 2717864. PMID 19423765.
  12. Lamba V, Yasuda K, Lamba JK, et al. (September 2004). “PXR (NR1I2): splice variants in human tissues, including brain, and identification of neurosteroids and nicotine as PXR activators”. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 199 (3): 251–65. doi:10.1016/j.taap.2003.12.027. PMID 15364541.
  13. Hu AQ, Wang ZM, Lan DM, et al. (July 2007). “Inhibition of evoked glutamate release by neurosteroid allopregnanolone via inhibition of L-type calcium channels in rat medial prefrontal cortex”. Neuropsychopharmacology 32 (7): 1477–89. doi:10.1038/sj.npp.1301261. PMID 17151597.
  14. Earl DE, Tietz EI (April 2011). “Inhibition of recombinant L-type voltage-gated calcium channels by positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors”. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 337 (1): 301–11. doi:10.1124/jpet.110.178244. PMC 3063747. PMID 21262851.
  15. Keitel V, Görg B, Bidmon HJ, et al. (November 2010). “The bile acid receptor TGR5 (Gpbar-1) acts as a neurosteroid receptor in brain”. Glia 58 (15): 1794–805. doi:10.1002/glia.21049. PMID 20665558.
  16. Rougé-Pont F, Mayo W, Marinelli M, Gingras M, Le Moal M, Piazza PV (July 2002). “The neurosteroid allopregnanolone increases dopamine release and dopaminergic response to morphine in the rat nucleus accumbens”. Eur. J. Neurosci. 16 (1): 169–73. PMID 12153544.
  17. Frye CA (December 2009). “Neurosteroids’ effects and mechanisms for social, cognitive, emotional, and physical functions”. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 34 Suppl 1: S143–61. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2009.07.005. PMC 2898141. PMID 19656632.
  18. Pinna G, Costa E, Guidotti A (February 2005). “Changes in brain testosterone and allopregnanolone biosynthesis elicit aggressive behavior”. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102 (6): 2135–40. doi:10.1073/pnas.0409643102. PMC 548579. PMID 15677716.
  19. Terán-Pérez G, Arana-Lechuga Y, Esqueda-León E, Santana-Miranda R, Rojas-Zamorano JÁ, Velázquez Moctezuma J (October 2012). “Steroid hormones and sleep regulation”. Mini Rev Med Chem 12 (11): 1040–8. PMID 23092405.
  20. Patte-Mensah C, Meyer L, Taleb O, Mensah-Nyagan AG (February 2014). “Potential role of allopregnanolone for a safe and effective therapy of neuropathic pain”. Prog. Neurobiol. 113: 70–8. doi:10.1016/j.pneurobio.2013.07.004. PMID 23948490.
  21. Bäckström T, Andersson A, Andreé L, et al. (December 2003). “Pathogenesis in menstrual cycle-linked CNS disorders”. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 1007: 42–53. PMID 14993039.
  22. Guille C, Spencer S, Cavus I, Epperson CN (July 2008). “The role of sex steroids in catamenial epilepsy and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: implications for diagnosis and treatment”. Epilepsy Behav 13 (1): 12–24. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2008.02.004. PMID 18346939.
  23. Finocchi C, Ferrari M (May 2011). “Female reproductive steroids and neuronal excitability”. Neurol. Sci. 32 Suppl 1: S31–5. doi:10.1007/s10072-011-0532-5. PMID 21533709.
  24. Bäckström T, Haage D, Löfgren M, et al. (September 2011). “Paradoxical effects of GABA-A modulators may explain sex steroid induced negative mood symptoms in some persons”. Neuroscience 191: 46–54. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2011.03.061. PMID 21600269.
  25. Andréen L, Nyberg S, Turkmen S, van Wingen G, Fernández G, Bäckström T (September 2009). “Sex steroid induced negative mood may be explained by the paradoxical effect mediated by GABAA modulators”. Psychoneuroendocrinology 34 (8): 1121–32. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2009.02.003. PMID 19272715.
  26. Bäckström T, Bixo M, Johansson M, et al. (February 2014). “Allopregnanolone and mood disorders”. Prog. Neurobiol. 113: 88–94. doi:10.1016/j.pneurobio.2013.07.005. PMID 23978486.
  27. Andréen L, Sundström-Poromaa I, Bixo M, Nyberg S, Bäckström T (August 2006). “Allopregnanolone concentration and mood–a bimodal association in postmenopausal women treated with oral progesterone”. Psychopharmacology (Berl.) 187 (2): 209–21. doi:10.1007/s00213-006-0417-0. PMID 16724185.
  28. Andréen L, Spigset O, Andersson A, Nyberg S, Bäckström T (June 2006). “Pharmacokinetics of progesterone and its metabolites allopregnanolone and pregnanolone after oral administration of low-dose progesterone”. Maturitas 54 (3): 238–44. doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2005.11.005. PMID 16406399.
  29. Orrin Devinsky; Steven Schachter; Steven Pacia (1 January 2005). Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Epilepsy. Demos Medical Publishing. pp. 378–. ISBN 978-1-934559-08-6.

Additional reading

  • Herd, MB; Belelli, D; Lambert, JJ (2007). Neurosteroid modulation of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. Pharmacol. Ther. 116(1):20-34. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2007.03.007.

Nemonoxacin….TaiGen’s pneumonia antibiotic Taigexyn 奈诺沙星 gets marketing approval in Taiwan


Nemonoxacin structure.svg

Nemonoxacin 奈诺沙星

378746-64-6 CAS

TG-873870

  • C20-H25-N3-O4
  • 371.4345

WARNER CHILCOTT ORIGINATOR

CLINICAL TRIALS    http://clinicaltrials.gov/search/intervention=Nemonoxacin

(3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-l-cyclopropyl-l,4- dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid

7-[3(S)-Amino-5(S)-methylpiperidin-1-yl]-1-cyclopropyl-8-methoxy-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid
Taigexyn has been approved in Taiwan IN 2014

“TAIPEI, MARCH 13, 2014 /PRNEWSWIRE/ — TAIGEN BIOTECHNOLOGY …”
13.03.14 |

TaiGen Biotechnology Receives Marketing Approval from the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration for Taigexyn in Taiwan

TAIPEI, March 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — TaiGen Biotechnology Company, Limited (“TaiGen”) today announced that the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) has approved the new drug application (NDA) of Taigexyn® (nemonoxacin) oral formulation (500 mg) for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CAP). With this NDA approval, Taiwan is the first region to grant marketing approval to Taigexyn®. An NDA for Taigexyn®  was also submitted to China FDA (CFDA) in April 2013 and is currently under review.

Nemonoxacin is a novel non-fluorinated quinolone antibiotic undergoing clinical trials.

Taigexyn Granted QIDP and Fast Track Designations

TaiGen Biotechnology announced that the FDA has granted nemonoxacin (Taigexyn) Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) and Fast Track designations for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CAP) and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI).

Safety and clinical pharmacokinetics of nemonoxacin, a novel non-fluorinated quinolone, in healthy Chinese volunteers following single and multiple oral doses

Nemonoxacin is a novel non-fluorinated quinolone broad spectrum antibiotic available in both oral and intravenous formulations. Nemonoxacin demonstrates activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and atypical pathogens. Nemonoxacin also possesses activities against methicillin-­resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant pathogens.

Nemonoxacin is a novel non-flourinated quinolone antibiotic registered in Taiwan for the oral treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. Clinical trials are in development at TaiGen Biotechnology for the treatment of diabetic foot infections and for the treatment of moderate to severe community-acquired pneumonia with an intravenous formulation. The drug is thought to accomplish its antibacterial action through topoisomerase inhibition.

Originally developed at Procter & Gamble, nemonoxacin was the subject of a strategic alliance formed in January 2005 between P&G and TaiGen to further the development and commercialization of nemonoxacin. In 2012, the product was licensed by TaiGen Biotechnology to Zhejiang Medicine in China for manufacturing, sales and marketing. In 2014, TaiGen out-licensed the exclusive rights of the product in Russian Federation, Commonwealth Independent States and Turkey to R-Pharm.

TaiGen has completed two Phase 2 clinical studies, one in CAP and the other in diabetic foot infections with demonstrated efficacy and safety. In the clinical trials conducted to date, nemonoxacin has shown activity against drug-resistant bacteria such as MRSA, quinolone-resistant MRSA, as well as quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Malate salt

Nemonoxacin malate anhydrous
951163-60-3 CAS NO, MW: 505.5209

Nemonoxacin malate hemihydrate
951313-26-1, MW: 1029.0566

Chemical structure of nemonoxacin as a malate salt (C20H25N3O4·C4H6O5·H2O). Nemonoxacin is the free base, and its molecular mass is 371.44 g/mol. The molecular mass of the salt, nemonoxacin malate, is 514.53 g/mol.

……………………..

isomeric compounds are:

Figure imgf000003_0002

(3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-l-cyclopropyl-l,4-dihydro-8- methoxy-4-oxo-3 -quinolinecarboxylic acid

COMPD1…….DESIRED

Figure imgf000003_0003

(3S,5R)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-l-cyclopropyl-l,4-dihydro-8- methoxy-4-oxo-3 -quinolinecarboxylic acid

COMPD 1’….NOT DESIRED

EP2303271A1

Example 1

Malate salts of (3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-l-cyclopropyl-l,4- dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (Compound 1) and (3S,5R)-7- [3-ammo-5-methyl-piperidinyl]- 1 -cyclopropyl- 1 ,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3- quinolinecarboxylic acid (Compound 1′) were synthesized as follows:

(A) Synthesis of (3S,5S)-(5-Methyl-piperidin-3-yl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester (Compound 9) and (3S,5R)-(5-Methyl-piperidin-3-yl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester (Compound 9′): Compound 9′ was synthesized as shown in Scheme 1 below:

Scheme 1

Figure imgf000009_0001

3 4 Boc

Figure imgf000009_0002

A 50-L reactor was charged with Compound 2 (5.50 kg, 42.60 mol), methanol (27 L) and cooled to 10-150C. Thionyl chloride (10.11 kg, 2.0 equiv.) was added via an addition funnel over a period of 65 min, with external cooling to keep temperature below 30°. The resulting solution was stirred at 250C for 1.0 hour, after which methanol was removed under reduced pressure. The oily residue was azeotroped with ethyl acetate (3 x 2.5 L) to remove residual methanol, dissolved in ethyl acetate (27.4 L), charged into a 50 L reactor, and neutralized by slow addition of triethylamine (3.6 kg) below 3O0C. The resulting suspension was filtered to remove triethylamine hydrochloride.

The filtrate was charged to a 50 L reactor, along with DMAP (0.53 kg). Di- fert-butyl dicarbonate (8.43 kg) was added via hot water heated addition funnel, over a period of 30 min at a temperature of 20-300C. The reaction was complete after 1 hour as determined by TLC analysis. The organic phase was washed with ice cold IN HCl (2 x 7.5 L), saturated sodium bicarbonate solution (1 x 7.5 L), dried over magnesium sulfate, and filtered. After ethyl acetate was removed under reduced pressure, crystalline slurry was obtained, triturated with MTBE (10.0 L), and filtered to afford Compound 3 as a white solid (5.45 kg, 52.4%).

Anal. Calcd for CHHI7NO5 : C, 54.3; H, 7.04; N, 5.76. Found: C, 54.5; H, 6.96; N, 5.80. HRMS (ESI+) Expected for CHHI8NO5, [M+H] 244.1185. Found

244.1174; 1H NMR (CDCl3, 500 MHz):δ=4.54 (dd, J= 3.1, 9.5 Hz, IH), 3.7 (s, 3H), 2.58-2.50 (m, IH), 2.41 (ddd, IH, J= 17.6, 9.5, 3.7), 2.30-2.23 (m, IH), 1.98-1.93 (m, IH), 1.40 (s, 9H); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.70 MHz) δ 173.3, 171.9, 149.2, 83.5, 58.8, 52.5, 31.1, 27.9, 21.5. Mp 70.20C.

A 50-L reactor was charged with Compound 3 (7.25 kg, 28.8 mol), DME (6.31 kg), and Bredereck’s Reagent (7.7 kg, 44.2 mole). The solution was agitated and heated to 750C + 50C for three hours. The reaction was cooled to O0C over an hour, during which time a precipitate formed. The mixture was kept at O0C for an hour, filtered, and dried in a vacuum oven for at least 30 hours at 3O0C + 50C to give compound 4 as a white crystalline solid (6.93 kg, 77.9%).

Anal. Calcd for Ci4H22N2O5: C, 56.4; H, 7.43; N, 9.39. Found C, 56.4; H, 7.32; N, 9.48; HRMS (ESI+) Expected for Ci4H22N2O5, [M+H] 299.1607. Found 299.1613; 1H NMR (CDCl3, 499.8 MHz) δ = 7.11 (s, IH), 4.54 (dd, IH, J= 10.8, 3.6), 3.74 (s, 3H), 3.28-3.19 (m, IH), 3.00 (s, 6H), 2.97-2.85 (m,lH), 1.48 (s, 9H); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.7 MHz) δ = 172.6, 169.5, 150.5, 146.5, 90.8, 82.2, 56.0, 52.3, 42.0, 28.1, 26.3. MP 127.90C. A 10-gallon Pfaudler reactor was charged with ESCAT 142 (Engelhard Corp.

N.J, US) 5% palladium powder on carbon (50% wet, 0.58 kg wet wt), Compound 4 (1.89 kg, 6.33 mol), and isopropanol (22.4 Kg). After agitated under a 45-psi hydrogen atmosphere at 450C for 18 hrs, the reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature and filtered though a bed of Celite (0.51 kg). The filtrate was evaporated under reduced pressure to give a thick oil, which was solidified on standing to afford Compound 5 (1.69 kg, 100%) as a 93:7 diastereomeric mixture.

A sample of product mixture was purified by preparative HPLC to give material for analytical data. Anal. Calcd for Ci2Hi9NO5: C, 56.0; H, 7.44; N, 5.44. Found C, 55.8; H, 7.31; N, 5.44; MS (ESI+) Expected for Ci2Hi9NO5, [M+H] 258.1342. Found 258.1321; 1H NMR (CDCl3, 499.8 MHz) δ = 4.44 (m, IH), 3.72 (s, 3H), 2.60-2.48 (m, 2H), 1.59-1.54 (m, IH), 1.43 (s, 9H), 1.20 (d, j = 6.8 Hz,3H); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.7 MHz) δ = 175.7, 172.1, 149.5, 83.6, 57.4, 52.5, 37.5, 29.8, 27.9, 16.2. Mp 89.90C.

A 50-L reactor was charged with Compound 5 (3.02 kg, 11.7 mol), absolute ethanol (8.22 kg), and MTBE (14.81 kg). Sodium borohydride (1.36 kg, 35.9 mol) was added in small portions at 00C + 50C. A small amount of effervescence was observed. The reaction mixture was warmed to 1O0C + 50C and calcium chloride dihydrate (2.65 kg) was added in portions at 1O0C + 50C over an hour. The reaction was allowed to warm to 2O0C + 50C over one hour and agitated for an additional 12 hours at 200C + 50C. After the reaction was cooled to -50C + 50C, ice-cold 2N HCl (26.9 kg) was added slowly at of O0C + 50C. Agitation was stopped. The lower aqueous phase was removed. The reactor was charged with aqueous saturated sodium bicarbonate (15.6 kg) over five minutes under agitation. Agitation was stopped again and the lower aqueous phase was removed. The reactor was charged with magnesium sulfate (2.5 kg) and agitated for at leastlO minutes. The mixture was filtered though a nutsche filter, and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford Compound 6 (1.80 kg, 66%). Anal. Calcd for CnH23NO4: C, 56.6 H, 9.94; N, 6.00. Found C, 56.0; H, 9.68;

N, 5.96; HRMS (ESI+) Expected for CnH24NO4, [M+H] 234.1705. Found 234.1703; 1H NMR (CDCl3, 500 MHz) δ = 6.34 (d, J= 8.9 Hz, IH, NH), 4.51 (t, J= 5.8, 5.3 Hz, IH, NHCHCH2OH), 4.34 (t, J= 5.3, 5.3 Hz, IH, OBCHCH2OH), 3.46-3.45, (m, IH, NHCH), 3.28 (dd, J= 10.6, 5.3 Hz, NHCHCHHOH), 3.21 (dd, J= 10.2, 5.8 Hz , IH, CH3CHCHHOH), 3.16 (dd, J = 10.2, 6.2 Hz, IH, NHCHCHHOH), 3.12 (dd, J= 10.6, 7.1 Hz , IH, CH3CHCHHOH), 1.53-1.50 (m, IH, CH3CHCHHOH), 1.35 (s, 9H, 0(CHB)3, 1.30 (ddd, J = 13.9, 10.2, 3.7 Hz, IH, NHCHCHHCH), 1.14 (ddd, J= 13.6, 10.2, 3.4 Hz, IH, NHCHCHHCH), 0.80 (d, J= 6.6 Hz, 3H, CH3); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.7 MHz) δ 156.1, 77.9, 50.8, 65.1, 67.6, 65.1, 35.6, 32.8, 29.0, 17.1. Mp 92.10C. A 50 L reactor was charged with a solution of Compound 6 (5.1 kg) in isopropyl acetate (19.7 kg). The reaction was cooled to 150C + 5°C and triethylamine (7.8 kg) was added at that temperature. The reactor was further cooled to O0C + 50C and methanesulfonyl chloride (MsCl) (6.6 kg) was added. The reaction was stirred for a few hours and monitored for completion by HPLC or TLC. The reaction was quenched by saturated aqueous bicarbonate solution. The organic phase was isolated and washed successively with cold 10% aqueous triethylamine solution, cold aqueous HCl solution, cold saturated aqueous bicarbonate solution, and finally saturated aqueous brine solution. The organic phase was dried, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo below 550C + 50C to afford compound 7 as a solid/liquid slurry, which was used in the subsequent reaction without further purification.

After charged with 9.1 kg of neat benzylamine, a 50 L reactor was warmed to 550C, at which temperature, a solution of compound 7 (8.2 kg) in 1,2- dimethoxyethane (14.1 kg) was added. After the addition, the reaction was stirred at 6O0C + 50C for several hours and monitored for completion by TLC or HPLC. The reaction was cooled to ambient temperature and the solvent was removed under vacuum. The residue was diluted with 11.7 kg of 15% (v/v) ethyl acetate/hexanes solution and treated, while agitating, with 18.7 kg of 20% (wt) aqueous potassium carbonate solution. A triphasic mixture was obtained upon standing. The upper organic layer was collected. The isolated middle layer was extracted twice again with 11.7 kg portions of 15% (v/v) ethyl acetate/hexanes solution. The combined organic layers were concentrated under vacuum to give an oily residue. The residue was then purified by chromatography to afford Compound 8 as an oil. A 40 L pressure vessel was charged with 0.6 kg 50% wet, solid palladium on carbon (ElOl, 10 wt. %) under flow of nitrogen. A solution of Compound 8 (3.2 kg) in 13.7 kg of absolute ethanol was then added to the reactor under nitrogen. The reactor was purged with nitrogen and then pressurized with hydrogen at 45 psi. The reaction was then heated to 45°C. It was monitored by TLC or LC. Upon completion, the reaction was cooled to ambient temperature, vented, and purged with nitrogen. The mixture was filtered through a bed of Celite and the solid was washed with 2.8 kg of absolute ethanol. The filtrate was concentrated under vacuum to afford Compound 9 as a waxy solid.

TLC R/(Silica F254, 70:30 v/v ethyl acetate-hexanes, KMnO4 stain) = 0.12; 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ 5.31 (br s, IH), 3.80-3.68 (m, IH), 2.92 (d, J=I 1.4 Hz,

IH), 2.77 (AB quart, JAB=12.0 Hz, v=50.2 Hz, 2H), 2.19 (t, J=10.7 Hz, IH), 1.82-1.68 (m, 2H), 1.54 (br s, IH), 1.43 (s, 9H), 1.25-1.15 (m, IH), 0.83 (d, J=6.6 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ: 155.3, 78.9, 54.3, 50.8, 45.3, 37.9, 28.4, 27.1, 19.2; MS (ESI+) m/z 215 (M+H), 429 (2M+H). Similarly, (3S,5R)-(5-Methyl-piperidin-3-yl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester

(Compound 9′) was synthesized as shown in Scheme 2.

Scheme 2

Figure imgf000013_0001

HN Boc HN Boc

NaBH4,EtOH w –  MsCI1TEA . „ _. – – _. „ Benzyl Amine

THF EA1CoId

Figure imgf000013_0002

(B) Synthesis of l-Cyclopropyl-7-fluoro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-l,4-dihydro-quinoline-3- carboxylic acid (Compound 10): Compound 10 was prepared according to the method described in U.S. Patent

6,329,391.

(C) Synthesis of borone ester chelate of l-Cyclopropyl-7-fluoro-8-methoxy-4-oxo- l,4-dihydro-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (Compound 11):

Scheme 3

Figure imgf000013_0003

Toluene, tert-Butylmethyl ether 20-500C, filter

A reactor was charged with boron oxide (2.0 kg, 29 mol), glacial acetic acid (8.1 L, 142 mol), and acetic anhydride (16.2 L, 171 mol). The resulting mixture was refluxed at least 2 hours, and then cooled to 400C, at which temperature, 7- fluoroquinolone acid compound 10 (14.2 kg, 51 mol) was added. The mixture was refluxed for at least 6 hours, and then cooled to about 900C. Toluene (45 L) was added to the reaction. At 5O0C, terϊ-butylmethyl ether (19 L) was added to introduce precipitation. The mixture was then cooled to 200C and filtered to isolate the precipitation. The isolated solid was then washed with teτt-butylmethyl ether (26 L) prior to drying in a vacuum oven at 4O0C (50 torr) to afford Compound 11 in a yield of 86.4%. Raman (cm 1): 3084.7, 3022.3, 2930.8, 1709.2, 1620.8, 1548.5, 1468.0, 1397.7, 1368.3, 1338.5, 1201.5, 955.3, 653.9, 580.7, 552.8, 384.0, 305.8. NMR (CDCl3, 300 MHz) δ (ppm): 9.22 (s, IH), 8.38-8.33 (m, IH), 7.54 (t, J=9.8 Hz, IH), 4.38-4.35 (m, IH), 4.13 (s, 3H), 2.04 (s, 6H), 1.42-1.38 (m, 2H), 1.34-1.29 (m, 2H). TLC (Whatman MKC18F Silica, 6θA, 200 μm), Mobile Phase: 1 :1 (v/v) CH3CN : 0.5N NaCl (aq), UV (254/366 nm) visualization; R^O.4-0.5. (D) Synthesis of malate salt of (3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidmyl]-l- cyclopropyl-l,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (Compound 1) and malate salt of (3S,5R)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidmyl]-l-cyclopropyl-l,4- dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (Compound 1′)

Compound 1 was synthesized from compound 9 as shown in Scheme 4 below:

Scheme 4

Figure imgf000014_0001

5O0C 3 d

a 6 0 N HCI (aq) CH2CI2 35°40°C 12 h t> Extract pH ad]ust to ~7-8 50″-65″C filter

Figure imgf000014_0003
Figure imgf000014_0002
Figure imgf000014_0004

A reactor was charged with Compound 11 (4.4 kg, 10.9 mol), Compound 9 (2.1 kg, 9.8 mol), triethylamine (TEA) (2.1 L, 14.8 mol), and acetonitrile (33.5 L, 15.7 L/kg). The resulting mixture was stirred at approximately 500C till completion of the reaction, as monitored by HPLC or reverse phase TLC. It was cooled to approximately 35°C and the reaction volume was reduced to approximately half by distillation of acetonitrile under vacuum between 0-400 torr. After 28.2 kg of 3.0 N NaOH (aq) solution was added, the reaction mixture was warmed to approximately 4O0C, distilled under vacuum until no further distillates were observed, and hydro lyzed at room temperature. Upon completion of hydrolysis, which was monitored by HPLC or reverse phase TLC, 4-5 kg of glacial acetic acid was added to neutralize the reaction mixture.

The resulting solution was extracted 3 times with 12.7 kg (9.6 L) of dichloromethane. The organic layers were combined and transferred to another reactor. The reaction volume was reduced to approximately a half by evaporation at 400C. After 20.2 Kg 6.0N HCl (aq) solution was added, the reaction mixture was stirred for at least 12 hours at 35°C. After the reaction was completed as monitored by HPLC or reverse phase TLC, agitation was discontinued to allow phase separation. The organic phase was removed and the aqueous layer was extracted with 12.7 kg (9.6 L) of dichloromethane. The aqueous layer was diluted with 18.3 kg distilled water and warmed to approximately 500C. Dichloromethane was further removed by distillation under vacuum (100-400 torr).

The pH of the aqueous solution was then adjusted to 7.8-8.1 by adding about 9.42 kg of 3.0 N NaOH (aq) below 65°C. The reaction mixture was stirred at 500C for at least an hour and then cooled to room temperature. The precipitate was isolated by suction filtration, washed twice with 5.2 kg of distilled water, and dried with suction for at least 12 hours and then in a convection oven at 55°C for additional 12 hours. Compound 12 (3.2 kg, 79%) was obtained as a solid.

A reactor was charged with 3.2 kg of Compound 12 and 25.6 kg of 95% ethanol. To the reactor was added 1.1 kg of solid D,L-malic acid. The mixture was refluxed temperature (~80°C). Distilled water (-5.7 L) was added to dissolve the precipice and 0.2 kg of activated charcoal was added. The reaction mixture was passed through a filter. The clear filtrate was cooled to 45°C and allowed to sit for at least 2 hours to allow crystallization. After the reaction mixture was further cooled to 5°C, the precipitate was isolated by suction filtration, washed with 6.6 kg of 95% ethanol, and dried with suction for at least 4 hours. The solid was further dried in a convection oven at 450C for at least 12 hours to afford 3.1 kg of Compound 1 (yield: 70%). NEMONOXACIN

NMR (D2O, 300 MHz) δ (ppm): 8.54 (s, IH), 7.37 (d, J=9.0 Hz, IH), 7.05 (d, J=9.0 Hz, IH), 4.23-4.18 (m, IH), 4.10-3.89 (m, IH), 3.66 (br s, IH), 3.58 (s, 3H), 3.45 (d, J=9.0 Hz, IH), 3.34 (d, J=9.3 Hz, IH), 3.16 (d, J=12.9 Hz, IH), 2.65 (dd, J=16.1, 4.1 Hz, IH), 2.64-2.53 (m, IH), 2.46 (dd, J=16.1, 8.0 Hz, IH), 2.06 (br s, IH), 1.87 (d, J=14.4 Hz, IH), 1.58-1.45 (m, IH), 1.15-0.95 (m, 2H), 0.91 (d, J=6.3 Hz, 3H), 0.85-0.78 (m, 2H).

Similarly, Compound 1′ was synthesized from Compound 9′ as shown in Scheme 5 below:

Scheme 5

Figure imgf000016_0001
Figure imgf000003_0003

(3S,5R)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-l-cyclopropyl-l,4-dihydro-8- methoxy-4-oxo-3 -quinolinecarboxylic acid

COMPD 1’….NOT DESIRED

…………………

US20070232650

US2007/232650 A1,

malate salts of

Figure US20070232650A1-20071004-C00001

(3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-1-cyclopropyl-1,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (hereinafter Compound I, see also intermediate (23) in Section D, of Detailed Description of the Invention).

EXAMPLES Example 1 Synthesis of (3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-1-cyclopropyl-1,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid and malate salt thereof A. Synthesis of (3S,5S)-(5-Methyl-piperidin-3-yl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester (8)

Figure US20070232650A1-20071004-C00002

(2S)-1-(1,1-Dimethylethyl)-5-oxo-1,2-pyrrolidinedicarboxylic acid-2-methyl ester, (2). A 50-L reactor is charged with compound (1) (5.50 Kg, 42.60 mol), methanol (27 L) and cooled to 10-15° C. Thionyl chloride (10.11 Kg, 2.0 equiv.) is added via addition funnel over a period of 65 min, with external cooling to maintain temperature at <30°. The resulting solution is stirred at 25° C.+5° C. for 1.0 hour, after which the methanol is distilled off under reduced pressure. The resulting thick oil is azeotroped with ethyl acetate (3×2.5 L) to remove residual methanol. The residue is dissolved in ethyl acetate (27.4 L), charged into a 50 L reactor, and neutralized by the addition of triethylamine (3.6 Kg) from an addition funnel over 30 minutes. The temperature of the neutralization is maintained below 30° C. via external cooling. The resulting suspension of triethylamine hydrochloride is removed by filtration, and the clarified mother liquor solution is charged to a 50 L reactor, along with DMAP (0.53 Kg). Di-tert-butyl dicarbonate (8.43 Kg) is added via hot water heated addition funnel, over a period of 30 min with external cooling to maintain temperature at about 20-30° C. The reaction is complete after 1 hour as determined by TLC analysis. The organic phase is washed with ice cold 1N HCl (2×7.5 L), saturated sodium bicarbonate solution (1×7.5 L), and dried over magnesium sulfate. The mixture is filtered through a nutsche filter and ethyl acetate is removed under reduced pressure to yield a crystalline slurry that is triturated with MTBE (10.0 L) and filtered to afford intermediate (2) as a white solid (5.45 Kg, 52.4%). Anal. Calcd for C11H17NO5: C, 54.3; H, 7.04; N, 5.76. Found: C, 54.5; H, 6.96; N, 5.80. HRMS (ESI+) Expected for C11H18NO5, [M+H] 244.1185. Found 244.1174; 1H NMR (CDCl3, 500 MHz): δ=4.54 (dd, J=3.1, 9.5 Hz, 1H), 3.7 (s, 3H), 2.58-2.50 (m, 1H), 2.41 (ddd, 1H, J=17.6, 9.5, 3.7), 2.30-2.23 (m, 1H), 1.98-1.93 (m, 1H), 1.40 (s, 9H); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.70 MHz) δ 173.3, 171.9, 149.2, 83.5, 58.8, 52.5, 31.1, 27.9, 21.5; Mp 70.2° C.

(2S,4E)-1-(1,1-Dimethylethyl)-4-[(dimethylamino)methylene]-5-oxo-1,2-pyrrolidinedicarboxylic acid-2-methyl ester (3). A 50-L reactor is charged with intermediate (2) (7.25 Kg, 28.8 mol), DME (6.31 Kg), and Bredereck’s Reagent (7.7 Kg, 44.2 mole). The solution is agitated and heated to 75° C.±5° C. for at least three hours. The progress of the reaction is monitored by HPLC. The reaction is cooled to 0° C.±5° C. over on hour during which time a precipitate forms. The mixture is held at 0° C.±5° C. for one hour and filtered though a nutsche filter and the product dried in a vacuum oven for at least 30 hours at 30° C.±5° C. to give intermediate (3) as a white crystalline solid (6.93 Kg, 77.9%). Anal. Calcd for C14H22N2O5: C, 56.4; H, 7.43; N, 9.39. Found C, 56.4; H, 7.32; N, 9.48; HRMS (ESI+) Expected for C14H22N2O5, [M+H] 299.1607. Found 299.1613; 1H NMR(CDCl3, 499.8 MHz)δ=7.11 (s, 1H), 4.54 (dd, 1H, J=10.8, 3.6), 3.74 (s, 3H), 3.28-3.19 (m, 1H), 3.00 (s, 6H), 2.97-2.85 (m, 1H), 1.48 (s, 9H); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.7 MHz) δ=172.6, 169.5, 150.5, 146.5, 90.8, 82.2, 56.0, 52.3, 42.0, 28.1, 26.3. Mp 127.9° C.

(2S,4S)-1-(1,1-Dimethylethyl)-4-methyl-5-oxo-1,2-pyrrolidinedicarboxylic acid-2-methyl ester (4). A 10-gallon Pfaudler reactor is inerted with nitrogen and charged with ESCAT 142 5% palladium powder on carbon (50% wet, 0.58 Kg wet wt.), intermediate (3) (1.89 Kg, 6.33 mol) and isopropanol (22.4 Kg). The reaction mixture is agitated under a 45-psi hydrogen atmosphere at 45° C. for 18 hrs. The reaction mixture is then cooled to room temperature and filtered though a bed of Celite (0.51 Kg) in a nutsche filter to remove catalyst. The mother liquor is evaporated under reduced pressure to give a thick oil that crystallizes on standing to afford 4 (1.69 Kg, 100%) as a 93:7 diastereomeric mixture. A sample of product mixture is purified by preparative HPLC to give material for analytical data. Anal. Calcd for C12H19NO5: C, 56.0; H, 7.44; N, 5.44. Found C, 55.8; H, 7.31; N, 5.44; MS (ESI+) Expected for C12H19NO5, [M+H] 258.1342. Found 258.1321; 1H NMR (CDCl3, 499.8 MHz) δ=4.44 (m, 1H), 3.72 (s, 3H), 2.60-2.48 (m, 2H), 1.59-1.54 (m, 1H), 1.43 (s, 9H), 1.20 (d, j=6.8 Hz,3H); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.7 MHz) δ=175.7, 172.1, 149.5, 83.6, 57.4, 52.5, 37.5, 29.8, 27.9, 16.2. Mp 89.9° C.

(1S,3S)-(4-Hydroxyl-1-hydroxymethyl-3-methyl-butyl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester (5). A 50-L reactor is charged with intermediate (4) (3.02 Kg, 11.7 mol), absolute ethanol (8.22 Kg), and MTBE (14.81 Kg). The solution is agitated and cooled to 0° C.±5° C. and sodium borohydride (1.36 Kg, 35.9 mol) is added in small portions so as to maintain reaction temperature at 0° C.±5° C. A small amount of effervescence is observed. The reaction mixture is warmed to 10° C.±5° C. and calcium chloride dihydrate (2.65 Kg) is added portion wise at a slow rate over an hour so as to maintain a reaction temperature of 10° C.±5° C. The reaction is allowed to warm to 20° C.±5° C. over one hour and agitated for an additional 12 hours at 20° C.±5° C. The reaction is cooled to −5° C.±5° C., ice-cold 2N HCl (26.9 Kg) is added at a rate to maintain a reaction temperature of 0° C.±5° C. Agitation is stopped to allow phases to separate. The lower aqueous phase (pH=1) is removed. The reactor is charged with aqueous saturated sodium bicarbonate (15.6 Kg) over five minutes. Agitation is stopped to allow phases to separate. The lower aqueous phase (pH=8) is removed. The reactor is charged with magnesium sulfate (2.5 Kg) and agitated for at least 10 minutes. The mixture is filtered though a nutsche filter, and condensed under reduced pressure to afford intermediate (5) (1.80 Kg, 66%). Anal. Calcd for C11H23NO4: C, 56.6; H, 9.94; N, 6.00. Found C, 56.0; H, 9.68; N, 5.96; HRMS (ESI+) Expected for C11H24NO4, [M+H] 234.1705. Found 234.1703; 1H NMR (CDCl3, 500 MHz)δ=6.34(d, J=8.9 Hz, 1H, NH), 4.51 (t, J=5.8, 5.3 Hz, 1H, NHCHCH2OH), 4.34 (t, J=5.3, 5.3 Hz, 1H, CH3CHCH2OH), 3.46-3.45, (m, 1H, NHCH), 3.28 (dd, J=10.6, 5.3 Hz, NHCHCHHOH), 3.21 (dd, J=10.2, 5.8 Hz, 1H, CH3CHCHHOH), 3.16 (dd, J=10.2, 6.2 Hz, 1H, NHCHCHHOH), 3.12 (dd, J=10.6, 7.1 Hz, 1H, CH3CHCHHOH), 1.53-1.50 (m, 1H, CH3CHCHHOH), 1.35 (s, 9H, O(CH 3)3, 1.30 (ddd, J=13.9, 10.2, 3.7 Hz, 1H, NHCHCHHCH), 1.14 (ddd, J=13.6, 10.2, 3.4 Hz, 1H, NHCHCHHCH), 0.80 (d, J=6.6 Hz, 3H, CH3); 13C NMR (CDCl3, 125.7 MHz) δ 156.1, 77.9, 50.8, 65.1, 67.6, 65.1, 35.6, 32.8, 29.0, 17.1. Mp 92.1° C.

(2S,4S)-Methanesulfonic acid 2-tert-butoxycarbonylamino-5-methanesulfonyloxy-4-methyl-pentyl ester (6). A 50 L reactor is charged with a solution of intermediate (5) (5.1 Kg) in isopropyl acetate (i-PrOAc) 11.8 Kg followed by a rinse with an additional 7.9 Kg i-PrOAc. The reaction is cooled to 15° C.±5° C. and triethylamine (TEA) (7.8 Kg) is added while maintaining the set temperature. The reactor is further cooled to 0° C.±5° C. and methanesulfonyl chloride (MsCl) (6.6 Kg) is added to the reaction solution while maintaining the set temperature. The reaction is stirred for a few hours and monitored for completion by HPLC or TLC. The reaction is quenched by the addition of a saturated aqueous bicarbonate solution and the resulting isolated organic phase is washed successively with cold 10% aqueous triethylamine solution, cold aqueous HCl solution, cold saturated aqueous bicarbonate solution, and finally saturated aqueous brine solution. The organic phase is dried, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo below 55° C.±5° C. until a solid/liquid slurry containing intermediate (6) is obtained. The slurry is used crude in subsequent reaction without further characterization.

(3S,5S)-(1-Benzyl-5-methyl-piperidin-3-yl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester (7). A 50 L reactor is charged with 9.1 Kg of neat benzylamine. The reactor is brought to 55° C. and a solution of intermediate (6) (8.2 Kg) in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) (14.1 Kg) is added to the reactor while maintaining a temperature of 60° C.±5° C. After complete addition of this solution, the reaction is stirred at 60° C.±5° C. for several hours and monitored for completion by TLC or HPLC. The reaction is cooled to ambient temperature and volatiles (DME) are removed by rotary evaporation under vacuum. The residue is diluted with 11.7 Kg of 15% (v/v) ethyl acetate/hexanes solution and treated, while agitating, with 18.7 Kg of 20% (wt) aqueous potassium carbonate solution. A triphasic mixture is obtained upon settling. The bottom aqueous phase is removed and the middle phase is set aside. The upper organic phase is collected and held for combination with extracts from additional extractions. The isolated middle phase is extracted twice again with 11.7 Kg portions of 15% (v/v) ethyl acetate/hexanes solution, each time combining the extracts with original organic phase. The combined organic extracts are transferred into a rotary evaporator and solvent is removed under vacuum until an oily residue remains. The residue is then purified via large-scale preparative chromatography to afford purified intermediate (7) as an oil.

(3S,5S)-(5-Methyl-piperidin-3-yl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester (8). A 40 L pressure vessel is charged with 0.6 Kg 50% wet, solid palladium on carbon (E101, 10 wt. %) under flow of nitrogen. A solution of 3.2 Kg intermediate (7) in 13.7 Kg of absolute ethanol is then charged to the reactor under nitrogen. The reactor is purged with nitrogen and is then pressurized with hydrogen at 45 psi. The reaction is then heated to 45° C. while maintaining a hydrogen pressure of 45 psi. The reaction is monitored by TLC or LC until complete. The reaction is cooled to ambient temperature, vented, and purged with nitrogen. The reactor contents are filtered through a bed of Celite and the solids are washed with 2.8 Kg of absolute ethanol. The filtrate is concentrated by rotary evaporation under vacuum until a waxy solid is obtained to afford intermediate (8): TLC R(Silica F254, 70:30 v/v ethyl acetate-hexanes, KMnOstain)=0.12; 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ 5.31 (br s, 1H), 3.80-3.68 (m, 1H), 2.92 (d, J=11.4 Hz, 1H), 2.77 (AB quart, JAB=12.0 Hz, Δν=50.2 Hz, 2H), 2.19 (t, J=10.7 Hz, 1H), 1.82-1.68 (m, 2H), 1.54 (br s, 1H), 1.43 (s, 9H), 1.25-1.15 (m, 1H), 0.83 (d, J=6.6 Hz, 3H); 13C NMR (75 MHz, CDCl3) δ 155.3, 78.9, 54.3, 50.8, 45.3, 37.9, 28.4, 27.1, 19.2; MS (ESI+) m/z 215 (M+H), 429 (2M+H).

B. Synthesis of 1-Cyclopropyl-7-fluoro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (19)

Figure US20070232650A1-20071004-C00003
Figure US20070232650A1-20071004-C00004

Intermediate (12): A reactor is charged with a solution of intermediate (11) (1.2 Kg, 7.7 mol, 1.0 eq) in anhydrous toluene (12 L) followed by ethylene glycol (1.8 L, 15.7 mol, 4.2 eq) and solid p-toluenesulfonic acid (120 g, 10 wt. %). The reaction mixture is stirred at ambient temperature for at least 30 minutes and then heated to reflux, collecting the water/toluene azeotrope in a Dean Stark type trap apparatus until the reaction is complete as determined by TLC analysis (15% EtOAc/Hexanes v/v). Upon completion, the reaction is cooled to ambient temperature and poured into an aqueous solution of sodium bicarbonate (6 L). The organic toluene phase was removed and washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution (6 L), distilled water (2×6 L), and saturated aqueous brine (6 L). The organic phase was removed and dried over MgSO4, filtered, and evaporated under reduced pressure to afford intermediate (12) as an oil (1.3 Kg, 86%). The material is used without further purification in subsequent reaction steps.

Intermediate (13): A reactor is charged with a solution of intermediate (12) (1.2 Kg, 6.0 mol, 1.0 eq) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (12 L) and n-butyllithium (2.5M in hexanes, 2.6 L, 6.6 mol, 1.1 eq) is added at −40° C., while maintaining this temperature throughout the addition. The reaction is stirred for at least one hour at −40° C. and trimethylborate (0.9 L, 7.8 mol, 1.3 eq) is added to the mixture while maintaining the temperature at or below −40° C. The reaction mixture is stirred for at least one hour at −40° C. until complete as determined by TLC analysis (30% EtOAc/Hexanes v/v). The reaction is warmed slightly to −30° C. and acetic acid (3 L) is added slowly. Upon complete addition, water is added (0.5 L) to the reaction and the mixture is allowed to quickly warm to ambient temperature while stirring overnight. Organic solvent is removed from the reaction by distillation under reduced pressure at 45° C. To the reaction residue is added 3-4 volumes of water (6 L) and 30% hydrogen peroxide (0.7 L, 1.0 eq) slowly at ambient temperature with cooling provided to control the exotherm. The reaction is stirred for at least an hour at ambient temperature until complete as determined by TLC (15% EtOAc/Hexanes v/v). The reaction mixture is cooled to 0-5° C. and excess peroxide is quenched with the addition of 10% aqueous sodium bisulfite solution (2 L). The mixture is tested to ensure a negative peroxide result and the reaction is acidified by the addition of 6N HCl (aq) (1.2 L). The reaction is stirred until the hydrolysis reaction is complete as determined by TLC or NMR analysis. The resulting solids are collected by suction filtration to afford intermediate (13) as a yellow solid (1.0 Kg, 79%).

Intermediate (14): A reactor is charged with intermediate (13) (0.53 Kg, 3.0 mol, 1.0 eq) and dissolved in dry toluene (2.7 Kg, 3.1 L). To this solution is added dimethylsulfate (0.49 Kg, 3.9 mol, 1.30 eq) followed by solid potassium carbonate (0.58 Kg, 4.2 mol, 1.4 eq). The reaction mixture is heated to reflux and held for at least 1 hour until complete as determined by HPLC. During this time, vigorous gas evolution is observed. The reaction is then cooled to ambient temperature and diluted with distilled water (3.2 L) along with 30% NaOH (aq) (0.13 Kg, 0.33 eq). The aqueous phase is separated and the remaining toluene phase is extracted twice more with distilled water (3.2 L) combined with 30% NaOH (aq) (0.13 Kg, 0.33 eq), removing the aqueous phase each time. The organic upper phase is concentrated by distillation in vacuo (<100 mbar) at approximately 40° C. until a concentrated toluene solution is achieved. The resulting solution is cooled to ambient temperature, checked for quality and yield by HPLC, and carried forward to the next step in the synthesis without further purification (theoretical yield for intermediate (14) assumed, 0.56 Kg).

Intermediate (15a,b): A reactor is charged with 1.8 Kg (2.1 L) anhydrous toluene along with sodium hydride (0.26 Kg, 6.6 mol, 2.20 eq) as a 60 wt. % dispersion in mineral oil. To this mixture is added (0.85 Kg, 7.2 mol, 2.4 eq) diethylcarbonate as the reaction mixture is heated to 90° C. over 1 hour. A solution of intermediate (14) (˜1.0 eq) in toluene from the previous step is added to the reaction while maintaining a temperature of 90° C.±5° C. Gas evolution can be observed during this addition. After complete addition, the reaction is stirred for at least 30 minutes or until complete as determined by HPLC analysis. Upon completion, the mixture is cooled to ambient temperature and diluted with 10 wt. % aqueous sulfuric acid (3.8 Kg, 3.9 mol, 1.3 eq) with agitation. The phases are allowed to separate and the lower aqueous phase is removed. The remaining organic phase is concentrated in vacuo (<100 mbar) at approximately 40° C. until a concentrated toluene solution is achieved. The resulting solution is cooled to ambient temperature and carried forward to the next step in the synthesis without further purification (theoretical yield for intermediate (15a,b) assumed, 0.85 Kg).

Intermediate (16a,b; 17a,b): A reactor is charged with a solution of intermediate (15a,b) (0.85 Kg, ˜3.0 mol, ˜1.0 eq) in toluene from the previous step. To the reactor is then added dimethylformamide-dimethylacetal (0.54 Kg, 4.5 mol, 1.5 eq) and the resulting solution is heated to reflux temperature (˜95-105° C.). The lower boiling solvent (methanol from reaction) is allowed to distill off while the temperature is maintained at ≧90° C. Heating is continued for at least 1 hour or until complete as determined by HPLC analysis. Upon completion, the reaction containing the mixture of intermediate (16a,b), is cooled to ambient temperature and toluene (1.8 Kg, 2.1 L) along with cyclopropylamine (0.21 Kg, 3.6 mol, 1.2 eq) are added to the reaction. The reaction is stirred at ambient temperature for at least 30 minutes until complete as determined by HPLC. Upon completion, the reaction is diluted with 10 wt. % aqueous sulfuric acid (2.9 Kg, 3.0 mol, 1.0 eq) with agitation, and the phases are then allowed to separate. The aqueous phase is removed and the organic phase is concentrated under reduced pressure (<100 mbar) at approximately 40° C. by distillation. When the desired concentration is achieved, the solution is cooled to ambient temperature and the toluene solution containing the mixture of intermediate (17a,b) is carried forward to the next step in the synthesis without further purification (theoretical yield for intermediate (17a,b) assumed, ˜1.1 Kg).

Intermediate (18): A reactor is charged with a solution of the mixture of intermediate (17a,b) (˜4.7 Kg, ˜3.0 mol) at ambient temperature. To the reactor is added N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetamide (0.61 Kg, 3.0 mol, 1.0 eq) and the reaction is heated to reflux temperature (˜105-115° C.) for at least 30 minutes or until complete as determined by HPLC analysis. If not complete, an additional amount of N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)acetamide (0.18 Kg, 0.9 mol, 0.3 eq) is added to the reaction to achieve completion. Upon completion, the reaction is cooled to below 40° C. and organic solvent is removed under reduced pressure (<100 mbar) at approximately 40° C. by distillation until a precipitate is formed. The reaction is cooled to ambient temperature and the precipitated solids are isolated by suction filtration and washed with distilled water twice (1×1.8 L, 1×0.9 L). The solid is dried to afford intermediate (18) as a white solid (0.76 Kg, 82%). The material is used without further purification in the next reaction step.

Intermediate (19): A reactor is charged with solid intermediate (18) (0.76 Kg, ˜2.5 mol, ˜1.0 eq) at ambient temperature followed by ethanol (5.3 Kg, 6.8 L) and 32 wt. % aqueous hydrochloric acid (1.1 Kg, 10 mol). The reaction mixture is brought to reflux temperature (76-80° C.) during which time the mixture first becomes homogeneous and later becomes heterogeneous. The mixture is heated at reflux for at least 5 hours or until complete as determined by TLC analysis (15% EtOAc/Hexanes v/v). Upon completion, the reaction is cooled to 0° C.±5° C. and the precipitated solid is isolated by filtration and washed with distilled water (1.7 Kg) followed by ethanol (1.7 Kg). The isolated solid is dried to afford intermediate (19) as a white solid (0.65 Kg, ˜95%). 1H NMR (CDCl3, 300 MHz) δ (ppm): 14.58 (s, 1H), 8.9 (s, 1H), 8.25 (m, 1H), 7.35 (m, 1H), 4.35 (m, 1H), 4.08 (s, 3H), 1.3 (m, 2H), 1.1 (m, 2H) 19F NMR (CDCl3+CFCl3, 292 MHz) δ (ppm): −119. HPLC: 99.5% by area.

C. Synthesis of borone ester chelate of 1-Cyclopropyl-7-fluoro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (20)

Figure US20070232650A1-20071004-C00005

A reactor is charged with boron oxide (2.0 Kg, 29 mol) followed by dilution with glacial acetic acid (8.1 L, 142 mol) and acetic anhydride (16.2 L, 171 mol). The resulting mixture is heated to reflux temperature for at least 2 hours. The reaction contents are cooled to 40° C. and the solid 7-fluoroquinolone acid intermediate (19) (14.2 Kg, 51 mol) is added to the reaction mixture. The mixture is again heated to reflux temperature for at least 6 hours. Reaction progress is monitored by HPLC and NMR. The mixture is cooled to approximately 90° C. and toluene (45 L) is added to the reaction. The reaction is further cooled to 50° C. and tert-butylmethyl ether (19 L) is added to the reaction mixture to bring about precipitation of the product. The mixture is then cooled to 20° C. and the solid product 19 is isolated by filtration. The isolated solids are then washed with tert-butylmethyl ether (26 L) prior to drying in a vacuum oven at 40° C. (50 torr). The product yield obtained for intermediate (20) in this reaction is 86.4%. Raman (cm−1): 3084.7, 3022.3, 2930.8, 1709.2, 1620.8, 1548.5, 1468.0, 1397.7, 1368.3, 1338.5, 1201.5, 955.3, 653.9, 580.7, 552.8, 384.0, 305.8. NMR (CDCl3, 300 MHz) δ (ppm): 9.22 (s, 1H), 8.38-8.33 (m, 1H), 7.54 (t, J=9.8 Hz, 1H), 4.38-4.35 (m, 1H), 4.13 (s, 3H), 2.04 (s, 6H), 1.42-1.38 (m, 2H), 1.34-1.29 (m, 2H). TLC (Whatman MKC18F Silica, 60 Å, 200 μm), Mobile Phase: 1:1 (v/v) CH3CN:0.5N NaCl (aq), UV (254/366 nm) visualization; Rf=0.4-0.5.

D. Coupling of 1-Cyclopropyl-7-fluoro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-1,4-dihydro-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (20) to (3S,5S)-(5-Methyl-piperidin-3-yl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester (8), and synthesis of malate salt of (3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-1-cyclopropyl-1,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid (25)

Figure US20070232650A1-20071004-C00006

A reactor is charged with solid intermediate (20) (4.4 Kg, 10.9 mol) followed by dilution with a solution of triethylamine (TEA) (2.1 L, 14.8 mol) and piperidine side chain intermediate (8) (2.1 Kg, 9.8 mol) in acetonitrile (33.5 L, 15.7 L/Kg) at room temperature. The resulting mixture is warmed to approximately 50° C. until reaction is judged complete. Reaction progress is monitored by HPLC or reverse phase TLC. When complete, the reaction is cooled to approximately 35° C. and reaction volume is reduced to approximately half by distillation of acetonitrile under vacuum between 0-400 torr. The reactor is then charged with 28.2 Kg of 3.0N NaOH (aq) solution and the temperature is raised to approximately 40° C. Distillation under vacuum is continued between 1-4 hours or until no further distillates are observed. The reaction is then cooled to room temperature and the hydrolysis reaction is monitored by HPLC or reverse phase TLC. Upon completion, the reaction mixture is neutralized to a pH of between 6-8 by adding ˜4-5 Kg of glacial acetic acid. The reactor is then charged with 12.7 Kg (9.6 L) of dichloromethane as an extraction solvent, the mixture is agitated, phases are allowed to separate, and the organic dichloromethane phase is removed. The extraction process is repeated two additional times using 12.7 Kg (9.6 L) of dichloromethane, collecting the lower, organic phase each time. The aqueous phase is discarded and the organic extracts are combined in a single reactor. The reactor contents are heated to 40° C. and the reaction volume is reduced to approximately one half by distillation. The reactor is then charged with 20.2 Kg 6.0N HCl (aq) solution, the temperature is adjusted to 35° C., and agitation is allowed for at least 12 hours to permit the Boc deprotection reaction to occur. The reaction is monitored by HPLC or reverse phase TLC. When complete, agitation is discontinued and the phases are allowed to separate. The lower, organic phase is removed and set aside. The reactor is then charged with 12.7 Kg (9.6 L) of dichloromethane as an extraction solvent, the mixture is agitated, phases are allowed to separate, and the organic dichloromethane phase is removed. The organic extracts are combined and discarded. The remaining aqueous phase is diluted with 18.3 Kg distilled water and the temperature is raised to approximately 50° C. Distillation under vacuum (100-400 torr) is performed to remove residual dichloromethane from the reaction. The pH of the reaction is then adjusted to between 7.8-8.1 using about 9.42 Kg of 3.0N NaOH (aq) solution while keeping the temperature of the reaction below 65° C. The reaction is cooled to 50° C. and the precipitated solids are aged for at least an hour prior to cooling the mixture to room temperature. The solids are isolated by suction filtration and washed twice with 5.2 Kg portions of distilled water. The solids are dried for at least 12 hours with suction and then for an additional 12 hours in a convection oven at 55° C. The yield achieved for intermediate (23) in this example is 3.2 Kg (79%). A reactor is charged with 3.2 Kg solid intermediate (23) and the solids are suspended in 25.6 Kg of 95% ethanol as solvent. To the reactor is then added 1.1 Kg of solid D,L-malic acid (24), and the mixture is heated to reflux temperature (˜80° C.). Distilled water (˜5.7 L) is added to the reaction until a complete solution is achieved and 0.2 Kg of activated charcoal is added. The reaction mixture is passed through a filter to achieve clarification, cooled to 45° C. and held for a period of at least 2 hours to allow crystallization to occur. The reaction mixture is further cooled to 5° C. and the suspended solids are isolated by suction filtration. The solids are then washed with 6.6 KG of 95% ethanol and dried for at least 4 hours with suction under vacuum. The solids are then further dried in a convection oven for at least 12 hours at 45° C. to afford 3.1 Kg of intermediate (24) (70%). NMR (D2O, 300 MHz) δ (ppm): 8.54 (s, 1H), 7.37 (d, J=9.0 Hz, 1H), 7.05 (d, J=9.0 Hz, 1H), 4.23-4.18 (m, 1H), 4.10-3.89 (m, 1H), 3.66 (br s, 1H), 3.58 (s, 3H), 3.45 (d, J=9.0 Hz, 1H), 3.34 (d, J=9.3 Hz, 1H), 3.16 (d, J=12.9 Hz, 1H), 2.65 (dd, J=16.1, 4.1 Hz, 1H), 2.64-2.53 (m, 1H), 2.46 (dd, J=16.1, 8.0 Hz, 1H), 2.06 (br s, 1H), 1.87 (d, J=14.4 Hz, 1H), 1.58-1.45 (m, 1H), 1.15-0.95 (m, 2H), 0.91 (d, J=6.3 Hz, 3H); 0.85-0.78 (m, 2H). TLC (Whatman MKC18F Silica, 60 Å, 200 μm), Mobile Phase: 1:1 (v/v) CH3CN:0.5N NaCl (aq), UV (254/366 nm) visualization. HPLC: Mobile Phase H2O with 0.1% formic acid/Acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid, gradient elution with 88% H2O/formic acid to 20% H2O/formic acid, Zorbax SB-C8 4.6 mm×150 mm column, Part No. 883975.906, 1.5 ml/min rate, 20 min run time, 292 nm, Detector Model G1314A, S/N JP72003849, Quat Pump Model G1311A, S/N US72102299, Auto Sampler Model G1313A, S/N DE14918139, Degasser Model G1322A, S/N JP73007229; approximate retention time for intermediate (19): 13.0 min; approximate retention time for intermediate (20): 11.6 min; approximate retention time for intermediate (21): 16.3 min; approximate retention time for intermediate (22): 18.2 min; approximate retention time for intermediate (23): 8.6 min; approximate retention time for compound (25): 8.6 min.

………………..

REF

A. ARJONA ET AL: “Nemonoxacin“, DRUGS OF THE FUTURE, vol. 34, no. 3, 1 January 2009 (2009-01-01), page 196, XP55014485, ISSN: 0377-8282, DOI: 10.1358/dof.2009.034.03.1350294

2 * ANONYMOUS: “TaiGen Announces Positive Data From the Phase II Study of Nemonoxacin (TG-873870) in Community-Acquired Pneumonia“, INTERNET CITATION, [Online] 7 April 2008 (2008-04-07), page 1, XP007919900, Retrieved from the Internet: URL:http://www.taigenbiotech.com/news.html#16&gt; [retrieved on 2011-12-12]
3 * ANONYMOUS: “TaiGen Biotechnology Initiates Phase II Trial Of Nemonoxacin For Treatment Of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP)“, 20070108, [Online] 8 January 2007 (2007-01-08), page 1, XP007919910, Retrieved from the Internet: URL:http://www.taigenbiotech.com/news.html#11&gt; [retrieved on 2011-12-12]
4 * ANONYMOUS: “TaiGen Initiates Phase 1B Trial of a Novel Quinolone Antibiotic“, 20050618, 18 June 2005 (2005-06-18), pages 1-2, XP007919904,
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WO2007110834A2 * Mar 26, 2007 Oct 4, 2007 Procter & Gamble Malate salts, and polymorphs of (3s,5s)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-1-cyclopropyl-1,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid
WO2009023473A2 * Aug 5, 2008 Feb 19, 2009 Chi-Hsin Richard King Antimicrobial parenteral formulation
WO2010009014A2 * Jul 10, 2009 Jan 21, 2010 Taigen Biotechnology Co., Ltd.
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TREATMENT OF ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT BACTERIA INFECTION
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Coupling Process For Preparing Quinolone Intermediates
10-19-2011
Malate salts, and polymorphs of (3S,5S)-7-[3-amino-5-methyl-piperidinyl]-1-cyclopropyl-1,4-dihydro-8-methoxy-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid
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STEREOSELECTIVE SYNTHESIS OF PIPERIDINE DERIVATIVES
2-19-2010
PNEUMONIA TREATMENT
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Hydride reduction process for preparing quinolone intermediates
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ANTIMICROBIAL PARENTERAL FORMULATION
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Coupling process for preparing quinolone intermediates
US8158798 Oct 27, 2008 Apr 17, 2012 Taigen Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Coupling process for preparing quinolone intermediates
US8211909 Sep 8, 2008 Jul 3, 2012 Taigen Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria infection
WO2010002965A2 * Jul 1, 2009 Jan 7, 2010 Taigen Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Pneumonia treatmen

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1, nemonoxacin; 2, delafloxacin; 3, finafloxacin; 4, zabofloxacin; 5, JNJ-Q2; 6, DS-8587; 7, KPI-10; 8, ozenoxacin; 9, chinfloxacin; 10, ACH-702.

FDA grants fast-track status to Peregrine’s bavituximab for lung cancer treatment


 

FDA grants fast-track status to Peregrine’s bavituximab for lung cancer treatment
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted fast-track designation for Peregrine Pharmaceuticals’ lead investigational immunotherapy ‘bavituximab’ to treat patients with second-line non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

 

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