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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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Over 700 biosimilars now in development worldwide: report


More than 700 follow-on biologic therapies are currently in development, and they are expected to account for around a quarter of the $100 billion-worth of sales stemming from off-patent biologic drugs by the end of this decade, according to new research.

read at

http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/14-09-30/Over_700_biosimilars_now_in_development_worldwide_report.aspx

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Amgen files ‘breakthrough’ leukaemia drug Blinatumomab (AMG103) in the US


Blinatumomab

Biotechnology giant Amgen has filed its investigational cancer immunotherapy blinatumomab in the US for the treatment of certain forms of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL).

Specifically, the Biologic License Application seeks approval to market the drug for patients with Philadelphia-negative (Ph-) relapsed/refractory B-precursor forms of the aggressive blood/bone marrow cancer.

Blinatumomab (AMG103) is a drug that has anti-cancer properties. It belongs to a new class of constructed monoclonal antibodies, bi-specific T-cell engagers (BiTEs), that exert action selectively and direct the human immune system to act against tumor cells. Blinatumomab specifically targets the CD19 antigen present on B cells.[1]

The drug was developed by a German-American company Micromet, Inc. in cooperation with Lonza; Micromet was later purchases byAmgen, which has furthered the drug’s clinical trials.

Structure and mechanism of action

Blinatumomab linking a T cell to a malignant B cell.

Blinatumomab enables a patient’s T cells to recognize malignant B cells. A molecule of blinatumomab combines two binding sites: a CD3 site for T cells and a CD19 site for the target B cells. CD3 is part of the T cell receptor. The drug works by linking these two cell types and activating the T cell to exert cytotoxic activity on the target cell.[2]

Therapeutic use

Clinical trials

In a phase 1 clinical study with blinatumomab, patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma showed tumor regression, and in some cases completeremission.[3] There are ongoing phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials of blinatumomab in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL),[4]lung or gastrointestinal cancers.[citation needed] One phase II trial for ALL reported good results in 2010 and another is starting.[5]

Blinatumomab
Monoclonal antibody
Type Bi-specific T-cell engager
Source Mouse
Target CD19, CD3
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number 853426-35-4 
ATC code None
UNII 4FR53SIF3A Yes
Chemical data
Formula C2367H3577N649O772S19 
Mol. mass 54.1 kDa

References

  1.  Statement on a Nonproprietary Name adopted by the USAN Council: Blinatumomab
  2.  Mølhøj, M; Crommer, S; Brischwein, K; Rau, D; Sriskandarajah, M; Hoffmann, P; Kufer, P; Hofmeister, R; Baeuerle, PA (March 2007). “CD19-/CD3-bispecific antibody of the BiTE class is far superior to tandem diabody with respect to redirected tumor cell lysis”. Mol Immunol 44 (8): 1935–43. doi:10.1016/j.molimm.2006.09.032. PMID 17083975.
  3.  Bargou, R; et al. (2008). “Tumor regression in cancer patients by very low doses of a T cell-engaging antibody”. Science 321 (5891): 974–977. doi:10.1126/science.1158545.PMID 18703743.
  4.  ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00560794 Phase II Study of the BiTE Blinatumomab (MT103) in Patients With Minimal Residual Disease of B-precursor Acute ALL
  5.  “Micromet initiates MT103 phase 2 trial in adult ALL patients”. 20 Sep 2010.

External links

http://makeinindia.com/ MAKE IN INDIA
http://makeinindia.com/
http://makeinindia.com/sector/pharmaceuticals/

Ibritumomab tiuxetan


 

Ibritumomab tiuxetan, sold under the trade name Zevalin, is a monoclonal antibody radioimmunotherapy treatment for relapsed or refractory, low grade or transformed B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a lymphoproliferative disorder. The drug uses the monoclonal mouse IgG1 antibody ibritumomab (pronounced as <ih bri TYOO mo mab>)[1] in conjunction with the chelator tiuxetan, to which a radioactive isotope (either yttrium-90 or indium-111) is added. Tiuxetan is a modified version of DTPA whose carbon backbone contains an isothiocyanatobenzyl and a methyl group.[2][3]

 

Mechanism of action

The antibody binds to the CD20 antigen found on the surface of normal and malignant B cells (but not B cell precursors), allowing radiation from the attached isotope (mostly beta emission) to kill it and some nearby cells. In addition, the antibody itself may trigger cell death via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), and apoptosis. Together, these actions eliminate B cells from the body, allowing a new population of healthy B cells to develop from lymphoid stem cells.

Zevalin (Ibritumomab tiuxetan) is a radio-labeled antibody.  The antibody seeks and binds to cells that have a receptor called CD20 — present on both normal and malignant mature b-cells. 

Once bound to the target cells, Zevalin delivers radiation, which enhances the killing effect of the antibody.  

Because immature b-cells do not have the CD20 receptor, normal b-cells will recover in about nine months after treatment.

Rituxan (the naked antibody) is administered prior to Zevalin with the goal of clearing the majority of normal b-cells so that the therapeutic dose (the radio-labeled antibody) is more focused on tumor cells.

 

 

Preparation

Zevalin is supplied as a single dosage kit supplied by IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corp. It consists of Ibritumomab covalently conjugated to the metal chelator tiuxetan, which forms a stable complex with indium-111 for imaging and yttrium-90 for therapy.

The kit is supplied with four vials – a vial containing 3.2 mg of conjugated antibody in 2 ml saline, a vial containing 2 ml 50mM sodium acetate, a vial containing phosphate buffer, and a fourth empty reaction vial. Prior to labeling, a volume of sodium acetate buffer equivalent to 1.2 times the volume of the tracer solution is transferred to the reaction vial. Then 5.5 mCi (203.5 MBq) indium-111 or 40mCi (1.48 GBq) yttrium-90 is added to the reaction vial and mixed thoroughly without shaking. Next, 1.3 ml of conjugated antibody is added. The mixture is incubated for exactly 30min for indium-111 and for 5 min with yttrium-90 labeling, followed by the addition of enough phosphate buffer to make the final volume 10 ml. The labeling yield is determined by ITLC-SG with 0.9% saline as the mobile phase. Labeling efficiency should be greater than 95%.[4]

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2006/cs/b514859f/unauth#!divAbstract

A cartoon depiction of the radiolabelled monoclonal antibody 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan 18.

 

Administration

In order to qualify for ibritumomab, a patient needs to have bone marrow involvement of < 25% and > 15% bone marrow cellularity. Since ibritumomab is known to cause cytopenia, platelet and neutrophil counts are also taken pretreatment. Refractory/relapsed patients should have platelet counts of 100,000 per cubic millimetre (100,000/cmm) or greater; consolidation patients should have counts of 150,000/cmm or greater. Since a murine antibody is used, the patient might also be tested for human anti mouse antibodies (HAMA). Having bulky disease does not disqualify a patient.

The ibritumomab regimen takes 7–9 days. An imaging dose of the drug is no longer required in the U.S. Rituxan 250 mg/sq.m is given day 1, then on day 7-9 the Rituxan dose is repeated and Zevalin given within four hours. The dose of Zevalin 0.4 mCi/kg (= 14.8MBq/kg) if platelet counts are above 150,000/cmm; 0.3 mCi/kg (= 11.1MBq/kg) if 100,000-150,000/cmm. The Zevalin dose never exceeds 32 mCi (= 1184MBq).[5]

Ibritumomab tiuxetan is administered by intravenous infusion which usually lasts around 10 minutes. Only acrylic shielding is needed, not lead. A trained nuclear medicine technologist performs the infusion and safely disposes of waste.

Efficacy

Treatment with ibritumomab showed higher response rates in clinical trials compared to treatment with only rituximab (similar to ibritumomab, but without the attached radioisotope), and showed very promising results for patients who no longer respond to rituximab.

In patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or transformed B-cell NHL, where no prior anti-CD20 therapy was allowed, the ORR was 83% / 55% and CR was 38% / 18%, comparing ibritumomab to rituximab. [6]

Recently, extended follow-up data for the ZEVALIN ([90Y]-ibritumomab tiuxetan) First-line Indolent (FIT) study presented at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting demonstrated the continued improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) following ibritumomab consolidation therapy for patients with follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma who achieved a response to first-line therapy over chemotherapy alone. Additionally, ibritumomab consolidation did not adversely affect the use of various effective second-line treatments including stem cell transplants in patients who relapsed.[7]

In a Phase II study on patients with relapsed and refractory mantle cell lymphoma, the OR was 42% and CR was 26%.[8]

A study demonstrated that rituximab followed by single agent ibritumomab in a front-line setting for patients with MALT lymphoma and low-grade follicular lymphoma that primarily involved the conjunctiva or orbit, produced a complete response rate of 83 percent.[9]

http://rd.springer.com/article/10.2165%2F00024669-200201050-00004#page-1

History

Developed by the IDEC Pharmaceuticals, which is now part of Biogen Idec, ibritumomab tiuxetan was the first radioimmunotherapy drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002 to treat cancer. It was approved for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory, low‑grade or follicular B‑cell non‑Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), including patients with rituximab refractory follicular NHL.

In December 2007, Cell Therapeutics Inc acquired the U.S. rights to sell, market, and distribute this radioimmunotherapy antibody from Biogen for approximately US$30 million, or the equivalent of about two years’ net sales revenue in the U.S. for the drug.[10] Outside of the U.S., Bayer Schering Pharma continues to have the rights to the drug.

In March 2009, Spectrum Pharmaceuticals acquired 100% control of RIT Oncology, LLC, to commercialize Zevalin in the US. Now Spectrum Pharmaceuticals is responsible for all activities relating to Zevalin in the US.

In September 2009, ibritumomab received approval from the FDA for an expanded label for the treatment of patients with previously untreated follicular non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL), who achieve a partial or complete response to first-line chemotherapy.

Costs

Ibritumomab which is not available in a generic form because it is still under patent protection, is currently the most expensive drug available given in a single dose, costing over US$ 37,000 (€ 30,000) for the average dose. However, ibritumomab is essentially an entire course of lymphoma therapy which is delivered in 7–9 days, with one visit for pre-dosing Rituxan, and one visit a week later for the actual Zevalin therapeutic dose preceded by Rituxan. Compared to other monoclonal antibody treatments (many of which are well over US$ 40,000 for a course of therapy), this drug is priced in the middle for many of these therapies.

Ibritumomab tiuxetan ?
Ibritumomab tiuxetan structure.svg
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Mouse
Target CD20
Clinical data
Trade names Zevalin
AHFS/Drugs.com monograph
Licence data US FDA:link
Legal status
Routes intravenous
Identifiers
CAS number 174722-31-7 Yes
ATC code V10XX02 (90Y)
DrugBank DB00078

External links

http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/01/slides/3782s2_02_idec/sld015.htm

References

  1. Ibritumomab: Pronunciation
  2. Milenic, Diane E.; Brady, Erik D.; Brechbiel, Martin W. (June 2004). “Antibody-targeted radiation cancer therapy”. Nat Rev Drug Discov 3 (6): 488–499. doi:10.1038/nrd1413. ISSN 1474-1776. PMID 15173838.
  3.  WHO Drug Information
  4.  http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2002/ibriide021902LB.pdf
  5.  Ibritumomab: Indications
  6.  Ibritumomab: Efficacy
  7.  ZEVALIN Consolidation in First-Line Therapy in Patients with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Resulted in a Progression-Free Survival of Greater Than 67 Months
  8.  Zevalin and mantle cell
  9.  ZEVALIN(R) Produced 83 Percent Complete Response Rate in Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) Orbital Lymphoma Study
  10.  [1]

// // // // //

September 23, 2014

// CASI Signs China Licensing Deal With Spectrum For 3 Cancer Drugs…http://www.outsourcedpharma.com/doc/casi-signs-china-licensing-deal-with-spectrum-for-cancer-drugs-0001

// CASI Signs China Licensing Deal With Spectrum For 3 Cancer Drugs// // // // //

CASI Pharmaceuticals and Spectrum Pharmaceuticals (SPPI) announced the signing of a license agreement that gives CASI exclusive rights to develop three cancer drugs from Spectrum and market them in China, including Macau, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

The agreement concerns the two approved cancer drugs Zevalin (ibritumomab tiuxetan) Injection non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and Marqibo (vinCRIStine sulfate LIPOSOME injection) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as well as the investigational Phase 3 drug Captisol-Enabled Melphalan (CE melphalan) being studied as a conditioning treatment before autologous stem cell transplant in patients with multiple myeloma. Spectrum recently reported that Melphalan met its primary endpoint in its pivotal safety and efficacy trial. In view of the results, Spectrum said it intends to file a New Drug Application (NDA) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the drug in the second half of 2014.

// // // // //

Sun Pharma, Merck & Co Inc ink pact for Tildrakizumab


 

Sep 17, 2014,

Under terms of the agreement, Sun Pharma will acquire worldwide rights to tildrakizumab for use in all human indications from Merck in exchange for an upfront payment of USD 80 million.

Pharma major Sun Pharmaceutical Industries today entered into a licensing agreement with  Merck & Co Inc for investigational therapeutic antibody candidate, tildrakizumab to be used for treatment of plaque psoriasis. Under terms of the agreement,  Sun Pharma   will acquire worldwide rights to tildrakizumab for use in all human indications from Merck in exchange for an upfront payment of USD 80 million, the companies said in a joint statement. Tildrakizumab is being evaluated in Phase III registration trials for the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis, a skin ailment. “Merck will continue all clinical development and regulatory activities, which will be funded by Sun Pharma. Upon product approval, Sun Pharma will be responsible for regulatory activities, including subsequent submissions, pharmacovigilance, post approval studies, manufacturing and commercialisation of the approved product,” it added.

Read more at: http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/business/sun-pharma-merckco-inc-ink-pact-for-tildrakizumab_1181848.html?utm_source=ref_article

 

Sun Pharma managing director Dilip Shanghvi.

 

 

Tildrakizumab 
Monoclonal antibody
Source Humanized (from mouse)
Target IL23
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number 1326244-10-3
ATC code None
Chemical data
Formula C6426H9918N1698O2000S46 
Mol. mass 144.4 kDa

Tildrakizumab is a monoclonal antibody designed for the treatment of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders.[1]

Tildrakizumab was designed to block interleukin-23, a cytokine that plays an important role in managing the immune system andautoimmune disease. Originally developed by Schering-Plough, this drug is now part of Merck‘s clinical program, following that company’s acquisition of Schering-Plough.

As of March 2014, the drug was in phase III clinical trials for plaque psoriasis. The two trials will enroll a total of nearly 2000 patients, and preliminary results are expected in June, 2015. [2][3]

References

  1.  Statement On A Nonproprietary Name Adopted By The USAN Council – Tildrakizumab, American Medical Association.
  2.  http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01729754?term=SCH-900222&phase=2&fund=2&rank=1
  3.  http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01722331?term=SCH-900222&phase=2&fund=2&rank=2

Teva’s Asthma Drug ‘Significantly’ Improves Lung Function In Phase 3 Trials



//

FDA approves Keytruda for advanced melanoma, First PD-1 blocking drug to receive agency approval


September 4, 2014

FDA Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Keytruda (pembrolizumab) for treatment of patients with advanced or unresectable melanoma who are no longer responding to other drugs.

Melanoma, which accounts for approximately 5 percent of all new cancers in the United States, occurs when cancer cells form in skin cells that make the pigment responsible for color in the skin. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 76,100 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma and 9,710 will die from the disease this year.

Keytruda is the first approved drug that blocks a cellular pathway known as PD-1, which restricts the body’s immune system from attacking melanoma cells. Keytruda is intended for use following treatment with ipilimumab, a type of immunotherapy. For melanoma patients whose tumors express a gene mutation called BRAF V600, Keytruda is intended for use after treatment with ipilimumab and a BRAF inhibitor, a therapy that blocks activity of BRAF gene mutations.

“Keytruda is the sixth new melanoma treatment approved since 2011, a result of promising advances in melanoma research,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Many of these treatments have different mechanisms of action and bring new options to patients with melanoma.”

The five prior FDA approvals for melanoma include: ipilimumab (2011), peginterferon alfa-2b (2011), vemurafenib (2011), dabrafenib (2013), and trametinib (2013).

The FDA granted Keytruda breakthrough therapy designation because the sponsor demonstrated through preliminary clinical evidence that the drug may offer a substantial improvement over available therapies. It also received priority review and orphan product designation. Priority review is granted to drugs that have the potential, at the time the application was submitted, to be a significant improvement in safety or effectiveness in the treatment of a serious condition. Orphan product designation is given to drugs intended to treat rare diseases.

The FDA action was taken under the agency’s accelerated approval program, which allows approval of a drug to treat a serious or life-threatening disease based on clinical data showing the drug has an effect on a surrogate endpoint reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit to patients. This program provides earlier patient access to promising new drugs while the company conducts confirmatory clinical trials. An improvement in survival or disease-related symptoms has not yet been established.

Keytruda’s efficacy was established in 173 clinical trial participants with advanced melanoma whose disease progressed after prior treatment. All participants were treated with Keytruda, either at the recommended dose of 2 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) or at a higher dose of 10 mg/kg. In the half of the participants who received Keytruda at the recommended dose of 2 mg/kg, approximately 24 percent had their tumors shrink. This effect lasted at least 1.4 to 8.5 months and continued beyond this period in most patients. A similar percentage of patients had their tumor shrink at the 10 mg/kg dose.

Keytruda’s safety was established in the trial population of 411 participants with advanced melanoma. The most common side effects of Keytruda were fatigue, cough, nausea, itchy skin (pruritus), rash, decreased appetite, constipation, joint pain (arthralgia) and diarrhea. Keytruda also has the potential for severe immune-mediated side effects. In the 411 participants with advanced melanoma, severe immune-mediated side effects involving healthy organs, including the lung, colon, hormone-producing glands and liver, occurred uncommonly.

Keytruda is marketed by Merck & Co., based in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey.

 

 

 

Pembrolizumab, LambrolizumabMK-3475

STRUCTURAL FORMULA
Heavy chain
QVQLVQSGVE VKKPGASVKV SCKASGYTFT NYYMYWVRQA PGQGLEWMGG 50
INPSNGGTNF NEKFKNRVTL TTDSSTTTAY MELKSLQFDD TAVYYCARRD 100
YRFDMGFDYW GQGTTVTVSS ASTKGPSVFP LAPCSRSTSE STAALGCLVK 150
DYFPEPVTVS WNSGALTSGV HTFPAVLQSS GLYSLSSVVT VPSSSLGTKT 200
YTCNVDHKPS NTKVDKRVES KYGPPCPPCP APEFLGGPSV FLFPPKPKDT 250
LMISRTPEVT CVVVDVSQED PEVQFNWYVD GVEVHNAKTK PREEQFNSTY 300
RVVSVLTVLH QDWLNGKEYK CKVSNKGLPS SIEKTISKAK GQPREPQVYT 350
LPPSQEEMTK NQVSLTCLVK GFYPSDIAVE WESNGQPENN YKTTPPVLDS 400
DGSFFLYSRL TVDKSRWQEG NVFSCSVMHE ALHNHYTQKS LSLSLGK 447
Light chain
EIVLTQSPAT LSLSPGERAT LSCRASKGVS TSGYSYLHWY QQKPGQAPRL 50′
LIYLASYLES GVPARFSGSG SGTDFTLTIS SLEPEDFAVY YCQHSRDLPL 100′
TFGGGTKVEI KRTVAAPSVF IFPPSDEQLK SGTASVVCLL NNFYPREAKV 150′
QWKVDNALQS GNSQESVTEQ DSKDSTYSLS STLTLSKADY EKHKVYACEV 200′
THQGLSSPVT KSFNRGEC 218′
Disulfide bridges
22-96 22”-96” 23′-92′ 23”’-92”’ 134-218′ 134”-218”’ 138′-198′ 138”’-198”’
147-203 147”-203” 226-226” 229-229” 261-321 261”-321” 367-425 367”-425”
Glycosylation sites (N)
Asn-297 Asn-297”
lambrolizumab, or MK-3475

1374853-91-4

  C6504H10004N1716O2036S46 (peptide)
MOL. MASS 146.3 kDa (peptide)

Pembrolizumab, Lambrolizumab (also known as MK-3475) is a drug in development by Merck that targets the PD-1 receptor. The drug is intended for use in treating metastatic melanoma.

http://www.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/usan/lambrolizumab.pdf  structureof lambrolizumab, or MK-3475

https://download.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/usan/x-pub/pembrolizumab.pdf  

Statement on a Nonproprietary Name Adopted by the USAN Council. November 27, 2013.

see above link for change in name

may 2, 2013,

An experimental drug from Merck that unleashes the body’s immune system significantly shrank tumors in 38 percent of patients with advanced melanoma, putting the company squarely in the race to bring to market one of what many experts view as the most promising class of drugs in years.

The drugs are attracting attention here at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, even though they are still in the early stage of testing. Data from drugs developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and by Roche had already been released.

The drugs work by disabling a brake that prevents the immune system from attacking cancer cells. The brake is a protein on immune system cells called programmed death 1 receptor, or PD-1.

Merck’s study, which was presented here Sunday and also published in the New England Journal of Medicine, involved 135 patients. While tumors shrank in 38 percent of the patients over all, the rate was 52 percent for patients who got the highest dose of the drug, which is called lambrolizumab, or MK-3475.

But that is what is disclosed tonight, as to pembrolizumab, or MK-3475. Wow. With over $44 billion in 2013 worldwide revenue, that disclosure implies (to seasoned SEC lawyers) that spending on this one drug (or, biologic, to be more technical about it — but remember 40 years ago, Merck had no protein chain biologics research & development programs in its pipe — only chemical drug compounds). . . is material, to that number. Normally that would, in turn, mean that the spending is approaching 5 per cent of revenue. So — Merck may be spending $2.2 billion over the next 12 rolling months, on MK-3475. That’s one BIGhairy science bet, given that Whitehouse Station likely already had over $2 billion invested in the program, at year end 2013.

About Pembrolizumab
Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) is an investigational selective, humanized monoclonal anti-PD-1 antibody designed to block the interaction of PD-1 on T-cells with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, to reactivate anti-tumor immunity. Pembrolizumab exerts dual ligand blockade of PD-1 pathway.
Today, pembrolizumab is being evaluated across more than 30 types of cancers, as monotherapy and in combination. It is anticipated that by the end of 2014, the pembrolizumab development program will grow to more than 24 clinical trials across 30 different tumor types, enrolling an estimated 6,000 patients at nearly 300 clinical trial sites worldwide, including new Phase 3 studies in head and neck and other cancers. For information about Merck’s oncology clinical studies, please click here.
The Biologics License Application (BLA) for pembrolizumab is under priority review with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the proposed indication for the treatment of patients with advanced melanoma previously-treated with ipilimumab; the PDUFA date is October 28, 2014. Pembrolizumab has been granted FDA’s Breakthrough Therapy designation for advanced melanoma. If approved by the FDA, pembrolizumab has the potential to be the first PD-1 immune checkpoint modulator approved in this class. The company plans to file a Marketing Authorization Application in Europe for pembrolizumab for advanced melanoma in 2014.
About Head and Neck Cancer
Head and neck cancers are a related group of cancers that involve the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx. Most head and neck cancers are squamous cell carcinomas that begin in the flat, squamous cells that make up the thin surface layer (epithelium) of the head and neck (called the). The leading risk factors for head and neck cancer include tobacco and alcohol use. Infection with certain types of HPV, also called human papillomaviruses, is a risk factor for some types of head and neck cancer, specifically cancer of the oropharynx, which is the middle part of the throat including the soft palate, the base of the tongue, and the tonsils. Each year there are approximately 400,000 cases of cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx, with 160,000 cancers of the larynx, resulting in approximately 300,000 deaths.


About Merck Oncology: A Focus on Immuno-Oncology
At Merck Oncology, our goal is to translate breakthrough science into biomedical innovations to help people with cancer worldwide. Harnessing immune mechanisms to fight cancer is the priority focus of our oncology research and development program. The Company is advancing a pipeline of immunotherapy candidates and combination regimens. Cancer is one of the world’s most urgent unmet medical needs. Helping to empower people to fight cancer is our passion. For information about Merck’s commitment to Oncology visit the Oncology Information Center at http://www.mercknewsroom.com/oncology-infocenter.


About Merck
Today’s Merck is a global healthcare leader working to help the world be well. Merck is known as MSD outside the United States and Canada. Through our prescription medicines, vaccines, biologic therapies, and consumer care and animal health products, we work with customers and operate in more than 140 countries to deliver innovative health solutions. We also demonstrate our commitment to increasing access to healthcare through far-reaching policies, programs and partnerships. For more information, visit http://www.merck.com and connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

 

Hamid, O; Robert, C; Daud, A; Hodi, F. S.; Hwu, W. J.; Kefford, R; Wolchok, J. D.; Hersey, P; Joseph, R. W.; Weber, J. S.; Dronca, R; Gangadhar, T. C.; Patnaik, A; Zarour, H; Joshua, A. M.; Gergich, K; Elassaiss-Schaap, J; Algazi, A; Mateus, C; Boasberg, P; Tumeh, P. C.; Chmielowski, B; Ebbinghaus, S. W.; Li, X. N.; Kang, S. P.; Ribas, A (2013). “Safety and tumor responses with lambrolizumab (anti-PD-1) in melanoma”. New England Journal of Medicine 369 (2): 134–44. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1305133PMID 23724846

key words
FDA,  approved,  Keytruda,  advanced melanoma, PD-1 blocking drug, pembrolizumab, LambrolizumabMK-3475, Monoclonal antibody

 

 

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Celltrion files Remsima in the United States


Celltrion files Remsima in the United States:

Celltrion announced that the company, on August 8, 2014, completed the filing procedure to obtain US FDA approval for its infliximab biosimilar. This marks the first 351(k) biosimilar mAb application to be filed in the U.S.A. and the second application for a biosimilar to be filed through the US BPCIA.

READ MORE

http://www.biosimilarnews.com/celltrion-files-remsima-in-the-us?utm_source=Biosimilar%20News%20%7C%20Newsletter&utm_campaign=0b76af10ab-15_08_2014_Biosimilar_News&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_9887459b7e-0b76af10ab-335885197

REFLECTION PAPER ON NANOTECHNOLOGY-BASED MEDICINAL PRODUCTS FOR HUMAN USE


Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology is the use of tiny structures – less than 1,000 nanometres across – that are designed to have specific properties. Nanotechnology is an emerging field in science that is used in a wide range of applications, from consumer goods to health products.

 

In medicine, nanotechnology has only partially been exploited. It is being investigated as a way to improve the properties of medicines, such as their solubility or stability, and to develop medicines that may provide new ways to:

  • deliver medicines to the body;
  • target medicines in the body more accurately;
  • diagnose and treat diseases;
  • support the regeneration of cells and tissues.

Activities at the European Medicines Agency 

The European Medicines Agency follows the latest developments in nanotechnology that are relevant to the development of medicines. Recommendations from the Agency’sCommittee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) have already led to the approval of a number of medicines based on nanotechnology. These include medicines containing:

 

  • liposomes (microscopic fatty structures containing the active substance), such asCaelyx (doxorubicin), Mepact (mifamurtide) and Myocet (doxorubicin);
  • nano-scale particles of the active substance, such as Abraxane (paclitaxel), Emend(aprepitant) and Rapamune (sirolimus).

The development of medicines using newer, innovative nanotechnology techniques may raise new challenges for the Agency in the future. These include discussions on whether the current regulatory framework is appropriate for these medicines and whether existing guidelines and requirements on the way the medicines are assessed and monitored are adequate.

The Agency also needs to consider the acceptability of new testing methods and the availability of experts to guide the Agency’s opinion-making.

 

An overview of the initiatives taken by European Union (EU) regulators in relation to the development and evaluation of nanomedicines and nanosimilars was published in the scientific journal Nanomedicines. The article describes the regulatory challenges and perspectives in this field:

Ad hoc expert group on nanomedicines

In 2009, the CHMP established an ad hoc expert group on nanomedicines.

This group includes selected experts from academia and the European regulatory network, who support the Agency’s activities by providing specialist input on new scientific knowledge and who help with the review of guidelines on nanomedicines. The group also helps the Agency’s discussions with international partners on issues concerning nanomedicines.

The group held the first ad hoc expert group meeting on nanomedicines on 29 April 2009.

 

Reflection papers on nanomedicines

In 2011, the CHMP began to develop in 2011 a series of four reflection papers on nanomedicines to provide guidance to sponsors developing nanomedicines.

These documents cover the development both of new nanomedicines and of nanosimilars (nanomedicines that are claimed to be similar to a reference nanomedicine), since the first generation of nanomedicines, including liposomal formulations, iron-based preparations and nanocrystal-based medicines, have started to come off patent:

The fourth document, a draft reflection paper on the data requirements for intravenous iron-based nanocolloidal products developed with reference to an innovator medicine, will be released for a six-month public consultation in 2013.

International workshops on nanomedicines

The Agency organises workshops on nanomedicines to explore the scientific aspects of nanomedicines and enable the sharing of experience at an international level, in order to assist future developments in the field:

REFLECTION PAPER ON NANOTECHNOLOGY-BASED MEDICINAL PRODUCTS FOR
HUMAN USE

http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/Regulatory_and_procedural_guideline/2010/01/WC500069728.pdf

Related information

 

 

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Higher-Order Structure Comparability: Case Studies of Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies


141206AR03_O_F0001g

Figure 1a: Diagram of the antibody array enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)

141206AR03_O_F0002g

Figure 1b: ELISA format for the antibody array technology

Great successes for monoclonal antibody (MAb)–based biologics over the past decade have provided many valuable options for patients combating some of the most serious diseases in the world, including cancer and autoimmune diseases. MAbs and antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) are among the fastest growing biologic segments in development, with hundreds of candidates currently under clinical study.

read at

http://www.bioprocessintl.com/manufacturing/biosimilars/higher-order-structure-comparability/

 

FDA approves Avastin to treat patients with aggressive and late-stage cervical cancer


August 14, 2014

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new use for Avastin (bevacizumab) to treat patients with persistent, recurrent or late-stage (metastatic) cervical cancer.

Cervical cancer grows in the tissues of the lower part of the uterus known as the cervix. It commonly occurs when human papillomaviruses (HPV), a virus that spreads through sexual contact, cause cells to become cancerous. Although there are two licensed vaccines available to prevent many types of HPV that can cause cervical cancer, the National Cancer Institute estimates that 12,360 American women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and 4,020 will die from the disease in 2014.

Avastin works by interfering with the blood vessels that fuel the development of cancerous cells. The new indication for cervical cancer is approved for use in combination with chemotherapy drugs paclitaxel and cisplatin or in combination with paclitaxel and topotecan.

“Avastin is the first drug approved for patients with late-stage cervical cancer since the 2006 approval of topotecan with cisplatin,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “It is also the first biologic agent approved for patients with late-stage cervical cancer and was approved in less than four months under the FDA’s priority review program, demonstrating the agency’s commitment to making promising therapies available to patients faster.”

The FDA reviewed Avastin for treatment of patients with cervical cancer under its priority review program because the drug demonstrated the potential to be a significant improvement in safety or effectiveness over available therapy in the treatment of a serious condition. Priority review provides an expedited review of a drug’s application.

The safety and effectiveness of Avastin for treatment of patients with cervical cancer was evaluated in a clinical study involving 452 participants with persistent, recurrent, or late-stage disease. Participants were randomly assigned to receive paclitaxel and cisplatin with or without Avastin or paclitaxel and topotecan with or without Avastin. Results showed an increase in overall survival to 16.8 months in participants who received chemotherapy in combination with Avastin as compared to 12.9 months for those receiving chemotherapy alone.

The most common side effects associated with use of Avastin in patients with cervical cancer include fatigue, decreased appetite, high blood pressure (hypertension), increased glucose in the blood (hyperglycemia), decreased magnesium in the blood (hypomagnesemia), urinary tract infection, headache and decreased weight. Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract and abnormal openings between the gastrointestinal tract and vagina (enterovaginal fistula) also were observed in Avastin-treated patients.

Avastin is marketed by South San Francisco, California-based Genentech, a member of the Roche Group.

Property Value Source
melting point 61 °C (FAB fragment), 71 °C (whole mAb) Vermeer, A.W.P. & Norde, W., Biophys. J. 78:394-404 (2000)

Db00112

Protein chemical formula C6538H10034N1716O2033S44
Protein average weight 149 kDa

A recombinant humanized monoclonal IgG1 antibody that binds to and inhibits the biologic activity of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab contains human framework regions and the complementarity-determining regions of a murine antibody that binds to VEGF. Bevacizumab is produced in a Chinese Hamster Ovary mammalian cell expression system in a nutrient medium containing the antibiotic gentamicin and has a molecular weight of approximately 149 kilodaltons.

sequence

>"Bevacizumab light chain"
DIQMTQSPSSLSASVGDRVTITCSASQDISNYLNWYQQKPGKAPKVLIYFTSSLHSGVPS
RFSGSGSGTDFTLTISSLQPEDFATYYCQQYSTVPWTFGQGTKVEIKRTVAAPSVFIFPP
SDEQLKSGTASVVCLLNNFYPREAKVQWKVDNALQSGNSQESVTEQDSKDSTYSLSSTLT
LSKADYEKHKVYACEVTHQGLSSPVTKSFNRGEC
>"Bevacizumab heavy chain"
EVQLVESGGGLVQPGGSLRLSCAASGYTFTNYGMNWVRQAPGKGLEWVGWINTYTGEPTY
AADFKRRFTFSLDTSKSTAYLQMNSLRAEDTAVYYCAKYPHYYGSSHWYFDVWGQGTLVT
VSSASTKGPSVFPLAPSSKSTSGGTAALGCLVKDYFPEPVTVSWNSGALTSGVHTFPAVL
QSSGLYSLSSVVTVPSSSLGTQTYICNVNHKPSNTKVDKKVEPKSCDKTHTCPPCPAPEL
LGGPSVFLFPPKPKDTLMISRTPEVTCVVVDVSHEDPEVKFNWYVDGVEVHNAKTKPREE
QYNSTYRVVSVLTVLHQDWLNGKEYKCKVSNKALPAPIEKTISKAKGQPREPQVYTLPPS
REEMTKNQVSLTCLVKGFYPSDIAVEWESNGQPENNYKTTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSKLTVDK
SRWQQGNVFSCSVMHEALHNHYTQKSLSLSPGK
Bevacizumab 
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Humanized (from mouse)
Target VEGF-A
Clinical data
Trade names Avastin
AHFS/Drugs.com monograph
Licence data EMA:Link, US FDA:link
Pregnancy cat. C (US)
Legal status Prescription only
Routes Intravenous
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 100% (IV only)
Half-life 20 days (range: 11–50 days)
Identifiers
CAS number 216974-75-3 Yes
ATC code L01XC07
DrugBank DB00112
UNII 2S9ZZM9Q9V Yes
KEGG D06409 Yes
ChEMBL CHEMBL1201583 
Chemical data
Formula C6638H10160N1720O2108S44 
Mol. mass approx. 149 kDa
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