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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

Read all about Organic Spectroscopy on ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY INTERNATIONAL 

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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FDA approves new treatment Xeljanz (tofacitinib) for moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approval of Xeljanz (tofacitinib) to include adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis. Xeljanz is the first oral medication approved for chronic use in this indication. Other FDA-approved treatments for the chronic treatment of moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis must be administered through an intravenous infusion or subcutaneous injection.

May 30, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approval of Xeljanz (tofacitinib) to include adults with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis. Xeljanz is the first oral medication approved for chronic use in this indication. Other FDA-approved treatments for the chronic treatment of moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis must be administered through an intravenous infusion or subcutaneous injection.

“New treatments are needed for patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis,” said Julie Beitz, M.D., director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Today’s approval provides an alternative therapy for a debilitating disease with limited treatment options.”

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, inflammatory bowel disease affecting the colon. Patients experience recurrent flares of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. Other symptoms include fatigue, weight loss and fever. More than 900,000 patients are affected in the U.S., many of them experiencing moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis, and there is currently no cure.

The efficacy of Xeljanz for the treatment of moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis was demonstrated in three controlled clinical trials. This included two 8-week placebo-controlled trials that demonstrated that 10 mg of Xeljanz given twice daily induces remission in 17 to 18 percent of patients by week eight. In a placebo-controlled trial among patients who achieved a clinical response by week eight, Xeljanz, at a 5 mg or 10 mg dose given twice daily, was effective in inducing remission by week 52 in 34 percent and 41 percent of patients, respectively. Among patients who achieved remission after 8 weeks of treatment, 35 percent and 47 percent achieved sustained corticosteroid-free remission when treated with 5 mg and 10 mg, respectively.

The safety of chronic use of Xeljanz for ulcerative colitis was studied in the 52-week placebo- controlled trial. Additional supportive safety information was collected from patients who received treatment in an open-label long-term study.

The most common adverse events associated with Xeljanz treatment for ulcerative colitis were diarrhea, elevated cholesterol levels, headache, herpes zoster (shingles), increased blood creatine phosphokinase, nasopharyngitis (common cold), rash and upper respiratory tract infection.

Less common serious adverse events included malignancy and serious infections such as opportunistic infections. Xeljanz has a boxed warning for serious infections and malignancy. Patients treated with Xeljanz are at increased risk for developing serious infections that may lead to hospitalization or death. Lymphoma and other malignancies have been observed in patients treated with Xeljanz.

Use of Xeljanz in combination with biological therapies for ulcerative colitis or with potent immunosuppressants, such as azathioprine and cyclosporine, is not recommended.

Xeljanz, made by Pfizer Labs, was previously approved in 2012 for rheumatoid arthritis and in 2017 for psoriatic arthritis.

/////////////Xeljanz, tofacitinib, pfizer, fda 2017, psoriatic arthritis, ulcerative colitis

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PF-04965842


PF-04965842, >=98% (HPLC).png

img

2D chemical structure of 1622902-68-4

PF-04965842

UNII: 73SM5SF3OR

CAS Number 1622902-68-4, Empirical Formula  C14H21N5O2S, Molecular Weight 323.41

N-[cis-3-(Methyl-7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamino)cyclobutyl]-1-propanesulfonamide,

N-((1s,3s)-3-(methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)cyclobutyl)propane-1-sulfonamide

1-Propanesulfonamide, N-(cis-3-(methyl-7H-pyrrolo(2,3-d)pyrimidin-4-ylamino)cyclobutyl)-

N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}-propane-1-sulfonamide

PHASE 3, for the potential oral treatment of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD)

Jak1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor

THE US

In February 2018, the FDA granted Breakthrough Therapy designation for the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe AD

PHASEIII

In December 2017, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, phase III trial (NCT03349060; JADE Mono-1; JADE; B7451012; 2017-003651-29) of PF-04965842 began in patients aged 12 years and older (expected n = 375) with moderate-to-severe AD

PRODUCT PATENT

Pub. No.: WO/2014/128591 International Application No.: PCT/IB2014/058889
Publication Date: 28.08.2014 International Filing Date: 11.02.2014

EXPIRY  Roughly 2034

form powder
color white to beige
solubility DMSO: 10 mg/mL, clear
storage temp. room temp
    Biochem/physiol Actions
    • PF-04965842 is a Janus Kinase (JAK) inhibitor selective for JAK1 with an IC50value of 29 nM for JAK1 compared to 803 nM for JAK2, >10000 nM for JAK3 and 1250 nM for Tyk2. JAKs mediate cytokine signaling, and are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. PF-04965842 has been investigated as a possible treatment for psoriasis.
  • Originator Pfizer
  • Class Skin disorder therapies; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Janus kinase 1 inhibitors

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase IIIAtopic dermatitis
  • DiscontinuedLupus vulgaris; Plaque psoriasis

Most Recent Events

  • 08 Mar 2018Phase-III clinical trials in Atopic dermatitis (In children, In adults, In adolescents) in USA (PO) (NCT03422822)
  • 14 Feb 2018PF 4965842 receives Breakthrough Therapy status for Atopic dermatitis in USA
  • 06 Feb 2018Pfizer plans the phase III JADE EXTEND trial for Atopic Dermatitis (In children, In adults, In adolescents) in March 2018 (PO) (NCT03422822)

This compound was developed by Pfizer for Kinase Phosphatase Biology research. To learn more about Sigma′s partnership with Pfizer and view other authentic, high-quality Pfizer compounds,

Image result for PF-04965842

PF-04965842 is an oral Janus Kinase 1 inhibitor being investigated for treatment of plaque psoriasis.

Protein kinases are families of enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of specific residues in proteins, broadly classified into tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. Inappropriate kinase activity, arising from mutation, over-expression, or inappropriate regulation, dys-regulation or de-regulation, as well as over- or under-production of growth factors or cytokines has been i mplicated in many diseases, including but not limited to cancer, cardiovascular diseases, allergies, asthma and other respiratory diseases, autoimmune d iseases, inflammatory diseases, bone diseases, metabolic disorders, and neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Inappropriate kinase activity triggers a variety of biological cellular responses relating to cell growth, cell differentiation , survival, apoptosis, mitogenesis, cell cycle control, and cel l mobility implicated in the aforementioned and related diseases.

Thus, protein kinases have emerged as an important class of enzymes as targets for therapeutic intervention. In particular, the JAK family of cellular protein tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, and Tyk2) play a central role in cytoki ne signaling (Kisseleva et al., Gene, 2002, 285 , 1; Yamaoka et al. Genome Biology 2004, 5, 253)). Upon binding to their receptors, cytokines activate JAK which then phosphorylate the cytokine receptor, thereby creating docking sites for signaling molecules, notably, members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family that ultimately lead to gene expression. Numerous cytokines are known to activate the JAK family. These cytokines include, the IFN family (IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, IFN-omega, Limitin, IFN-gamma, IL- 10, IL- 19, IL-20, IL-22), the gp 130 family (IL-6, IL- 11, OSM, LIF, CNTF, NNT- 1//SF-3, G-CSF, CT- 1, Leptin, IL- 12 , I L-23), gamma C family (IL-2 , I L-7, TSLP, IL-9, IL- 15 , IL-21, IL-4, I L- 13), IL-3 family (IL-3 , IL-5 , GM-CSF), single chain family (EPO, GH, PRL, TPO), receptor tyrosine kinases (EGF, PDGF, CSF- 1, HGF), and G-protein coupled receptors (ATI).

There remains a need for new compounds that effectively and selectively inhibit specific JAK enzymes, and JAK1 in particular, vs. JAK2. JAK1 is a member of the Janus family of protein kinases composed of JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2. JAK1 is expressed to various levels in all tissues. Many cytokine receptors signal through pairs of JAK kinases in the following combinations: JAK1/JAK2, JAK1/JAK3, JAK1/TYK2 , JAK2/TYK2 or JAK2/JAK2. JAK1 is the most broadly

paired JAK kinase in this context and is required for signaling by γ-common (IL-2Rγ) cytokine receptors, IL—6 receptor family, Type I, II and III receptor families and IL- 10 receptor family. Animal studies have shown that JAK1 is required for the development, function and homeostasis of the immune system. Modulation of immune activity through inhibition of JAK1 kinase activity can prove useful in the treatment of various immune disorders (Murray, P.J.

J. Immunol., 178, 2623-2629 (2007); Kisseleva, T., et al., Gene, 285 , 1-24 (2002); O’Shea, J . J., et al., Ceil , 109, (suppl .) S121-S131 (2002)) while avoiding JAK2 dependent erythropoietin (EPO) and thrombopoietin (TPO) signaling (Neubauer H., et al., Cell, 93(3), 397-409 (1998);

Parganas E., et al., Cell, 93(3), 385-95 (1998)).

Figure

Tofacitinib (1), baricitinib (2), and ruxolitinib (3)

SYNTHESIS 5+1 =6 steps

Main synthesis

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 61(3), 1130-1152; 2018

 

 

INTERMEDIATE

CN 105732637

ONE STEP

CAS 479633-63-1,  7H-Pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine, 4-chloro-7-[(4- methylphenyl)sulfonyl]-

Image result for PF-04965842

Pfizer Receives Breakthrough Therapy Designation from FDA for PF-04965842, an oral JAK1 Inhibitor, for the Treatment of Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis

Wednesday, February 14, 2018 8:30 am EST

Dateline:

NEW YORK

Public Company Information:

NYSE:
PFE
US7170811035
“We look forward to working closely with the FDA throughout our ongoing Phase 3 development program with the hope of ultimately bringing this important new treatment option to these patients.”

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) today announced its once-daily oral Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) inhibitor PF-04965842 received Breakthrough Therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD). The Phase 3 program for PF-04965842 initiated in December and is the first trial in the J AK1 A topic D ermatitis E fficacy and Safety (JADE) global development program.

“Achieving Breakthrough Therapy Designation is an important milestone not only for Pfizer but also for patients living with the often devastating impact of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, their providers and caregivers,” said Michael Corbo, Chief Development Officer, Inflammation & Immunology, Pfizer Global Product Development. “We look forward to working closely with the FDA throughout our ongoing Phase 3 development program with the hope of ultimately bringing this important new treatment option to these patients.”

Breakthrough Therapy Designation was initiated as part of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) signed in 2012. As defined by the FDA, a breakthrough therapy is a drug intended to be used alone or in combination with one or more other drugs to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition and preliminary clinical evidence indicates that the drug may demonstrate substantial improvement over existing therapies on one or more clinically significant endpoints, such as substantial treatment effects observed early in clinical development. If a drug is designated as a breakthrough therapy, the FDA will expedite the development and review of such drug.1

About PF-04965842 and Pfizer’s Kinase Inhibitor Leadership

PF-04965842 is an oral small molecule that selectively inhibits Janus kinase (JAK) 1. Inhibition of JAK1 is thought to modulate multiple cytokines involved in pathophysiology of AD including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, IL-31 and interferon gamma.

Pfizer has established a leading kinase research capability with multiple unique kinase inhibitor therapies in development. As a pioneer in JAK science, the Company is advancing several investigational programs with novel selectivity profiles, which, if successful, could potentially deliver transformative therapies for patients. Pfizer has three additional kinase inhibitors in Phase 2 development across multiple indications:

  • PF-06651600: A JAK3 inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis and alopecia areata
  • PF-06700841: A tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2)/JAK1 inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of psoriasis, ulcerative colitis and alopecia areata
  • PF-06650833: An interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4) inhibitor under investigation for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

Working together for a healthier world®

At Pfizer, we apply science and our global resources to bring therapies to people that extend and significantly improve their lives. We strive to set the standard for quality, safety and value in the discovery, development and manufacture of health care products. Our global portfolio includes medicines and vaccines as well as many of the world’s best-known consumer health care products. Every day, Pfizer colleagues work across developed and emerging markets to advance wellness, prevention, treatments and cures that challenge the most feared diseases of our time. Consistent with our responsibility as one of the world’s premier innovative biopharmaceutical companies, we collaborate with health care providers, governments and local communities to support and expand access to reliable, affordable health care around the world. For more than 150 years, we have worked to make a difference for all who rely on us. We routinely post information that may be important to investors on our website at www.pfizer.com. In addition, to learn more, please visit us on www.pfizer.com and follow us on Twitter at @Pfizer and @Pfizer_NewsLinkedInYouTube and like us on Facebook at Facebook.com/Pfizer.

DISCLOSURE NOTICE: The information contained in this release is as of February 14, 2018. Pfizer assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements contained in this release as the result of new information or future events or developments.

This release contains forward-looking information about PF-04965842 and Pfizer’s ongoing investigational programs in kinase inhibitor therapies, including their potential benefits, that involves substantial risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statements. Risks and uncertainties include, among other things, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, including the ability to meet anticipated clinical trial commencement and completion dates and regulatory submission dates, as well as the possibility of unfavorable clinical trial results, including unfavorable new clinical data and additional analyses of existing data; risks associated with preliminary data; the risk that clinical trial data are subject to differing interpretations, and, even when we view data as sufficient to support the safety and/or effectiveness of a product candidate, regulatory authorities may not share our views and may require additional data or may deny approval altogether; whether regulatory authorities will be satisfied with the design of and results from our clinical studies; whether and when drug applications may be filed in any jurisdictions for any potential indication for PF-04965842 or any other investigational kinase inhibitor therapies; whether and when any such applications may be approved by regulatory authorities, which will depend on the assessment by such regulatory authorities of the benefit-risk profile suggested by the totality of the efficacy and safety information submitted, and, if approved, whether PF-04965842 or any such other investigational kinase inhibitor therapies will be commercially successful; decisions by regulatory authorities regarding labeling, safety and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of PF-04965842 or any other investigational kinase inhibitor therapies; and competitive developments.

A further description of risks and uncertainties can be found in Pfizer’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016 and in its subsequent reports on Form 10-Q, including in the sections thereof captioned “Risk Factors” and “Forward-Looking Information and Factors That May Affect Future Results”, as well as in its subsequent reports on Form 8-K, all of which are filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and available at www.sec.gov  and www.pfizer.com .

Image result for PF-04965842

# # # # #

1 Food and Drug Administration Fact Sheet Breakthrough Therapies at https://www.fda.gov/RegulatoryInformation/LawsEnforcedbyFDA/SignificantAmendmentstotheFDCAct/FDASIA/ucm329491.htmaccessed on January 25, 2018

PATENT

CA 2899888

PATENT

WO 2014128591

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=6767BBB5964A985E88C9251B6DF3182B.wapp2nB?docId=WO2014128591&recNum=233&maxRec=8235&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=EN_ALL%3Anmr+AND+PA%3Apfizer&tab=PCTDescription

PFIZER INC. [US/US]; 235 East 42nd Street New York, New York 10017 (US)

BROWN, Matthew Frank; (US).
FENWICK, Ashley Edward; (US).
FLANAGAN, Mark Edward; (US).
GONZALES, Andrea; (US).
JOHNSON, Timothy Allan; (US).
KAILA, Neelu; (US).
MITTON-FRY, Mark J.; (US).
STROHBACH, Joseph Walter; (US).
TENBRINK, Ruth E.; (US).
TRZUPEK, John David; (US).
UNWALLA, Rayomand Jal; (US).
VAZQUEZ, Michael L.; (US).
PARIKH, Mihir, D.; (US)

COMPD 2

str1

Example 2 : N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}-propane- l -sulƒonamide

This compound was prepared using 1-propanesulfonyl chloride. The crude compound was purified by chromatography on silica gel eluting with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (93 : 7) to afford the title compound as a tan sol id (78% yield). 1NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 11.60 (br s, 1 H), 8.08 (s, 1 H), 7.46 (d, 1 H), 7.12 (d, 1 H), 6.61 (d, 1 H), 4.81-4.94 (m, 1 H), 3.47-3.62 (m, 1 H), 3.23 (s, 3 H), 2.87-2.96 (m, 2 H), 2.52-2.63 (m, 2 H), 2.14-2.27 (m, 2 H) 1.60- 1.73 (m, 2 H) 0.96 (t, 3 H). LC/MS (exact mass) calculated for C14H21N5O2S;

323.142, found (M + H+); 324.1.

PAPER

 Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2018), 61(3), 1130-1152.

Abstract Image

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b01598

N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}propane-1-sulfonamide (25)

Compound 48a·2HBr …………..was collected by filtration, washed with 2:1 EtOH/H2O (100 mL), and again dried overnight in a vacuum oven at 40 °C.
1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): 11.64 (br s, 1H), 8.12 (s, 1 H), 7.50 (d, J = 9.4 Hz, 1H), 7.10–7.22 (m, 1H), 6.65 (dd, J= 1.8, 3.3 Hz, 1H), 4.87–4.96 (m, 1H), 3.53–3.64 (m, 1H), 3.27 (s, 3H), 2.93–2.97 (m, 2H), 2.57–2.64 (m, 2H), 2.20–2.28 (m, 2H), 1.65–1.74 (m, 2H), 0.99 (t, J = 7.4 Hz, 3H).
LC/MS m/z (M + H+) calcd for C14H22N5O2S: 324. Found: 324. Anal. Calcd for C14H21N5O2S: C, 51.99; H, 6.54; N, 21.65; O, 9.89; S, 9.91. Found: C, 52.06; H, 6.60; N, 21.48; O, 10.08; S, 9.97.

SchmiederG.DraelosZ.PariserD.BanfieldC.CoxL.HodgeM.KierasE.Parsons-RichD.MenonS.SalganikM.PageK.PeevaE. Efficacy and safety of the Janus Kinase 1 inhibitor PF-04965842 in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study Br. J. Dermatol. 2017DOI: 10.1111/bjd.16004

Compound 25N-{cis-3-[Methyl(7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]cyclobutyl}-propane-1-sulfonamide is available through MilliporeSigma (cat. no. PZ0304).

REFERENCES

1: Schmieder GJ, Draelos ZD, Pariser DM, Banfield C, Cox L, Hodge M, Kieras E, Parsons-Rich D, Menon S, Salganik M, Page K, Peeva E. Efficacy and safety of the Janus Kinase 1 inhibitor PF-04965842 in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: phase 2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Br J Dermatol. 2017 Sep 26. doi: 10.1111/bjd.16004. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 28949012

 2 Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2018), 61(3), 1130-1152.

/////////////////PF-04965842, PF 04965842, PF04965842, PF 4965842, Phase 3, Atopic dermatitis, PFIZER, Breakthrough Therapy Designation

CCCS(=O)(N[C@H]1C[C@@H](N(C)C2=C3C(NC=C3)=NC=N2)C1)=O

CCCS(=O)(=O)N[C@@H]1C[C@@H](C1)N(C)c2ncnc3[nH]ccc23

Pfizer’s Monobactam PF-?


STR1

Pfizer’s monobactam PF-?

1380110-34-8, C20 H24 N8 O12 S2, 632.58

Propanoic acid, 2-​[[(Z)​-​[1-​(2-​amino-​4-​thiazolyl)​-​2-​[[(2R,​3S)​-​2-​[[[[[(1,​4-​dihydro-​1,​5-​dihydroxy-​4-​oxo-​2-​pyridinyl)​methyl]​amino]​carbonyl]​amino]​methyl]​-​4-​oxo-​1-​sulfo-​3-​azetidinyl]​amino]​-​2-​oxoethylidene]​amino]​oxy]​-​2-​methyl-

2-((Z)-1-(2-Aminothiazol-4-yl)-2-((2R,3S)-2-((((1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-1,4-dihydropyridin-2-yl)methoxy)carbonylamino)methyl)-4-oxo-1-sulfoazetidin-3-ylamino)-2-oxoethylideneaminooxy)-2-methylpropanoic Acid

2-[[(Z)-[1-(2-Amino-4-thiazolyl)-2-[[(2R,3S)-2-[[[[[(1,4-dihydro-1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-2-pyridinyl)methyl]amino]carbonyl]amino]methyl]-4-oxo-1-sulfo-3-azetidinyl]amino]-2-oxoethylidene]amino]oxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid

Monobactams are a class of antibacterial agents which contain a monocyclic beta-lactam ring as opposed to a beta-lactam fused to an additional ring which is found in other beta-lactam classes, such as cephalosporins, carbapenems and penicillins. The drug Aztreonam is an example of a marketed monobactam; Carumonam is another example. The early studies in this area were conducted by workers at the Squibb Institute for Medical Research, Cimarusti, C. M. & R.B. Sykes: Monocyclic β-lactam antibiotics. Med. Res. Rev. 1984, 4, 1 -24. Despite the fact that selected

monobacatams were discovered over 25 years ago, there remains a continuing need for new antibiotics to counter the growing number of resistant organisms.

Although not limiting to the present invention, it is believed that monobactams of the present invention exploit the iron uptake mechanism in bacteria through the use of siderophore-monobactam conjugates. For background information, see: M. J. Miller, et al. BioMetals (2009), 22(1 ), 61-75.

The mechanism of action of beta-lactam antibiotics, including monobactams, is generally known to those skilled in the art and involves inhibition of one or more penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), although the present invention is not bound or limited by any theory. PBPs are involved in the synthesis of peptidoglycan, which is a major component of bacterial cell walls.

WO 2012073138

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2012073138A1?cl=en

Inventors Matthew Frank BrownSeungil HanManjinder LallMark. J. Mitton-FryMark Stephen PlummerHud Lawrence RisleyVeerabahu ShanmugasundaramJeremy T. Starr
Applicant Pfizer Inc.

Example 4, Route 1

2-({[(1Z)-1 -(2-amino-1 ,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-({(2f?,3S)-2-[({[(1 ,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-1 ,4- dihydropyridin-2-yl)methyl]carbamoyl}amino)methyl]-4-oxo-1 -sulfoazetidin-3- yl}amino)-2-oxoethylidene]amino}oxy)-2-methylpropanoic acid, bis sodium salt

(C92-Bis Na Salt).

Figure imgf000080_0001

C92-bis Na salt

Step 1 : Preparation of C90. A solution of C26 (16.2 g, 43.0 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (900 mL) was treated with 1 , 1 ‘-carbonyldiimidazole (8.0 g, 47.7 mmol). After 5 minutes, the reaction mixture was treated with a solution of C9 (15 g, 25.0 mmol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (600 mL) at room temperature. After 15 hours, the solvent was removed and the residue was treated with ethyl acetate (500 mL) and water (500 mL). The layers were separated and the aqueous layer was back extracted with additional ethyl acetate (300 mL). The organic layers were combined, washed with brine solution (500 mL), dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The crude product was purified via chromatography on silica gel (ethyl acetate / 2-propanol) to yield C90 as a yellow foam. Yield: 17.44 g, 19.62 mmol, 78%. LCMS m/z 889.5 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) 1 1 .90 (br s, 1 H), 9.25 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.40 (br s, 1 H), 7.98 (s, 1 H), 7.50-7.54 (m, 2H), 7.32-7.47 (m, 8H), 7.28 (s, 1 H), 6.65 (br s, 1 H), 6.28 (br s, 1 H), 5.97 (s, 1 H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.8, 5 Hz, 1 H), 4.99 (s, 2H), 4.16-4.28 (m, 2H), 3.74-3.80 (m, 1 H), 3.29-3.41 (m, 1 H), 3.13-3.23 (m, 1 H), 1.42 (s, 9H), 1.41 (s, 3H), 1.39 (br s, 12H).

Step 2: Preparation of C91. A solution of C90 (8.5 g, 9.6 mmol) in anhydrous N,N- dimethylformamide (100 mL) was treated sulfur trioxide /V,/V-dimethylformamide complex (15.0 g, 98.0 mmol). The reaction was allowed to stir at room temperature for 20 minutes then quenched with water (300 mL). The resulting solid was collected by filtration and dried to yield C91 as a white solid. Yield: 8.1 g, 8.3 mmol, 87%. LCMS m/z 967.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1 1.62 (br s, 1 H), 9.29 (d, J=8.8 Hz, 1 H), 9.02 (s, 1 H), 7.58-7.61 (m, 2H), 7.38-7.53 (m, 9H), 7.27 (s, 1 H), 7.07 (s, 1 H), 6.40 (br d, J=8 Hz, 1 H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.20 (dd, J=8.8, 5.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.46 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17, 5 Hz, 1 H), 4.38 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17, 6 Hz, 1 H), 3.92-3.98 (m, 1 H), 3.79-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.07-3.17 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 9H), 1 .39 (s, 3H), 1 .38 (s, 12H).

Step 3: Preparation of C92. A solution of C91 (8.1 g, 8.3 mmol) in anhydrous dichloromethane (200 mL) was treated with 1 M boron trichloride in p-xylenes (58.4 mL, 58.4 mmol) and allowed to stir at room temperature for 15 minutes. The reaction mixture was cooled in an ice bath, quenched with 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (61 mL), and the solvent was removed in vacuo. A portion of the crude product (1 g) was purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.1 % formic acid modifier) to yield C92 as a white solid. Yield: 486 mg, 0.77 mmol. LCMS m/z 633.3 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 9.22 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.15 (s, 1 H), 7.26-7.42 (br s, 2H), 7.18-7.25 (m, 1 H), 6.99 (s, 1 H), 6.74 (s, 1 H), 6.32-6.37 (m, 1 H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.33 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.94-4.00 (m, 1 H), 3.60-3.68 (m, 1 H), 3.19-3.27 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 3H), 1.39 (s, 3H).

Step 4: Preparation of C92-Bis Na Salt. A flask was charged with C92 (388 mg, 0.61 mmol) and water (5.0 mL). The mixture was cooled in an ice bath and treated dropwise with a solution of sodium bicarbonate (103 mg, 1.52 mmol) in water (5.0 mL). The sample was lyophilized to yield C92-Bis Na Salt as a white solid. Yield: 415 mg, 0.61 mmol, quantitative. LCMS m/z 633.5 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, D20) δ 7.80 (s, 1 H), 6.93 (s, 1 H), 6.76 (s, 1 H), 5.33 (d, J=5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.44 (ddd, J=6.0, 6.0, 5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.34 (AB quartet, JAB=17.7 Hz, ΔνΑΒ=10.9 Hz, 2H), 3.69 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.7, 5.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.58 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.7, 6.2 Hz, 1 H), 1.44 (s, 3H), 1.43 (s, 3H).

Alternate preparation of C92

Figure imgf000082_0001

Step 1 : Preparation of C93. An Atlantis pressure reactor was charged with 10% palladium hydroxide on carbon (0.375 g, John Matthey catalyst type A402028-10), C91 (0.75 g, 0.77 mmol) and treated with ethanol (35 mL). The reactor was flushed with nitrogen and pressurized with hydrogen (20 psi) for 20 hours at 20 °C. The reaction mixture was filtered under vacuum and the filtrate was concentrated using the rotary evaporator to yield C93 as a tan solid. Yield: 0.49 g, 0.62 mmol, 80%. LCMS m/z 787.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1 1.57 (br s, 1 H), 9.27 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1 H), 8.16 (s, 1 H), 7.36 (br s, 1 H), 7.26 (s, 1 H), 7.00 (s, 1 H), 6.40 (br s, 1 H), 5.18 (m, 1 H), 4.35 (m, 2H), 3.83 (m, 1 H), 3.41 (m, 1 H), 3.10 (m, 1 H), 1.41 (s, 6H), 1.36 (s, 18H).

Step 2: Preparation of C92. A solution of C93 (6.0 g, 7.6 mmol) in anhydrous dichloromethane (45 mL) at 0 °C was treated with trifluoroacetic acid (35.0 mL, 456 mmol). The mixture was warmed to room temperature and stirred for 2 hours. The reaction mixture was cannulated into a solution of methyl ferf-butyl ether (100 mL) and heptane (200 mL). The solid was collected by filtration and washed with a mixture of methyl ferf-butyl ether (100 mL) and heptane (200 mL) then dried under vacuum. The crude product (~5 g) was purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.1 % formic acid modifier) and lyophilized to yield C92 as a pink solid. Yield: 1.45 g, 2.29 mmol. LCMS m/z 631.0 (M-1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 9.20 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1H), 8.13 (s, 1H), 7.24-7.40 (br s, 2H), 7.16-7.23 (m, 1H), 6.97 (s, 1H), 6.71 (s, 1H), 6.31-6.35 (m, 1H), 5.15 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1H), 4.31 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.92-3.98 (m, 1H), 3.58-3.67 (m, 1H), 3.17-3.25 (m, 1H), 1.37 (s, 3H), 1.36 (s, 3H).

Example 4, route 2

2-({[(1Z)-1-(2-amino-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-({(2 ?,3S)-2-[({[(1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-^ dihydropyridin-2-yl)methyl]carbamoyl}amino)methyl]-4-oxo-1-sulfoazetidin-3- yl}amino)-2-oxoethylidene]amino}oxy)-2-methylpropanoic acid (C92).

lt

Figure imgf000083_0001

single

enantiomer

Figure imgf000083_0002

Step 1. Preparation of C95. A solution of C94 (50.0 g, 189.9 mmol) in

dichloromethane (100 mL) was treated with trifluoroacetic acid (50.0 mL, 661.3 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 24 hours. The dichloromethane and trifluoroacetic acid was displaced with toluene (4 x 150 mL) using vacuum, to a final volume of 120 mL. The solution was added to heptane (250 mL) and the solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with a mixture of toluene and heptane (1 : 3, 60 mL), followed by heptane (2 x 80 mL) and dried under vacuum at 50 °C for 19 hours to afford C95 as a solid. Yield: 30.0 g, 158 mmol, 84%. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 9.66 (s, 1 H), 7.86 – 7.93 (m, 2H), 7.73 – 7.80 (m, 2H), 4.57 (s, 2H). HPLC retention time 5.1 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1.5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1.5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes.

Step 2: Preparation of C96-racemic. A solution of C95 (32.75 g; 173.1 mmol) in dichloromethane (550 mL) under nitrogen was cooled to 2 °C. The solution was treated with 2,4-dimethoxybenzylamine (28.94 g, 173.1 mmol) added dropwise over 25 minutes, maintaining the temperature below 10 °C. The solution was stirred for 10 minutes at 2 °C and then treated with molecular sieves (58.36 g, UOP Type 3A). The cold bath was removed and the reaction slurry was stirred for 3 hours at room temperature. The slurry was filtered through a pad of Celite (34.5 g) and the filter cake was rinsed with dichloromethane (135 mL). The dichloromethane filtrate (imine solution) was used directly in the following procedure.

A solution of A/-(ferf-butoxycarbonyl)glycine (60.6 g, 346.1 mmol) in

tetrahydrofuran (622 mL) under nitrogen was cooled to -45 °C and treated with triethylamine (38.5 g, 380.8 mmol). The mixture was stirred for 15 minutes at -45 °C and then treated with ethyl chloroformate (48.8 g, 450 mmol) over 15 minutes. The reaction mixture was stirred at -50 °C for 7 hours. The previously prepared imine solution was added via an addition funnel over 25 minutes while maintaining the reaction mixture temperature below -40 °C. The slurry was treated with triethylamine (17.5 g, 173 mmol) and the reaction mixture was slowly warmed to room temperature over 5 hours and stirred for an additional 12 hours. The reaction slurry was charged with water (150 mL) and the volatiles removed using a rotary evaporator. The reaction mixture was charged with additional water (393 mL) and the volatiles removed using a rotary evaporator. The mixture was treated with methyl ferf-butyl ether (393 mL) and vigorously stirred for 1 hour. The solid was collected by vacuum filtration and the filter cake was rinsed with a mixture of methyl ferf-butyl ether and water (1 : 1 , 400 mL). The solid was collected and dried in a vacuum oven at 50 °C for 16 hours to afford C96- racemic. Yield: 55.8 g, 1 13 mmol, 65%. 1H-NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 7.85 (s, NH), 7.80 (s, 4H), 6.78 (d, J=7.8 Hz, 1 H), 6.25 (m, 1 H), 6.10 (m, 1 H), 4.83 (m, 1 H), 4.38 (d, J=9.5 Hz, 1 H), 3.77-3.95 (m, 3H), 3.62 (s, 3H), 3.45 (m, 1 H), 3.40 (s, 3H), 1.38 (s, 9H). HPLC retention time 6.05 minutes; XBridge C8 column (4.6 x 75 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 2.0 mL/minute; detection UV 210 nm, 230 nm, and 254 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = methanesulfonic acid (5%) in 10 mmol sodium octylsulfonate, solvent B = acetonitrile (100%); gradient elusion: 0-1.5 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%), 1.5-8.5 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 8.5- 10.0 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 10.01 -12.0 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%); total run time 12.0 minutes.

Step 3: Preparation of C97-racemic. A solution of C96-racemic (15.0 g, 30.3 mmol) in ethyl acetate (150 mL) under nitrogen was treated with ethanolamine (27.3 mL, 454.1 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at 90 °C for 3 hours and then cooled to room temperature. The mixture was charged with water (150 mL) and the layers separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (75 mL) and the combined organic layers washed with water (2 x 150 mL) followed by saturated aqueous sodium chloride (75 mL). The organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and the filtrate concentrated to a volume of 38 mL. The filtrate was treated with heptane (152 mL) and the solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with heptane and dried at 50 °C in a vacuum oven overnight to yield C97-racemic as a solid. Yield: 9.68 g, 26.5 mmol, 88%. LCMS m/z 967.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 7.64 (d, J=9.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.14 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 6.56 (s, 1 H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.20, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.78 (dd, J=9.37, 5.1 Hz, 1 H), 4.30 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 4.14 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.75 (s, 3H), 3.45 – 3.53 (m, 1 H), 2.65 – 2.75 (m, 1 H), 2.56 – 2.64 (m, 1 H), 1.38 (s, 9H), 1.30 – 1.35 (m, 2H). HPLC retention time 5.1 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μΐη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute;

detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1 .5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes. Step 4: Preparation of C97-(2R,3S) enantiomer. A solution of C97-racemic (20.0 g, 54.7 mmol) in ethyl acetate (450 mL) was treated with diatomaceous earth (5.0 g) and filtered through a funnel charged with diatomaceous earth. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (150 mL). The filtrate was charged with diatomaceous earth (20.0 g) and treated with (-)-L-dibenzoyltartaric acid (19.6 g, 54.7 mmol). The slurry was heated at 60 °C for 1.5 hours and then cooled to room temperature. The slurry was filtered and the solid washed with ethyl acetate (90 mL). The solid was collected and dried at 50 °C in a vacuum oven for 17 hours to yield C97-(2R,3S) enantiomer as a solid (mixed with diatomaceous earth). Yield: 17.3 g, 23.9 mmol, 43.6%, 97.6% ee. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 7.89 – 7.91 (m, 4H), 7.59 – 7.65 (m, 3H), 7.44 – 7.49 (m, 4H), 7.09 (d, J=8.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.53 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.3, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 5.65 (s, 2H), 4.85 (dd, J=9.3, 4.9 Hz, 1 H), 4.30 (d, J=15.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.10 (d, J=15.3 Hz, 1 H), 3.74 (s, 3H), 3.72 (s, 3H), 3.68 – 3.70 (m, 1 H), 2.92 – 2.96 (dd, J=13.6, 5.4 Hz, 1 H), 2.85 – 2.90 (dd, J=13.6, 6.3 Hz, 1 H), 1.36 (s, 9H). HPLC retention time 5.1 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1.5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes. Chiral HPLC retention time 9.1 minutes; column: Chiralcel OD-H column (250 mm x 4.6 mm); column temperature 40 °C; flow rate 1 .0 mL / minute; detection UV 208 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = ethanol (18%), solvent B = heptane (85%); isocratic elusion; total run time 20.0 minutes.

Step 5: Preparation of C98-(2R,3S) enantiomer. A solution of C97-(2R,3S) enantiomer. (16.7 g, 23.1 mmol) in ethyl acetate (301 mL) was treated with diatomaceous earth (18.3 g) and 5% aqueous potassium phosphate tribasic (182 mL). The slurry was stirred for 30 minutes at room temperature, then filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with ethyl acetate (2 x 67 mL). The filtrate was washed with 5% aqueous potassium phosphate tribasic (18 mL) and the organic layer dried over magnesium sulfate. The solid was filtered and the filter cake washed with ethyl acetate (33 mL). The filtrate was concentrated to a volume of 42 mL and slowly added to heptane (251 mL) and the resulting solid was collected by filtration. The solid was washed with heptane and dried at 50 °C in a vacuum oven for 19 hours to yield C98- (2R,3S) enantiomer as a solid. Yield: 6.4 g, 17.5 mmol, 76%, 98.8% ee. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de) δ 7.64 (d, J=9.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.14 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1 H), 6.56 (s, 1 H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.20, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 4.78 (dd, J=9.37, 5.1 Hz, 1 H), 4.30 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 4.14 (d, J=14.8 Hz, 1 H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.75 (s, 3H), 3.45 – 3.53 (m, 1 H), 2.65 – 2.75 (m, 1 H), 2.56 – 2.64 (m, 1 H), 1.38 (s, 9H), 1.30 – 1.35 (m, 2H). HPLC retention time 5.2 minutes; column: Agilent Extended C-18 column (75 mm x 3 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 230 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = acetonitrile (100%), solvent B = acetonitrile (5%) in 10 mM ammonium acetate; gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent B (100%), 1.5-10.0 minutes solvent B (5%), 10.0-13.0 minutes solvent B (100%); total run time 13.0 minutes. Chiral HPLC retention time 8.7 minutes; column: Chiralcel OD-H column (250 mm x 4.6 mm); column temperature 40 °C; flow rate 1.0 mL / minute; detection UV 208 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = ethanol (18%), solvent B = heptane (85%); isocratic elusion; total run time 20.0 minutes.

Step 6: Preparation of C99. A solution of potassium phosphate tribasic N-hydrate (8.71 g, 41 .05 mmol) in water (32.0 mL) at 22 °C was treated with a slurry of C26- mesylate salt (12.1 g, 27.4 mmol, q-NMR potency 98%) in dichloromethane (100.00 mL). The slurry was stirred for 1 hour at 22 °C. The reaction mixture was transferred to a separatory funnel and the layers separated. The aqueous layer was back extracted with dichloromethane (50.0 mL). The organic layers were combined, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with

dichloromethane (2 x 16 mL). The filtrate (-190 mL, amine solution) was used directly in the next step.

A solution of 1 ,1 ‘-carbonyldiimidazole (6.66 g, 41 .0 mmol) in dichloromethane (100 mL) at 22 °C under nitrogen was treated with the previously prepared amine solution (-190 mL) added dropwise using an addition funnel over 3 hour at 22 °C with stirring. After the addition, the mixture was stirred for 1 hour at 22 °C, then treated with C98-(2R,3S) enantiomer. (10.0 g, 27.4 mmol) followed by /V,/V-dimethylformamide (23.00 mL). The reaction mixture was stirred at 22 °C for 3 hours and then heated at 40 °C for 12 hours. The solution was cooled to room temperature and the dichloromethane was removed using the rotary evaporator. The reaction mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate (216.0 mL) and washed with 10% aqueous citric acid (216.0 mL), 5% aqueous sodium chloride (2 x 216.0 mL), dried over magnesium sulfate and filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (3 x 13 mL) and the ethyl acetate solution was concentrated on the rotary evaporator to a volume of (-1 10.00 mL) providing a suspension. The suspension (~1 10.00 mL) was warmed to 40 °C and transferred into a stirred solution of heptane (22 °C) over 1 hour, to give a slurry. The slurry was stirred for 1 hour and filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was washed with heptane (3 x 30 mL) and dried under vacuum at 50 °C for 12 hours to afford C99 as a solid. Yield: 18.1 g, 24.9 mmol, 92%. LCMS m/z 728.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.09 (s, 1 H), 7.62 (d, J=9.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.33-7.52 (m, 10H), 7.07 (d, J=8.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.51 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.50 (m, 1 H), 6.44 (dd, J=8.3, 2.3 Hz, 1 H), 6.12 (m, 1 H), 6.07 (s, 1 H), 5.27 (s, 2H), 5.00 (s, 2H), 4.73 (dd, J=9.4, 5.2 Hz, 1 H), 4.38 (d, J=15.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.19 (m, 2H), 3.99 (d, J=15.0 Hz, 1 H), 3.72 (s, 3H), 3.71 (s, 3H), 3.48 (m, 1 H), 3.28 (m, 1 H), 3.12 (m, 1 H), 1 .37 (s, 9H).

Step 7: Preparation of C100. A solution of C99 (46.5 g, 63.9 mmol) in acetonitrile (697 mL and water (372 mL) was treated with potassium persulfate (69.1 g, 255.6 mmol) and potassium phosphate dibasic (50.1 g, 287.5 mmol). The biphasic mixture was heated to 75 °C and vigorously stirred for 1.5 hours. The pH was maintained between 6.0-6.5 by potassium phosphate dibasic addition (-12 g). The mixture was cooled to 20 °C, the suspension was filtered and washed with acetonitrile (50 mL). The filtrate was concentrated using the rotary evaporator and treated with water (50 mL) followed by ethyl acetate (200 mL). The slurry was stirred for 2 hours at room temperature, filtered and the solid dried under vacuum at 40 °C overnight. The solid was slurried in a mixture of ethyl acetate and water (6 : 1 , 390.7 mL) at 20 °C for 1 hour then collected by filtration. The solid was dried in a vacuum oven to yield C100. Yield: 22.1 g, 38.3 mmol, 60%. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.17 (br s, 1 H), 7.96 (s, 1 H), 7.58 (d, J=9.6 Hz, 1 H), 7.29-7.50 (m, 10H), 6.49 (dd, J=8.0, 6.0 Hz, 1 H), 6.08 (dd, J=5.6, 5.2 Hz, 1 H), 5.93 (s, 1 H), 5.22 (s, 2H), 4.96 (s, 2H), 4.77 (dd, J=9.6, 5.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.16 (m, 2H), 3.61 (m, 1 H), 3.1 1 (m, 2H), 1.36 (s, 9H). HPLC retention time 6.17 minutes; XBridge C8 column (4.6 x 75 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 2.0 mL/minute; detection UV 210 nm, 230 nm, and 254 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = methanesulfonic acid (5%) in 10 mmol sodium octylsulfonate, solvent B = acetonitrile (100%); gradient elusion: 0-1 .5 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%), 1.5-8.5 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 8.5-10.0 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 10.01- 12.0 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%); total run time 12.0 minutes.

Step 8: Preparation of C101. A solution of trifluoroacetic acid (120 mL, 1550 mmol) under nitrogen was treated with methoxybenzene (30 mL, 269 mmol) and cooled to -5 °C. Solid C100 (17.9 g, 31.0 mmol) was charged in one portion at -5 °C and the resulting mixture stirred for 3 hours. The reaction mixture was cannulated with nitrogen pressure over 15 minutes to a stirred mixture of Celite (40.98 g) and methyl ferf-butyl ether (550 mL) at 10 °C. The slurry was stirred at 16 °C for 30 minutes, then filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was rinsed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 100 mL). The solid was collected and slurried in methyl ferf-butyl ether (550 mL) with vigorous stirring for 25 minutes. The slurry was filtered by vacuum filtration and washed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 250 mL). The solid was collected and dried in a vacuum oven at 60 °C for 18 hours to afford C101 on Celite. Yield: 57.6 g total = C101 + Celite; 16.61 g C101 , 28.1 mmol, 91%. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.75-8.95 (br s, 2H), 8.65 (s, 1 H), 8.21 (s, 1 H), 7.30-7.58 (m, 10H), 6.83 (br s, 1 H), 6.65 (br s, 1 H), 6.17 (s, 1 H), 5.30 (s, 2H), 5.03 (s, 2H), 4.45 (br s, 1 H), 4.22 (br s, 2H), 3.77 (m, 1 H), 3.36 (m, 1 H), 3.22 (m, 1 H). 19F NMR (376 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ -76.0 (s, 3F). HPLC retention time 5.81 minutes; XBridge C8 column (4.6 x 75 mm, 3.5 μηη); column temperature 45 °C; flow rate 2.0 mL/minute; detection UV 210 nm, 230 nm, and 254 nm; mobile phase: solvent A = methanesulfonic acid (5%) in 10 mmol sodium octylsulfonate, solvent B = acetonitrile (100%); gradient elusion: 0-1.5 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%), 1.5-8.5 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 8.5-10.0 minutes solvent A (5%) and solvent B (95%), 10.01-12.0 minutes solvent A (95%) and solvent B (5%); total run time 12.0 minutes.

Step 9: Preparation of C90. A suspension of C101 (67.0 g, 30% activity on Celite = 33.9 mmol) in acetonitrile (281 .4 mL) was treated with molecular sieves 4AE (40.2 g), C5 (17.9 g, 33.9 mmol), 4-dimethylaminopyridine (10.4 g, 84.9 mmol) and the mixture was stirred at 40°C for 16 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to 20 °C, filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with acetonitrile (2 x 100 mL). The filtrate was concentrated under vacuum to a volume of -50 mL. The solution was diluted with ethyl acetate (268.0 mL) and washed with 10% aqueous citric acid (3 x 134 mL) followed by 5% aqueous sodium chloride (67.0 mL). The organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate and filtered under vacuum. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (2 x 50 mL) and the filtrate was concentrated to a volume of -60 mL. The filtrate was added slowly to heptane (268 mL) with stirring and the slurry was stirred at 20 °C for 1 hour. The slurry was filtered under vacuum and the filter cake washed with a mixture of heptane and ethyl acetate (4: 1 , 2 x 27 mL). The solid was collected and dried under vacuum for 12 hours at 50 °C to afford a solid. The crude product was purified via chromatography on silica gel (ethyl acetate / 2-propanol), product bearing fractions were combined and the volume was reduced to -60 mL. The solution was added dropwise to heptane (268 mL) with stirring. The slurry was stirred at room temperature for 3 hours, filtered and washed with heptane and ethyl acetate (4: 1 , 2 x 27 mL). The solid was collected and dried under vacuum for 12 hours at 50 °C to afford C90 as a solid. Yield: 16.8 g, 18.9 mmol, 58%. LCMS m/z 889.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-cfe) 1 1.90 (br s, 1 H), 9.25 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.40 (br s, 1 H), 7.98 (s, 1 H), 7.50-7.54 (m, 2H), 7.32- 7.47 (m, 8H), 7.28 (s, 1 H), 6.65 (br s, 1 H), 6.28 (br s, 1 H), 5.97 (s, 1 H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.8, 5 Hz, 1 H), 4.99 (s, 2H), 4.16-4.28 (m, 2H), 3.74-3.80 (m, 1 H), 3.29-3.41 (m, 1 H), 3.13-3.23 (m, 1 H), 1 .42 (s, 9H), 1 .41 (s, 3H), 1.39 (br s, 12H).

Step 10: Preparation of C91. A solution of C90 (14.5 g, 16.3 mmol) in anhydrous N,N- dimethylformamide (145.0 mL) was treated with sulfur trioxide /V,/V-dimethylformamide complex (25.0 g, 163.0 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 45 minutes, then transferred to a stirred mixture of 5% aqueous sodium chloride (290 mL) and ethyl acetate (435 mL) at 0 °C. The mixture was warmed to 18 °C and the layers separated. The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (145 mL) and the combined organic layers washed with 5% aqueous sodium chloride (3 x 290 mL) followed by saturated aqueous sodium chloride (145 mL). The organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered through diatomaceous earth and the filter cake washed with ethyl acetate (72 mL). The filtrate was concentrated to a volume of 36 mL and treated with methyl ferf-butyl ether (290 mL), the resulting slurry was stirred at room temperature for 1 hour. The solid was collected by filtration, washed with methyl ferf- butyl ether (58 mL) and dried at 50 °C for 2 hours followed by 20 °C for 65 hours in a vacuum oven to yield C91 as a solid. Yield: 15.0 g, 15.4 mmol, 95%. LCMS m/z 967.6 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 1 1.62 (br s, 1 H), 9.29 (d, J=8.8 Hz, 1 H), 9.02 (s, 1 H), 7.58-7.61 (m, 2H), 7.38-7.53 (m, 9H), 7.27 (s, 1 H), 7.07 (s, 1 H), 6.40 (br d, J=8.0 Hz, 1 H), 5.55 (s, 2H), 5.25 (s, 2H), 5.20 (dd, J=8.8, 5.6 Hz, 1 H), 4.46 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17.0, 5.0 Hz, 1 H), 4.38 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=17.0, 6.0 Hz, 1 H), 3.92- 3.98 (m, 1 H), 3.79-3.87 (m, 1 H), 3.07-3.17 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 9H), 1.39 (s, 3H), 1.38 (s, 12H).

Step 11 : Preparation of C92. A solution of C91 (20.0 g, 20.6 mmol) in

dichloromethane (400 mL) was concentrated under reduced pressure (420 mmHg) at 45 °C to a volume of 200 mL. The solution was cooled to -5 °C and treated with 1 M boron trichloride in dichloromethane (206.0 mL, 206.0 mmol) added dropwise over 40 minutes. The reaction mixture was warmed to 15 °C over 1 hour with stirring. The slurry was cooled to -15 °C and treated with a mixture of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (69.2 mL) and methyl ferf-butyl ether (400 mL), maintaining the temperature at -15 °C. The reaction mixture was warmed to 0 °C over 1 hour. The suspension was filtered using nitrogen pressure and the solid washed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 200 mL).

Nitrogen was passed over the solid for 2 hours. The solid was collected and suspended in methyl ferf-butyl ether (400 mL) for 1 hour with stirring at 18 °C. The suspension was filtered using nitrogen pressure and the solid washed with methyl ferf-butyl ether (2 x 200 mL). Nitrogen was passed over the resulting solid for 12 hours. A portion of the crude product was neutralized with 1 M aqueous ammonium formate to pH 5.5 with minimal addition of /V,/V-dimethylformamide to prevent foaming. The feed solution was filtered and purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.2% formic acid modifier). The product bearing fractions were combined and concentrated to remove acetonitrile. The solution was captured on a GC-161 M column, washed with deionized water and blown dry with nitrogen pressure. The product was released using a mixture of methanol / water (10: 1 ) and the product bearing fractions were added to a solution of ethyl acetate (6 volumes). The solid was collected by filtration to afford C92 as a solid. Yield: 5.87 g, 9.28 mmol. LCMS m/z 633.3 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 9.22 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1 H), 8.15 (s, 1 H), 7.26-7.42 (br s, 2H), 7.18-7.25 (m, 1 H), 6.99 (s, 1 H), 6.74 (s, 1 H), 6.32-6.37 (m, 1 H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1 H), 4.33 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.94-4.00 (m, 1 H), 3.60-3.68 (m, 1 H), 3.19-3.27 (m, 1 H), 1.40 (s, 3H), 1.39 (s, 3H).

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2014), 57(9), 3845-3855

Siderophore Receptor-Mediated Uptake of Lactivicin Analogues in Gram-Negative Bacteria

Medicinal Chemistry, Computational Chemistry, §Antibacterials Research Unit, and Structural Biology, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
J. Med. Chem.201457 (9), pp 3845–3855
DOI: 10.1021/jm500219c
Publication Date (Web): April 2, 2014
Copyright © 2014 American Chemical Society
*Phone: (860)-686-1788. E-mail: seungil.han@pfizer.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens are an emerging threat to human health, and addressing this challenge will require development of new antibacterial agents. This can be achieved through an improved molecular understanding of drug–target interactions combined with enhanced delivery of these agents to the site of action. Herein we describe the first application of siderophore receptor-mediated drug uptake of lactivicin analogues as a strategy that enables the development of novel antibacterial agents against clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. We report the first crystal structures of several sideromimic conjugated compounds bound to penicillin binding proteins PBP3 and PBP1a from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and characterize the reactivity of lactivicin and β-lactam core structures. Results from drug sensitivity studies with β-lactamase enzymes are presented, as well as a structure-based hypothesis to reduce susceptibility to this enzyme class. Finally, mechanistic studies demonstrating that sideromimic modification alters the drug uptake process are discussed.

PAPER

Pyridone-Conjugated Monobactam Antibiotics with Gram-Negative Activity

Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Computational Chemistry, §Antibacterials Research Unit, Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics & Metabolism, Structural Biology, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
J. Med. Chem.201356 (13), pp 5541–5552
DOI: 10.1021/jm400560z
Publication Date (Web): June 11, 2013
Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society
*Phone: 860-441-3522. E-mail: matthew.f.brown@pfizer.com.
Abstract Image

Herein we describe the structure-aided design and synthesis of a series of pyridone-conjugated monobactam analogues with in vitro antibacterial activity against clinically relevant Gram-negative species including Pseudomonas aeruginosaKlebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Rat pharmacokinetic studies with compound 17 demonstrate low clearance and low plasma protein binding. In addition, evidence is provided for a number of analogues suggesting that the siderophore receptors PiuA and PirA play a role in drug uptake in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1.

STR1

17 as a solid. Yield: 5.87 g, 9.28 mmol. LCMS m/z 633.3 (M+1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSOd6) δ 9.22 (d, J=8.7 Hz, 1H), 8.15 (s, 1H), 7.26-7.42 (br s, 2H), 7.18-7.25 (m, 1H), 6.99 (s, 1H), 6.74 (s, 1H), 6.32-6.37 (m, 1H), 5.18 (dd, J=8.7, 5.7 Hz, 1H), 4.33 (br d, J=4.6 Hz, 2H), 3.94-4.00 (m, 1H), 3.60-3.68 (m, 1H), 3.19-3.27 (m, 1H), 1.40 (s, 3H), 1.39 (s, 3H).

Nc1nc(cs1)\C(=N\OC(C)(C)C(=O)O)C(=O)N[C@@H]3C(=O)N([C@@H]3CNC(=O)NCC2=CC(=O)C(O)=CN2O)S(=O)(=O)O

PAPER

Process Development for the Synthesis of Monocyclic β-Lactam Core 17

Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Eastern Point Road, Groton, Connecticut 06340, United States
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00359
Publication Date (Web): January 4, 2018
Copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society
Abstract Image

Process development and multikilogram synthesis of the monocyclic β-lactam core 17 for a novel pyridone-conjugated monobactam antibiotic is described. Starting with commercially available 2-(2,2-diethoxyethyl)isoindoline-1,3-dione, the five-step synthesis features several telescoped operations and direct isolations to provide significant improvement in throughput and reduced solvent usage over initial scale-up campaigns. A particular highlight in this effort includes the development of an efficient Staudinger ketene–imine [2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of N-Boc-glycine ketene 12 and imine 9 to form racemic β-lactam 13 in good isolated yield (66%) and purity (97%). Another key feature in the synthesis involves a classical resolution of racemic amine 15 to afford single enantiomer salt 17 in excellent isolated yield (45%) with high enantiomeric excess (98%).

Figure

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00359/suppl_file/op7b00359_si_001.pdf

Nc1nc(cs1)\C(=N\OC(C)(C)C(=O)O)C(=O)N[C@@H]3C(=O)N([C@@H]3CNC(=O)NCC2=CC(=O)C(O)=CN2O)S(=O)(=O)O

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

J. Med. Chem.201356 (13), pp 5541–5552
DOI: 10.1021/jm400560z

OXYGEN ANALOGUE…………..

STR2
 1380110-45-1, C20 H23 N7 O13 S2, 633.57
Propanoic acid, 2-​[[(Z)​-​[1-​(2-​amino-​4-​thiazolyl)​-​2-​[[(2R,​3S)​-​2-​[[[[(1,​4-​dihydro-​1,​5-​dihydroxy-​4-​oxo-​2-​pyridinyl)​methoxy]​carbonyl]​amino]​methyl]​-​4-​oxo-​1-​sulfo-​3-​azetidinyl]​amino]​-​2-​oxoethylidene]​amino]​oxy]​-​2-​methyl-
2-[[(Z)-[1-(2-Amino-4-thiazolyl)-2-[[(2R,3S)-2-[[[[(1,4-dihydro-1,5-dihydroxy-4-oxo-2-pyridinyl)methoxy]carbonyl]amino]methyl]-4-oxo-1-sulfo-3-azetidinyl]amino]-2-oxoethylidene]amino]oxy]-2-methylpropanoic acid

STR2

18 as a light yellow solid. Yield: 43 mg, 0.068 mmol, 51%. LCMS m/z 634.4 (M+1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6), characteristic peaks: δ 9.29 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1H), 8.10 (s, 1H), 7.04-7.10 (m, 1H), 7.00 (s, 1H), 6.75 (s, 1H), 5.05-5.30 (m, 3H), 4.00-4.07 (m, 1H), 1.42 (s, 3H), 1.41 (s, 3H).

Nc1nc(cs1)\C(=N\OC(C)(C)C(=O)O)C(=O)N[C@@H]3C(=O)N([C@@H]3CNC(=O)OCC2=CC(=O)C(O)=CN2O)S(=O)(=O)O

Step 4: Preparation of 18-Bis Na salt. A suspension of 5 (212 mg, 0.33 mmol) in water (10 mL) was cooled to 0 oC and treated with a solution of sodium bicarbonate (56.4 mg, 0.67 mmol) in water (2 mL), added dropwise. The reaction mixture was cooled to -70 oC (frozen) and lyophilized to afford 18-Bis Na salt as a white solid. Yield: 210 mg, 0.31 mmol, 93%. LCMS m/z 632.5 (M-1). 1H NMR (400 MHz, D2O) δ 7.87 (s, 1H), 6.94 (s, 1H), 6.92 (s, 1H), 5.35 (d, J=5 Hz, 1H), 5.16 (s, 2H), 4.46-4.52 (m, 1H), 3.71 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1H), 3.55 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1H), 1.43 (s, 3H), 1.42 (s, 3H).

WO 2012073138

Inventors Matthew Frank BrownSeungil HanManjinder LallMark. J. Mitton-FryMark Stephen PlummerHud Lawrence RisleyVeerabahu ShanmugasundaramJeremy T. Starr
Applicant Pfizer Inc.

Example 5

disodium 2-({[(1Z)-1 -(2-amino-1 ,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-({(2R,3S)-2-[({[(1 ,5-dihydroxy-4- oxo-1 ,4-dihydropyridin-2-yl)methoxy]carbonyl}amino)methyl]-4-oxo-1 – sulfonatoazetidin-3-yl}amino)-2-oxoethylidene]amino}oxy)-2-methylpropanoate

(C104-Bis Na salt).

Figure imgf000092_0001

Step 1 : Preparation of C102. A solution of C28 (300 mg, 0.755 mmol) in

tetrahydrofuran (10 mL) was treated with 1 , 1 ‘-carbonyldiimidazole (379 mg, 2.26 mmol) at room temperature and stirred for 20 hours. The yellow reaction mixture was treated with a solution of C9 (286 mg, 0.543 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (25 mL). The mixture was stirred for 6 hours at room temperature, then treated with water (20 mL) and extracted with ethyl acetate (3 x 25 mL). The combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and concentrated in vacuo. The crude material was purified via chromatography on silica gel (heptane / ethyl acetate / 2-propanol) to afford C102 as a light yellow solid. Yield: 362 mg, 0.381 mmol, 62%. LCMS m/z 950.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de), characteristic peaks: δ 9.31 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 1 H), 8.38 (s, 1 H), 8.00 (s, 1 H), 7.41 (br d, J=8.2 Hz, 2H), 7.36 (br d, J=8.8 Hz, 2H), 7.26 (s, 1 H), 6.10 (s, 1 H), 5.20 (s, 2H), 4.92 (br s, 4H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.76 (s, 3H), 1.45 (s, 9H), 1.38 (s, 9H). Step 2: Preparation of C103. A solution of C102 (181 mg, 0.191 mmol) in anhydrous /V,/V-dimethylformamide (2.0 mL) was treated with sulfur trioxide pyridine complex (302 mg, 1.91 mmol). The reaction mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature for 6 hours, then cooled to 0 °C and quenched with water. The resulting solid was collected by filtration and dried in vacuo to yield C103 as a white solid. Yield: 145 mg, 0.14 mmol, 74%. APCI m/z 1028.5 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6), characteristic peaks: δ 1 1.65 (br s, 1 H), 9.37 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1 H), 8.87 (s, 1 H), 7.49 (br d, J=8.6 Hz, 2H), 7.43 (br d, J=8.6 Hz, 2H), 7.26 (s, 1 H), 7.01 (br d, J=8.9 Hz, 2H), 7.00 (br d, J=8.8 Hz, 2H), 5.43 (s, 2H), 5.20 (dd, J=8.4, 6 Hz, 1 H), 4.01-4.07 (m, 1 H), 3.78 (s, 3H), 3.77 (s, 3H), 3.50- 3.58 (m, 1 H), 3.29-3.37 (m, 1 H), 1.44 (s, 9H), 1.37 (s, 9H). Step 3: Preparation of C104. A solution of C103 (136 mg, 0.132 mmol) in anhydrous dichloromethane (5 mL) was treated with 1 M boron trichloride in p-xylenes (0.92 mL, 0.92 mmol) and allowed to stir at room temperature for 40 minutes. The reaction mixture was cooled in an ice bath, quenched with water (0.4 mL), and transferred into a solution of methyl ferf-butyl ether: heptane (1 :2, 12 mL). The solvent was removed in vacuo and the crude product was purified via reverse phase chromatography (C-18 column; acetonitrile / water gradient with 0.1 % formic acid modifier) to yield C104 as a light yellow solid. Yield: 43 mg, 0.068 mmol, 51 %. LCMS m/z 634.4 (M+1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-de), characteristic peaks: δ 9.29 (d, J=8.5 Hz, 1 H), 8.10 (s, 1 H), 7.04- 7.10 (m, 1 H), 7.00 (s, 1 H), 6.75 (s, 1 H), 5.05-5.30 (m, 3H), 4.00-4.07 (m, 1 H), 1 .42 (s, 3H), 1 .41 (s, 3H).

Step 4: Preparation of C104-Bis Na salt. A suspension of C104 (212 mg, 0.33 mmol) in water (10 mL) was cooled to 0 °C and treated with a solution of sodium bicarbonate (56.4 mg, 0.67 mmol) in water (2 mL), added dropwise. The reaction mixture was cooled to -70 °C (frozen) and lyophilized to afford C104-Bis Na salt as a white solid. Yield: 210 mg, 0.31 mmol, 93%. LCMS m/z 632.5 (M-1 ). 1H NMR (400 MHz, D20) δ 7.87 (s, 1 H), 6.94 (s, 1 H), 6.92 (s, 1 H), 5.35 (d, J=5 Hz, 1 H), 5.16 (s, 2H), 4.46-4.52 (m, 1 H), 3.71 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1 H), 3.55 (dd, half of ABX pattern, J=14.5, 6 Hz, 1 H), 1.43 (s, 3H), 1 .42 (s, 3H).

////////////Pfizer,  monobactam,  PF-?, 1380110-34-8, pfizer, pf, 1380110-45-1, WO 2012073138, Matthew Frank BrownSeungil HanManjinder LallMark. J. Mitton-FryMark Stephen PlummerHud Lawrence RisleyVeerabahu ShanmugasundaramJeremy T. Starr, preclinical

Gedatolisib, гедатолисиб , غيداتوليسيب , 吉达利塞 ,


Image result for GedatolisibImage result for Gedatolisib

Gedatolisib

Pfizer

PF-05212384; PF-5212384; PKI-587

CAS 1197160-78-3
Chemical Formula: C32H41N9O4
Molecular Weight: 615.72

1-(4-{[4-(Dimethylamino)-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl}phenyl)-3-{4-[4,6-di(4-morpholinyl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]phenyl}urea
3-{4-[bis(morpholin-4-yl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]phenyl}-1-{4-[4-(dimethylamino)piperidine-1-carbonyl]phenyl}urea
N-[4-[[4-(Dimethylamino)-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl]phenyl]-N’-[4-[4,6-di(4-morpholinyl)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]phenyl]urea
гедатолисиб [Russian] [INN]
غيداتوليسيب [Arabic] [INN]
吉达利塞 [Chinese] [INN]
  • Phase III Acute myeloid leukaemia
  • Phase II Colorectal cancer; Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Phase I Breast cancer; Solid tumours
  • Discontinued Endometrial cancer

Most Recent Events

  • 22 Nov 2017Pfizer suspends patient enrolment in a phase I/II trial due to drug supply delay in Non-small cell lung cancer (Combination therapy, Inoperable/Unresectable, Metastatic disease, Late-stage disease) in USA (IV) (NCT02920450)
  • 04 Nov 2017No recent reports of development identified for phase-I development in Solid-tumours(Combination therapy, Late-stage disease, Second-line therapy or greater) in Canada (IV, Infusion)
  • 04 Nov 2017No recent reports of development identified for phase-I development in Solid-tumours(Combination therapy, Late-stage disease, Second-line therapy or greater) in Italy (IV, Infusion)

Gedatolisib, also known as PKI-587 and PF-05212384, is an agent targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway, with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon intravenous administration, PI3K/mTOR kinase inhibitor PKI-587 inhibits both PI3K and mTOR kinases, which may result in apoptosis and growth inhibition of cancer cells overexpressing PI3K/mTOR. Activation of the PI3K/mTOR pathway promotes cell growth, survival, and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy; mTOR, a serine/threonine kinase downstream of PI3K, may also be activated independent of PI3K.

PKI-587 is a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, currently being developed by Pfizer. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is a key pathway in cell proliferation, growth, survival, protein synthesis, and glucose metabolism. It has been recognized recently that inhibiting this pathway might provide a viable therapy for cancer. PKI-587  has shown excellent activity in vitro and in vivo, with antitumor efficacy in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft tumor models when administered intravenously.

PATENT

WO 2009143317

WO 2010096619

WO 2012148540

WO 2014151147

PATENT

US 20170119778

PAPER

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2010), 53(6), 2636-2645

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm901830p

Bis(morpholino-1,3,5-triazine) Derivatives: Potent Adenosine 5′-Triphosphate Competitive Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors: Discovery of Compound 26 (PKI-587), a Highly Efficacious Dual Inhibitor

 Chemical Sciences
 Oncology
§ Drug Metabolism
Wyeth Research, 401 N. Middletown Road, Pearl River, New York 10965
J. Med. Chem.201053 (6), pp 2636–2645
DOI: 10.1021/jm901830p
Publication Date (Web): February 18, 2010
Copyright © 2010 American Chemical Society
*To whom correspondence should be addressed. Phone: (845) 602-4023. Fax (845) 602-5561. E-mail: venkata@wyeth.com or venkata699@gmail.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is a key pathway in cell proliferation, growth, survival, protein synthesis, and glucose metabolism. It has been recognized recently that inhibiting this pathway might provide a viable therapy for cancer. A series of bis(morpholino-1,3,5-triazine) derivatives were prepared and optimized to provide the highly efficacious PI3K/mTOR inhibitor 1-(4-{[4-(dimethylamino)piperidin-1-yl]carbonyl}phenyl)-3-[4-(4,6-dimorpholin-4-yl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl]urea 26 (PKI-587). Compound 26 has shown excellent activity in vitro and in vivo, with antitumor efficacy in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft tumor models when administered intravenously. The structure−activity relationships and the in vitro and in vivo activity of analogues in this series are described.

Preparation of 1-(4-{[4-(Dimethylamino)piperidin-1-yl]carbonyl}phenyl)-3-[4-(4,6-dimorpholin-4- yl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl]urea (26)

MS (ESI) m/z = 616.7. HRMS: calcd for C32H41N9O4 + H+, 616.335 43; found (ESI-FTMS, [M + H]+), 616.334 24. Purity by analytical HPLC 99.3%. (Prodigy ODS3, 0.46 cm × 15 cm, 20 min gradient acetonitrile in water, trifluoroacetic acid, detector wavelengths, 215 and 254 nm.) 1H NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 1.29−1.36 (m, 6H), 2.6 (m, 4H), 2.9 (m,1H), 3.3 (m, 4H), 3.6 (m, 8H), 3.7 (m, 8H), 7.3 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 2H), 7.51−7.57 (m, 4H), 8.3 (d, J = 8.3 Hz 2H), 8.9 (s, 1H), 9.0 (s, 1H) ppm. Anal. Calcd for C32H41N9O4: C 62.42%, H 6.71%, N 20.47%. Found: C 62.34%, H 6.67%, N 20.39%.

PAPER

Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2011), 21(16), 4773-4778.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960894X11008468

PAPER

New and Practical Synthesis of Gedatolisib

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00298

 College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, 333 Longteng Road, Shanghai 201620, China
 Key Laboratory of Tropical Medicinal Plant Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Hainan Normal University, 99 South Longkun Road, Haina 571158, China
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00298
*Fax: +86 21 67791214. E-mail: yongjun.mao@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Abstract Image

A new, practical, and convergent synthetic route of gedatolisib, an antitumor agent, is developed on a hectogram scale which avoids the Pd coupling method. The key step is adopting 6-(4-nitrophenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine and 2,2′-dichlorodiethyl ether to prepare the key 4,4′-(6-(4-nitrophenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diyl)dimorpholine in 77% yield and 98.8% purity. Gedatolisib is obtained in 48.6% yield over five simple steps and 99.3% purity (HPLC). Purification methods of the intermediates and the final product involved in the route are given.

off-white solid. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6): δ 1.46 (brs, 2H), 1.89 (brs, 2H), 2.29 (s, 6H), 2.94 (brs, 2H), 3.76 (m, 8H), 3.89 (m, 8H), 7.09 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2H), 7.20 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 2H), 7.50 (d, J = 8.7 Hz, 2H), 8.28 (s, 1H), 8.31 (d, J = 8.6 Hz, 2H), 8.48 (s, 1H). ESI-MS (m/z) 615.9 (M + H). HPLC conditions: Column: Agilent Eclipse XDB-C18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5 μm); Detection: 254 nm; Flow rate: 0.8 mL/min; Temperature: 30 °C; Injection load: 1 μL; Solvent: MeOH; Concentration: 0.5 mg/mL; Run time: 20 min; Mobile phase A: water; Mobile phase B: MeOH/TEA = 100:0.1; Gradient program: time (min): 20; % of mobile phase A: 10; % of mobile phase B: 90; tR = 2.598 min, purity: 99.34%

  • ZhaoX.; TanQ.ZhangZ.ZhaoY. Med. Chem. Res. 2014235188– 5196 DOI: 10.1007/s00044-014-1084-z
  • KhafizovaG.PotoskiJ. R. PCT Int. Appl. WO 2010096619, 2010.
  • VenkatesanA. M.ChenZ.DehnhardtC. M.Dos SantosO.Delos SantosE. G.ZaskA.VerheijenJ. C.KaplanJ. A.RichardD. J.Ayral-KaloustianS.MansourT. S.GopalsamyA.CurranK. J.ShiM. PCT Int. Appl. WO 2009143317, 2009.

REFERENCES

1: Gedaly R, Galuppo R, Musgrave Y, Angulo P, Hundley J, Shah M, Daily MF, Chen C, Cohen DA, Spear BT, Evers BM. PKI-587 and sorafenib alone and in combination on inhibition of liver cancer stem cell proliferation. J Surg Res. 2013 Nov;185(1):225-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2013.05.016. Epub 2013 May 25. PubMed PMID: 23769634.

2: Gedaly R, Angulo P, Hundley J, Daily MF, Chen C, Evers BM. PKI-587 and sorafenib targeting PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK pathways synergistically inhibit HCC cell proliferation. J Surg Res. 2012 Aug;176(2):542-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2011.10.045. Epub 2011 Nov 21. PubMed PMID: 22261591.

3: Dehnhardt CM, Venkatesan AM, Chen Z, Delos-Santos E, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Brooijmans N, Yu K, Hollander I, Feldberg L, Lucas J, Mallon R. Identification of 2-oxatriazines as highly potent pan-PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitors. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2011 Aug 15;21(16):4773-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.06.063. Epub 2011 Jun 21. PubMed PMID: 21763134.

4: Mallon R, Feldberg LR, Lucas J, Chaudhary I, Dehnhardt C, Santos ED, Chen Z, dos Santos O, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Venkatesan A, Hollander I. Antitumor efficacy of PKI-587, a highly potent dual PI3K/mTOR kinase inhibitor. Clin Cancer Res. 2011 May 15;17(10):3193-203. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-1694. Epub 2011 Feb 15. PubMed PMID: 21325073.

5: Venkatesan AM, Chen Z, dos Santos O, Dehnhardt C, Santos ED, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Mallon R, Hollander I, Feldberg L, Lucas J, Yu K, Chaudhary I, Mansour TS. PKI-179: an orally efficacious dual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2010 Oct 1;20(19):5869-73. doi: 10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.07.104. Epub 2010 Jul 30. PubMed PMID: 20797855.

6: Venkatesan AM, Dehnhardt CM, Delos Santos E, Chen Z, Dos Santos O, Ayral-Kaloustian S, Khafizova G, Brooijmans N, Mallon R, Hollander I, Feldberg L, Lucas J, Yu K, Gibbons J, Abraham RT, Chaudhary I, Mansour TS. Bis(morpholino-1,3,5-triazine) derivatives: potent adenosine 5′-triphosphate competitive phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors: discovery of compound 26 (PKI-587), a highly efficacious dual inhibitor. J Med Chem. 2010 Mar 25;53(6):2636-45. doi: 10.1021/jm901830p. PubMed PMID: 20166697.

????????????PF 05212384, PF 5212384, PKI-587, PF-05212384; PF-5212384; PKI 587, gedatolisib, antitumor agent, PHASE 3, PFIZER, гедатолисиб غيداتوليسيب 吉达利塞 

O=C(NC1=CC=C(C2=NC(N3CCOCC3)=NC(N4CCOCC4)=N2)C=C1)NC5=CC=C(C(N6CCC(N(C)C)CC6)=O)C=C5

 Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2017), 60(17), 7524-7538 PQR 309

TAFAMIDIS


Tafamidis skeletal.svgChemSpider 2D Image | Tafamidis | C14H7Cl2NO3

Tafamidis

  • Molecular Formula C14H7Cl2NO3
  • Average mass 308.116 Da

TAFAMIDIS, Fx-1006A
PF-06291826

2-(3,5-Dichlorophenyl)-1,3-benzoxazole-6-carboxylic acid
594839-88-0 [RN]
6-Benzoxazolecarboxylic acid, 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-
Vyndaqel
Tafamidis meglumine
Familial amyloid polyneuropathy LAUNCHED PFIZER 2011 EU
ApprovedJapanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in September 2013
PHASE 3, at  FDA, Amyloidosis, PFIZER
Image result for Vyndaqel tafamidis meglumine
Molecular Formula: C21H24Cl2N2O8
Molecular Weight: 503.329 g/mol

CAS 951395-08-7

Image result for Vyndaqel tafamidis meglumine

D-Glucitol, 1-deoxy-1-(methylamino)-, 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-6-benzoxazolecarboxylate

Tafamidis (INN, or Fx-1006A,[1] trade name Vyndaqel) is a drug for the amelioration of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis(also familial amyloid polyneuropathy, or FAP), a rare but deadly neurodegenerative disease.[2][3] The drug was approved by the European Medicines Agency in November 2011 and by the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency in September 2013.[4]

In 2011 and 2012, orphan drug designation was assigned in Japan and the U.S., respectively, for the treatment of transthyretin amyloid polyneuropathy. This designation was assigned in the E.U. in 2012 for the treatment of senile systemic amyloidosis. In 2017, fast drug designation was assigned in the U.S. for the treatment of transthyretin cardiomyopathy.

Tafamidis is a novel specific transthyretin (TTR) stabilizer or dissociation inhibitor. TTR is a tetramer that is responsible in transporting the retinol-binding protein-vitamin A complex and minimally transporting thyroxine in the blood. In TTR-related disorders such as transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP), tetramer dissociation is accelerated that results in unregulated amyloidogenesis and amyloid fibril formation. Eventually the failure of autonomic and peripheral nervous system is induced. Tafamidiswas approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2011 under the market name Vyndaqel for the treatment of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) in adult patients with early-stage symptomatic polyneuropathy to delay peripheral neurologic impairment. Tafamidis is an investigational drug under the FDA and in June 2017, Pfizer received FDA Fast Track Designation for tafamidis

Image result for TAFAMIDIS

The marketed drug, a meglumine salt, has completed an 18 month placebo controlled phase II/III clinical trial,[5][6] and an 12 month extension study[7] which provides evidence that tafamidis slows progression of Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.[8] Tafamidis (20 mg once daily) is used in adult patients with an early stage (stage 1) of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.[9][10]

Tafamidis was discovered in the Jeffery W. Kelly Laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute[11] using a structure-based drug design strategy[12] and was developed at FoldRx pharmaceuticals, a biotechnology company Kelly co-founded with Susan Lindquist. FoldRx was led by Richard Labaudiniere when it was acquired by Pfizer in 2010.

Tafamidis functions by kinetic stabilization of the correctly folded tetrameric form of the transthyretin (TTR) protein.[13] In patients with FAP, this protein dissociates in a process that is rate limiting for aggregation including amyloid fibril formation, causing failure of the autonomic nervous system and/or the peripheral nervous system (neurodegeneration) initially and later failure of the heart. Kinetic Stabilization of tetrameric transthyretin in familial amyloid polyneuropathy patients provides the first pharmacologic evidence that the process of amyloid fibril formation causes this disease, as treatment with tafamidis dramatically slows the process of amyloid fibril formation and the degeneration of post-mitotic tissue. Sixty % of the patients enrolled in the initial clinical trial have the same or an improved neurologic impairment score after six years of taking tafamidis, whereas 30% of the patients progress at a rate ≤ 1/5 of that predicted by the natural history. Importantly, all of the V30M FAP patients remain stage 1 patients after 6 years on tafamidis out of four stages of disease progression. [Data presented orally by Professor Coelho in Brazil in 2013][7]

The process of wild type transthyretin amyloidogenesis also appears to cause wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis (WTTA), also known as senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA), leading to cardiomyopathy as the prominent phenotype.[14] Some mutants of transthyretin — including V122I, which is primarily found in individuals of African descent — are destabilizing, enabling heterotetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and subsequent misassembly of transthyretin into a variety of aggregate structures [15] including amyloid fibrils[16]leading to familial amyloid cardiomyopathy.[17] While there is clinical evidence from a small number of patients that tafamidis slows the progression of the transthyretin cardiomyopathies,[18] this has yet to be demonstrated in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Pfizer has enrolled a placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the ability of tafamidis to slow the progression of both familial amyloid cardiomyopathy and senile systemic amyloidosis (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01994889).

Regulatory Process

Tafamidis was approved for use in the European Union by the European Medicines Agency in November 2011, specifically for the treatment of early stage transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP (all mutations). In September 2013 Tafamidis was approved for use in Japan by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, specifically for the treatment of transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP (all mutations). Tafamidis is also approved for use in Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Israel by the relevant authorities.[19] It is currently being considered for approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of early stage transthyretin-related hereditary amyloidosis or familial amyloid polyneuropathy or FAP.

In June 2012, the FDA Peripheral and Central Nervous System Drugs Advisory Committee voted “yes” (13-4 favorable vote) when asked if the findings of the pivotal clinical study with tafamidis were “sufficiently robust to provide substantial evidence of efficacy for a surrogate endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit”. The Advisory Committee voted “no” 4-13 to reject the drug–in spite of the fact that both primary endpoints were met in the efficacy evaluable population (n=87) and were just missed in the intent to treat population (n=125), apparently because more patients than expected in the intent to treat population were selected for liver transplantation during the course of the trial, not owing to treatment failure, but because their name rose to the top of the transplant list. However, these patients were classified as treatment failures in the conservative analysis used.

Pfizer (following its acquisition of FoldRx ), under license from Scripps Research Institute , has developed and launched tafamidis, a small-molecule transthyretin stabilizer, useful for treating familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

SYN

 European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 121, 823-840; 2016

SYN 2

INNOVATORS

THE SCRIPPS RESEARCH INSTITUTE [US/US]; 10550 N Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (US)

KELLY, Jeffrey, W.; (US).
SEKIJIMA, Yoshiki; (US)

Image result for The Scripps Research Institute

Dr. Jeffery W. Kelly

Lita Annenberg Hazen Professor of Chemistry

Co-Chairman, Department of Molecular Medicine

Click here to download a concise version of Dr. Jeffery Kelly’s curriculum vitae.

Image result for The Scripps Research Institute

PATENT

WO2004056315

Example 5: Benzoxazoles as Transthyretin Amyloid Fibril Inhibitors
Transthyretin’s two thyroxine binding sites are created by its quaternary structural interface. The tetramer can be stabilized by small molecule binding to these sites, potentially providing a means to treat TTR amyloid disease with small molecule drugs. Many families of compounds have been discovered whose binding stabilizes the tetrameric ground state to a degree proportional to the small molecule dissociation constants Km and Ka2. This also effectively increases the dissociative activation barrier and inhibits amyloidosis by kinetic stabilization. Such inhibitors are typically composed of two aromatic rings, with one ring bearing halogen substituents and the other bearing hydrophilic substituents. Benzoxazoles substituted with a carboxylic acid at C(4)-C(7) and a halogenated phenyl ring at C(2) also appeared to complement the TTR thyroxine binding site. A small library of these compounds was therefore prepared by dehydrocyclization of N-acyl amino-hydroxybenzoic acids as illustrated in Scheme 1.

Scheme 1: General Synthesis of Benzoxazoles
Reagents: (a) ArCOCl, THF, pyridine (Ar = Phenyl, 3,5-Difluorophenyl, 2,6-Difluorophenyl, 3,5-Dichlorophenyl, 2,6-Dichlorophenyl, 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl, and 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl); (b) TsOH*H2O, refluxing xylenes; (c) TMSCHN2, benzene, MeOH; (d) LiOH, THF, MeOH, H2O (8-27% yield over 4 steps).

The benzoxazoles were evaluated using a series of analyses of increasing stringency. WT TTR (3.6 μM) was incubated for 30 min (pH 7, 37 °C) with a test compound (7.2 μM). Since at least one molecule ofthe test compound must bind to each molecule of TTR tetramer to be able to stabilize it, a test compound concentration of 7.2 μM is only twice the minimum effective concentration. The pH was then adjusted to 4.4, the optimal pH for fibrilization. The amount of amyloid formed after 72 h (37 °C) in the presence ofthe test compound was determined by turbidity at 400 nm and is expressed as % fibril formation (ff), 100%) being the amount formed by TTR alone. Ofthe 28 compounds tested, 11 reduced fibril formation to negligible levels (jf< 10%; FIG. 7).
The 11 most active compounds were then evaluated for their ability to bind selectively to TTR over, all other proteins in blood. Human blood plasma (TTR cone. 3.6 -5.4 μM) was incubated for 24 h with the test compound (10.8 μM) at 37 °C. The TTR and any bound inhibitor were immunoprecipitated using a sepharose-bound polyclonal TTR antibody. The TTR with or without inhibitor bound was liberated from the resin at high pH, and the inhibitor: TTR stoichiometry was ascertained by HPLC analysis (FIG. 8). Benzoxazoles with carboxylic acids in the 5- or 6-position, and 2,6-dichlorophenyl (13, 20) or 2-trifluoromethylphenyl (11, 18) substituents at the 2-position displayed the highest binding stoichiometries. In particular, 20 exhibited excellent inhibitory activity and binding selectivity. Hence, its mechanism of action was characterized further.
To confirm that 20 inhibits TTR fibril formation by binding strongly to the tetramer, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and sedimentation velocity experiments were conducted with wt TTR. ITC showed that two equivalents of 20 bind with average dissociation constants of Kdi = Kd2 = 55 (± 10) nM under physiological conditions. These are comparable to the dissociation constants of many other highly efficacious TTR
amyloidogenesis inhibitors. For the sedimentation velocity experiments, TTR (3.6 μM) was incubated with 20 (3.6 μM, 7.2 μM, 36 μM) under optimal fibrilization conditions (72 h, pH 4.4, 37 °C). The tetramer (55 kDa) was the only detectable species in solution with 20 at 7.2 or 36 μM. Some large aggregates formed with 20 at 3.6 μM, but the TTR remaining in solution was tetrameric.
T119M subunit inclusion and small molecule binding both prevent TTR amyloid formation by raising the activation barrier for tetramer dissociation. An inhibitor’s ability to do this is most rigorously tested by measuring its efficacy at slowing tetramer dissociation in 6 M urea, a severe denaturation stress. Thus, the rates of TTR tetramer dissociation in 6 M urea in the presence and absence of 20, 21 or 27 were compared (FIG. 9). TTR (1.8 μM) was completely denatured after 168 h in 6 M urea. In contrast, 20 at 3.6 μM prevented tetramer dissociation for at least 168 h (> 3 the half-life of TTR in human plasma). With an equimolar amount of 20, only 27% of TTR denatured in 168 h. Compound 27 (3.6 μM) was much less able to prevent tetramer dissociation (90% unfolding after 168 h), even though it was active in the fibril formation assay. Compound 21 did not hinder the dissociation of TTR at all. These results show that inhibitor binding to TTR is necessary but not sufficient to kinetically stabilize the TTR tetramer under strongly denaturing conditions; it is also important that the dissociation constants be very low (or that the off rates be very slow). Also, the display of functional groups on 20 is apparently optimal for stabilizing the TTR tetramer; moving the carboxylic acid from C(6) to C(7), as in 27, or removing the chlorines, as in 21, severely diminishes its activity.

The role ofthe substituents in 20 is evident from its co-crystal stracture with TTR (FIG. 10). Compound 20 orients its two chlorine atoms near halogen binding pockets 2 and 2′ (so-called because they are occupied by iodines when thyroxine binds to TTR). The 2,6 substitution pattern on the phenyl ring forces the benzoxazole and phenyl rings out of planarity, optimally positioning the carboxylic acid on the benzoxazole to hydrogen bond to the ε-NH3+ groups of Lys 15/15′. Hydrophobic interactions between the aromatic rings of 20 and the side chains of Leu 17, Leu 110, Ser 117, and Val 121 contribute additional binding energy.

PAPER

ChemMedChem (2013), 8(10), 1617-1619.

Nature Reviews Drug Discovery (2012), 11(3), 185-186

PAPER

Design and synthesis of pyrimidinone and pyrimidinedione inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV
J Med Chem 2011, 54(2): 510

PATENT

WO-2017190682

Novel crystalline forms of tafamidis methylglucamine (designated as Form E), processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them are claimed. Also claimed is their use for treating familial amyloid neuropathy. Represents first PCT filing from Crystal Pharmatech and the inventors on this API.

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf;jsessionid=2C2DC88BD4DC90B179C38EC5283D0941.wapp2nA?docId=WO2017190682&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=FullText

CLIP

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2016/ob/c5ob02496j/unauth#!divAbstract

Image result for TAFAMIDIS

2-(3, 5-Dichlorophenyl)benzo[d]oxazole-6-carboxylic acid (Tafamidis)

m.p. = 200.4–202.7 °C; Rf = 0.37 (petroleum ether/ethyl acetate/acetic acid = 6:1:0.01).

IR (cm-1 , KBr): 3383, 1685, 1608, 1224, 769;

1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 400 MHz) (ppm) 8.27 (s, 1H), 8.18 (d, J = 6.8 Hz, 1H), 8.04–8.02 (m, 1H), 7.94 (s, 1H), 7.88 (d, J = 1.6 Hz, 1H), 7.67 (dd, J = 6.8 Hz, 5.2 Hz, 1H);

13C NMR (DMSOd6, 100 MHz) (ppm) 167.2, 162.1, 150.1, 145.0, 137.8, 133.7, 131.4, 128.6, 126.8, 124.3, 120.5, 112.6.

Data was consistent with that reported in the literature. [27]Yamamoto, T.; Muto, K.; Komiyama, M.; Canivet, J.; Yamaguchi, J.; Itami, K. Chem. Eur. J. 2011, 17, 10113.

Clip

http://synth.chem.nagoya-u.ac.jp/wordpress/publication/nicatalystscopemechanism?lang=en

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CLIP

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 12; 109(24): 9629–9634.
Published online 2012 May 29. doi:  10.1073/pnas.1121005109

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3386102/

str1

The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A–retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils in elderly patients. Because tetramer dissociation is the rate-limiting step in TTR amyloidogenesis, targeted therapies have focused on small molecules that kinetically stabilize the tetramer, inhibiting TTR amyloid fibril formation. One such compound, tafamidis meglumine (Fx-1006A), has recently completed Phase II/III trials for the treatment of Transthyretin Type Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) and demonstrated a slowing of disease progression in patients heterozygous for the V30M TTR mutation. Herein we describe the molecular and structural basis of TTR tetramer stabilization by tafamidis. Tafamidis binds selectively and with negative cooperativity (Kds ∼2 nM and ∼200 nM) to the two normally unoccupied thyroxine-binding sites of the tetramer, and kinetically stabilizes TTR. Patient-derived amyloidogenic variants of TTR, including kinetically and thermodynamically less stable mutants, are also stabilized by tafamidis binding. The crystal structure of tafamidis-bound TTR suggests that binding stabilizes the weaker dimer-dimer interface against dissociation, the rate-limiting step of amyloidogenesis.

4-Amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (AHBA) is reacted with HCl (3 to 6 M equivalents) in methanol (8 to 9 L/kg). Methyl t-butyl ether (TBME) (9 to 11 L/kg) is then added to the reaction mixture. The product, methyl 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoate hydrochloride salt, is isolated by filtration and then reacted with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride (0.95 to 1.05 M equivalents) in the presence of pyridine (2.0 to 2.5 M equivalents) in dichloromethane (DCM), (8 to 9 L/kg) as a solvent. After the distillation of DCM, acetone and water are added to the reaction mixture, producing methyl 4-(3,5-dichlorobenzoylamino)-3- hydroxy-benzoate. This is recovered by filtration and reacted with p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate (0.149 to 0.151 M equivalents) in toluene (12 to 18 L/kg) at reflux with water trap. Treatment with charcoal is then performed. After the distillation of toluene, acetone (4-6 L/kg) is added. The product, methyl 2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-benzoxazole-6- carboxylate, is isolated by filtration and then reacted with LiOH (1.25 to 1.29 M equivalents) in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF) (7.8 to 8.2 L/kg) and water (7.8 to 8.2 L/kg) at between 40 and 45 °C. The pH of the reaction mixture is adjusted with aqueous HCl to yield 2-(3,5-dichloro-phenyl)-benzoxazole-6-carboxylic acid, the free acid of tafamidis. This is converted to the meglumine salt by reacting with N-methyl-Dglucamine (0.95 to 1.05 M equivalents) in a mixture of water (4.95 to 5.05 L/kg)/isopropyl alcohol (19.75 to 20.25 L/kg) at 65-70 °C. Tafamidis meglumine (dglucitol, 1-deoxy-1-(methylamino)-,2-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-6-benzoxazole carboxylate) is then isolated by filtration.

2 The following fragments were identified from electrospray ionization mass spectra acquired in positive-ion mode: meglumine M+ (C7H18NO5+, m/z = 196.13), M (carboxylate form) +2H (C14H6Cl2NO3, m/z = 308.13), M (salt) + H (C21H24Cl2N2O8, m/z = 504.26). 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired on a 700 MHz Bruker AVANCE II spectrometer in acetone:D2O (~8:2). Data were reported as chemical shift in ppm (δ), multiplicity (s = singlet, dd = double of doublets, m = multiplet), coupling constant (J Hz), relative integral and assignment: δ = 8.14 (m, JH2-H5 = 0.6 and JH2-H6 = 1.5, 1H, H2), 8.02 (dd, JH9-H11 = 1.9 and JH13-H11 = 1.9, 2H, H9 and H13), 7.97 (dd, JH6-H5 = 8.25, 1H, H6), 7.67 (dd, JH5-H2 = 0.6 and JH5-H6 = 8.25, 1H, H5), 7.58 (m, JH11-H9 = 1.9 and JH11-H13 = 1.9, 1H, H11), 4.08 (m, JH16-H17 = 4.9, 1H, H16), 3.79 (dd, JH17-H18 = 2.2, 1H, H17), 3.73 (dd, JH19-H20 = 3.2, 1H, H20), 3.69 (m, JH19-H20 = 3.2, 1H, H19), 3.61 (m, JH18-H19 = 12.25, 1H, H18), 3.58 (m, JH19-H20′ = 5.8 and JH20-H20′ = 11.7, 1H, H20′ ), 3.19 (m, JH15-H15′ = 12.9 and JH15′-H16 = 9.25 and JH15-H16 = 3.5, 2H, H15).

CLIP

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1002/chem.201101091/asset/supinfo/chem_201101091_sm_miscellaneous_information.pdf?v=1&s=7badb204a12057710743c1711a744253eccd636a

Concise Synthesis of Tafamidis (Scheme 8)

4-(6-Benzoxazoyl)morpholine (8)

str1

A mixture of 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (1.53 g, 10 mmol) and trimethyl orthofomate (3 mL) was heated at 100 ºC for 5 h. After cooling to room temperature, trimethyl orthofomate was removed under reduced pressure. To a solution of benzoxazole 6-carboxylic acid in CH2Cl2 (10 mL) were added DMF (0.1 mL) and oxalyl chloride (1.8 mL, 20 mmol) and the resultant mixture was stirred at room temperature for 12 h. After cooling to room temperature, DMF and oxalyl chloride were removed under reduced pressure to yield the corresponding acid chloride as a solid. Thus-generated acid chloride and morpholine (2.2 mL) were stirred at room temperature for 3 h. After removing solvents under reduced pressure, the mixture was treated with saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate (20 mL) and ethyl acetate (20 mL). The layers were separated, and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (2 × 20 mL). The combined organic layer was washed with brine (20 mL), dried with anhydrous magnesium sulfate, and the solvent removed under reduced pressure. Purification of the resulting oil by flash column chromatography on silica (5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) afforded heteroarene 8 (1.30 g, 56%) as a white solid. Rf = 0.47 (MeOH/CHCl3 = 1:20). 1 H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.23 (s, 1H), 7.83 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 1H), 7.71 (s, 1H) 7.44 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.00–3.25 (br, 8H). 13C NMR (150 MHz, CDCl3) δ 169.52, 153.87, 149.67, 141.24, 132.90, 123.79, 120.76, 110.48, 66.81. HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C12H13N2O3 [MH]+ : 233.0926, found 233.0926.

4-(3,5-Dichlorophenyl 6-benzoxazoyl)morpholine

To a 20-mL glass vessel equipped with J. Young® O-ring tap containing a magnetic stirring bar were added Ni(cod)2 (13.9 mg, 0.05 mmol), 2,2’-bipyridyl (7.8 mg, 0.05 mmol), LiOt-Bu (60 mg, 0.75 mmol), 8 (174.2 mg, 0.5 mmol), 3,5-dichloroiodobenzene (9: 203.9 mg, 0.75 mmol), followed by dry 1,2-dimethoxyethane (2.0 mL). The vessel was sealed with an O-ring tap and then heated at 100 °C in an 8-well reaction block with stirring for 24 h. After cooling the reaction mixture to room temperature, the mixture was passed through a short silica gel pad (EtOAc). The filtrate was concentrated and the residue was subjected to preparative thin-layer chromatography (5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) to afford SI-2 (139.6 mg, 74 %) as a white foam. Rf = 0.70 (MeOH/CHCl3 = 1:20). 1 H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.16 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 2H), 7.82 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 7.70 (s, 1H), 7.55 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.45 (d, J = 7.6 Hz, 1H), 4.00–3.25 (br, 8H). 13C NMR (150 MHz, CDCl3) δ 169.38, 161.78, 150.40, 142.90, 135.82, 132.95, 131.61, 129.26, 125.91, 124.23, 120.41, 110.26, 66.77. HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C18H15Cl2N2O3 [MH]+ : 377.0460 found 377.0465.

Tafamidis[19  ] Razavi, H.; Palaninathan, S. K.; Powers, E. T.; Wiseman, R. L.; Purkey, H. E.; Mohamedmohaideen, N. N.; Deechongkit, S.; Chiang, K. P.; Dendle, M. T. A.; Sacchettini, J. C.; Kelly, J. W. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 2758.]

HF·pyridine (0.5 mL) was added to a stirred solution of SI-2 (32 mg, 0.09 mmol) in THF (0.5 mL) at 70 ºC for 12 h. After cooling the reaction mixture to room temperature, the mixuture was diluted with EtOAc and washed sequentially with sat.NaHCO3, 2N HCl and brine. The organic layer was concentrated and the residue was subjected to preparative thin-layer chromatography (1% acetic acid, 5% methanol in CHCl3 as eluent) to afford tafamidis (24.7 mg, 94%) as a white foam.

1 H NMR (600 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.23 (s, 1H), 8.08 (d, J = 1.4 Hz, 2H), 8.00 (d, J = 8.3 Hz, 1H), 7.88 (m, 2H).

13C NMR (150 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 166.6, 162.0, 150.0, 144.6, 135.1, 131.7, 129.1, 128.7, 126.5, 125.8, 120.0, 112.2.

HRMS (DART) m/z calcd for C14H8Cl2NO3 [MH]+ : 307.9881, found 307.9881.

References

  1. Jump up^ Bulawa, C.E.; Connelly, S.; DeVit, M.; Wang, L. Weigel, C.;Fleming, J. Packman, J.; Powers, E.T.; Wiseman, R.L.; Foss, T.R.; Wilson, I.A.; Kelly, J.W.; Labaudiniere, R. “Tafamidis, A Potent and Selective Transthyretin Kinetic Stabilizer That Inhibits the Amyloid Cascade”. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2012 109, 9629-9634.
  2. Jump up^ Ando, Y., and Suhr, O.B. (1998). Autonomic dysfunction in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP). Amyloid, 5, 288-300.
  3. Jump up^ Benson, M.D. (1989). “Familial Amyloidotic polyneuropathy”. Trends in Neurosciences, 12.3, 88-92, PMID 2469222doi:10.1016/0166-2236(89)90162-8.
  4. Jump up^ http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20111117005505/en/Pfizer%E2%80%99s-Vyndaqel%C2%AE-tafamidis-Therapy-Approved-European-Union
  5. Jump up^ Clinical trial number NCT00409175 for “Safety and Efficacy Study of Fx-1006A in Patients With Familial Amyloidosis” at ClinicalTrials.gov
  6. Jump up^ Coelho, T.; Maia, L.F.; Martins da Silva, A.; Cruz, M.W.; Planté-Bordeneuve, V.; Lozeron, P.; Suhr, O.B.; Campistol, J.M.; Conceiçao, I.; Schmidt, H.; Trigo, P. Kelly, J.W.; Labaudiniere, R.; Chan, J., Packman, J.; Wilson, A.; Grogan, D.R. “Tafamidis for transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy: a randomized, controlled trial”. Neurology, 2012, 79, 785-792.
  7. Jump up to:a b Coelho, T.; Maia, L.F.; Martins da Silva, A.; Cruz, M.W.; Planté-Bordeneuve, V.; Suhr, O.B.; Conceiçao, I.; Schmidt, H. H. J.; Trigo, P. Kelly, J.W.; Labaudiniere, R.; Chan, J., Packman, J.; Grogan, D.R. “Long-term Effects of Tafamidis for the Treatment of Transthyretin Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy”. J. Neurology, 2013 260, 2802-2814.
  8. Jump up^ Ando, Y.; Sekijima, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Yamashita, T.; Ueda, M.; Misumi, Y.; Morita, H.; Machii, K; Ohta, M.; Takata, A; Ikeda, S-I. “Effects of tafamidis treatment on transthyretin (TTR) stabilization, efficacy, and safety in Japanese patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) with Val30Met and non-Varl30Met: A phase III, open-label study”. J. Neur. Sci., 2016 362, 266-271, doi:10.1016/j.jns.2016.01.046.
  9. Jump up^ Andrade, C. (1952). “A peculiar form of peripheral neuropathy; familiar atypical generalized amyloidosis with special involvement of the peripheral nerves”. Brain: a Journal of Neurology, 75, 408-427.
  10. Jump up^ Coelho, T. (1996). “Familial amyloid polyneuropathy: new developments in genetics and treatment”. Current Opinion in Neurology, 9, 355-359.
  11. Jump up^ Razavi, H.; Palaninathan, S.K. Powers, E.T.; Wiseman, R.L.; Purkey, H.E.; Mohamadmohaideen, N.N.; Deechongkit, S.; Chiang, K.P.; Dendle, M.T.A.; Sacchettini, J.C.; Kelly, J.W. “Benzoxazoles as Transthyretin Amyloid Fibril Inhibitors: Synthesis, Evaluation and Mechanism of Action”. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2003, 42, 2758-2761.
  12. Jump up^ Connelly, S., Choi, S., Johnson, S.M., Kelly, J.W., and Wilson, I.A. (2010). “Structure-based design of kinetic stabilizers that ameliorate the transthyretin amyloidoses”. Current Opinion in Structural Biology, 20, 54-62.
  13. Jump up^ Hammarstrom, P.; Wiseman, R. L.; Powers, E.T.; Kelly, J.W. “Prevention of Transthyretin Amyloid Disease by Changing Protein Misfolding Energetics”. Science, 2003, 299, 713-716
  14. Jump up^ Westermark, P., Sletten, K., Johansson, B., and Cornwell, G.G., 3rd (1990). “Fibril in senile systemic amyloidosis is derived from normal transthyretin”. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 87, 2843-2845.
  15. Jump up^ Sousa, M.M., Cardoso, I., Fernandes, R., Guimaraes, A., and Saraiva, M.J. (2001). “Deposition of transthyretin in early stages of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: evidence for toxicity of nonfibrillar aggregates”. The American Journal of Pathology, 159, 1993-2000.
  16. Jump up^ Colon, W., and Kelly, J.W. (1992). “Partial denaturation of transthyretin is sufficient for amyloid fibril formation in vitro”. Biochemistry 31, 8654-8660.
  17. Jump up^ Jacobson, D.R., Pastore, R.D., Yaghoubian, R., Kane, I., Gallo, G., Buck, F.S., and Buxbaum, J.N. (1997). “Variant-sequence transthyretin (isoleucine 122) in late-onset cardiac amyloidosis in black Americans”. The New England Journal of Medicine, 336, 466-473.
  18. Jump up^ Maurer, M.S.; Grogan, D.R.; Judge, D.P.; Mundayat, R.; Lombardo, I.; Quyyumi, A.A.; Aarts, J.; Falk, R.H. “Tafamidis in transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathy: effects on transthyretin stabilization and clinical outcomes.” Circ. Heart. Fail. 2015 8, 519-526.
  19. Jump up^http://www.pfizer.com/sites/default/files/news/Brazil%20Approval%20Press%20Statement%2011-7-16_0.pdf
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2016185739 Solid Forms Of A Transthyretin Dissociation Inhibitor
2015-12-22
2016-06-30
US2017196985 SULFUR(VI) FLUORIDE COMPOUNDS AND METHODS FOR THE PREPARATION THEREOF
2015-06-05
US9770441 Crystalline solid forms of 6-carboxy-2-(3, 5-dichlorophenyl)-benzoxazole
2015-08-31
2017-09-26
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9771321 Small Molecules That Covalently Modify Transthyretin
2014-04-14
2014-11-13
US9610270 NEW THERAPY FOR TRANSTHYRETIN-ASSOCIATED AMYLOIDOSIS
2012-10-23
2014-10-02
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2014-10-31
2015-02-26
US9249112 SOLID FORMS OF A TRANSTHYRETIN DISSOCIATION INHIBITOR
2012-09-12
2015-01-29
US9499527 COMPOSITIONS AND METHODS FOR THE TREATMENT OF FAMILIAL AMYLOID POLYNEUROPATHY
2013-02-27
2015-05-07
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US9150489 1-(2-FLUOROBIPHENYL-4-YL)-ALKYL CARBOXYLIC ACID DERIVATIVES FOR THE THERAPY OF TRANSTHYRETIN AMYLOIDOSIS
2011-10-27
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2014-01-15
2014-05-15
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2010-10-14
2014-04-22
US8653119 Methods for treating transthyretin amyloid diseases
2011-11-22
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US2008131907 ASSAYS FOR DETECTING NATIVE-STATE PROTEINS AND IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS THAT MODULATE THE STABILITY OF NATIVE-STATE PROTEINS
2007-09-14
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Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

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2004-08-05
2007-05-08
US7214696 Compositions and methods for stabilizing transthyretin and inhibiting transthyretin misfolding
2006-03-16
2007-05-08
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2007-04-05
2009-07-14
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2010-05-13
2012-05-01
US8236984 COMPOUND AND USE THEREOF IN THE TREATMENT OF AMYLOIDOSIS
2010-09-30
2012-08-07
Tafamidis
Tafamidis skeletal.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Vyndaqel
License data
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
  • In general: ℞ (Prescription only)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
Chemical and physical data
Formula C14H7Cl2NO3
Molar mass 308.116 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

//////////////TTAFAMIDIS, Fx-1006A, PF-06291826, Orphan Drug, SCRIPP, PFIZER

C1=CC2=C(C=C1C(=O)O)OC(=N2)C3=CC(=CC(=C3)Cl)Cl

CNC[C@@H]([C@H]([C@@H]([C@@H](CO)O)O)O)O.c1cc2c(cc1C(=O)O)oc(n2)c3cc(cc(c3)Cl)Cl

 

“NEW DRUG APPROVALS” CATERS TO EDUCATION GLOBALLY, No commercial exploits are done or advertisements added by me. This is a compilation for educational purposes only. P.S. : The views expressed are my personal and in no-way suggest the views of the professional body or the company that I represent

FDA approves Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia


09/01/2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) for the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia whose tumors express the CD33 antigen (CD33-positive AML). The FDA also approved Mylotarg for the treatment of patients aged 2 years and older with CD33-positive AML who have experienced a relapse or who have not responded to initial treatment (refractory).

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) for the treatment of adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia whose tumors express the CD33 antigen (CD33-positive AML). The FDA also approved Mylotarg for the treatment of patients aged 2 years and older with CD33-positive AML who have experienced a relapse or who have not responded to initial treatment (refractory).

Mylotarg originally received accelerated approval in May 2000 as a stand-alone treatment for older patients with CD33-positive AML who had experienced a relapse. Mylotarg was voluntarily withdrawn from the market after subsequent confirmatory trials failed to verify clinical benefit and demonstrated safety concerns, including a high number of early deaths. Today’s approval includes a lower recommended dose, a different schedule in combination with chemotherapy or on its own, and a new patient population.

“We are approving Mylotarg after a careful review of the new dosing regimen, which has shown that the benefits of this treatment outweigh the risk,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Mylotarg’s history underscores the importance of examining alternative dosing, scheduling, and administration of therapies for patients with cancer, especially in those who may be most vulnerable to the side effects of treatment.”

AML is a rapidly progressing cancer that forms in the bone marrow and results in an increased number of white blood cells in the bloodstream. The National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health estimates that approximately 21,380 people will be diagnosed with AML this year and that 10,590 patients with AML will die of the disease.

Mylotarg is a targeted therapy that consists of an antibody connected to an anti-tumor agent that is toxic to cells. It is thought to work by taking the anti-tumor agent to the AML cells that express the CD33 antigen, blocking the growth of cancerous cells and causing cell death.

The safety and efficacy of Mylotarg in combination with chemotherapy for adults were studied in a trial of 271 patients with newly diagnosed CD33-positive AML who were randomized to receive Mylotarg in combination with daunorubicin and cytarabine or to receive daunorubicin and cytarabine without Mylotarg. The trial measured “event-free survival,” or how long patients went without certain complications, including failure to respond to treatment, disease relapse or death, from the date they started the trial.  Patients who received Mylotarg in combination with chemotherapy went longer without complications than those who received chemotherapy alone (median, event-free survival 17.3 months vs. 9.5 months).

The safety and efficacy of Mylotarg as a stand-alone treatment were studied in two, separate trials. The first trial included 237 patients with newly diagnosed AML who could not tolerate or chose not to receive intensive chemotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive treatment with Mylotarg or best supportive care. The trial measured “overall survival,” or how long patients survived from the date they started the trial. Patients who received Mylotarg survived longer than those who received only best supportive care (median overall survival 4.9 months vs. 3.6 months). The second trial was a single-arm study that included 57 patients with CD33-positive AML who had experienced one relapse of disease. Patients received a single course of Mylotarg. The trial measured how many patients achieved a complete remission. Following treatment with Mylotarg, 26 percent of patients achieved a complete remission that lasted a median 11.6 months.

Common side effects of Mylotarg include fever (pyrexia), nausea, infection, vomiting, bleeding, low levels of platelets in the blood (thrombocytopenia), swelling and sores in the mouth (stomatitis), constipation, rash, headache, elevated liver function tests, and low levels of certain white blood cells (neutropenia). Severe side effects of Mylotarg include low blood counts, infections, liver damage, blockage of the veins in the liver (hepatic veno-occlusive disease), infusion-related reactions, and severe bleeding (hemorrhage). Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should not take Mylotarg, because it may cause harm to a developing fetus or a newborn baby. Patients with hypersensitivity to Mylotarg or any component of its formulation should not use Mylotarg.

The prescribing information for Mylotarg includes a boxed warning that severe or fatal liver damage (hepatotoxicity), including blockage of veins in the liver (veno-occlusive disease or sinusoidal obstruction syndrome), occurred in some patients who took Mylotarg.

Mylotarg received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases.

The FDA granted the approval of Mylotarg to Pfizer Inc.

 

Image result for gemtuzumab ozogamicin

 

Image result for gemtuzumab ozogamicin

 

Image result for gemtuzumab ozogamicin

Gemtuzumab ozogamicin
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Humanized (from mouse)
Target CD33
Clinical data
Trade names Mylotarg
AHFS/Drugs.com Monograph
MedlinePlus a607075
Pregnancy
category
  • D
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
DrugBank
ChemSpider
  • none
KEGG
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
Molar mass 151–153 g/mol

Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (marketed by Wyeth as Mylotarg) is a drug-linked monoclonal antibody (an antibody-drug conjugate) that was used to treat acute myelogenous leukemia from 2000 to 2010. It was withdrawn from market in June 2010 when a clinical trial showed the drug increased patient death and added no benefit over conventional cancer therapies.

Mechanism and side effects

Gemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody to CD33 linked to a cytotoxic agent from the class of calicheamicins. CD33 is expressed in most leukemic blast cells but also in normal hematopoietic cells, the intensity diminishing with maturation of stem cells.

Common side effects of administration included shiveringfevernausea and vomiting. Serious side effects included severe myelosuppression (suppressed activity of bone marrow, which is involved in formation of various blood cells [found in 98% of patients]), disorder of the respiratory systemtumor lysis syndromeType III hypersensitivity, venous occlusion, and death.

History

Gemtuzumab ozogamicin was created in a collaboration between Celltech and Wyeth that began in 1991.[1][2] The same collaboration later produced inotuzumab ozogamicin.[3] Celltech was acquired by UCB in 2004[4] and Wyeth was acquired by Pfizer in 2009.[5]

In the United States, it was approved under an accelerated-approval process by the FDA in 2000 for use in patients over the age of 60 with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML); or those who are not considered candidates for standard chemotherapy.[6] The accelerated approval was based on the surrogate endpoint of response rate.[7] It was the first antibody-drug conjugate to be approved.[8]

Within the first year after approval, the FDA required a black box warning be added to Gemtuzumab packaging. The drug was noted to increase the risk of veno-occlusive disease in the absence of bone marrow transplantation.[9] Later the onset of VOD was shown to occur at increased frequency in Gemtuzumab patients even following bone marrow transplantation.[10] The drug was discussed in a 2008 JAMA article, which criticized the inadequacy of postmarketing surveillance of biologic agents.[11]

A randomized phase 3 comparative controlled trial (SWOG S0106) was initiated in 2004 by Wyeth in accordance with the FDA accelerated-approval process. The study was stopped[when?] prior to completion due to worrisome outcomes. Among the patients evaluated for early toxicity, fatal toxicity rate was significantly higher in the gemtuzumab combination therapy group vs the standard therapy group. Mortality was 5.7% with gemtuzumab and 1.4% without the agent (16/283 = 5.7% vs 4/281 = 1.4%; P = .01).[7]

In June 2010, Pfizer withdrew Mylotarg from the market at the request of the US FDA.[12][13] However, some other regulatory authorities did not agree with the FDA decision, with Japan’s Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency stating in 2011 that the “risk-benefit balance of gemtuzumab ozogamicin has not changed from its state at the time of approval”.[14]

In early 2017 Pfizer reapplied for US and EU approval, based on a meta-analysis of prior trials and results of the ALFA-0701 clinical trial, an open-label Phase III trial in 280 older people with AML. [8]

References

  1. Jump up^ “Mylotarg”. Informa Biomedtracker. Retrieved 19 August 2017.
  2. Jump up^ Niculescu-Duvaz, I (December 2000). “Technology evaluation: gemtuzumab ozogamicin, Celltech Group.”. Current opinion in molecular therapeutics2 (6): 691–6. PMID 11249747.
  3. Jump up^ Damle, NK; Frost, P (August 2003). “Antibody-targeted chemotherapy with immunoconjugates of calicheamicin.”. Current opinion in pharmacology3 (4): 386–90. PMID 12901947doi:10.1016/S1471-4892(03)00083-3.
  4. Jump up^ “Celltech sold to Belgian firm in £1.5bn deal”The Guardian. 18 May 2004.
  5. Jump up^ Sorkin, Andrew Ross; Wilson, Duff (25 January 2009). “Pfizer Agrees to Pay $68 Billion for Rival Drug Maker Wyeth”The New York Times.
  6. Jump up^ Bross PF, Beitz J, Chewn G, Chen XH, Duffy E, Kieffer L, Roy S, Sridhara R, Rahman A, Williams G, Pazdur R (2001). “Approval summary: gemtuzumab ozogamicin in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.”. Clin Cancer Res7 (6): 1490–6. PMID 11410481.
  7. Jump up to:a b Gemtuzumab Voluntarily Withdrawn From US Market. June 2010
  8. Jump up to:a b Stanton, Dan (February 1, 2017). “Pfizer resubmits US and EU application for withdrawn ADC Mylotarg”BioPharma Reporter.
  9. Jump up^ Giles FJ, Kantarjian HM, Kornblau SM, Thomas DA, Garcia-Manero G, Waddelow TA, David CL, Phan AT, Colburn DE, Rashid A, Estey EH (2001). “Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) therapy is associated with hepatic venoocclusive disease in patients who have not received stem cell transplantation.”. Cancer92 (2): 406–13. PMID 11466696doi:10.1002/1097-0142(20010715)92:2<406::AID-CNCR1336>3.0.CO;2-U.
  10. Jump up^ Wadleigh M, Richardson PG, Zahrieh D, Lee SJ, Cutler C, Ho V, Alyea EP, Antin JH, Stone RM, Soiffer RJ, DeAngelo DJ (2003). “Prior gemtuzumab ozogamicin exposure significantly increases the risk of veno-occlusive disease in patients who undergo myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation.”. Blood102 (5): 1578–82. PMID 12738663doi:10.1182/blood-2003-01-0255.
  11. Jump up^ The Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports (RADAR) Project, JAMA
  12. Jump up^ Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin): Market Withdrawal, US FDA
  13. Jump up^ Pfizer pulls leukemia drug from U.S. marketReuters
  14. Jump up^ Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Safety Information, No. 277, February 2011 (PDF) (Technical report). Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency of Japan. 2011.

PF 2562


str1

PF 2562

CAS 1609258-91-4

MF C19 H17 N5 O

MW 331.37
1H-Pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridine, 4-[4-(4,6-dimethyl-5-pyrimidinyl)-3-methylphenoxy]-

Jennifer Elizabeth Davoren

Principal Scientist at Pfizer

SYNTHESIS

str1

  • Dopamine acts upon neurons through two families of dopamine receptors, D1-like receptors (D1Rs) and D2-like receptors (D2Rs). The D1-like receptor family consists of D1 and D5 receptors which are expressed in many regions of the brain. D1 mRNA has been found, for example, in the striatum and nucleus accumbens. See e.g., Missale C, Nash S R, Robinson S W, Jaber M, Caron M G “Dopamine receptors: from structure to function”, Physiological Reviews 78:189-225 (1998). Pharmacological studies have reported that D1 and D5 receptors (D1/D5), namely D1-like receptors, are linked to stimulation of adenylyl cyclase, whereas D2, D3, and D4 receptors, namely D2-like receptors, are linked to inhibition of cAMP production.
  • Dopamine D1 receptors are implicated in numerous neuropharmacological and neurobiological functions. For example, D1 receptors are involved in different types of memory function and synaptic plasticity. See e.g., Goldman-Rakic P S et al., “Targeting the dopamine D1 receptor in schizophrenia: insights for cognitive dysfunction”, Psychopharmacology 174(1):3-16 (2004). Moreover, D1 receptors have been implicated in a variety of psychiatric, neurological, neurodevelopmental, neurodegenerative, mood, motivational, metabolic, cardiovascular, renal, ophthalmic, endocrine, and/or other disorders described herein including schizophrenia (e.g., cognitive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia), cognitive impairment associated with D2 antagonist therapy, ADHD, impulsivity, autism spectrum disorder, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), age-related cognitive decline, Alzheimer’s dementia, Parkinson’s disease (PD), Huntington’s chorea, depression, anxiety, treatment-resistant depression (TRD), bipolar disorder, chronic apathy, anhedonia, chronic fatigue, post-traumatic stress disorder, seasonal affective disorder, social anxiety disorder, post-partum depression, serotonin syndrome, substance abuse and drug dependence, Tourette’s syndrome, tardive dyskinesia, drowsiness, sexual dysfunction, migraine, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), hyperglycemia, dislipidemia, obesity, diabetes, sepsis, post-ischemic tubular necrosis, renal failure, resistant edema, narcolepsy, hypertension, congestive heart failure, postoperative ocular hypotonia, sleep disorders, pain, and other disorders in a mammal. See e.g., Goulet M, Madras B K “D(1) dopamine receptor agonists are more effective in alleviating advanced than mild parkinsonism in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-treated monkeys”, Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapy 292(2):714-24 (2000); Surmeier D J et al., “The role of dopamine in modulating the structure and function of striatal circuits”, Prog. Brain Res. 183:149-67 (2010).
    New or improved agents that modulate (such as agonize or partially agonize) D1 are needed for developing new and more effective pharmaceuticals to treat diseases or conditions associated with dysregulated activation of D1, such as those described herein.

PATENT

US 20140128374

Example 6

4-[4-(4,6-Dimethylpyrimidin-5-yl)-3-methylphenoxy]-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridine (6)

Figure US20140128374A1-20140508-C00042

Step 1. Synthesis of 4-[4-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-5-yl)-3-methylphenoxy]-1-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridine (C31)

Cesium carbonate (1.03 g, 3.16 mmol) and palladium(II) acetate (24 mg, 0.11 mmol) were added to a solution of C28 (225 mg, 1.05 mmol) and P3 (250 mg, 1.05 mmol) in 1,4-dioxane (10 mL) in a sealable reaction vessel, and the solution was purged with nitrogen for 10 minutes. Di-tert-butyl[3,4,5,6-tetramethyl-2′,4′,6-tri(propan-2-yl)biphenyl-2-yl]phosphane (97%, 104 mg, 0.210 mmol) was added, and the reaction mixture was briefly purged with nitrogen. The vessel was sealed and the reaction mixture was stirred at 100° C. for 3 hours. After cooling to room temperature, the mixture was filtered through Celite and the filter pad was washed with ethyl acetate; the combined filtrates were concentrated in vacuo and purified via silica gel chromatography (Eluents: 20%, then 50%, then 100% ethyl acetate in heptane). The product was obtained as an off-white solid. Yield: 272 mg, 0.655 mmol, 62%. LCMS m/z 416.5 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.99 (s, 1H), 8.11 (d, J=0.6 Hz, 1H), 7.99 (d, J=6.0 Hz, 1H), 7.25-7.27 (m, 2H, assumed; partially obscured by solvent peak), 7.20-7.24 (m, 1H), 7.10 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 1H), 5.73 (dd, J=9.4, 2.5 Hz, 1H), 4.04-4.10 (m, 1H), 3.74-3.82 (m, 1H), 2.49-2.59 (m, 1H), 2.28 (s, 6H), 2.08-2.21 (m, 2H), 2.04 (s, 3H), 1.66-1.84 (s, 3H).

Step 2. Synthesis of 4-[4-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-5-yl)-3-methylphenoxy]-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridine (6)

C31 (172 mg, 0.414 mmol) was dissolved in 1,4-dioxane (5 mL) and dichloromethane (5 mL), and cooled to 0° C. A solution of hydrogen chloride in 1,4-dioxane (4 M, 1.04 mL, 4.16 mmol) was added, and the reaction mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature for 45 hours. After removal of solvent in vacuo, the residue was partitioned between saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution and dichloromethane. The aqueous layer was extracted twice with dichloromethane, and the combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated under reduced pressure, affording the product as an off-white solid. Yield: 130 mg, 0.392 mmol, 95%. LCMS m/z 332.3 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 9.00 (s, 1H), 8.20 (br s, 1H), 7.99 (d, J=6.0 Hz, 1H), 7.28-7.30 (m, 1H), 7.23-7.27 (m, 1H), 7.16 (dd, J=6.0, 1.0 Hz, 1H), 7.11 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 2.28 (s, 6H), 2.05 (s, 3H).

Preparation P8

6-(4-Hydroxy-2-methylphenyl)-1,5-dimethylpyrazin-2(1H)-one (P8)

Figure US20140128374A1-20140508-C00033

Step 1. Synthesis of 1-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)propan-2-one (C8)

Four batches of this experiment were carried out (4×250 g substrate). Tributyl(methoxy)stannane (400 g, 1.24 mol), 1-bromo-4-methoxy-2-methylbenzene (250 g, 1.24 mol), prop-1-en-2-yl acetate (187 g, 1.87 mol), palladium(II) acetate (7.5 g, 33 mmol) and tris(2-methylphenyl)phosphane (10 g, 33 mmol) were stirred together in toluene (2 L) at 100° C. for 18 hours. After cooling to room temperature, the reaction mixture was treated with aqueous potassium fluoride solution (4 M, 400 mL) and stirred for 2 hours at 40° C. The resulting mixture was diluted with toluene (500 mL) and filtered through Celite; the filter pad was thoroughly washed with ethyl acetate (2×1.5 L). The organic phase from the combined filtrates was dried over sodium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo. Purification via silica gel chromatography (Gradient: 0% to 5% ethyl acetate in petroleum ether) provided the product as a yellow oil. Combined yield: 602 g, 3.38 mol, 68%. LCMS m/z 179.0 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.05 (d, J=8.3 Hz, 1H), 6.70-6.77 (m, 2H), 3.79 (s, 3H), 3.65 (s, 2H), 2.22 (s, 3H), 2.14 (s, 3H).

Step 2. Synthesis of 1-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)propane-1,2-dione (C9)

C8 (6.00 g, 33.7 mmol) and selenium dioxide (7.47 g, 67.3 mmol) were suspended in 1,4-dioxane (50 mL) and heated at 100° C. for 18 hours. The reaction mixture was cooled to room temperature and filtered through Celite; the filtrate was concentrated in vacuo. Silica gel chromatography (Eluent: 10% ethyl acetate in heptane) afforded the product as a bright yellow oil. Yield: 2.55 g, 13.3 mmol, 39%. LCMS m/z 193.1 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.66 (d, J=8.6 Hz, 1H), 6.81 (br d, half of AB quartet, J=2.5 Hz, 1H), 6.78 (br dd, half of ABX pattern, J=8.7, 2.6 Hz, 1H), 3.87 (s, 3H), 2.60 (br s, 3H), 2.51 (s, 3H).

Step 3. Synthesis of 6-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-5-methylpyrazin-2(1H)-one (C10)

C9 (4.0 g, 21 mmol) and glycinamide acetate (2.79 g, 20.8 mmol) were dissolved in methanol (40 mL) and cooled to −10° C. Aqueous sodium hydroxide solution (12 N, 3.5 mL, 42 mmol) was added, and the resulting mixture was slowly warmed to room temperature. After stirring for 3 days, the reaction mixture was concentrated in vacuo. The residue was diluted with water, and 1 N aqueous hydrochloric acid was added until the pH was approximately 7. The aqueous phase was extracted with ethyl acetate, and the combined organic extracts were washed with saturated aqueous sodium chloride solution, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The resulting residue was slurried with 3:1 ethyl acetate/heptane, stirred for 5 minutes, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo. Silica gel chromatography (Eluent: ethyl acetate) provided the product as a tan solid that contained 15% of an undesired regioisomer; this material was used without further purification. Yield: 2.0 g. LCMS m/z 231.1 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.09 (s, 1H), 7.14 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 6.82-6.87 (m, 2H), 3.86 (s, 3H), 2.20 (s, 3H), 2.11 (s, 3H).

Step 4. Synthesis of 6-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-1,5-dimethylpyrazin-2(1H)-one (C11)

C10 (from the previous step, 1.9 g) was dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide (40 mL). Lithium bromide (0.86 g, 9.9 mmol) and sodium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide (95%, 1.91 g, 9.89 mmol) were added, and the resulting solution was stirred for 30 minutes. Methyl iodide (0.635 mL, 10.2 mmol) was added and stirring was continued at room temperature for 18 hours. The reaction mixture was then diluted with water and brought to a pH of approximately 7 by slow portion-wise addition of 1 N aqueous hydrochloric acid. The aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate and the combined organic layers were washed several times with water, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated. Silica gel chromatography (Gradient: 75% to 100% ethyl acetate in heptane) afforded the product as a viscous orange oil. Yield: 1.67 g, 6.84 mmol, 33% over two steps. LCMS m/z 245.1 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.17 (s, 1H), 7.03 (br d, J=8 Hz, 1H), 6.85-6.90 (m, 2H), 3.86 (s, 3H), 3.18 (s, 3H), 2.08 (br s, 3H), 2.00 (s, 3H).

Step 5. Synthesis of P8

To a −78° C. solution of C11 (1.8 g, 7.37 mmol) in dichloromethane (40 mL) was added a solution of boron tribromide in dichloromethane (1 M, 22 mL, 22 mmol). The cooling bath was removed after 30 minutes, and the reaction mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature and stir for 18 hours. The reaction was cooled to −78° C., and methanol (10 mL) was slowly added; the resulting mixture was slowly warmed to room temperature. The reaction mixture was concentrated in vacuo, methanol (20 mL) was added, and the mixture was again concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was diluted with ethyl acetate (300 mL) and water (200 mL) and the aqueous layer was brought to pH 7 via portion-wise addition of saturated aqueous sodium carbonate solution. The mixture was extracted with ethyl acetate (3×200 mL). The combined organic extracts were washed with water and with saturated aqueous sodium chloride solution, dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo to afford the product as a light tan solid. Yield: 1.4 g, 6.0 mmol, 81%. LCMS m/z 231.1 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.21 (s, 1H), 6.98 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 6.87-6.89 (m, 1H), 6.85 (br dd, J=8.2, 2.5 Hz, 1H), 3.22 (s, 3H), 2.06 (br s, 3H), 2.03 (s, 3H).

Step 1. Synthesis of 5-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (C27)

1,1′-Bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene]dichloropalladium(II)-dichloromethane complex (5 g, 6 mmol) was added to a degassed mixture of 2-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolane (30 g, 120 mmol), 5-bromo-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine (22.5 g, 120 mmol), and potassium phosphate (76.3 g, 359 mmol) in 1,4-dioxane (300 mL) and water (150 mL). The reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 4 hours, whereupon it was filtered and concentrated in vacuo. Purification via silica gel chromatography (Gradient: ethyl acetate in petroleum ether) provided the product as a brown solid. Yield: 25 g, 110 mmol, 92%. LCMS m/z 229.3 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (300 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.95 (s, 1H), 6.94 (d, J=8.2 Hz, 1H), 6.87-6.89 (m, 1H), 6.84 (dd, J=8.3, 2.5 Hz, 1H), 3.86 (s, 3H), 2.21 (s, 6H), 1.99 (s, 3H).

Step 2. Synthesis of 4-(4,6-dimethylpyrimidin-5-yl)-3-methylphenol (C28)

Boron tribromide (3.8 mL, 40 mmol) was added drop-wise to a solution of C27 (3.0 g, 13 mmol) in dichloromethane (150 mL) at −70° C. The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 16 hours, then adjusted to pH 8 with saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution. The aqueous layer was extracted with dichloromethane (3×200 mL), and the combined organic layers were dried over sodium sulfate, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo. Silica gel chromatography (Gradient: 60% to 90% ethyl acetate in petroleum ether) afforded the product as a yellow solid. Yield: 1.2 g, 5.6 mmol, 43%. LCMS m/z 215.0 [M+H+]. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 8.98 (s, 1H), 6.89 (d, J=8.0 Hz, 1H), 6.86 (d, J=2.3 Hz, 1H), 6.80 (dd, J=8.3, 2.5 Hz, 1H), 2.24 (s, 6H), 1.96 (s, 3H).

str1

//////////////PF 2562, non-catechol dopamine 1 receptor agonist, PFIZER, Jennifer Elizabeth Davoren, Amy Beth Dounay, Ivan Viktorovich Efremov, David Lawrence Firman Gray, Scot Richard Mente, Steven Victor O’Neil, Bruce Nelsen Rogers, Chakrapani Subramanyam, Lei Zhang, 1609258-91-4

Now at 1st time disclosures David Gray of @pfizer on a non-catechol dopamine 1 receptor agonist

str2

Cc1ncnc(C)c1c2ccc(cc2C)Oc4nccc3nncc34

PF 06821497


str1

PF 06821497

Cas 1844849-11-1

Designed to treat lymphoma

1(2H)-Isoquinolinone, 5,8-dichloro-2-[(1,2-dihydro-4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-7-[(S)-methoxy-3-oxetanylmethyl]-

MF C22 H24 Cl2 N2 O5, 

MW 467.34

ChemSpider 2D Image | 5,8-Dichloro-2-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-7-[methoxy(3-oxetanyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-isoquinolinone | C22H24Cl2N2O5PF 06821497

5,8-Dichloro-2-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-7-[methoxy(3-oxetanyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-isoquinolinone

1(2H)-Isoquinolinone, 5,8-dichloro-2-[(1,2-dihydro-4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-7-(methoxy-3-oxetanylmethyl)-

  • Molecular Formula C22H24Cl2N2O5
  • Average mass 467.342 Da

SCHEMBL17330377.pngPF 06821497

5,8-dichloro-2-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-1H-pyridin-3-yl)methyl]-7-[(S)-methoxy(oxetan-3-yl)methyl]-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-1-one

US2015361067

Inventors Michael Raymond Collins, Robert Steven Kania, Robert Arnold Kumpf, Pei-Pei Kung, Daniel Tyler Richter, Scott Channing Sutton, Martin James Wythes
Original Assignee Pfizer Inc.Image result
  • Epigenetic alterations play an important role in the regulation of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell survival. The epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes may occur through alteration of CpG island methylation patterns, histone modification, and dysregulation of DNA binding protein. Polycomb genes are a set of epigenetic effectors. EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) is the catalytic component of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2), a conserved multi-subunit complex that represses gene transcription by methylating lysine 27 on Histone H3 (H3K27). EZH2 plans a key role in regulating gene expression patterns that regulate cell fate decisions, such as differentiation and self-renewal. EZH2 is overexpressed in certain cancer cells, where it has been linked to cell proliferation, cell invasion, chemoresistance and metastasis.
  • High EZH2 expression has been correlated with poor prognosis, high grade, and high stage in several cancer types, including breast, colorectal, endometrial, gastric, liver, kidney, lung, melanoma, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, and bladder cancers. See Crea et al., Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol. 2012, 83:184-193, and references cited therein; see also Kleer et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2003, 100:11606-11; Mimori et al., Eur. J. Surg. Oncol. 2005, 31:376-80; Bachmann et al., J. Clin. Oncol. 2006, 24:268-273; Matsukawa et al., Cancer Sci. 2006, 97:484-491; Sasaki et al. Lab. Invest. 2008, 88:873-882; Sudo et al., Br. J. Cancer 2005, 92(9):1754-1758; Breuer et al., Neoplasia 2004, 6:736-43; Lu et al., Cancer Res. 2007, 67:1757-1768; Ougolkov et al., Clin. Cancer Res. 2008, 14:6790-6796; Varambally et al., Nature 2002, 419:624-629; Wagener et al., Int. J. Cancer 2008, 123:1545-1550; and Weikert et al., Int. J. Mol. Med. 2005, 16:349-353.
    Recurring somatic mutations in EZH2 have been identified in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphomas (FL). Mutations altering EZH2 tyrosine 641 (e.g., Y641C, Y641F, Y641N, Y641S, and Y641H) were reportedly observed in up to 22% of germinal center B-cell DLBCL and 7% of FL. Morin et al. Nat. Genetics 2010 February; 42(2):181-185. Mutations of alanine 677 (A677) and alanine 687 (A687) have also been reported. McCabe et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2012, 109:2989-2994; Majer et al. FEBS Letters 2012, 586:3448-3451. EZH2 activating mutations have been suggested to alter substrate specificity resulting in elevated levels of trimethylated H3K27 (H3K27me3).
    Accordingly, compounds that inhibit the activity of wild type and/or mutant forms of EZH2 may be of interest for the treatment of cancer.

SYNTHESIS

Steps

1 COUPLING, Ag2CO3

2 Alkylation, K2CO3

3 LiAlH4 REDUCTION

4 THIONYL CHLORIDE

5 N-Alkylation of Amides, t-BuOK

6 A GRIGNARD REACTION

7 AN ALKYLATION , METHYL IODIDE, t-BuOK

8 HYDROGENATION, DE BENZYLATION,  PLATINUM OXIDE

9 LAST STEP separation by chiral preparative, SFC on (R,R) Whelk O1 column, TO GET PF 06821497

PATENT

US 20150361067

///////////////PF 06821497, 1844849-11-1, PFIZER, lymphoma, Pei-Pei Kung,  @pfizer, #ACSSanFran, Michael Raymond Collins, Robert Steven Kania, Robert Arnold Kumpf, Pei-Pei Kung, Daniel Tyler Richter, Scott Channing Sutton, Martin James Wythes

Next up in #MEDI 1st time disclosures Pei-Pei Kung from @pfizer presenting a molecule designed to treat lymphoma #ACSSanFran

str0

CO[C@H](c2cc(Cl)c3CCN(CC1=C(OC)C=C(C)NC1=O)C(=O)c3c2Cl)C4COC4

CC1=CC(=C(C(=O)N1)CN2CCC3=C(C=C(C(=C3C2=O)Cl)C(C4COC4)OC)Cl)OC

Lorlatinib, лорлатиниб , لورلاتينيب , 洛拉替尼 , PF-6463922


Lorlatinib.svgChemSpider 2D Image | lorlatinib | C21H19FN6O2

Lorlatinib, PF-6463922

For Cancer; Non-small-cell lung cancer

  • Molecular Formula C21H19FN6O2
  • Average mass 406.413 Da

Phase 2

WO 2013132376

Andrew James Jensen, Suman Luthra, Paul Francis RICHARDSON
Applicant Pfizer Inc.
Image result for pfizer
(10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-4,8- methenopyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile
(16R)-19-Amino-13-fluoro-4,8,16-trimethyl-9-oxo-17-oxa-4,5,8,20-tetraazatetracyclo[16.3.1.02,6.010,15]docosa-1(22),2,5,10,12,14,18,20-octaene-3-carbonitrile
(10R)-7-Amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile
CAS 1454846-35-5 [RN]
UNII:OSP71S83EU
лорлатиниб [Russian]
لورلاتينيب [Arabic]
洛拉替尼 [Chinese]

Ros1 tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor; Anaplastic lymphoma kinase receptor inhibitor

useful for treating cancer mediated by anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) or c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) receptor tyrosine kinase, particularly NSCLC.  an ATP-competitive inhibitor of ROS1/ALK, for treating NSCLC. In February 2017, lorlatinib was reported to be in phase 2 clinical development.

  • Originator Pfizer
  • Developer Pfizer; The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia; Yale University
  • Class Antineoplastics; Aza compounds; Benzoxazines; Pyrazoles; Pyrazolones; Small molecules
  • Mechanism of Action Anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors; ROS1-protein-inhibitors
  • Orphan Drug Status Yes – Non-small cell lung cancer

Lorlatinib (PF-6463922) is an experimental anti-neoplastic drug in development by Pfizer. It is a orally-administered small molecule inhibitor of ROS1 and ALK.

In 2015, FDA granted Pfizer orphan drug status for lorlatinib for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.[1]

  • 05 Oct 2016 Massachusetts General Hospital plans a phase II trial for Non-small cell lung cancer (Late-stage disease, Metastatic disease) in USA (PO, unspecified formulation) (NCT02927340)
  • 01 Oct 2016 Pfizer completes a phase I trial in pharmacokinetic trial in Healthy volunteers in USA (NCT02804399)
  • 01 Aug 2016 Pfizer initiates a phase I drug-drug interaction trial in Healthy volunteers in Belgium (PO, unspecified formulation) (NCT02838264)

Figure

Structures of ALK inhibitors marketed or currently in the clinic

Synthesis

NEED COLOUR

Clinical studies

Several clinical trials are ongoing. A phase II trial comparing avelumab alone and in combination with lorlatinib or crizotinib for non-small cell lung cancer is expected to be complete in late 2017. A phase II trial comparing lorlatinib with crizotinib is expected to be complete in mid-2018.[2] A phase II trial for treatment of ALK-positive or ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer with CNA metastases is not expected to be complete until 2023.[3] Preclinical studies are investigating lorlatinib for treatment of neuroblastoma.

Lorlatinib is an investigational medicine that inhibits the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 proto-oncogene. Due to tumor complexity and development of resistance to treatment, disease progression is a challenge in patients with ALK-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A common site for progression in metastatic NSCLC is the brain. Lorlatinib was specifically designed to inhibit tumor mutations that drive resistance to other ALK inhibitors and to penetrate the blood brain barrier.

ABOUT LORLATINIB

ALK in NSCLC ROS1 in NSCLC PRECLINICAL DATA CLINICAL STUDIES Originally discovered as an oncogenic driver in a type of lymphoma, ALK gene alterations were also found to be among key drivers of tumor development in cancers, such as NSCLC.1 In ALK-positive lung cancer, a normally inactive gene called ALK is fused with another gene. This genetic alteration creates the ALK fusion gene and ultimately, the production of an ALK fusion protein, which is responsible for tumor growth.1,2 This genetic alteration is present in 3-5% of NSCLC patients.3,4,5 Another gene that can fuse with other genes is called ROS1. Sometimes a ROS1 fusion protein can contribute to cancer-cell growth and tumor survival. This genetic alteration is present in approximately 1% of NSCLC patients.5 Preclinical data showed lorlatinib is capable of overcoming resistance to existing ALK inhibitors and penetrated the blood brain barrier in ALK-driven tumor models.2 Specifically, in these preclinical models, lorlatinib had activity against all tested clinical resistance mutations in ALK.

A Phase 1/2 clinical trial of lorlatinib in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC is currently ongoing. • The primary objective of the Phase 1 portion was to assess safety and tolerability of single-agent lorlatinib at increasing dose levels in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive advanced NSCLC.6 • Data from the Phase 1 study showed that lorlatinib had promising clinical activity in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1- positive advanced NSCLC. Most of these patients had developed CNS metastases and had received ≥1 prior tyrosine kinase inhibitor.7 o The most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were hypercholesterolemia (69%) and peripheral edema (37%). Hypercholesterolemia was the most common (11%) grade 3 or higher treatment-related AE and the most frequent reason for dose delay or reduction. No patients discontinued due to treatment-related AEs. At the recommended Phase 2 dose, 4 out of 17 patients (24%) experienced a treatment-related AE of any grade that led to a dose delay or hold.

PATENT

WO2014207606

This invention relates to crystalline forms of the macrocyclic kinase inhibitor, (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10,16-trimethyl-15-OXO-10,15, 16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4, 3-?][2,5,1 1 ]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile, including crystalline solvates thereof, that may be useful in the treatment of abnormal cell growth, such as cancer, in mammals. The invention also relates to compositions including such crystalline forms, and to methods of using such compositions in the treatment of abnormal cell growth in mammals, especially humans.

Background of the Invention

The compound (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2,5,1 1 ]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile, represented by the formula (I):

(I)

is a potent, macrocyclic inhibitor of both wild type and resistance mutant forms of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) receptor tyrosine kinase. Preparation of the free base compound of formula (I) as an amorphous solid is disclosed in International Patent Publication No. WO 2013/132376 and in United States Patent Publication No. 2013/0252961 , the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

Human cancers comprise a diverse array of diseases that collectively are one of the leading causes of death in developed countries throughout the world (American Cancer Society, Cancer Facts and Figures 2005. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2005). The progression of cancers is caused by a complex series of multiple genetic and molecular events including gene mutations, chromosomal translocations, and karyotypic abnormalities (Hanahan & Weinberg, The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 2000; 100: 57-70). Although the underlying genetic causes of

cancer are both diverse and complex, each cancer type has been observed to exhibit common traits and acquired capabilities that facilitate its progression. These acquired capabilities include dysregulated cell growth, sustained ability to recruit blood vessels (i.e., angiogenesis), and ability of tumor cells to spread locally as well as metastasize to secondary organ sites (Hanahan & Weinberg 2000). Therefore, the ability to identify novel therapeutic agents that inhibit molecular targets that are altered during cancer progression or target multiple processes that are common to cancer progression in a variety of tumors presents a significant unmet need.

Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play fundamental roles in cellular processes, including cell proliferation, migration, metabolism, differentiation, and survival. RTK activity is tightly controlled in normal cells. The constitutively enhanced RTK activities from point mutation, amplification, and rearrangement of the corresponding genes have been implicated in the development and progression of many types of cancer. (Gschwind et al., The discovery of receptor tyrosine kinases: targets for cancer therapy. Nat. Rev. Cancer 2004; 4, 361-370; Krause & Van Etten, Tyrosine kinases as targets for cancer therapy. N. Engl. J. Med. 2005; 353: 172-187.)

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase, grouped together with leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) to a subfamily within the insulin receptor (IR) superfamily. ALK was first discovered as a fusion protein with nucleophosmin (NPM) in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell lines in 1994. (Morris et al., Fusion of a kinase gene, ALK, to a nucleolar protein gene, NPM, in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Science 1994; 263:1281-1284.) NPM-ALK, which results from a chromosomal translocation, is implicated in the pathogenesis of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) (Pulford et al., Anaplastic lymphoma kinase proteins in growth control and cancer. J. Cell Physiol., 2004; 199: 330-58). The roles of aberrant expression of constitutively active ALK chimeric proteins in the pathogenesis of ALCL have been defined (Wan et. al., Anaplastic lymphoma kinase activity is essential for the proliferation and survival of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cells. Blood, 2006; 107:1617-1623). Other chromosomal rearrangements resulting in ALK fusions have been subsequently detected in ALCL (50-60%), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (27%), and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (2-7%). (Palmer et al., Anaplastic lymphoma kinase: signaling in development and disease. Biochem. J. 2009; 420:345-361 .)

The EML4-ALK fusion gene, comprising portions of the echinoderm microtubule associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene and the ALK gene, was first discovered in NSCLC archived clinical specimens and cell lines. (Soda et al., Identification of the transforming EML4-ALK fusion gene in non-small cell lung cancer. Nature 2007; 448:561-566; Rikova et al., Cell 2007; 131 :1 190-1203.) EML4-ALK fusion variants were demonstrated to transform NIH-3T3 fibroblasts and cause lung adenocarcinoma when expressed in transgenic mice, confirming the

potent oncogenic activity of the EML4-ALK fusion kinase. (Soda et al., A mouse model for EML4-ALK-positive lung cancer. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2008; 105:19893-19897.) Oncogenic mutations of ALK in both familial and sporadic cases of neuroblastoma have also been reported. (Caren et al., High incidence of DNA mutations and gene amplifications of the ALK gene in advanced sporadic neuroblastoma tumors. Biochem. J. 2008; 416:153-159.)

ROS1 is a proto-oncogene receptor tyrosine kinase that belongs to the insulin receptor subfamily, and is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation processes. (Nagarajan et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1986; 83:6568-6572). ROS is expressed, in humans, in epithelial cells of a variety of different tissues. Defects in ROS expression and/or activation have been found in glioblastoma, as well as tumors of the central nervous system (Charest et al., Genes Chromos. Can. 2003; 37(1): 58-71). Genetic alterations involving ROS that result in aberrant fusion proteins of ROS kinase have been described, including the FIG-ROS deletion translocation in glioblastoma (Charest et al. (2003); Birchmeier et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci 1987; 84:9270-9274; and NSCLC (Rimkunas et al., Analysis of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ROS1 -Positive Tumors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Identification of FIG-ROS1 Fusion, Clin Cancer Res 2012; 18:4449-4457), the SLC34A2-ROS translocation in NSCLC (Rikova et al. Cell 2007;131 :1 190-1203), the CD74-ROS translocation in NSCLC (Rikova et al. (2007)) and cholangiocarcinoma (Gu et al. PLoS ONE 201 1 ; 6(1 ): e15640), and a truncated, active form of ROS known to drive tumor growth in mice (Birchmeier et al. Mol. Cell. Bio. 1986; 6(9):3109-31 15). Additional fusions, including TPM3-ROS1 , SDC4-ROS1 , EZR-ROS1 and LRIG3-ROS1 , have been reported in lung cancer patient tumor samples (Takeuchi et al., RET, ROS1 and ALK fusions in lung cancer, Nature Medicine 2012; 18(3):378-381).

The dual ALK/c-MET inhibitor crizotinib was approved in 201 1 for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC that is ALK-positive as detected by an FDA-approved test. Crizotinib has also shown efficacy in treatment of NSCLC with ROS1 translocations. (Shaw et al. Clinical activity of crizotinib in advanced rson-smali cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring ROS1 gene rearrangement. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Chicago, June 1-5, 2012.) As observed clinically for other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mutations in ALK and ROS1 that confer resistance to ALK inhibitors have been described (Choi et ai., EML4-ALK Mutations in Lung Cancer than Confer Resistance to ALK Inhibitors, N Engl J Med 2010; 363:1734-1739; Awad et ai., Acquired Resistance to Crizotinib from a Mutation in CD74-ROS1, Engl J Med 2013; 368:2395-2401 ).

Thus, ALK and ROS1 are attractive molecular targets for cancer therapeutic intervention. There remains a need to identify compounds having novel activity profiles against wild-type and mutant forms of ALK and ROS1 .

The present invention provides crystalline forms of the free base of (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10,16-trimethyl-15-OXO-10,15, 16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2, 5,1 1 ]-benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile having improved properties, such as improved crystallinity, dissolution properties, decreased hygroscopicity, improved mechanical properties, improved purity, and/or improved stability, while maintaining chemical and enantiomeric stability.

Comparative Example 1A

Preparation of (10f?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?l[2,5,1 Hbenzoxadiazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile (amorphous)

Example 1A

Step 1 :

Palladium (II) acetate (53 mg, 0.24 mmol) and cataCXium® A (180 mg, 0.5 mmol) were mixed together in toluene (1 .5 mL, de-gassed) and the resulting solution was added via pipette to a stirred solution of compound 7 (0.9 g, 2.4 mmol), compound 15 (1 .0 g, 3.0 mmol) bis-pinacolato diboron (0.9 g, 3.6 mmol) and CsF (1 .9 g, 12.6 mmol) in MeOH/H20 (9:1 , 12 mL, degassed) at 60 °C. The resulting mixture was then stirred at reflux for 3 hrs. A further portion of Palladium (II) acetate (26 mg, 0.12 mmol) and cataCXium® A (90 mg, 0.25 mmol) in toluene (1 .5 mL, de-gassed) was added, and the yellow reaction mixture stirred at 60 °C overnight. After cooling to room temperature, the mixture was diluted with EtOAc (150 mL) and filtered through CELITE®. The filtrate was washed with water (100 mL), then brine (100 mL), dried (Na2S04) and evaporated. The residue was purified by flash chromatography over silica gel, which was eluted with 1 :1 EtOAc/cyclohexane, to give compound 22 as a yellow oil (570 mg, 43% yield). TLC (Rf = 0.40, 1 :1 EtOAc/cyclohexane). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 8.03 (m, 1 H), 7.65 (s, 1 H), 7.27 (dd,1 H, J = 9.9, 2.7 Hz), 7.01 (m, 1 H), 6.68 (m, 1 H), 6.40 (m, 1 H), 4.90 (br s, 2 H), 4.20 – 4.30 (m, 2 H), 3.96 (s, 3 H), 3.94 (s, 3 H), 2.55 – 2.85 (m, 3 H), 1 .68 (d, 3 H, J = 6.6 Hz), 1 .24 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 539 [M+H]+.

Step 2:

To a solution of compound 22 (69% purity, 0.95 g, assumed 1 .05 mmol) in MeOH (20 mL) was added a solution NaOH (1 .0 g, 25 mmol) in water (2 mL). The mixture was stirred at 40 °C for 3.5 hours. The reaction was diluted with water (80 mL), concentrated by 20 mL to remove MeOH on the rotary evaporator, and washed with MTBE (100 mL). The aqueous layer was then acidified carefully with 1 M aq HCI to approx. pH 2 (pH paper). Sodium chloride (15 g) was added to the mixture and the mixture was extracted with EtOAc (100 mL). The organic layer was separated, dried (Na2S04) and evaporated to give compound 23 as a pale yellow solid (480 mg, 87% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 8.05 (m, 1 H), 7.45 (s, 1 H), 7.37 (dd,1 H, J = 10.4, 2.8 Hz), 7.10 (dt, 1 H, J = 8.5, 2.4 Hz), 6.50 – 6.60 (m, 2 H), 4.05 – 4.30 (m, 2 H), 3.99 (s, 3 H), 2.60 – 2.80 (m, 3 H), 1 .72 (d, 3 H, J = 6.5 Hz). LCMS ES m/z 525 [M+H]+.

Step 3:

A solution of HCI in dioxane (4 M, 6.0 mL) was added to a solution of compound 23

(480 mg, 0.91 mmol) in MeOH (methanol) (6 mL) and the reaction was stirred at 40 °C for 2.5 hours. The reaction mixture was then concentrated to dryness under reduced pressure. The residue was taken-up in MeOH (50 mL) and acetonitrile (100 mL) was added and the mixture was then again evaporated to dryness, to give compound 24 as an off white solid (400 mg, 87% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD) δ 8.07 (dd, 1 H, J = 8.9. 5.9 Hz), 7.51 (d, 1 H, J = 1 .7 Hz), 7.42 (dd, 1 H, J = 9.8, 2.6 Hz), 7.23 (d, 1 H, J = 1 .6 Hz), 7.16 (dt, 1 H, J = 8.5, 2.7 Hz), 6.73 (dd, 1 H, J = 1 1 .9, 6.9 Hz), 4.22 (d, 1 H, J = 14.7 Hz), 4.14 (d, 1 H, J = 14.7 Hz), 4.07 (s, 3 H), 2.75 (s, 3 H), 1 .75 (d, 3 H, J = 5.5 Hz). LCMS ES m/z 425 [M+H]+.

Step 4:

A solution of compound 24 (400 mg, assumed 0.91 mmol) as the HCI salt and DIPEA

(diisopropylethylamine) (1 .17 g, 9.1 mmol) in DMF (dimethylformamide) (5.0 mL) and THF (0.5 mL) was added drop-wise to a solution of HATU (2-(1 H-7-azabenzotriazol-1 -yl)-1 ,1 ,3,3-tetramethyl uronium hexafluorophosphate methanaminium) (482 mg, 1 .27 mmol) in DMF (10.0 mL) at 0 °C over 30 minutes. After complete addition, the mixture was stirred at 0 °C for a further 30 mins. Water (70 mL) was added and the mixture was extracted into EtOAc (2 x 60 mL). The combined organics were washed with saturated aqueous NaHC03 (2 x 100 mL), brine (100 mL), dried over Na2S04, and evaporated. The residue was purified by column chromatography over silica gel, which was eluted with 70% EtOAc/cyclohexane giving 205 mg of a pale yellow residue (semi-solid). The solids were dissolved in MTBE (7 mL) and cyclohexane (20 mL) was added slowly with good stirring to precipitate the product. After stirring for 30 minutes, the mixture was filtered, and Example 1A was collected as an

amorphous white solid (1 10 mg, 29% yield). TLC (Rf = 0.40, 70% EtOAc in cyclohexane). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.83 (d, 1 H, J = 2.0 Hz), 7.30 (dd, 1 H, J = 9.6, 2.4 Hz), 7.21 (dd, 1 H, J = 8.4, 5.6 Hz), 6.99 (dt, 1 H, J = 8.0, 2.8 Hz), 6.86 (d, 1 H, J = 1 .2 Hz), 5.75 – 5.71 (m, 1 H), 4.84 (s, 2 H), 4.45 (d, 1 H, J = 14.4 Hz), 4.35 (d ,1 H, J = 14.4 Hz), 4.07 (s, 3 H), 3.13 (s, 3 H), 1 .79 (d, 3 H, J = 6.4Hz). LCMS ES m/z 407 [M+H]+.

Example 1

Preparation of crystalline hydrate of (10 ?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo- 10,15,16,17-tetrahvdro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?l[2,5,1 Hbenzoxa-diazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile (Form 1)

Example 1A Example 1

(amorphous) (Form 1 }

Amorphous (10f?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2,5,11 ]benzoxa-diazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile free base, prepared as described in Example 1A (and Example 2 of United States Patent Publication No. 2013/0252961), was dissolved in 1 .0 : 1 .1 (v:v) H20:MeOH at a concentration of 22 mg/mL at 50°C, then allowed to cool to room temperature . This slurry was granulated for approximately 72 hours. The solids were isolated by filtration and vacuum dried overnight at 60°C to produce crystalline hydrate Form 1 of (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-/?][2,5,1 1 ]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile.

Example 4

Alternative preparation of crystalline acetic acid solvate of (10 ?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10,16-trimethyl-15-OXO-10,15, 16,17-tetrahvdro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?U2,5, 1 1 lbenzoxa-diazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile (Form 3)

Step 1 :

To a reaction vessel under N2 were charged compound 9 (9.97 kg, 17.95 mol), compound 21 (3.52 kg, 18.85 mol) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (97 L). Triethylamine (7.45 kg, 73.6 mol) was added while keeping the internal temperature below 35°C. The reaction mixture was held for 30 min and n-propylphosphonic anhydride (T3P), 50% solution in ethyl acetate (22.85 kg, 35.9 mol) was charged slowly, maintaining the internal temperature below 25°C. The reaction mixture was held at 20°C for at least 2 h until reaction was deemed complete. Ethyl acetate (35 L) and water (66 L) were added followed by 0.5N Hydrochloric acid solution (80 L). The aqueous layer was removed and the organic layer was washed with brine solution (80 L). The organic layer was concentrated and solvent exchanged with 2-methyl-2-butanol (80 L) give compound 25 (23 wt/wt%) solution in 2-methyl-2-butanol . This solution was carried forward to the next step directly in three batches, assuming 12.00 kg (100% yield) from this step.

Step 2:

2-Methyl-2-butanol (100 L) was combined with potassium acetate (1 .8 kg, 18.34 mol), palladium(ll) acetate (0.10 kg, 0.46 mol) and water (0.10 kg, 5.73 mol). The resulting mixture was purged with nitrogen. Di(1 -adamantyl)n-butylphosphine (0.23 kg, 0.43 mol) was added. An amount of 20% of compound 25 (3.97 kg active or 17.3 L of step 1 solution in 2-methyl-2-butanol) was added, and the resulting reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 2 h. The remaining solution of compound 25 in 2-methyl-2-butanol was subsequently added to the reaction over a period of 5 h. The resulting mixture was heated until the reaction was deemed complete (typically 16 – 20 h). This reaction step was processed in three batches, and the isolation was done in one single batch. Thus, the combined three batches were filtered through CELITE® to remove insoluble materials. The filtrate was concentrated to a low volume (approximately 20 L). Acetonitrile (60 L) was added. The resulting mixture was heated to reflux for 2 – 4 h, then cooled to RT for granulation. The resulting slurry was filtered to give compound 26 as a crude product. The crude product was combined with ethyl acetate (80 L) and Silicycle thiol (5 kg). The resulting mixture was heated for 2 h, cooled to RT and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated to approx. 20 L, and the resulting slurry was granulated and filtered. The filter cake was rinsed with ethyl acetate (4 L) and dried in a vacuum oven to give compound 26 as a pure product (4.74 kg, 43.5% overall last two steps). 1H NMR (CDCI3) δ 8.25 – 8.23 (m, 1 H), 7.28 (1 H, dd, 2.76 and 9.79 Hz), 7.22 (1 H, dd, 5.52 and 8.53 Hz), 7.18 (1 H, d, J = 1 .76 Hz), 7.01 (1 H, dt, J = 2.50 and 8.03 Hz), 5.78 – 5.70 (m, 1 H), 4.76 (1 H, d, J = 14.3 Hz), 4.13 (s, 3H), 3.16 (s, 3H), 1 .78 (d, 3H, J = 6.02 Hz), 1 .45 (s, 18H); 13C NMR (CDCI3) δ 167.0, 162.9, 160.4, 148.7, 146.3, 143.0, 140.7, 139.9, 135.5, 129.9, 129.8, 126.1 , 123.8, 123.5, 1 19.7, 1 13.8, 1 13.5, 1 1 1 .6, 108.1 , 81 .1 , 70.1 , 45.5, 37.0, 29.7, 26.0, 20.7; LCMS (M+1)+ 607.3, 507.1 , 451 .2.

Step 3:

To a reactor under N2 was added compound 26 (4.74 kg, 7.82 mol) and ethyl acetate (54 L). Hydrochloric acid 37% (5.19 L, 63.2 mol) was charged slowly while keeping the internal temperature below 25°C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 24 – 48 h until the reaction was complete. Ethyl acetate (54L) and water (54 L) were added. The reaction mixture was then treated with triethylamine until pH 8 – 9 was reached. The aqueous layer was removed and then the organic layer was washed water (2 x 54 L). The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure to approx. 54 L to give compound 27 (unisolated).

Step 4:

Acetic acid (1 .0 kg, 16.6 mol) was added to the organic layer containing compound 27. The reaction mixture was concentrated and then held for at least 3 h with stirring at RT. The resulted slurry was filtered. The filter cake was washed with ethyl acetate (2 L) and dried under vacuum to give 3.20 kg (87.8% yield) of Example 4 acetic acid solvate (Form 3). The spectroscopic data of this material was identical to that of an authentic sample of the crystalline acetic acid Form 3 of (10R)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2, 10, 16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10, 15,16, 17-tetrahydro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?][2,5,1 1 ]-benzoxadiazacyclo-tetradecine-3-carbonitrile prepared according to Example 3.

Preparation of Synthetic Intermediates

7 6 5

Step 1 :

A solution of (-)-DIPCI ((-)-B-chlorodiisopinocampheylborane) (57.1 g, 178 mmol) in THF

(tetrahydrofuran) (100 ml) was cooled to -20 to -30 °C. A solution of compound 1 (31 .3 g, 1 19 mmol) in THF (100 ml) was then added dropwise, via addition funnel (30 min addition). The reaction was left to warm up to room temperature (RT). After 2 h, the reaction was cooled to -30 °C and another portion of (-)-DIPCI (38.0 g, 1 19 mmol) was added. After 30 min, the reaction was allowed to warm to RT and after 1 h, the solvents were removed in vacuo and the residue re-dissolved in MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether) (200 ml). A solution of diethanolamine (31 g, 296 mmol) in ethanol/THF (15 ml/30 ml) was added via addition funnel, to the reaction mixture under an ice bath. The formation of a white precipitate was observed. The suspension was heated at reflux for 2 hours then cooled to room temperature, filtered and the mother liquids concentrated in vacuo. The residue was suspended in heptane/EtOAc (7:3, 200 ml) and again

filtered. This procedure was repeated until no more solids could be observed after the liquids were concentrated. The final yellow oil was purified by column chromatography (eluent: cyclohexane/EtOAc 99:1 to 96:4). The resulting colorless oil was further purified by recrystallization from heptanes, to give alcohol compound 2 (25 g, 80% yield, 99% purity and 96% ee) as white crystals. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.73 (dd, 1 H), 7.32 (dd, 1 H), 6.74 (ddd, 1 H), 4.99 – 5.04 (m, 1 H), 2.01 (d, 1 H), 1 .44 (d, 3 H). LCMS-ES: No ionization, Purity 99%. Chiral GC (column CP-Chirasil-DexnCB): 96% ee; Rt (minor) 17.7 minutes and Rt (major) 19.4 minutes.

Step 2:

A solution of compound 2 (22 g, 83 mmol) in MTBE (350 mL) was cooled under an ice bath and triethylamine (23 mL, 166 mmol) followed by mesyl chloride (9.6 mL, 124 mmol) were added drop-wise. The reaction was then warmed to RT and stirred for 3 h. The reaction mixture was filtered and the solids washed with EtOAc. The mother liquids were concentrated in vacuo to give compound 3 (35 g, 80% yield) as a pale yellow oil. This material was taken into the following step without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 7.78 (dd, 1 H), 7.24 (dd, 1 H), 6.82 (ddd, 1 H), 2.92 (s, 3 H), 1 .64 (d, 3 H). LCMS-ES no ionization.

Step 3:

A suspension of Cs2C03 (65 g, 201 mmol) and compound 4 (13.3 g, 121 mmol) in 2-CH3-THF (2-methyitetrahydrofuran) (600 mL) and acetone (300 mL) was stirred at RT for 30 minutes then heated at 40 °C before drop-wise addition of a solution of compound 3 (34.4 g, 80 mmol) in 2-CH3-THF (300 mL) via addition funnel. The resulting mixture was left stirring at 75 -80 °C for 24 h. The reaction was then filtered through CELITE® with MTBE, the solvents removed in vacuo and the residue purified by column chromatography over silica gel which was eluted with cyclohexane/EtOAc (9:1 to 1 :1) to give compound 5 (14.3 g, 39 % yield, 90% ee) as a white solid. The solids were then re crystallized from heptane/EtOAc to give compound 5 (10.8 g, 37% yield, 95% ee). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) 5 7.38 (dd, 1 H), 7.62 (dd, 1 H), 7.10 (dd, 1 H), 6.75 (ddd, 1 H), 6.44 – 6.51 (m, 2 H), 5.34 – 5.39 (m, 1 H), 4.73 (br s, 2 H), 1 .61 (d, 3 H). LCMS-ES m/z 359 [M+H]+. HPLC (Chiralpak IC 4.6 x 250 mm): 95% ee; Rt (minor) 10.4 minutes; Rt (major) 14.7 minutes; eluent: Heptane 80%/IPA 20% with 0.2% DEA, 0.7 mL/min. Step 4:

Compound 5 (20 g, 57 mmol) was dissolved in methanol (300 mL), and sequentially treated with triethylamine (TEA) (15.4 mL, 1 13 mmol) and PdCI2(dppf) (1 ,1 -bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene]dichloropalladium(ll) ) (4.1 g, 5.7 mmol). This mixture was heated at 100 °C for 16 hours, under a 100 psi carbon monoxide atmosphere. LCMS indicated consumption of starting material. The reaction mixture was filtered through a pad of CELITE®, and the filtrate evaporated to a brown oil. The crude product was purified by flash

chromatography over silica gel which was eluted with 50% to 75% ethyl acetate in cyclohexane, affording the pure product 6 as a brick-red solid (13.0 g, 79% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 1 .65 (d, 3 H), 3.94 (s, 3 H), 4.75 (br s, 2 H), 6.32 (q, 1 H), 6.42 (dd, 1 H), 6.61 (dd, 1 H), 7.00 (ddd, 1 H), 7.28 (dd, 1 H), 7.60 (dd, 1 H), 8.03 (dd, 1 H). LCMS ES m/z 291 for [M+H]+.

Step 5:

Compound 6 (13.0 g, 45 mmol) was dissolved in acetonitrile (195 mL), and cooled to <10 °C in an ice water bath. NBS (N-bromosuccinimide) (7.9 g, 45 mmol) was added drop-wise to the cooled reaction mixture as a solution in acetonitrile (195 mL), monitoring the internal temperature to ensure it did not rise above 10 °C. After addition was complete, the mixture was stirred for 15 minutes. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) (1 :1 cyclohexane/ethyl acetate) showed consumption of starting material. The reaction mixture was evaporated, and the residue redissolved in ethyl acetate (400 mL), and washed with 2M aqueous NaOH (2 x 300 mL), and 10% aqueous sodium thiosulfate solution (300 mL). The organic extracts were dried over MgS04, and evaporated to a red oil (17.6 g). The crude product was purified over silica gel, which was eluted with 10% to 50% ethyl acetate in cyclohexane, which gave compound 7 (12.0 g, 73% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 1 .65 (d, 3 H), 3.96 (s, 3 H), 4.74 – 4.81 (br s, 2 H), 6.33 (q, 1 H), 6.75 (d, 1 H), 7.03 (ddd, 1 H), 7.25 (dd, 1 H), 7.66 (d, 1 H), 8.06 (dd, 1 H). LCMS ES m/z 369/371 [M+H]+. A Chiralpak AD-H (4.6 x 100 mm, 5 micron) column was eluted with 10% MeOH (0.1 % DEA) in C02 at 120 bar. A flow rate of 5.0 mL/min gave the minor isomer Rt 0.6 minutes and the major isomer Rt 0.8 minutes (99% ee). Optical rotation: [ ]d20 = -92.4 deg (c=1 .5, MeOH).

Preparation of (/?)-methyl 2-(1 -((N,N-di-Boc-2-amino-5-bromopyridin-3-yl)oxy)ethyl)-4-fluorobenzoic acid (9)

7

Step 1 :

To a solution of compound 7 (2000 g, 5.4 mol) in dry DCM (dichloromethane) (32000 mL) was added DIPEA (N.N-dsisopropyleibylamine) (2100 g, 16.28 mol) and DMAP (4-dimethylaminopyridine) (132 g, 1 .08 mol). Then Boc20 (di-tert-butyl-dicarbonate) (3552 g, 16.28 mol) was added to the mixture in portions. The reaction was stirred at RT for overnight. TLC (petroleum ether/EtOAc =5:1) show the reaction was complete, the mixture was washed with sat. NH4CI (15 L) two times, then dried over Na2S04and concentrated to give a crude product which was purified by column (silica gel, petroleum ether/EtOAc from 20:1 to 10:1) to give compound 8 (2300 g, 75%) as a white solid.

Step 2:

Compound 8 (50 g, 87.81 mmol, 100 mass%) was charged to a round bottom flask (RBF) containing tetrahydrofuran (12.25 mol/L) in Water (5 mL/g, 3060 mmol, 12.25 mol/L) and sodium hydroxide (1 mol/L) in Water (1 .5 equiv., 131 .7 mmol, 1 mol/L). The biphasic mixture was stirred at RT for 14 hours. 1 N HCI was added to adjust pH to < 2. THF was then removed by vacuum distillation. The product precipitated out was collected by filtration. The filter cake was rinsed with water, pulled dried then dried in vacuum oven to constant weight (48 h, 55°C, 25 mbar). 48.3g isolated, 99% yield. 1H NMR (CDCI3, 400MHz) δ 8.24 (1 H, dd, 1 H, J = 5.76 and 3.0 Hz), 8.16 (1 H, d, J = 2.0 Hz), 7.37 (1 H, dd, J = 2.5 and 9.8 Hz), 7.19 (1 H, d, J = 2 Hz), 7.14 – 7.06 (1 H, m), 6.50 (1 H, q, J = 6.3 Hz), 1 .67 (3H, d, J = 8.4 Hz), 1 .48 (18H, s). 13C NMR (CDCI3, 100 MHz), δ 170.1 , 169.2, 167.6, 165.1 , 150.6, 149.2, 148.6, 141 .4, 140.7, 135.2, 135.1 , 124.2, 122.2,122.1 , 1 19.9, 1 15.4, 1 15.1 , 1 13.4, 1 13.2, 100.0, 83.4, 73.3, 27.9, 23.9. LCMS (M+ +1) 557.2, 555.3, 457.1 , 455.1 , 401 , 0, 399.0.

Step 1 :

Ethyl 1 ,3-dimethylpyrazole-5-carboxylate (5.0 g, 30 mmol) was dissolved in 1 ,2-dichloroethane (200 mL), followed by addition of NBS (5.3 g, 30 mmol) and dibenzoyi peroxide (727 mg, 3.0 mmol), in small portions and stirred at 85 °C for 2 hours. The mixture was allowed to cool, diluted to 400 mL with dichloromethane, and washed with water (2 x 200 mL). The organic layer was dried over MgS04, and evaporated to give compound 10 (4.1 g, 42% yield). TLC (EtOAc/Cyclohexane; 1 :10; KMn04): Rf~0.3. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.47 (s, 2 H), 4.41 (q, 2 H), 4.15 (s, 3 H), 1 .42 (t, 3 H). LCMS ES m/z 324/326/328 [M+H]+.

Step 2:

Compound 10 (3.0 g, 9.2 mmol) was dissolved in methylamine solution (33% solution in ethanol, 70 mL), and stirred at RT for 16 hours. The mixture was evaporated to give compound 11 (1 .8 g, 71 % yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.39 (q, 2 H), 4.14 (s, 3 H), 4.05 (s, 2 H), 2.62 (d, 3 H), 1 .41 (t, 3 H). LCMS ES m/z 276/278 [M+H]+.

Step 3:

Compound 11 (1 .8 g, 6.5 mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane (20 mL), and the mixture cooled to 0 °C. A solution of di(fe/?-butyl) dicarbonate (1 .75 g, 8 mmol) in dichloromethane (17.5 mL) was added dropwise. The ice bath was removed and the mixture stirred for 18 hours at room temperature. The mixture was diluted to 100 mL with dichloromethane, and washed with water (2 x 50 mL). Organic extracts were dried over magnesium sulfate, and evaporated to give compound 12 (1 .8 g, 72% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.48 – 4.44 (m, 2 H), 4.41 (q, 2 H), 4.12 (s, 3 H), 2.82 – 2.79 (m, 3 H), 1 .47 (s, 9 H), 1 .41 (t, 3 H). LCMS ES m/z 376/378 [M+H]+ and 276/278 [M-BOC]+.

Step 4:

Compound 12 (4 g, 1 1 mmol) was dissolved in dioxane (43 mL). Sodium amide (1 g, 27 mmol) was added in one portion. The reaction mixture was stirred at 100 °C for 24 h. After this time, the solvent was removed under reduced pressure to give a white solid. The material was suspended in EtOAc (100 mL) and washed with 5% citric acid solution (100 mL). The organic phase was separated and washed with water (100 mL), dried over MgS04, filtered and the solvent removed in vacuo to give compound 13 as a yellow gum (3.1 g, 84% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-c/6) δ 4.27 (s, 2 H), 3.92 (s, 3 H), 2.70 (s, 3 H), 1 .40 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 348/350 [M+H]+ and 248/250 [M-BOC]+.

Step 5:

Compound 13 (3 g, 8.6 mmol) was dissolved in DMF (43 mL, 0.2 M). HOBt (1 .2 g, 8.6 mmol) was added, followed by ammonium chloride (0.9 g, 17.2 mmol). EDCI (2.5 g, 13 mmol) was then added, followed by TEA (2.4 mL, 17 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature. After 18h, the solvent was removed under reduced pressure to give a yellow oil

(8.0 g). The residue was dissolved in EtOAc (75ml_). The organic phase was washed with NaHC03 (sat. solution, 70 ml_) and then brine (100 ml_). The combined organic layers were dried over MgS04 and the solvent removed in vacuo to give compound 14 as a dark yellow oil (2.7 g, 91 % yield). This material was used directly in the next step without further purification. 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 6.74 (br s, 1 H), 5.95 (br s, 1 H), 4.49 (br s, 2 H), 4.16 (s, 3 H), 2.81 (br s, 3 H), 1 .47 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 347/349 [M+H]+ and 247/249 [M-BOC]+.

Step 6:

Compound 14 (2.7 g, 7.9 mmol) was dissolved in DCM (80 ml_, 0.1 M). TEA (3.3 ml_, 23.8 mmol) was then added and the reaction mixture cooled down to -5 °C. Trifluoroacetic anhydride (2.2 ml_, 15.8 mmol) in DCM (15 ml_) was added dropwise over 30 min. After addition, the reaction mixture was stirred at 0 °C for 1 h. After this time, the solvents were removed under reduced pressure to give a dark yellow oil. This residue was diluted in DCM (100 ml_), washed with 5% citric acid, sat. NaHC03and brine, dried over MgS04, filtered and the solvents removed in vacuo to give a dark yellow oil (2.6 g). The crude product was purified by reverse phase chromatography to give compound 15 as a yellow oil (2.3 g, 87% yield). 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCI3) δ 4.46 (br s, 2 H), 4.01 (s, 3 H), 2.83 (br s, 3 H), 1 .47 (s, 9 H). LCMS ES m/z 331 /329 [M+H]+ and 229/231 [M-BOC]+ as the base ion.

Preparation o/: 1 -methyl-3-((methylamino)methyl)-1 H-pyrazole-5-carbonitrile (21)

Step 1 :

To /V-benzylmethylamine (2.40 kg, 19.8 mol) and ethyldiisopropylamine (2.61 kg, 20.2 mol) in acetonitrile (6 L) at 16°C was added chloroacetone (1 .96 kg, 21 .2 mol) over 60 mins [exothermic, temp kept <30°C]. The mixture was stirred at 22°C for 18 hours then concentrated to an oily solid. The residue was triturated with MTBE (5 L), and then filtered through a pad of CELITE® (600 g, top) and silica (1 .5 kg, bottom), washing with MTBE (8 L). The filtrate was evaporated to afford compound 16 (3.35 kg, 18.9 mol, 95%) as a brown oil.

Step 2:

Compound 16 (1 .68 kg, 9.45 mol), Boc-anhydride (2.1 kg, 9.6 mol) and 20wt% Pd/C (50% H20, 56 g) in ethanol (5 L) were hydrogenated in an 1 1 -L autoclave at 50 psi [exotherm to 40°C with 20°C jacket]. The atmosphere became saturated with carbon dioxide during the reaction and so needed to be vented and de-gassed twice to ensure sufficient hydrogen uptake and completion of the reaction. The total reaction time was ~1 .5 hours. Two runs (for a total of 18.9 mol) were combined and filtered through a pad of SOLKA-FLOC®, washing with methanol. The filtrate was treated with DMAP (45 g, 0.37 mol) and stirred at room temperature overnight to destroy the excess Boc-anhydride. The mixture was then concentrated to dryness, dissolved in MTBE (6 L) and filtered through a pad of magnesol (1 kg), washing with MTBE (4 L). The filtrate was evaporated to afford compound 17 (3.68 kg, ~95 wt%, 18.7 mol, 99%) as an orange-brown oil.

Step 3:

To compound 17 (3.25 kg, -95 wt%, 16.5 mol) and diethyl oxalate (4.71 kg, 32.2 mol) in methanol (12 L) at 15°C was added 25 wt% sodium methoxide in methanol (6.94 kg, 32.1 mol) over 25 mins [temp kept <25°C]. The mixture was stirred at 20°C for 16 hours then cooled to -37°C and 37% hydrochloric acid (3.1 kg, 31 mol) was added over 5 mins [temp kept <-10°C]. The mixture was cooled to -40°C and methylhydrazine (1 .42 kg, 30.8 mol) was added over 7 mins [temp kept <-17°C]. The mixture was warmed to 5°C over 90 minutes, then re-cooled to 0°C and quenched by addition of 2.4M KHS04 (6.75 L, 16.2 mol) in one portion [exotherm to 27°C]. The mixture was diluted with water (25 L) and MTBE (15 L), and the layers separated. The organic layer was washed with brine (7 L) and the aqueous layers then sequentially re-extracted with MTBE (8 L). The combined organics were evaporated and azeotroped with toluene (2 L) to afford crude compound 18. Chromatography (20 kg silica, 10-40% EtOAc in hexane) afforded compound 18 (3.4 kg, ~95 wt%, 11 .4 mol, 69%) as an orange oil.

Step 4:

Ammonia (3 kg, 167 mol) was bubbled in to cooled methanol (24 L) [temp kept <18°C]. A solution of compound 18 (4.8 kg, ~95 wt%, 16.1 mol) in methanol (1 .5 L) was added over 30 minutes and the mixture stirred at 25°C for 68 hours and then at 30°C for 24 hours. Two runs (from a total of 9.68 kg of ~95 wt% Step 3) were combined and concentrated to ~13 L volume. Water (30 L) was slowly added over 80 minutes, keeping the temperature 30 to 40°C. The resulting slurry was cooled to 20°C, filtered, washed with water (12 L) and pulled dry on the filter overnight. The solids were triturated in MTBE (8 L) and hexane (8 L) at 45°C then re-cooled to 15°C, filtered, washed with hexane (4 L) and dried under vacuum to afford compound 19 (7.95 kg, 29.6 mol, 90%) as an off-white solid.

Step 5:

To compound 19 (7.0 kg, 26.1 mol) in DCM (30 L) at 0°C was added triethylamine (5.85 kg, 57.8 mol). The mixture was further cooled to -6°C then trifluoroacetic anhydride (5.85 kg, 27.8 mol) added over 90 minutes [temp kept 0 to 5°C]. TLC assay showed the reaction was incomplete. Additional triethylamine (4.1 kg, 40.5 mol) and trifluoroacetic acid (4.1 kg, 19.5 mol) were added over 2 hours until TLC showed complete reaction. The reaction mixture was quenched in to water (40 L) [temp to 23°C]. The layers were separated and the aqueous re-extracted with DCM (8 L). The organic layers were sequentially washed with brine (7 L), filtered through a pad of silica (3 kg) and eluted with DCM (10 L). The filtrate was evaporated and chromatographed (9 kg silica, eluent 10-30% EtOAc in hexane). Product fractions were evaporated and azeotroped with IPA to afford compound 20 (6.86 kg, -94 wt%, 25.8 mol, 99%) as an orange oil.

Step 6:

To compound 20 (6.86 kg, -94 wt%, 25.8 mol) in IPA (35 L) at 17°C was added 37% hydrochloric acid (6.4 L, 77.4 mol). The mixture was heated to 35°C overnight then concentrated to a moist solid and residual water azeotroped with additional IPA (8 L). The resulting moist solid was triturated with MTBE (12 L) at 45°C for 30 minutes then cooled to 20°C and filtered, washing with MTBE (5 L). The solids were dried under vacuum at 45°C to afford compound 21 (4.52 kg, 24.2 mol, 94%) as a white solid. 1H-NMR was consistent with desired product; mp 203-205°C; HPLC 99.3%. 1H NMR (CD3OD, 400 MHz) δ 7.12 (1 H, s), 4.28 (2H, s), 4.09 (3H, s), 2.77 (3H, s). 13C NMR (CD3OD, 100 MHz) δ 144.5, 177.8, 1 14.9, 110.9, 45.9, 39.0, 33.2. LCMS (M++1) 151 .1 , 138.0, 120.0.

PATENT

WO2013132376

PATENT

WO 2016089208

PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017021823&redirectedID=true

Preparation of the free base of lorlatinib as an amorphous solid is disclosed in

International Patent Publication No. WO 2013/132376 and in United States Patent No. 8,680,1 1 1 . Solvated forms of lorlatinib free base are disclosed in International Patent Publication No. WO 2014/207606.

Example 1

Lab Scale Preparation of Form 7 of (10 ?)-7-amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2/-/-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3- ?l[2,5,1 l lbenzoxadiazacyclotetra-decine- -carbonitrile (lorlatinib) Free Base

[AcOH solvate]

Form 7 of lorlatinib free base was prepared by de-solvation of the acetic acid solvate of lorlatinib (Form 3), prepared as described in International Patent Publication No. WO 2014/207606, via an intermediate methanol solvate hydrate form of lorlatinib (Form 2).

The acetic acid solvate of lorlatinib (Form 3) (5 g, 10.72 mmol) was slurried in methanol

(10 mL/g, 1235.9 mmol) at room temperature in an Easymax flask with magnetic stirring to which triethylamine (1 .2 equiv., 12.86 mmol) was added over 10 minutes. The resulting solution was heated to 60°C and water (12.5 mL/g, 3469.3 mmol) was added over 10 minutes, while maintaining a temperature of 60°C. Crystallization was initiated by scratching the inside of the glass vessel to form a rapidly precipitating suspension which was triturated to make the system mobile. The suspension was then cooled to 25°C over 1 hour, then cooled to 5°C and granulated for 4 hours. The white slurry was filtered and washed with 1 mL/g chilled

water/methanol (1 :1) then dried under vacuum at 50°C overnight to provide the methanol solvate hydrate Form 2 of lorlatinib.

Form 7 was then prepared via a re-slurry of the methanol solvate hydrate Form 2 of lorlatinib in heptane. 100 mg of lorlatinib Form 2 was weighed into a 4-dram vial and 3 mL of heptane was added. The mixture was slurried at room temperature on a roller mixer for 2 hours. Form conversion was confirmed by PXRD revealing complete form change to Form 7 of lorlatinib free base.

Paper

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm500261q

*E-mail: ted.w.johnson@pfizer.com. Phone: (858) 526-4683., *E-mail: paul.f.richardson@pfizer.com. Phone: (858) 526-4290.

Abstract Image

Although crizotinib demonstrates robust efficacy in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients, progression during treatment eventually develops. Resistant patient samples revealed a variety of point mutations in the kinase domain of ALK, including the L1196M gatekeeper mutation. In addition, some patients progress due to cancer metastasis in the brain. Using structure-based drug design, lipophilic efficiency, and physical-property-based optimization, highly potent macrocyclic ALK inhibitors were prepared with good absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME), low propensity for p-glycoprotein 1-mediated efflux, and good passive permeability. These structurally unusual macrocyclic inhibitors were potent against wild-type ALK and clinically reported ALK kinase domain mutations. Significant synthetic challenges were overcome, utilizing novel transformations to enable the use of these macrocycles in drug discovery paradigms. This work led to the discovery of 8k (PF-06463922), combining broad-spectrum potency, central nervous system ADME, and a high degree of kinase selectivity.

Discovery of (10R)-7-Amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]-benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile (PF-06463922), a Macrocyclic Inhibitor of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) and c-ros Oncogene 1 (ROS1) with Preclinical Brain Exposure and Broad-Spectrum Potency against ALK-Resistant Mutations

La Jolla Laboratories, Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, 10770 Science Center Drive, San Diego, California 92121, United States
J. Med. Chem., 2014, 57 (11), pp 4720–4744
DOI: 10.1021/jm500261q
(10R)-7-Amino-12-fluoro-2,10,16-trimethyl-15-oxo-10,15,16,17-tetrahydro-2H-8,4-(metheno)pyrazolo[4,3-h][2,5,11]benzoxadiazacyclotetradecine-3-carbonitrile (8k)
white solid:
TLC Rf = 0.40 (70% EtOAc in cyclohexane);
LC–MS (ESI), m/z 407.1 [M + H]+;
1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.83 (d, J = 2.0 Hz, 1 H), 7.30 (dd, J = 9.6, 2.4 Hz, 1 H), 7.21 (dd, J = 8.4, 5.6 Hz, 1 H), 6.99 (dt, J = 8.0, 2.8 Hz, 1 H), 6.86 (d, J = 1.2 Hz, 1 H), 5.75–5.71 (m, 1 H), 4.84 (s, 2 H), 4.45 (d, J = 14.4 Hz, 1 H), 4.35 (d, J = 14.4 Hz, 1 H), 4.07 (s, 3 H), 3.13 (s, 3 H), 1.79 (d, J = 6.4 Hz, 3 H).

References

1H NMR PREDICT

13C NMR PREDICT

Lorlatinib
Lorlatinib.svg
Clinical data
Routes of
administration
PO
Legal status
Legal status
  • experimental
Identifiers
CAS Number 1454846-35-5
ChemSpider 32813339
Chemical and physical data
Formula C22H20FN5O2
Molar mass 405.43 g·mol−1
3D model (Jmol) Interactive image

///////////////////Lorlatinib, PF-6463922,  anti-neoplastic,  Pfizer,  ROS1,  ALK, phase 2, UNII:OSP71S83EU, лорлатиниб لورلاتينيب 洛拉替尼 Orphan Drug, PF 6463922

Fc2ccc3C(=O)N(C)Cc1nn(C)c(C#N)c1c4cc(O[C@H](C)c3c2)c(N)nc4

PF-04136309


STR1

Image result for PF-04136309

PF 4136309

PF4136309; PF 4136309; PF-4136309; PF04136309; PF4136309; PF-04136309; INCB8761; INCB 8761; INCB-8761

(S)-N-(2-(3-((4-hydroxy-4-(5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)pyridin-2-yl)cyclohexyl)amino)pyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide

N-[2-[(3S)-3-[[trans-4-Hydroxy-4-[5-(2-pyrimidinyl)-2-pyridinyl]cyclohexyl]amino]-1-pyrrolidinyl]-2-oxoethyl]-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide

N-[2-((3S)-3-[4-hydroxy-4-(4-pyrimidin-2-ylphenyl)cyclohexyl]aminopyrrolidin-1-yl)-2- oxoethyl]-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide

1341224-83-6
MF: C29H31F3N6O3
MW: 568.24097

CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist

Image result for PFIZER

Pfizer Limited

Gary Burgess

Image result for INCYTE

PF-4136309, also known as INCB8761, is an orally available human chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist with potential immunomodulating and antineoplastic activities. Upon oral administration, CCR2 antagonist PF-04136309 specifically binds to CCR2 and prevents binding of the endothelium-derived chemokine ligand CLL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 or MCP1) to its receptor CCR2, which may result in inhibition of CCR2 activation and signal transduction. This may inhibit inflammatory processes as well as angiogenesis, tumor cell migration, and tumor cell proliferation. The G-protein coupled receptor CCR2 is expressed on the surface of monocytes and macrophages, stimulates the migration and infiltration of these cell types, and plays an important role in inflammation, angiogenesis, and tumor cell migration and proliferation.

  • Originator Pfizer
  • Class Analgesics
  • Mechanism of Action CCR2 receptor antagonists

Highest Development Phases

  • Phase I/II Pancreatic cancer
  • Discontinued Hepatic fibrosis; Pain

Most Recent Events

  • 01 Apr 2016 Phase-I/II clinical trials in Pancreatic cancer (Combination therapy, First-line therapy, Metastatic disease) in USA (PO) (NCT02732938)
  • 01 Dec 2015 Phase-I clinical trials in Pancreatic cancer (In volunteers) in Belgium (PO) (NCT02598206)
  • 09 Nov 2015 Pfizer plans a phase I trial in Healthy volunteers in Belgium and USA (NCT02598206)

STR1

(S)-N-[2-(3-{trans-4-Hydroxy-4-[5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)pyridin-2-
yl]cyclohexylamino}pyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl]-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide

MS (M+H)+:569.2.

1H NMR (400 MHz, CD3OD): δ 9.57 – 9.45 (m, 1H), 8.94-8.84 (m, 2H), 8.82 –
8.72 (m, 1H), 8.27 – 8.19 (m, 1H), 8.15 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.91 – 7.84 (m, 2H), 7.69
(dd, J = 7.8, 7.8 Hz, 1H), 7.46-7.39 (m, 1H), 4.29 – 4.12 (m, 2H), 3.87 (dd, J = 10.1, 6.4
Hz, 0.5H), 3.83 – 3.39 (m, 3.5H), 3.38 – 3.32 (m, 1H), 3.02 – 2.91 (m, 1H), 2.51 – 2.35
(m, 2H), 2.34 – 2.14 (m, 1H), 2.13 – 1.88 (m, 2.5H), 1.88 – 1.76 (m, 0.5H), 1.74 – 1.56
(m, 4H).

Anal. (C29H31F3N6O3): calcd C 61.24, H 5.50, N 14.79; found C 61.18, H 5.59,
N 14.87.

INTERMEDIATES

8-(5-Bromopyridin-2-yl)-1,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]decan-8-ol

str1

LC-MS (M+H)+: 316.1/314.1. 1H NMR (300 MHz,CDCl3): δ 8.60 (s, 1 H), 7.82 (d, 1 H), 7.38 (d, 1 H), 4.6 (s, 1 H), 4.0 (m, 4 H), 2.2 (m, 4
H), 1.7 (m, 4 H).

8-(5-Pyrimidin-2-ylpyridin-2-yl)-1,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]decan-8-ol

str1

LC-MS (M+H)+: 314.2.

 

4-Hydroxy-4-(5-pyrimidin-2-ylpyridin-2-yl)cyclohexanone

str1

MS
(M+H)+: 270.2.

tert-Butyl [(S)-1-({[3-(Trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino}acetyl)
pyrrolidin-3-yl]carbamate.

STR1

MS (M-Boc+H)+: 316.

 

(S)-N-{2-[3-Aminopyrrolidin-1-yl]-2-oxoethyl}-3-(trifluoromethyl)
benzamide hydrochloride

str1

MS
(M+H)+: 316.

 

 

PATENT

WO 2012114223

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2012114223A1?cl=en

Example 35

Step A

Figure imgf000062_0002

8-(4-lodo-phenyl)-1 ,4-dioxa-spiro[4.5]decan-8-ol. To a solution of 1 ,4-diiodobenzene (16.5 g, 50 mmol) in THF (350 mL) at -78°C was added n-BuLi (2.5 M, 24 mL) over 1 hour. After stirred additional 30 minutes, a solution of 1 ,4-dioxa-spiro[4.5]decan-8-one (7.8 g, 50 mmol) in THF (30 mL) was added in and the resulting mixture was stirred for 3 hours. To the mixture was added TMSCI (5.4 g, 50 mmol) and the resulting mixture was allowed to warm to rt and stirred at rt for 18 hours. The reaction mixture was neutralized to pH 6.0, and extracted with ethyl acetate (3X 50 mL). The organic extracts were combined, washed with saline solution (2X 50 mL), dried over sodium sulfate, concentrated in vacuo. The residue was chromatographed on silica gel, eluting with hexane/ethyl acetate (95/5 to 100/0). The appropriate fractions were combined to give 8-(4-lodo-phenyl)-1 ,4-dioxa-spiro[4.5]decan-8-ol (12 g, 66.6%) with LCMS: 361 .2 (M+H+, 100%) and {[8-(4-iodophenyl)-1 ,4- dioxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]oxy}(trimethyl)silane (6 g, 27%) with LCMS: 433.1 (M+H+, 100%). Step B

Figure imgf000063_0001

8-(4-pyrimidin-2-ylphenyl)-1 ,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]decan-8-ol. To a solution of 8-(4-iodo- phenyl)-1 ,4-dioxa-spiro[4.5]decan-8-ol (450.0 mg, 1.249 mmol) in THF (1.0 mL) at room temperature was added dropwise isopropylmagnesium chloride (2.0 M in THF, 1 .37 mL) and the reaction mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 mins. To another flask charged with nickel acetylacetonate (20 mg, 0.06 mmol) and 1 ,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)-propane (26 mg, 0.062 mmol) suspened in THF (3 mL) under N2 was added 2-bromopyrimidine (199 mg, 1.25 mmol). The resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature until it is clear. The second mixture was transferred into the degassed Grignard solution prepared in step 1. The resulting mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight. The reaction mixture was diluted with EtOAc, quenched with water, washed with brine, dried overNa2S04, and concentrated. The residue was columned on silica gel, eluted with hexane/EtOAc (2/1 ), to gave the desired compound (270 mg, 69%) as white solid. LCMS: 313.1 , (M+H, 100%). 1H

NMR (CDCIs): δ 8.86 (d, 2H), 8.46 (dd, 2H), 7.71 (dd, 2H), 7.24 (t, 1 H), 4.05 (d, 4H), 2.30 (dt, 2H), 2.18 (dt, 2H), 1 .90 (m, 2H), 1 .78 (m, 2H).

Step C

Figure imgf000063_0002

4-Hydroxy-4-(4-pyrimidin-2-ylphenyl)cyclohexanone. The title compound was prepared by treating the ketal of step B with HCI in water following the procedure described in step B of Example 2. MS (M+H)+ 269.

Step D

Figure imgf000063_0003

N-[2-((3S)-3-[4-hydroxy-4-(4-pyrimidin-2-ylphenyl)cyclohexyl]aminopyrrolidin-1-yl)-2- oxoethyl]-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide bis(trifluoroacetate) (salt). To a 1-neck round-bottom flask charged with methylene chloride (1 ml.) was added 4-hydroxy-4-(4-pyrimidin-2- ylphenyl)cyclohexanone (50.0 mg, 0.186 mmol), N-2-[(3S)-3-aminopyrrolidin-1-yl]-2- oxoethyl-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide hydrochloride (65.5 mg, 0.186 mmol), and triethylamine (85.7 uL, 0.615 mmol). The resulting mixture was stirred at 25°C for 30 minutes, and to it was added sodium triacetoxyborohydride (62.4 mg, 0.28 mmol) in portion. The reaction mixture was stirring at rt overnight. The reaction was concentrated, and the residue was chromatographed on Si02, eluted with acetone/methanol (100% to 90%/10%) to give two fractions, which were further purified on prep-LCMS separately to afford F1 (24.2 mg ) and F2 (25.9 mg) as white powder in total 34% of the yield. LCMS: 568.2 (M+H, 100%)

Paper

Discovery of INCB8761/PF-4136309, a Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable CCR2 Antagonist

Incyte Corporation, Experimental Station E336, Wilmington, Delaware 19880, United States
Pfizer Global Research and Development, Chesterfield Parkway West, St. Louis, Missouri 63017, United States
ACS Med. Chem. Lett., 2011, 2 (12), pp 913–918
Tel: 302-498-6706. Fax: 302-425-2750. E-mail: cxue@incyte.com.
Abstract Image

We report the discovery of a new (S)-3-aminopyrrolidine series of CCR2 antagonists. Structure–activity relationship studies on this new series led to the identification of 17 (INCB8761/PF-4136309) that exhibited potent CCR2 antagonistic activity, high selectivity, weak hERG activity, and an excellent in vitro and in vivo ADMET profile. INCB8761/PF-4136309 has entered human clinical trials.

HPLC

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10337-015-2860-8

A precise and sensitive LC method was developed and further validated for the determination of enantiomeric purity of (S)-N-[2-(3-{trans-4-hydroxy-4-[5-(pyrimidin-2-yl)pyridin-2-yl] cyclohexylamino} pyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-oxoethyl]-3-(trifluoromethyl) benzamide (PF-04136309). Baseline separation with a resolution higher than 1.8 was accomplished within 40 min using a CHIRALPAK AD (250 × 4.6 mm; particle size 5 μm) column, with n-hexane:2-propanol (70:30v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1 mL min−1. The eluted analytes were subsequently detected with a UV detector at 260 nm. The effects of mobile phase components and temperature on enantiomeric selectivity as well as the resolution of enantiomers were thoroughly investigated. The calibration curves were plotted within a concentration range between 0.01 and 1 mg mL−1 (n = 9), and recoveries between 98.17 and 101.28 % were obtained, with relative standard deviation (RSD) lower than 1.44 %. The LOD and LOQ for PF-04136309 were 3.59 and 11.54 μg mL−1 and for its enantiomer were 3.39 and 11.28 μg mL−1, respectively. The developed method was demonstrated to be accurate, robust and sensitive for the determination of enantiomeric purity of PF-04136309, especially for the analysis of bulk samples.

REFERENCES

1: Xue CB, Wang A, Han Q, Zhang Y, Cao G, Feng H, Huang T, Zheng C, Xia M, Zhang K, Kong L, Glenn J, Anand R, Meloni D, Robinson DJ, Shao L, Storace L, Li M, Hughes RO, Devraj R, Morton PA, Rogier DJ, Covington M, Scherle P, Diamond S, Emm T, Yeleswaram S, Contel N, Vaddi K, Newton R, Hollis G, Metcalf B. Discovery of INCB8761/PF-4136309, a Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable CCR2 Antagonist. ACS Med Chem Lett. 2011 Oct 5;2(12):913-8. doi: 10.1021/ml200199c. eCollection 2011 Dec 8. PubMed PMID: 24900280; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4018168.

http://www.pfizer.com/files/news/asco/ASCO2016_PipelineFactSheet_CCR2.pdf

//////1341224-83-6, PF 4136309, PF4136309,  PF 4136309, PF-4136309, PF04136309, PF4136309, PF-04136309, INCB8761, INCB 8761, INCB-8761, PFIZER, PHASE 2

O=C(NCC(N1C[C@@H](NC2CCC(C3=NC=C(C4=NC=CC=N4)C=C3)(O)CC2)CC1)=O)C5=CC=CC(C(F)(F)F)=C5

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