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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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TAK-981


LXRZVMYMQHNYJB-UNXOBOICSA-N.png

TAK-981

C25 H28 Cl N5 O5 S2, 578.103

[(1R,2S,4R)-4-[(5-[4-[(1R)-7-Chloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-1-yl]-5-methylthiophene-2-carbonyl]pyrimidin-4-yl)amino]-2-hydroxycyclopentyl]methyl sulfamate

[(1R,2S,4R)-4-[[5-[4-[(1R)-7-Chloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-1-yl]-5-methyl-thiophene-2-carbonyl]pyrimidin-4-yl]amino]-2-hydroxy-cyclopentyl]methyl sulfamate

Sulfamic acid, [(1R,2S,4R)-4-[[5-[[4-[(1R)-7-chloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-isoquinolinyl]-5-methyl-2-thienyl]carbonyl]-4-pyrimidinyl]amino]-2-hydroxycyclopentyl]methyl ester

CAS 1858276-04-6 FREE

CAS 1858279-63-6 HYDRATE

 MW 578.103
  • Originator Takeda Oncology
  • Class Antineoplastics
  • Mechanism of Action Small ubiquitin-related modifier protein inhibitors
  • Phase I Lymphoma; Solid tumours
  • 01 Oct 2018 Phase-I clinical trials in Solid tumours (Late-stage disease, Metastatic disease) and and Lymphoma (Refractory metastatic disease, Second-line therapy or greater) in USA (IV) (NCT03648372)
  • 03 Sep 2018 Takeda Oncology plans a phase I trial for Solid tumours (Late-stage disease, Metastatic disease) and Lymphoma (Refractory metastatic disease, Second-line therapy or greater) in September 2018 (IV) (NCT03648372)
  • 03 Sep 2018 Preclinical trials in Lymphoma in USA (IV) prior to September 2018 (NCT03648372)

Takeda is evaluating TAK-981, a SUMO-Activating Enzyme (SAE) inhibitor, in early clinical trials for the treatment of adult patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors or with relapsed or refractory lymphomas.

str1

Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a member of the ubiquitin-like protein (Ubl) family that is covalently conjugated to cellular proteins in a manner similar to Ub-conjugation (Kerscher, O., Felberbaum, R., and Hochstrasser, M. 2006. Modification of proteins by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins. Annu Rev Cell Dev Biol. 22: 159-80). Mammalian cells express three major isoforms: SUMO l , SUM02 and SUM03. SUM02 and SUM03 share -95% amino acid sequence homology but have -45% sequence homology with SUMO l (Kamitani, T., Kito, K., Nguyen, H. P., Fukuda-Kamitani, T., and Yeh, E. T. 1998. Characterization of a second member of the sentrin family of ubiquitin-like proteins. J Biol Chem. 273( 18): 1 1349-53). SUMO proteins can be conjugated to a single lysine residue of a protein (monosumoylation) or to a second SUMO protein that is already conjugated to a protein forming a SUMO chain (polysumoylation). Only SUM02/3 can form such chains because they possess internal consensus SUMO modification sites (Tatham, M. H., Jaffray, E., Vaughan, O. A., Desterro, J. M., Botting, C. H., Naismith, J. H., Hay, R. T. 2001. Polymeric chains of SUMO-2 and SUM 0-3 are conjugated to protein substrates by SAE1/SAE2 and Ubc9. J Biol Chem. 276(38):35368-74). An additional isoform, SUM04, is found in kidney, lymph node and spleen cells, but it is not known whether SUM04 can be conjugated to cellular proteins.

[0003] SUMO l , SUM02 and SUM03 are activated in an ATP-dependent manner by the SUMO-activating enzyme (SAE). SAE is a heterodimer that consists of SAE 1 (SUMO-activating enzyme subunit 1) and SAE2 (UBA2). SAE, like other El activating enzymes, uses ATP to adenylate the C-terminal glycine residue of SUMO. In a second step, a thioester intermediate is then formed between the C-terminal glycine of SUMO and a cysteine residue in SAE2. Next, SUMO is transferred from the El to the cysteine residue of the SUMO conjugating enzyme (E2), UBC9. Unlike the Ub pathway that contains many E2 enzymes, Ubc9 is currently the only known conjugating enzyme for SUMO and functions with SUMOl , SUM02 and SUM03 proteins. SUMO proteins are then conjugated to the target protein, either directly or in conjunction with an E3 ligase, through isopeptide bond formation with the epsilon amino group of a lysine side chain on a target protein. Several SUMO E3 ligases, including PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription protein) proteins and Ran-binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and polycomb 2 (Pc2), have been identified (Johnson, E. S., and Gupta, A. A. 2001. An E3-like factor that promotes SUMO conjugation to the yeast septins. Cell. 106(6):735-44; Pichler, A., Gast, A., Seeler, J. S., Dejean, A.; Melchior, F. 2002. The nucleoporin RanBP2 has SUMOl E3 ligase activity. Cell. 108(1): 109-20; Kagey, M. H., Melhuish, T. A., and Wotton, D. 2003. The polycomb protein Pc2 is a SUMO E3. Cell. 1 13(1): 127- 37). Once attached to cellular targets, SUMO modulates the function, subcellular localization, complex formation and/or stability of substrate proteins (Miiller, S., Hoege, C, Pyrowolakis, G., and Jentsch, S. 2001. SUMO, ubiquitin’s mysterious cousin. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2(3):202-10). SUMO- conjugation is reversible through the action of de-sumoylating enzymes called SENPs (Hay, R. T. 2007. SUMO-specific proteases: a twist in the tail. Trends Cell Biol. 17(8):370-6) and the SUMO proteins can then participate in additional conjugation cycles.

[0004] SAE-initiated SUMO-conjugation plays a major role in regulating diverse cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation, transcriptional regulation, cellular protein targeting, maintenance of genome integrity, chromosome segregation, and protein stability (Hay, R. T. 2005. SUMO: a history of modification. Mol Cell. 18( 1): 1 -12; Gill, G. 2004. SUMO and ubiquitin in the nucleus: different functions, similar mechanisms? Genes Dev. 18(17):2046-59). For example, SUMO- conjugation causes changes in the subcellular localization of RanGAPl by targeting it to the nuclear pore complex (Mahajan, R., Delphin, C., Guan, T., Gerace, L., and Melchior, F. 1997. A small ubiquitin-related polypeptide involved in targeting RanGAPl to nuclear pore complex protein RanBP2. Cell. 88(1):97- 1070). Sumoylation counteracts ubiquitination and subsequently blocks the degradation of Ι Β, thereby negatively regulating NF-κΒ activation (Desterro, J. M., Rodriguez, M. S., Hay, R. T. 1998. SUMO- 1 modification of IkappaB alpha inhibits NF-kappaB activation. Mol Cell. 2(2):233-9). Sumoylation has been reported to play an important role in transcription exhibiting both repressive and stimulatory effects. Many of the transcriptional nodes that are modulated play important roles in cancer. For example, sumoylation stimulates the transcriptional activities of transcription factors such as p53 and HSF2 (Rodriguez, M. S., Desterro, J. M., Lain, S., Midgley, C. A., Lane, D. P., and Hay, R. T. 1999. SUMO- 1 modification activates the transcriptional response of p53. EMBO J. 18(22):6455-61 ; Goodson, M. L., Hong, Y., Rogers, R., Matunis, M. J., Park-Sarge, O. K., Sarge, K. D. 2001. Sumo- 1 modification regulates the DNA binding activity of heat shock transcription factor 2, a promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body associated transcription factor. J Biol Chem. 276(21 ): 18513-8). In contrast, SUMO-conjugation represses the transcriptional activities of transcription factors such as LEF (Sachdev, S., Bruhn, L., Sieber, H., Pichler, A., Melchior, F., Grosschedl, R. 2001. PIASy, a nuclear matrix-associated SUMO E3 ligase, represses LEF1 activity by sequestration into nuclear bodies. Genes Dev. 15(23):3088- 103) and c-Myb (Bies, J., Markus, J., and Wolff, L. 2002. Covalent attachment of the SUMO- 1 protein to the negative regulatory domain of the c-Myb transcription factor modifies its stability and transactivation capacity. / Biol Chem. 277( 1 1):8999-9009). Thus, SUMO-conjugation controls gene expression and growth control pathways that are important for cancer cell survival.

[0005] Altered expression of SAE pathway components have been noted in a variety of cancer types: (Moschos, S. J., Jukic, D. M., Athanassiou, C., Bhargava, R., Dacic, S., Wang, X., Kuan, S. F., Fayewicz, S. L., Galambos, C., Acquafondata, M., Dhir, R., and Becker, D. 2010. Expression analysis of Ubc9, the single small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E2 conjugating enzyme, in normal and malignant tissues. Hum Pathol. 41(9): 1286-980); including multiple myeloma (Driscoll, J. J., Pelluru, D., Lefkimmiatis, K., Fulciniti, M., Prabhala, R. H., Greipp, P. R., Barlogie, B., Tai, Y. T., Anderson, K. C, Shaughnessy, J. D. Jr., Annunziata, C. M., and Munshi, N. C. 2010. The sumoylation pathway is dysregulated in multiple myeloma and is associated with adverse patient outcome. Blood. 1 15(14):2827-34); and breast cancer (Chen, S. F., Gong, C, Luo, M., Yao, H. R., Zeng, Y. J., and Su, F. X. 201 1. Ubc9 expression predicts chemoresistance in breast cancer. Chin J Cancer. 30(9):638-44), In addition, preclinical studies indicate that Myc-driven cancers may be especially sensitive to SAE inhibition (Kessler, J. D., Kahle, K. T., Sun, T., Meerbrey, K. L., Schlabach, M. R., Schmitt, E. M., Skinner, S. O., Xu, Q., Li, M. Z., Hartman, Z. C, Rao, M., Yu, P., Dominguez-Vidana, R., Liang, A. C, Solimini, N. L., Bernardi, R. J., Yu, B., Hsu, T., Golding, I., Luo, J., Osborne, C. K., Creighton, C. J., Hilsenbeck, S. G., Schiff, R., Shaw, C. A., Elledge, S. J., and Westbrook, T. F. 2012. A SUMOylation-dependent transcriptional subprogram is required for Myc-driven tumorigenesis. Science. 335(6066):348-53; Hoellein, A., Fallahi, M., Schoeffmann, S., Steidle, S., Schaub, F. X., Rudelius, M., Laitinen, I., Nilsson, L., Goga, A., Peschel, C, Nilsson, J. A., Cleveland, J. L., and Keller, U. 2014. Myc-induced SUMOylation is a therapeutic vulnerability for B-cell lymphoma. Blood. 124( 13):2081 -90). Since SUMO-conjugation regulates essential cellular functions that contribute to the growth and survival of tumor cells, targeting SAE could represent an approach to treat proliferative disorders such as cancer.

[0006] SAE inhibitors may also be applicable for the treatment of other diseases and conditions outside of oncology. For example, SUMO modifies proteins that play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases (Steffan, J. S., Agrawal, N., Pallos, J., Rockabrand, E., Trotman, L. C, Slepko, N., Hies, K., Lukacsovich, T., Zhu, Y. Z., Cattaneo, E., Pandolfi, P. P., Thompson, L. M., Marsh, J. L. 2004. SUMO modification of Huntington and Huntington’s disease pathology. Science. 304(5667): 100-4); Dorval, V., and Fraser, P. E. 2006. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification of natively unfolded proteins tau and alpha-synuclein. J Biol Chem. 281 ( 15):9919-24; Ballatore, C, Lee, V. M., and Trojanowski, J. Q. 2007. Tau-mediated neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. Nat Rev Neurosci. 8(9):663-72). Sumoylation also has been reported to play important role in pathogenic viral infection, inflammation and cardiac function (Lee, H. R., Kim, D. J., Lee, J. M., Choi, C. Y., Ahn, B. Y., Hayward, G. S., and Ahn, J. H. 2004. Ability of the human cytomegalovirus ΓΕ1 protein to modulate sumoylation of PML correlates with its functional activities in transcriptional regulation and infectivity in cultured fibroblast cells. / Virol. 78(12):6527-42; Liu, B., and Shuai, K. 2009. Summon SUMO to wrestle with inflammation. Mol Cell. 35(6):731-2; Wang, J., and Schwartz, R. J. 2010. Sumoylation and regulation of cardiac gene expression. Circ Rei. l07( l): 19-29). [0007] It would be beneficial therefore to provide new SAE inhibitors that possess good therapeutic properties, especially for the treatment of proliferative, inflammatory, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders.

PATENT

WO 2016004136

https://patents.google.com/patent/WO2016004136A1/en

Example 133: [(lR,2S,4R)-4-[[5-[4-[(lR)-7-Chloro-l,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-l-yl]-5-methyl- thiophene-2-carbonyl]pyrimidin-4-yl]amino]-2-hydroxy-cyclopentyl]methyl sulfamate I-263a

Figure imgf000367_0001

Step 1: 7-Chloro-l-[5-(l,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-methyl-3-thienyl]-l,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline

[00714] An oven-dried 2-neck 250 mL round bottom flask under nitrogen was charged with THF (40 mL) and cooled to -74 °C . Added 2.50 M ra-BuLi in hexane (6.92 mL, 17.3 mmol). Added a solution of Int-1 (4.00 g, 16.0 mmol) in THF (60 mL) slowly keeping the internal temperature less than -70 °C . Stirred with cooling 5 min. A second oven-dried 250 mL round bottom flask under nitrogen was charged with THF (60 mL) and Int-50 (2.04 g, 12.4 mmol) and the resulting solution was cooled to 0 °C . Added boron trifluoride diethyl ether complex ( 1.71 mL, 13.6 mmol) slowly and cooled to -30 °C . The contents of the first flask were transferred via cannula to the second flask. Reaction was quenched with saturated aqueous NaHC03 and warmed to rt. Water was added, and the mixture was extracted three times with EtOAc. Combined organic portions were washed with brine, dried over anhydrous Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo. Residue was purified via flash column chromatography eluting with a hexane / EtOAc gradient (0 to 100% EtOAc) to afford the title compound as a white solid ( 1.88g, 45%). Ή NMR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 7.17 – 7.01 (m, 2H), 6.83 – 6.61 (m, 2H), 5.92 (s, 1H), 5.09 (s, 1H), 4.17 – 4.04 (m, 2H), 4.03 – 3.92 (m, 2H), 3.37 – 3.25 (m, 1H), 3.13 – 2.91 (m, 2H), 2.82 – 2.69 (m, 1H), 2.46 (s, 3H). LCMS: (AA) M+l 336.1

Step 2: ieri-Butyl 7-chIoro-l-[5-(l,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-methyl-3-thienyl]-3,4-dihydroisoquinoIine -2(lH)-carboxyIate [00715] A 50 mL round bottom flask under nitrogen was charged with 7-chloro-l -[5-(l ,3-dioxolan-2- yl)-2-methyl-3-thienyl]- l ,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (5.67 g, 16.9 mmol) and DCM ( 100 mL), to which was added triethylamine (4.71 mL, 33.8 mmol), di-ieri-butyldicarbonate (4.61 g, 21.1 mmol), and N,N-dimethylaminopyridine (23 mg, 0.18 mmol). Reaction was stirred for 1 h at rt and then poured into saturated NaHC03 solution. Mixture was extracted three times with DCM, and the combined organic portions were washed with brine, dried over Na2S04, filtered, and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was subjected to flash column chromatography eluting with a hexane / EtOAc gradient to afford 6.96g (95%) of the title compound. LCMS: (AA) M+ l 436.1

Step 3: tert-Butyl 7-chloro-l-(5-formyl-2-methyl-3-thienyl)-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline -2(1H)- carboxylate

[00716] A 1 L round bottom flask was charged with ferf-butyl 7-chloro-

1 -[5-( 1 ,3-dioxolan-2-yl)-2-methyl-3-thienyl]-3 ,4-dihydroisoquinoline-2( 1 H)-carboxylate (7.30 g, 16.7 mmol), methanol (200 mL), and water (20 mL), to which was added a solution of 12M HC1 (4.00 mL, 130 mmol) in methanol (200 mL), and the reaction was stirred at rt for 1 h. Reaction was quenched via addition of 50mL of saturated NaHC03 and stirred for 5 min. Methanol was removed in vacuo, and the resulting aqueous mixture was extracted three times with EtOAc, and then the combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was subjected to flash column chromatography eluting with a hexane / EtOAc gradient to afford the title compound (4.55g, 70%). Ή NMR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 9.67 (s, 1 H), 7.27 – 7.15 (m, 2H), 7.12 (s, 1 H), 6.98 – 6.94 (m, 1 H), 6.34 (m, l H), 4.15 (s, 1 H), 3.18 – 3.06 (m, 1 H), 3.05 – 2.93 (m, 1H), 2.82 – 2.73 (m, 1 H), 2.69 (s, 3H), 1.50 (s, 9H). LCMS: (AA) M+Na 414.2

Step 4: tert-Butyl 7-chIoro-l-{5-[(4-chloropyrimidin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methyI]-2-methyl-3-thienyl}- 3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-2(lH)-carboxylate

[00717] An oven-dried 500 mL 3-neck round bottom flask under nitrogen was charged with 4-chloro- 5-iodopyrimidine (4.08 g, 17.0 mmol) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran ( 150 mL). An addition funnel containing a solution of rert-butyl 7-chloro- l -(5-formyl-2-methyl-3-thienyl)-3,4- dihydroisoquinoline-2(l H)-carboxylate (4.75 g, 12.1 mmol) in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (50 mL) was attached, and the contents of the reaction flask were cooled to -75 °C . 2.50 M n-BuLi in hexane ( 14.1 mL, 35.2 mmol) was added in small portions keeping the internal temperature less than -70 °C , at which point the contents of addtion funnel were added in a single portion. Upon completion of addition, the reaction was quenched by adding 20 mL of saturated NaHC03 in small portions and warmed to rt. The aqueous mixture was extracted three times with EtOAc, and then the combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was subjected to flash column chromatography eluting with a hexane / EtOAc gradient to afford the title compound (4.85g, 79%). LCMS: (AA) M+Na 528.1

Step 5: tert-Butyl 7-chloro-l-{5-[(4-chloropyrimidin-5-yl)(hydroxy)methyl]-2-methyl-3-thienyl}- 3,4- dihydroisoquinoline-2(lH)-carboxylate

[00718] A 1 L round bottom flask was charged with fe/Y-butyl 7-chloro- l – { 5-[(4-chloropyrimidin-5- yl)(hydroxy)methyl]-2-methyl-3-thienyl}-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-2(l H)-carboxylate (4.85 g, 9.58 mmol) and DCM (300 mL). Manganese (IV) oxide (14.2 g, 163 mmol) was added and the reaction was stirred at rt for 18 h. Mixture was filtered through Celite, and the filter cake was rinsed with hot EtOAc. Filtrate was concentrated in vacuo to afford the title compound (4.47g , 93%). Ή NMR (400 MHz, Chloroform-d) δ 9.09 (s, 1 H), 8.70 (s, 1 H), 7.24 – 7.16 (m, 1 H), 7.16

– 7.07 (m, 1 H), 7.00 – 6.90 (m, 2H), 6.32 (s, 1 H), 4.28 – 3.97 (m, 1H), 3.14 – 2.89 (m, 2H), 2.78

– 2.65 (m, 4H), 1 .53 – 1.43 (m, 9H).

Step 6: tert-Butyl (lR)-7-chloro-l-[5-[4-[[(lR,3R,4S)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-triisopropylsiIyloxy- cyclopentyl]amino]pyrimidine-5-carbonyl]-2-methyl-3-thienyl]-3,4-dihydro-lH-isoquinoline-2- carboxylate

[00719] A 1 L round bottom flask under nitrogen was charged with iert-butyl 7-chloro- l – { 5-[(4- chloropyrimidin-5-yl)carbonyI]-2-methyl-3-thienyl }-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline-2( l H)-carboxylate (4.47 g, 8.86 mmol), DMF (20.0 mL, 258 mmol), Int-259 (3.06 g, 10.6 mmol), and triethylamine (3.09 mL, 22.2 mmol) and the mixture was stirred at rt for 18 h. Reaction mixture was poured into water and saturated NaHC03, and then extracted three times with EtOAc, and then the combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was subjected to flash column chromatography eluting with a 70/30 to 60/40 hexane/EtOAc gradient to afford 0.56g of first-eluting diastereomer 1 (not pictured), 4.3 l g of a mixture of diastereomers, and 1.1 lg ( 17%) of second-eluting diastereomer 2 (the title compound). The mixture of diastereomers thus obtained was resubjected to the described chromatography conditions two additional times to afford a total of 2.62 g of the desired diastereomer. Ή NMR (400 MHz, Methanol-d4) δ 8.54 – 8.46 (m, 2H), 7.27 – 7.19 (m, 2H), 7.09 – 6.99 (m, 2H), 6.37 (s, 1H), 4.87 – 4.75 (m, 1H), 4.38 – 4.29 (m, 1H), 4.20 – 4.09 (m, 1H), 3.66 – 3.52 (m, 2H), 3.28- 3.14 (m, 2H), 3.02 – 2.89 (m, 1 H), 2.89 – 2.78 (m, 1 H), 2.68 (s, 3H), 2.54 – 2.41 (m, 1 H), 2.22 – 2.09 (m, 2H), 1.86 – 1.73 (m, 1H), 1.50 (s, 8H), 1.39 – 1.23 (m, 2H), 1.15 – 1.04 (m, 20H).

LCMS: (AA) M+ 1 755.3

Step 7: tert-Butyl (lR)-7-chloro-l-[2-methyl-5-[4-[[(lR,3R,4S)-3-(sulfamoyloxymethyl)-4- triisopropylsilyloxy-cyclopentyl]amino]pyrimidine-5-carbonyl]-3-thienyl]-3,4-dihydro-lH- isoquinoline-2-carboxylate [00720] A solution of ie/t-butyl (lR)-7-chloro-l-[5-[4-[[( lR,3R,4S)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4- triisopropylsilyloxy-cyclopentyl]amino]pyrimidine-5-carbonyl]-2-methyl-3-thienyl]-3,4-dih lH-isoquinoline-2-carboxylate (2.46 g, 3.26 mmol) in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (25 mL), and DMF (25 mL) was cooled to 0 °C. Triethylamine ( 1.82 mL, 13.0 mmol) and chlorosulfonamide (1.50 g, 13.0 mmol) were added and the reaction was stirred for 10 min. Added methanol (0.53 mL, 13.0 mmol) and stirred for 15 min. Reaction mixture was poured into saturated NaHC03, extracted three times with EtOAc, and then the combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was subjected to flash column chromatography eluting with a hexane / EtOAc gradient to afford the title compound (2.41g, 89%). Ή NMR (400 MHz, Methanol-d4) δ 8.58 – 8.45 (m, 2H), 7.29 – 7.17 (m, 2H), 7.1 1 – 6.98 (m, 2H), 6.36 (s, 1 H), 4.84 – 4.73 (m, 1H), 4.44 – 4.33 (m, 1H), 4.21 – 4.08 (m, 4H), 3.27- 3.17 (m, 1 H),3.02 – 2.89 (m, 1 H), 2.88 – 2.78 (m, 1 H), 2.67 (s, 3H), 2.57 – 2.47 (m, 1 H), 2.41 – 2.30 (m, 1 H), 2.23 – 2.13 (m, 1 H), 1.87- 1.78 (m, 1 H), 1.50 (s, 9H), 1.43 – 1 .33 (m, 1 H), 1 .17 – 1.04 (m, 20H). LCMS: (AA) M+l 834.3

Step 8: [(lR,2S,4R)-4-[[5-[4-[(lR)-7-Chloro-l,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-l-yl]-5-methyl- thiophene-2-carbonyl]pyrimidin-4-yI]aniino]-2-hydroxy-cyclopentyl]methyl sulfamate

[00721] A solution of f«?r/-butyl ( l R)-7-chloro- l -[2-methyl-5-[4-[[( l R,3R,4S)-3-

(sulfamoyloxymethyl)-4-triisopropylsilyloxy-cyclopentyl]amino]pyrimidine-5-carbonyl]-3- thienyl]-3,4-dihydro- l H-isoquinoline-2-carboxylate (2.41 g, 2.89 mmol) in CH3CN ( 10 mL) was cooled in an ice bath to + 1 °C . Phosphoric acid ( 10 mL, 200 mmol) was added dropwise and the reaction was stirred with ice bath cooling for 60 min. The mixture was warmed to rt and stirred for an additional 3 h. Reaction was poured into a stirring mixture of 50 mL water and 50 mL EtOAc, and the the pH was adjusted to ~9 by slowly adding 200 mL of saturated NaHC03 with stirring. Resulting aqueous mixture was extracted three times with EtOAc, and then the combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over anhydrous Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo. The residue was subjected to flash column chromatography eluting with a gradient that began with 100% DCM and increased in polarity to 80% DCM / 20% methanol / 2% ammonium hydroxide gradient to afford the title compound (1.50 g, 90%). Ή NMR (400 MHz, Methanol-d4) δ 8.61 (s, 1H), 8.52 (s, 1 H), 7.27 (s, 1 H), 7.18 – 7.13 (m, 2H), 6.73 – 6.68 (m, 1 H), 5.23 (s, 1H), 4.81 – 4.70 (m, 1 H), 4.26 – 4.10 (m, 3H), 3.29 – 3.23 (m, 2H), 3.1 1 – 2.96 (m, 2H), 2.87 – 2.76 (m, 1H), 2.60 (s, 3H), 2.55 – 2.42 (m, 1 H), 2.33 – 2.19 (m, 1H), 2.18 – 2.07 (m, 1H), 1.95 – 1.81 (m, 1H), 1.47 – 1.35 (m, 1 H). LCMS: (AA) M+l 580.0

CLIP

Candidate: TAK-981

https://cen.acs.org/pharmaceuticals/drug-discovery/Drug-structures-displayed-first-time-in-Orlando/97/web/2019/04?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=CEN

20190404lnp1-tak981.jpg

Credit: Tien Nguyen/C&EN

Presenter: Steven Paul Langston, associate director at Takeda Pharmaceuticals International

Target: Sumo activating enzyme

Disease: Solid tumors

Reporter’s notes: Langston gave the last talk of the morning session, placing him in the “precarious position of being between you and lunch,” he said. Takeda acquired this drug development program, falling under the umbrella of immuno-oncology, along with Millenium Pharmaceuticals in 2008. The team targeted a pathway known as SUMOylation, a protein post translation modification that is implicated in a number of cellular processes including immune response. In SUMOylation, enzymes attach a small protein to another protein. They found that inhibiting this pathway activates a type I interferon response in immune cells. How the molecule, TAK-981, inhibits this pathway is quite complicated, Langston said. TAK-981 forms an adduct with a small ubiquitin like modifier (SUMO) to inhibit a SUMO activating enzyme that catalyzes SUMOylation. While the synthesis of TAK-981 is fairly short, it requires a nonideal chiral chromatography separation after the first step. TAK-981 is in Phase I clinical trials as an intravenous infusion for patients with metastatic solid tumors or lymphomas.

Patent ID Title Submitted Date Granted Date
US2018311239 HETEROARYL COMPOUNDS USEFUL AS INHIBITORS OF SUMO ACTIVATING ENZYME 2018-03-16
US9962386 HETEROARYL COMPOUNDS USEFUL AS INHIBITORS OF SUMO ACTIVATING ENZYME 2017-04-17
US9683003 HETEROARYL COMPOUNDS USEFUL AS INHIBITORS OF SUMO ACTIVATING ENZYME 2015-06-30 2016-01-14

//////////TAK-981, TAK 981, Phase I,  Lymphoma, Solid tumours, TAKEDA, 

Cc3sc(cc3[C@@H]1NCCc2ccc(Cl)cc12)C(=O)c5cncnc5N[C@@H]4C[C@H](COS(N)(=O)=O)[C@@H](O)C4

https://cen.acs.org/pharmaceuticals/drug-discovery/Drug-structures-displayed-first-time-in-Orlando/97/web/2019/04?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=CEN

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Acalabrutinib, ACP-196, Акалабрутиниб , أكالابروتينيب , 阿可替尼 ,


ChemSpider 2D Image | acalabrutinib | C26H23N7O2

Acalabrutinib.png

Image result for Acalabrutinib

Acalabrutinib

  • Molecular FormulaC26H23N7O2
  • Average mass465.507 Da

AcalabrutinibrINN, ACP-196,

FDA 2017 APPROVED, Lymphoma, mantle cell, ACERTA PHARMA

Orphan Drug, breakthrough therapy designation,

CAS 1420477-60-6 [RN]

(S)-4-[8-Amino-3-[1-(but-2-ynoyl)pyrrolidin-2-yl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

(S)-4-(8-amino-3-n-but-2-vnoylpyrrolidin-2-vnimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-1-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

4-{8-Amino-3-[(2S)-1-(2-butynoyl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl}-N-(2-pyridinyl)benzamide
Benzamide, 4-[8-amino-3-[(2S)-1-(1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-2-pyridinyl-
Calquence [Trade name]
UNII:I42748ELQW
Акалабрутиниб [Russian] [INN]
أكالابروتينيب [Arabic] [INN]
阿可替尼 [Chinese] [INN]
4-[8-amino-3-[(2S)-1-(1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)-2-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-2-pyridinyl-benzamide
4-[8-amino-3-[(2S)-1-but-2-ynoylpyrrolidin-2-yl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl]-N-pyridin-2-ylbenzamide
I42748ELQW
Image result for Acalabrutinib
Image result for Acalabrutinib
 Acalabrutinib, also known as ACP-196, is an orally available inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon administration, ACP-196 inhibits the activity of BTK and prevents the activation of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling pathway. This prevents both B-cell activation and BTK-mediated activation of downstream survival pathways. This leads to an inhibition of the growth of malignant B cells that overexpress BTK. BTK, a member of the src-related BTK/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, is overexpressed in B-cell malignancies; it plays an important role in B lymphocyte development, activation, signaling, proliferation and survival.
Image result for Acalabrutinib

Acalabrutinib (rINN,[1] ACP-196) is a novel experimental anti-cancer drug and a 2nd generation Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor[2][3] developed by Acerta Pharma.[4] It is more potent and selective (fewer side-effects) than ibrutinib, the first-in-class BTK inhibitor.[2][3][5]

The compound was granted orphan drug designation for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and mantle cell lymphoma in the U.S. and the E.U. in 2015 and 2016, respectively. In 2017, the product was granted breakthrough therapy designation in the U.S. for the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma who have received at least one prior therapy.

Acalabrutinib is an orally available inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) with potential antineoplastic activity. Upon administration, acalabrutinib inhibits the activity of BTK and prevents the activation of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling pathway. This prevents both B-cell activation and BTK-mediated activation of downstream survival pathways. This leads to an inhibition of the growth of malignant B cells that overexpress BTK. BTK, a member of the src-related BTK/Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosinekinases, is overexpressed in B-cell malignancies; it plays an important role in B lymphocyte development, activation, signaling, proliferation and survival.

Acalabrutinib is a Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) inhibitor developed at Acerta Pharma launched in 2017 in the U.S. for the oral treatment of adults with mantle cell lymphoma who have received at least one prior therapy.

Image result for Acalabrutinib

Image result for Acalabrutinib

To date, acalabrutinib has been used in trials studying the treatment of B-All, Myelofibrosis, Ovarian Cancer, Multiple Myeloma, and Hodgkin Lymphoma, among others. As of October 31, 2017 the FDA approved Astra Zeneca’s orally administered Calquence (acalabrutinib) medication as a Bruton Tyrosine Kinase (BTK) inhibitor indicated for the treatment of adult patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) who have already received at least one prior therapy, marking the company’s first entry into the treatment of blood cancers. Also known as ACP-196, acalabrutinib is also considered a second generation BTK inhibitor because it was rationally designed to be more potent and selective than ibrutinib, theoretically expected to demonstrate fewer adverse effects owing to minimized bystander effects on targets other than BTK. Nevertheless, acalabrutinib was approved under the FDA’s accelerated approval pathway, which is based upon overall response rate and faciliates earlier approval of medicines that treat serious conditions or/and that fill an unmet medical need based on a surrogate endpoint. Continued approval for acalabrutinib’s currently accepted indication may subsequently be contingent upon ongoing verification and description of clinical benefit in confimatory trials. Furthermore, the FDA granted this medication Priority Review and Breakthrough Therapy designations. It also received Orphan Drug designation, which provides incentives to assist and encourage the development of drugs for rare diseases. At this time, more than 35 clinical trials across 40 countries with more than 2500 patients are underway or have been completed with regards to further research into better understanding and expanding the therapeutic uses of acalabrutinib [L1009].
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Clinical and Regulatory Status

Pre-clinical

Relative to ibrutinib, acalabrutinib demonstrated higher selectivity and inhibition of the targeted activity of BTK, while having a much greater IC50 or otherwise virtually no inhibition on the kinase activities of ITK, EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB4, JAK3, BLK, FGR, FYN, HCK, LCK, LYN, SRC, and YES1.[3] In addition, in platelets treated with ibrutinib, thrombus formation was clearly inhibited while no impact to thrombus formation was identified relative to controls for those treated with acalabrutinib.[3] These findings strongly suggest an improved safety profile of acalabrutinib with minimized adverse effects relative to ibrutinib.[3]

As was conducted in the development of ibrutinib, pre-clinical studies of acalabrutinib included in vitro and in vivo pharmacodynamic evaluation in a canine lymphoma model.[6] A dose-dependent relationship resulting in cyto-toxicity and anti-proliferative effects was first demonstrated in a canine lymphoma cell line in vitro.[6] In vivo, the compound was found to be generally safe and well tolerated in the dosage range of 2.5–20 mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours, with clinical benefit observed in 30% of canine patients while observed adverse events consisted primarily of gastrointestinal effects such as anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy.[6]

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Clinical

The interim results of the still on-going first human phase 1/2 clinical trial (NCT02029443) with 61 patients for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are encouraging, with a 95% overall response rate demonstrating potential to become a best-in-class treatment for CLL.[2][7] Notably, a 100% response rate was achieved for those patients which were positive for the 17p13.1 gene deletion – a subgroup of patients that typically results in a poor response to therapy and expected outcomes.[3]

The most common adverse events were headache, diarrhea and weight gain.[3] Despite the appearance of a greater occurrence of transient headaches, the pre-clinical data suggests a preferred advantage of acalabrutinib over ibrutinib due to expected reduced adverse events of skin rash, severe diarrhea, and bleeding risk.[3] An additional clinical trial is currently in progress to directly compare the safety and efficacy performance of acalabrutinib to ibrutinib to better elucidate the differences in the therapeutic agents.[3]

While the primary indication is for CLL, as of late 2016, acalabrutinib is under evaluation for multiple indications in 20+ clinical trials (alone and in combination with other interventions) for various blood cancers, solid tumors, and rheumatoid arthritis.[7][8] Approximately 1,000 patients have been treated with acalabrutinib in clinical trials so far, including more than 600 on acalabrutinib alone and almost 400 on additional therapies in combination with acalabrutinib.[9]

Regulatory

As of February 2016, acalabrutinib had received orphan designation in the United States for CLL only,[10] and was similarly designated as an orphan medicinal product by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products (COMP) for treatment of three indications – chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/ small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (Waldenström’s macroglobulinaemia, MG).[11] If the drug is ultimately approved, this designation will result in a 10-year period of market exclusivity for the stated indications within Europe.[12]

Commercial Aspects

Acerta Pharma, the innovator responsible for the discovery and development of acalabrutinib, is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company recently founded in 2012 in Oss, the Netherlands.[13] A combined $13 Million in Series A funding was secured March 14, 2013 from various investor sources including the venture capital firms of BioGeneration Ventures and OrbiMed Advisors, the Dutch State and Province of Brabant through the Brabant Development Agency, and the private US equity firm Frazier Healthcare.[14] Further undisclosed amounts of Series B funding was secured May 2015 from the mutual fund company T. Rowe Price.[15]

After the promising results for the treatment of CLL in initial clinical trials,[2] Astra Zeneca purchased a 55% stake in Acerta Pharma for $4 billion in December 2015, with an option to acquire the remaining 45% stake for an additional $3 billion, conditional on the first approval in both the US and Europe and the establishment of commercial opportunity.[16]

Intellectual Property

Several patents have been filed by Acerta Pharma through the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) for the use of acalabrutinib (and structurally similar derivatives) either alone or in combination with additional therapeutic agents for the treatment of various hematological and solid tumor cancers as well as inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.[17][18][19][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27]

Notably, patents filed through WIPO still need to be filed appropriately for each individual nation on the path to commercialization. For example, one related United States patent application is US2014155385, which was filed July 11, 2012 and approved June 5th, 2014 for the use of 6-5 membered fused pyridine ring compounds (including acalabrutnib and its structurally similar derivatives) in the treatment of BTK mediated disorders.[28]

SYNTHESIS

Inventors Tjeerd A. BarfChristiaan Gerardus Johannes Maria Jansde Adrianus Petrus Antonius MANArthur A. OubrieHans C.A. RaaijmakersJohannes Bernardus Maria RewinkelJan-Gerard SterrenburgJacobus C.H.M. Wijkmans
Applicant Msd Oss B.V.

WO 2013010868

Synthesis of acalabrutinib, using 3-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile as the starting material, is described. The method comprises reduction of the starting material, condensation with N-Cbz-L-proline, intramolecular cyclization, bromination, Suzuki coupling with (4-(2-pyridylcarbamoyl)phenyl)boronic acid and condensation with 2-butynoic acid. WO 2013010868

Reduction of 3-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile  with H2 over Raney-Ni in AcOH, followed by treatment with aqueous HCl in Et2O gives (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl)methylamine hydrochloride , which upon condensation with N-Cbz-L-proline  in the presence of HATU and Et3N in CH2Cl2 affords amide .

Intramolecular cyclization of intermediate  by means of DMI and POCl3 in acetonitrile at 63 °C provides N-Cbz-8-chloro-3-[2(S)-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine , which is brominated with NBS in DMF to yield N-Cbz-1-bromo-8-chloro-3-[2(S)-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine .

Reaction of chloro compound  with NH3 in i-PrOH at 110 °C produces N-Cbz-1-bromo-3-[2(S)-pyrrolidinyl]imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazin-8-amine , which upon Suzuki coupling with (4-(2-pyridylcarbamoyl)phenyl)boronic acid in the presence of PdCl2(dppf) and K2CO3 in dioxane at 140 °C under microwave irradiation furnishes diaryl derivative .

Removal of the benzyloxycarbonyl moiety in intermediate  using HBr in AcOH generates pyrrolidine derivative , which is condensed with 2-butynoic acid  in the presence of HATU and Et3N in CH2Cl2 to afford the target acalabrutinib 

PATENT

WO 2013010868

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2013010868A1?cl=en

scheme I

Figure imgf000026_0001

 scheme II

Figure imgf000027_0001

Intermediate 1

Figure imgf000032_0001

(S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-vnpyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

(a) (3-Chloropyrazin-2-yl)methanamine. hydrochloride

To a solution of 3-chloropyrazine-2-carbonitrile (160 g, 1 .147 mol) in acetic acid (1.5 L) was added Raney Nickel (50% slurry in water, 70 g, 409 mmol). The resulting mixture was stirred under 4 bar hydrogen at room temperature overnight. Raney Nickel was removed by filtration over decalite and the filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure and co-evaporated with toluene. The remaining brown solid was dissolved in ethyl acetate at 50°C and cooled on an ice-bath. 2M hydrogen chloride solution in diethyl ether (1 .14 L) was added in 30 min. The mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature over weekend. The crystals were collected by filtration, washed with diethyl ether and dried under reduced pressure at 40°C. The product brown solid obtained was dissolved in methanol at 60°C. The mixture was filtered and partially concentrated, cooled to room temperature and diethyl ether (1000 ml) was added. The mixture was allowed to stir at room temperature overnight. The solids formed were collected by filtration, washed with diethyl ether and dried under reduced pressure at 40°C to give 153.5 g of (3-chloropyrazin-2- yl)methanamine. hydrochloride as a brown solid (74.4 %, content 77 %).

(b) (S)-benzyl 2-((3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methylcarbamoyl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

To a solution of (3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methanamine.HCI (9.57 g, 21.26 mmol, 40% wt) and Z-Pro-OH (5.3 g, 21 .26 mmol) in dichloromethane (250 mL) was added triethylamine (1 1.85 mL, 85 mmol) and the reaction mixture was cooled to 0°C. After 15 min stirring at 0°C, HATU (8.49 g, 22.33 mmol) was added. The mixture was stirred for 1 hour at 0°C and then overnight at room temperature. The mixture was washed with 0.1 M HCI-solution, 5% NaHC03, water and brine, dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated in vacuo. The product was purified using silica gel chromatography (heptane/ethyl acetate = 1/4 v/v%) to give 5 g of (S)-benzyl 2-((3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methylcarbamoyl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (62.7%).

(c) (S)-Benzyl 2-(8-chloroimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

(S)-Benzyl 2-((3-chloropyrazin-2-yl)methylcarbamoyl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (20.94 mmol, 7.85 g) was dissolved in acetonitrile (75 ml), 1 ,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (62.8 mmol, 6.9 ml, 7.17 g) was added and the reaction mixture was cooled to 0°C before POCI3 (84 mmol, 7.81 ml, 12.84 g) was added drop wise while the temperature remained around 5°C. The reaction mixture was refluxed at 60-65°C overnight. The reaction mixture was poured carefully in ammonium hydroxide 25% in water (250 ml)/crushed ice (500 ml) to give a yellow suspension (pH -8-9) which was stirred for 15 min until no ice was present in the suspension. Ethyl acetate was added, layers were separated and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate (3x). The organic layers were combined and washed with brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and evaporated to give 7.5 g crude product. The crude product was purified using silica gel chromatography (heptane/ethyl acetate = 1/4 v/v%) to give 6.6 g of (S)-benzyl 2-(8- chloroimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (88%).

(d) (S)-Benzyl 2-(1-bromo-8-chloroimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

N-Bromosuccinimide (24.69 mmol, 4.4 g) was added to a stirred solution of (S)-benzyl 2-(8- chloroimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (24.94 mmol, 8.9 g) in DMF (145 mL). The reaction was stirred 3 h at rt. The mixture was poored (slowly) in a stirred mixture of water (145 mL), ethyl acetate (145 mL) and brine (145 mL). The mixture was then transferred into a separating funnel and extracted. The water layer was extracted with 2×145 mL ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with 3×300 mL water, 300 mL brine, dried over sodium sulfate, filtered and evaporated. The product was purified using silica gel chromatography (ethyl acetate/heptane = 3/1 v/v%) to give 8.95 g of (S)-benzyl 2-(1-bromo-8-chloroimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (82.3%).

(e) (S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate

(S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1-carboxylate (20.54 mmol, 8.95 g) was suspended in 2-propanol (1 13 ml) in a pressure vessel. 2-propanol (50 ml) was cooled to -78°C in a pre-weighed flask (with stopper and stirring bar) and ammonia gas (646 mmol, 1 1 g) was lead through for 15 minutes. The resulting solution was added to the suspension in the pressure vessel. The vessel was closed and stirred at room temperature and a slight increase in pressure was observed. Then the suspension was heated to 1 10 °C which resulted in an increased pressure to 4.5 bar. The clear solution was stirred at 1 10 °C, 4.5 bar overnight. After 18h the pressure remained 4 bar. The reaction mixture was concentrated in vacuum, the residue was suspended in ethyl acetate and subsequent washed with water. The layers were separated and the aqueous layer was extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with water, saturated sodium chloride solution, dried over sodium sulfate and concentrated to give 7.35 g of (S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1- carboxylate (86%).

Intermediate 2

Figure imgf000034_0001

(S)-4-(8-Amino-3-(pyrrolidin-2-v0im^

(a) (S)-Benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-(4-(pyridin-2-ylcarbamov0

carboxylate

(S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-bromoimidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1 -carboxylate (0.237 mmol, 98.5 mg) and 4-(pyridin-2-yl-aminocarbonyl)benzeneboronic acid (0.260 mmol, 63.0 mg) were suspended in a mixture of 2N aqueous potassium carbonate solution (2.37 mmol, 1 .18 mL) and dioxane (2.96 mL). Nitrogen was bubbled through the mixture, followed by the addition of 1 , 1 ‘- bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene palladium (ii) chloride (0.059 mmol, 47.8 mg). The reaction mixture was heated for 20 minutes at 140°C in the microwave. Water was added to the reaction mixture, followed by an extraction with ethyl acetate (2x). The combined organic layer was washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate and evaporated. The product was purified using silicagel and dichloromethane/methanol = 9/1 v/v% as eluent to afford 97.1 mg of (S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-(4-(pyridin- 2-ylcarbamoyl)phenyl)imidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1 -carboxylate (77%).

(b) (S)-4-(8-Amino-3-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)imidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-1-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

To (S)-benzyl 2-(8-amino-1-(4-(pyridin-2-ylcarbamoyl)phenyl)imidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-3-yl)pyrrolidine-1- carboxylate (0.146 mmol, 78 mg) was added a 33% hydrobromic acid/acetic acid solution (1 1.26 mmol, 2 ml) and the mixture was left at room temperature for 1 hour. The mixture was diluted with water and extracted with dichloromethane. The aqueous phase was neutralized using 2N sodium hydroxide solution, and then extracted with dichloromethane. the organic layer was dried over magnesium sulfate, filtered and evaporated to give 34 mg of (S)-4-(8-Amino-3-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)imidazo[1 ,5-a]pyrazin-1-yl)-N- (pyridin-2-yl)benzamide (58%).

Example 6

Figure imgf000038_0001

(S)-4-(8-amino-3-n-but-2-vnoylpyrrolidin-2-vnimidazo[1 ,5-alpyrazin-1-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-yl)benzamide

This compound was prepared, in an analogues manner as described in Example 2, from the compound described in intermediate 2b and 2-butynoic acid, to afford the title compound (10.5 mg, 18.0%). Data: LCMS (B) Rt : 2.08 min; m/z 466.1 (M+H)+.

PATENT

WO 2016024228

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2016024228A1?cl=en

PATENT

CN 107056786

Step SI:

[0029] The pressure in the reactor was added 3-chloro-2-carboxaldehyde l-yl P ratio of (II) (0.71g, 5mmol) and dioxane (20mL), under stirring ammonia gas (I. 7g, 0 . Imol), was added 4- (pyridin-2-yl – aminocarbonyl) phenylboronic acid (III) (2.42g, lOmmol), Ming dicarbonyl acetylacetonate (0.26g, lmmol), and water 4mL. The reactor was sealed, gradually warmed to 80~90 °, the reaction 16-18 hours, TLC detection, the reaction was complete. Concentrated under reduced pressure, the residue was dissolved in dichloromethane, washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate and water successively, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate. Concentrated to give brown oil, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether (volume ratio 1: 2) column chromatography to give an off-white solid 4- [amino (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl) methyl] -N- (2-pyridyl) benzamide (IV) 1.38g, yield 81 · 2%; ESI-MS (m / z): 340 (m + H).

[0030] Step S2:

[0031] added in the reactor [1- (1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)] – L- proline (1.09g, 6mmol) and thionyl chloride (IOmL), was added dropwise 4mL of triethylamine and heated to 30 to 40 degrees, after the reaction for 2-4 hours under reduced pressure to remove excess thionyl chloride, the residue that is [I- (1- oxo-2-butyn-1-yl )] – L- proline acid chloride (V). The resulting [I- (1- oxo-2-butynyl -1_ yl)] _ L_ proline acid chloride (V) dissolved in 20mL dichloromethane burning, to a solution of 4- [amino (3-chloro -2-P ratio piperazinyl) methyl] -N- (2- pyridinyl) benzamide (IV) (1.35g, 4mmol) and triethylamine (0.6g, 6mmol) in dichloromethane (30mL) solution of in. Dropwise, warmed to 30-50 °, the reaction was stirred for 6 ~ 8 hours, TLC detection, the reaction was complete. Cooled to room temperature, washed with saturated sodium bicarbonate solution, brine and water, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate. Concentrated to give a beige solid of 4- [1- (1-acyl-2-yne-2-yl) carboxamido (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl) methyl] -N- (2- pyridinyl) benzamide (VI) 1.8g, yield 89.6% C3ESI-MS (m / z): 503 (m + H).

[0032] Step S3:

[0033] in a reaction flask was added 4- [I- (1- but-2-yn-acyl-2-yl) carboxamido (3-chloro-2-pyrazinyl) methyl] -N- ( 2-P ratio piperidinyl) benzamide (VI) (1 · 0g, 2mmol), phosphorus oxychloride (1 · 53g, IOmmol) and acetonitrile (25 mL), warmed to 80 ~ 100 ° with stirring, maintaining the temperature reaction 6 ~ 8 h, TLC the reaction was complete. Cooled to room temperature, the reaction solution was poured into 50mL concentration of 8% aqueous ammonia was added ethyl acetate, and the organic phase was separated, the aqueous phase was extracted twice with ethyl acetate. The combined organic phases were washed with brine and water, dried over anhydrous over sodium sulfate. Concentrated and the resulting residue with ethyl acetate and petroleum ether (volume ratio 2: 1) column chromatography to give an off-white solid 4- [8-Chloro -3- [(2S) -I- (1- oxo-2 – butyn-1-yl) -2-pyrrolidinyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-1-yl] -N-2- pyridinyl benzamide (VII) 0.85g, yield 87.8 %; EI-MS m / z: 485 [m + H] + square

[0034] Step S4:

[0035] The pressure reactor was added to 4- [8-Chloro -3- [(2S) -I- (1- oxo-2-butyn-1-yl) -2-pyrrolidinyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin – Buji] -N-2- pyridinyl benzamide (VII) (0.48g, lmmol) and isopropanol (15 mL), cooled to 0 degrees, by controlling the dose into ammonia gas (0.51g, 30mmol), the reactor is closed, warmed up to room temperature for 1 hour, and then continuously increasing the reaction temperature to 110~120 °, maintained at the reaction temperature and pressure 20~24 h, TLC the reaction was complete. Cooled to room temperature, slowly vented, and concentrated under reduced pressure, the resulting residue was dissolved with ethyl acetate, water and saturated brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate. Concentrated and the resulting residue with ethyl acetate and petroleum ether (volume ratio 2: 1) column chromatography to give an off-white solid Acre imatinib ⑴ 0.40g, yield 86 · 0%; 1Η bandit R (DMS0-d6) 1.63 (m, lH), 1.97 (s, 3H), 2.02 ~2.12 (m, lH), 2 · 28~2.35 (m, 2H); 3.36~3.85 (m, 2H), 5 · 47~5.49 (m , lH), 6 · 17~6.23 (m, 2H), 7.12~7.20 (m, 2H), 7 · 73~7.86 (m, 4H), 8 · 16~8.25 (m, 3H), 8 · 41 ( dd, lH), 10.86 (s, lH); EI-MS m / z: 466 [m + H] +.

[0036] 3-chloro starting material employed in the method above relates to the present invention yl pyrazin-2-carbaldehyde (II) and 4- (pyridin-2-yl – aminocarbonyl) phenylboronic acid (III), respectively, refer to methods for their preparation Document “Tetrahedron Letters, 47 (l), 31-34; 2006” international Patent W02013010868 and method for preparing the same compound. Raw [1- (1-oxo-2-butyn-1-yl)] – L- proline acid chloride (V), in one embodiment, the compound may be made [the I-(1-oxo-known -2-yn-1-yl)] – L- proline acylation.

PATENT

US 20170224688

PATENT

CN 107522701

 Example I

[0030] (1) Preparation of ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0031] (S) -2- (8- chloro-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (10g, 28mmol) was dissolved in N- methylpyrrolidone ( SOML), the mass concentration was added 28% aqueous ammonia (168mm〇l), the reaction mixture was placed in a sealed stainless steel autoclave at 85 ° C, stirring the reaction under a pressure of 2.5 atm 6h, after the completion of the reaction, was cooled to 40 ° C and delivery system pressure, slow addition of water (50 mL), cooled to 10 ° C, crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin – 3- yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (8.5 g of), yield 90%, reaction formula of this step is as follows:

Figure CN107522701AD00091

[0033] (2) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0034] (S) -2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (8g, 24mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane (IOOmL) was added tert-butyl dicarbonate (5.7g, 26mmol), reaction mixture was stirred 3h at 25 ° C, after completion of the reaction, post-treatment and purification to give ⑸-2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazole and [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (IoG), 96% yield, this step follows the reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00092

[0036] (3) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0037] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (IOg, 23mmol) was dissolved in tetrahydrofuran ( 80mL), was slowly added N- bromosuccinimide (4.5g, 25mmol), the reaction mixture was 25 ° C the reaction was stirred for 4h. The mixture was then slowly added water (80 mL), cooled to -10 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (I I. Ig), a yield of 94.5%, the reaction formula of this step is as follows:

Figure CN107522701AD00093

[0039] (4) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} 1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0040] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (I Ig, 2lmmol ), 4- (2-pyridyl-carbamoyl) phenylboronic acid (5.7g, 23.4mmol), [1, Γ – bis (diphenylphosphino) ferrocene] dichloropalladium cesium (〇.78g, the I · lmmol), potassium carbonate (4.0g, 29mmol), N, N- dimethylformamide (120 mL) and water (50mL) added to the reaction flask, the reaction mixture was heated to 90 ° C the reaction was stirred for 20 h, the reaction solution was reduced at room temperature, was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, extracted with ethyl acetate, washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, a mixed solvent of ethyl acetate and n-hexane and recrystallized to give (S) -2- {8- tert butoxycarbonyl group -I- [4- (2-P of pyridine-ylcarbamoyl) phenyl] imidazole and sat Jie [I, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, class as a white solid (10.3 g of), a yield of 76.5%, the reaction formula of this step is as follows:

Figure CN107522701AD00101

[0042] (5) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} pyrrolidine:

[0043] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1- [1-carboxylic acid than the burning section slightly ester (10g, 15.8mmol) was dissolved in methanol (80mL), was added cesium charcoal (0.5g), under a hydrogen pressure into 35 ° C the reaction 8h. Concentrated suction through Celite to remove the catalyst and the filtrate was rotary evaporated to dryness to afford ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} pyrrolidine as a white solid powder (7.6 g of), 96% yield, this step follows the reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00102

[0045] (6) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine:

[0046] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } ratio slightly burning Jie (7g, 14mmol) was dissolved in tetrahydrofuran (75 mL), with stirring, was added 2-butyne chloride (I. 7g, 16.6mmol), was added dropwise N, N- diisopropylethylamine (2.7 g, 21 mmol), the reaction mixture was 50 ° C the reaction was stirred for 8h, the reaction solution was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, dilute hydrochloric acid was added was adjusted to neutral, extracted with ethyl acetate was added, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, recrystallized from methanol to give ⑸ -2_ {8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino -1- [4- (2-P of pyridine-ylcarbamoyl) phenyl] imidazole and sat Jie [I, 5_a] [! than 3-yl} -1 – (2_ butynoyl) pyrrolidine-white solid (7g), in 88% yield, this step follows the reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00111

[0048] ⑺ prepared Acalabrutinib:

[0049] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine (7g, 12.4mmol) and dissolved in methanol (70 mL), trifluoroacetic acid (1.55g, 13.6mmol), 65 ° C until the reaction was complete the reaction was stirred for 6h, the reaction was added dropwise to a stirred solution of water (150 mL), cooled to 0 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered to give the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia BTK inhibitors Acalabrut inib, as a white solid (5.3 g of), 92% yield, this step is the following reaction formula:

Figure CN107522701AD00112

[0051] Example 2:

[0052] (1) Preparation of ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0053] (S) -2- (8- chloro-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (15g, 42mmol) was dissolved in N- methylpyrrolidone ( 75 mL), aqueous ammonia (273_〇1) was added mass percent concentration of 28%, the reaction mixture was placed in a sealed stainless steel autoclave at 70 ° C, stirring the reaction under a pressure of 3 atm 8h, after the completion of the reaction, was cooled to 40 ° C and releasing the pressure in the system, slow addition of water (50 mL), cooled to 10 ° C, crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl) pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester, off-white solid (12.9 g of), yield 91% ,, this step reaction scheme in Example 1.

[0054] (2) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0055] (S) -2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (12g, 35.6mmol) was dissolved in chloroform (80mL), was added tert-butyl dicarbonate (7.8g, 35.6mmol), the reaction mixture was stirred for lh the reaction at 35 ° C, after completion of the reaction, post-treatment and purification to give ⑸-2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazole and [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (14.8 g of), in 95% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0056] (3) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0057] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (Hg, 32mmol) was dissolved in 1, 1,2-dichloroethane (90mL), was slowly added bromine (6g, 37.8mmol), the reaction mixture was 20 ° C the reaction was stirred for 6h. After the reaction, water was slowly added (I5mL), cooled to -5 ° C crystallization 4h, filtered and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1-bromo-imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (15.8 g), yield 95.5%, the reaction of the present step is the same formula as in Example 1.

[0058] (4) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} 1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0059] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (15g, 29mmol) , 4- (2-pyridyl-carbamoyl) phenylboronic acid (34 · 7mmol 8 · 4g,), tetrakis (triphenylphosphine) palladium (0 · 84g, 0.73mmol), sodium carbonate (6.9g, 65mmol), tetrahydrofuran (IOOmL) and water (40 mL) was added a reaction flask, the reaction mixture was heated to 80 ° C the reaction was stirred for 24h, the reaction was cooled to room temperature, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, extracted with ethyl acetate, washed with brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, a mixed solvent of ethyl acetate and n-hexane and recrystallized to give ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazole and [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (14.4g), 78% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0060] (5) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} pyrrolidine:

[0061] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-yl _3- it is slightly burned} -1-carboxylic acid ester section (14g, 22mmol) dissolved in isopropanol (85mL), was added Raney nickel (0.5g), under a hydrogen pressure into the reaction 60 ° C 12h. Concentrated suction through Celite to remove the catalyst and the filtrate was rotary evaporated to dryness to afford ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} pyrrolidine as a white solid powder (10.4 g of), 94% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0062] (6) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine:

[0063] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } pyrrolidine (10g, 20mmo 1) was dissolved in N, N- dimethylformamide (SOML), with stirring, was added 2-butyne chloride (3. lg, 30mmol), dropwise addition of triethylamine (2.2g, 22mmol ), the reaction mixture was 60 ° C the reaction was stirred for 4h, the reaction solution was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, dilute hydrochloric acid was added was adjusted to neutral, extracted with ethyl acetate was added, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, and recrystallized from methanol to give ⑸- 2- {8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -l- (2- butynoyl) pyrrolidine-white solid (10.2 g of), a yield of 90.2%, the same reaction scheme of the present embodiment step 1〇

[0064] ⑺ prepared Acalabrutinib:

[0065] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine (IOg, 17.7mmol) was dissolved in ethanol, and (IOOmL), trifluoroacetic acid (2.6g, 23mmol), 50 ° C with stirring until the reaction was complete IOh reaction, the reaction solution was added dropwise to a stirred solution of water (70 mL), cooled to 0 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered to give the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia BTK inhibitors AcaIabrut inib, as a white solid (7.5 g of), yield 91%, reaction of this step formula same as in Example 1.

[0066] Example 3:

[0067] (1) Preparation of ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0068] (S) -2- (8- chloro-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (4.5g, 12.6mmol) was dissolved in N- methyl pyrrolidinone (70 mL), was added mass percent concentration of 28% aqueous ammonia (69.4 mmol), the reaction mixture was placed in the autoclave 90 ° C, the reaction was stirred under atmospheric pressure of 4h, after the completion of the reaction, it was cooled to 35 ° C a sealed stainless steel reactor and releasing the pressure in the system, slow addition of water (50 mL), cooled to 10 ° C, crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give ⑸-2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl) pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester, off-white solid (3.9 g of), 92% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0069] (2) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0070] (S) -2- (8- amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester (3 · 5g, 10 · 4mmol) was dissolved in 1, 4- dioxane (50 mL), was added tert-butyl dicarbonate (2.7g, 12.4mmol), the reaction mixture was stirred at 10 ° C the reaction 6h, after the completion of the reaction, workup and purification, to give (S) 2- (8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (4.3 g of), in 95% yield, according to the present step reaction scheme in Example 1.

[0071] (3) Preparation of (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0072] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-imidazo [l, 5_a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1_ pyrrolidine-carboxylate (4g, 9.6mmol) was dissolved in toluene (50 mL ), was slowly added N- bromosuccinimide (I. 8g, 10. lmmol), the reaction mixture was 35 ° C the reaction was stirred for 2h. The mixture was then slowly added water (25 mL), cooled to -10 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered, and recrystallized from isopropanol to give (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (4.7 g), 94% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0073] (4) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} 1-pyrrolidine-carboxylic acid benzyl ester:

[0074] (S) -2- (8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-1-bromo-imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl) -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate (4g, 7 · 7mmol), 4_ (2- piperidinyl than Jie carbamoyl) phenylboronic acid (2 · 4g, IOmmol), bis (triphenylphosphine) dichloride Leba (0.41g, 0.58mmol), potassium phosphate (I. 9g, 8.9mmol), methyl tert-butyl ether (IOOmL) and water (40 mL) was added a reaction flask, the reaction mixture was heated to 100 ° C the reaction was stirred for 12h, the reaction was cooled to room temperature, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, was added acetic acid extracted with ethyl, brine, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, a mixed solvent of ethyl acetate and n-hexane and recrystallized to give ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2 – pyridin-ylcarbamoyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1-pyrrolidine-carboxylate, an off-white solid (3.9 g of), in 79% yield, this step the reaction scheme in Example 1.

[0075] (5) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5_a] pyrazin-3 -} pyrrolidine:

[0076] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl group -I- [4- (2- carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } -1 Jie section than slightly burning acid ester (3.5g, 5.5mmol) was dissolved in ethanol (50mL), was added cesium charcoal (0.2g), under a hydrogen pressure into 45 ° C the reaction 6h. Concentrated suction through Celite to remove the catalyst and the filtrate was rotary evaporated to dryness to afford ⑸-2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [ I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} pyrrolidine as a white solid powder (2.6 g of), in 95% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0077] (6) Preparation of (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [1, 5-a] pyrazine 3-yl} -1- (2-butynoyl) pyrrolidine:

[0078] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl } ratio slightly burning Jie (2.5g, 5mmol) was dissolved in toluene (50 mL), with stirring, was added 2-butyne chloride (0.62g, 6mmol), was added dropwise N, N- dimethylaniline (Ig, 8.5mmo 1), The reaction mixture was 40 ° C the reaction was stirred for 12h, the reaction solution was concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, dilute hydrochloric acid was added was adjusted to neutral, extracted with ethyl acetate was added, dried over magnesium sulfate, and concentrated by rotary evaporation to dryness, and recrystallized from methanol to give ⑸-2- {8-tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-3-yl} -1- (2-butyn acyl) pyrrolidine-white solid (2.5g), 88% yield, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

[0079] ⑺ prepared Acalabrutinib:

[0080] (S) -2- {8- tert-butoxycarbonyl-amino-1- [4- (2-carbamoyl-pyridyl) phenyl] imidazo [I, 5-a] pyrazin-yl _3_ } -1- (2-block group) ratio slightly burning Jie (2.5g, 4.4mmol) was dissolved in dichloromethane and burned (IOmL), two gas was added acetic acid (0.76g, 6.6mmol), 80 ° C The reaction was stirred 4h until the reaction was complete, the reaction was added dropwise to a stirred solution of water (25 mL), cooled to 0 ° C crystallization 3h, filtered to give the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia BTK inhibitors AcaIabrut inib, as a white solid (1.8 g of), the yield of 89%, this step is the same reaction scheme as in Example 1.

PATENT

US 20170035881

References

  1. Jump up^ “WHO Drug Information – recommended INN” (PDF). WHO Drug Information. World Health Oorganisation. Retrieved 24 December 2015.
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  5. Jump up^ Wu, Jingjing; Zhang, Mingzhi; Liu, Delong (2016-03-09). “Acalabrutinib (ACP-196): a selective second-generation BTK inhibitor”Journal of Hematology & Oncology9 (1). doi:10.1186/s13045-016-0250-9ISSN 1756-8722PMC 4784459Freely accessiblePMID 26957112.
  6. Jump up to:a b c Harrington, Bonnie K.; Gardner, Heather L.; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R.; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael (2016-07-19). “Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma”PLOS ONE11 (7): e0159607. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0159607ISSN 1932-6203PMC 4951150Freely accessiblePMID 27434128.
  7. Jump up to:a b Acerta Pharma Announces Study Published in New England Journal of Medicine Demonstrates Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) Shows Marked Activity in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
  8. Jump up^ 21 studies found for: ACP-196
  9. Jump up^ “Acerta Investor Conference Call – 17 December 2015” (PDF). http://www.astrazeneca.com. Retrieved 2016-11-20.
  10. Jump up^ “Public summary of opinion on orphan designation” (PDF). European Medicines Agency. 2016-04-27. Retrieved 2016-11-20.
  11. Jump up^ “azn201602256k.htm”http://www.sec.gov. Retrieved 2016-11-21.
  12. Jump up^ House, SA Editor Douglas W. (2016-02-25). “AstraZeneca and Acerta Pharma’s acalabrutinib tagged an Orphan Drug in Europe for three indications”Seeking Alpha. Retrieved 2016-11-21.
  13. Jump up^ “Acerta Pharma B.V. – Company Profile – BioCentury”http://www.biocentury.com. Retrieved 2016-11-12.
  14. Jump up^ “Log in to CB Insights”http://www.cbinsights.com. Retrieved 2016-11-12.
  15. Jump up^ “This is The Most Valuable Startup You’ve Never Heard Of”Fortune. 2015-12-17. Retrieved 2016-11-12.
  16. Jump up^ Walker, Ian; Roland, Denise (2015-12-17). “AstraZeneca to Buy Stake in Acerta Pharma”Wall Street JournalISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2016-11-19.
  17. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Nov 26, 2015), Btk inhibitor for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic and small lymphocytic leukemia, retrieved 2016-11-19
  18. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Jun 11, 2015), Therapeutic combination of a pi3k inhibitor and a btk inhibitor, retrieved 2016-11-19
  19. Jump up to:a b IZUMI, Raquel; SALVA, Francisco; HAMDY, Ahmed (Feb 4, 2016), Methods of blocking the cxcr-4/sdf-1 signaling pathway with inhibitors of bruton’s tyrosine kinase, retrieved 2016-11-19
  20. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Aug 4, 2016), Therapeutic combinations of a btk inhibitor, a pi3k inhibitor and/or a jak-2 inhibitor, retrieved 2016-11-19
  21. Jump up^ Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Johnson, David; STAMATIS, Jay; Krejsa, Cecile M.; Slatter, John Gregory (Feb 11, 2016), Methods of treating cancers, immune and autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory diseases based on btk occupancy and btk resynthesis rate, retrieved 2016-11-19
  22. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Feb 18, 2016), Btk inhibitors to treat solid tumors through modulation of the tumor microenvironment, retrieved 2016-11-19
  23. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Feb 18, 2016), Therapeutic combinations of a btk inhibitor, a pi3k inhibitor, a jak-2 inhibitor, and/or a bcl-2 inhibitor, retrieved 2016-11-19
  24. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Feb 18, 2016), Therapeutic combinations of a btk inhibitor, a pi3k inhibitor, a jak-2 inhibitor, a pd-1 inhibitor and/or a pd-l1 inhibitor, retrieved 2016-11-19
  25. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Feb 18, 2016), Therapeutic combinations of a btk inhibitor, a pi3k inhibitor, a jak-2 inhibitor and/or a cdk 4/6 inhibitor, retrieved 2016-11-19
  26. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Jul 28, 2016), Compositions and methods for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic leukemia using a btk inhibitor, retrieved 2016-11-19
  27. Jump up^ HAMDY, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; IZUMI, Raquel; Lannutti, Brian; Covey, Todd; ULRICH, Roger; Johnson, Dave; Barf, Tjeerd; Kaptein, Allard (Aug 18, 2016), Therapeutic combinations of a btk inhibitor, a pi3k inhibitor, a jak-2 inhibitor, a pd-1 inhibitor, and/or a pd-l1 inhibitor, retrieved 2016-11-19
  28. Jump up^ Barf, Tjeerd A.; Jans, Christian Gerardus Johannes Maria; Man, Petrus Antonius De Adrianus; Oubrie, Arthur A.; Raaijmakers, Hans C. A.; Rewinkel, Johannes Bernardus Maria; Sterrenburg, Jan-Gerard; Wijkmans, Jacobus C. H. M. (5 June 2014), United States Patent Application: 0140155385 – 4-IMIDAZOPYRIDAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AND 4-IMIDAZOTRIAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AS BTK INHIBITORS, retrieved 2016-11-19

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Acalabrutinib is a potent and selective BTK (Bruton’s tyrosine kinase) inhibitor. BTK is a cytoplasmic, non-receptor tyrosine kinase that transmits signals from a variety of cell-surface molecules, including the B-cell receptor (BCR) and tissue homing receptors. Genetic BTK deletion causes B-cell immunodeficiency in humans and mice, making this kinase an attractive therapeutic target for B-cell disorders. BTK inhibitors targeting B cell receptor signaling and other survival mechanism showed great promise for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)s holds great promise.

As of 2015 it is in late stage clinical trials for relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Interim results are encouraging : 95% overall response rate. It is also in another 20 clinical trials (alone and in combination) for various cancers.

REFERENCES

1: Maly J, Blachly JS. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Exploiting Vulnerabilities with Targeted Agents. Curr Hematol Malig Rep. 2016 Feb 11. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 26893063.

2: Byrd JC, Harrington B, O’Brien S, Jones JA, Schuh A, Devereux S, Chaves J, Wierda WG, Awan FT, Brown JR, Hillmen P, Stephens DM, Ghia P, Barrientos JC, Pagel JM, Woyach J, Johnson D, Huang J, Wang X, Kaptein A, Lannutti BJ, Covey T, Fardis M, McGreivy J, Hamdy A, Rothbaum W, Izumi R, Diacovo TG, Johnson AJ, Furman RR. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 28;374(4):323-32. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509981. Epub 2015 Dec 7. PubMed PMID: 26641137.

Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017231995 BTK Inhibitors to Treat Solid Tumors Through Modulation of the Tumor Microenvironment
2015-08-11
US2017095471 Methods of Treating Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Small Lymphocytic Leukemia Using a BTK Inhibitor
2015-01-21
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017231986 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor, a JAK-2 Inhibitor, and/or a BCL-2 Inhibitor
2015-08-11
US2017035756 METHODS OF BLOCKING THE CXCR-4/SDF-1 SIGNALING PATHWAY WITH INHIBITORS OF BRUTON’S TYROSINE KINASE
2015-04-10
US2017266191 Therapeutic Combination of PI3K Inhibitor and a BTK Inhibitor
2014-12-05
US2016159810 4-IMIDAZOPYRIDAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AND 4-IMIDAZOTRIAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AS BTK INHIBITORS
2016-02-09
2016-06-09
US2017143712 Methods of Treating Cancers, Immune and Autoimmune Diseases, and Inflammatory Diseases Based on BTK Occupancy and BTK Resynthesis Rate
2017-02-07
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017035881 Therapeutic Combinations of an IRAK4 Inhibitor and a BTK Inhibitor
2016-10-19
US2017071962 Therapeutic Combinations of a Proteasome Inhibitor and a BTK Inhibitor
2016-09-12
US9717745 PHARMACEUTICAL COMPOSITIONS AND THEIR USE FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES
2016-06-15
US9758524 4-IMIDAZOPYRIDAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AND 4-IMIDAZOTRIAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AS BTK INHIBITORS
2016-02-09
2016-06-02
US2017224819 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor, a JAK-2 Inhibitor, and/or a CDK 4/6 Inhibitor
2015-08-11
Patent ID

Patent Title

Submitted Date

Granted Date

US2017029428 Solid Forms and Formulations of Imidazopyrazine Compound
2016-07-01
US2017239351 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor, a JAK-2 Inhibitor, a PD-1 Inhibitor, and/or a PD-L1 Inhibitor
2015-08-11
US2017136014 Therapeutic Combinations of a BTK Inhibitor, a PI3K Inhibitor and/or a JAK-2 Inhibitor
2015-06-17
US9290504 4-IMIDAZOPYRIDAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AND 4-IMIDAZOTRIAZIN-1-YL-BENZAMIDES AS BTK INHIBITORS
2012-07-11
2014-06-05
US2017224688 Methods of Using BTK Inhibitors to Treat Dermatoses
2017-02-03
Acalabrutinib
Acalabrutinib.svg
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
Chemical and physical data
Formula C26H23N7O2
Molar mass 465.507 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

FDA Orange Book Patents

FDA Orange Book Patents: 1 of 3 (FDA Orange Book Patent ID)
Patent 9290504
Expiration Jul 11, 2032
Applicant ASTRAZENECA
Drug Application N210259 (Prescription Drug: CALQUENCE. Ingredients: ACALABRUTINIB)
FDA Orange Book Patents: 2 of 3 (FDA Orange Book Patent ID)
Patent 9758524
Expiration Jul 11, 2032
Applicant ASTRAZENECA
Drug Application N210259 (Prescription Drug: CALQUENCE. Ingredients: ACALABRUTINIB)
FDA Orange Book Patents: 3 of 3 (FDA Orange Book Patent ID)
Patent 9796721
Expiration Jul 1, 2036
Applicant ASTRAZENECA
Drug Application N210259 (Prescription Drug: CALQUENCE. Ingredients: ACALABRUTINIB)

////////////AcalabrutinibrINNACP-196, fda 2017, Акалабрутиниб , أكالابروتينيب , 阿可替尼 , Orphan Drug, breakthrough therapy designation, Lymphoma, mantle cell, ACERTA PHARMA

CC#CC(=O)N1CCC[C@H]1c2nc(c3n2ccnc3N)c4ccc(cc4)C(=O)Nc5ccccn5

CC#CC(=O)N1CCCC1C2=NC(=C3N2C=CN=C3N)C4=CC=C(C=C4)C(=O)NC5=CC=CC=N5

PF 06821497


str1

PF 06821497

Cas 1844849-11-1

Designed to treat lymphoma

1(2H)-Isoquinolinone, 5,8-dichloro-2-[(1,2-dihydro-4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-7-[(S)-methoxy-3-oxetanylmethyl]-

MF C22 H24 Cl2 N2 O5, 

MW 467.34

ChemSpider 2D Image | 5,8-Dichloro-2-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-7-[methoxy(3-oxetanyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-isoquinolinone | C22H24Cl2N2O5PF 06821497

5,8-Dichloro-2-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-7-[methoxy(3-oxetanyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-isoquinolinone

1(2H)-Isoquinolinone, 5,8-dichloro-2-[(1,2-dihydro-4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-7-(methoxy-3-oxetanylmethyl)-

  • Molecular Formula C22H24Cl2N2O5
  • Average mass 467.342 Da

SCHEMBL17330377.pngPF 06821497

5,8-dichloro-2-[(4-methoxy-6-methyl-2-oxo-1H-pyridin-3-yl)methyl]-7-[(S)-methoxy(oxetan-3-yl)methyl]-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-1-one

US2015361067

Inventors Michael Raymond Collins, Robert Steven Kania, Robert Arnold Kumpf, Pei-Pei Kung, Daniel Tyler Richter, Scott Channing Sutton, Martin James Wythes
Original Assignee Pfizer Inc.Image result
  • Epigenetic alterations play an important role in the regulation of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell survival. The epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes may occur through alteration of CpG island methylation patterns, histone modification, and dysregulation of DNA binding protein. Polycomb genes are a set of epigenetic effectors. EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2) is the catalytic component of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2), a conserved multi-subunit complex that represses gene transcription by methylating lysine 27 on Histone H3 (H3K27). EZH2 plans a key role in regulating gene expression patterns that regulate cell fate decisions, such as differentiation and self-renewal. EZH2 is overexpressed in certain cancer cells, where it has been linked to cell proliferation, cell invasion, chemoresistance and metastasis.
  • High EZH2 expression has been correlated with poor prognosis, high grade, and high stage in several cancer types, including breast, colorectal, endometrial, gastric, liver, kidney, lung, melanoma, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, and bladder cancers. See Crea et al., Crit. Rev. Oncol. Hematol. 2012, 83:184-193, and references cited therein; see also Kleer et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2003, 100:11606-11; Mimori et al., Eur. J. Surg. Oncol. 2005, 31:376-80; Bachmann et al., J. Clin. Oncol. 2006, 24:268-273; Matsukawa et al., Cancer Sci. 2006, 97:484-491; Sasaki et al. Lab. Invest. 2008, 88:873-882; Sudo et al., Br. J. Cancer 2005, 92(9):1754-1758; Breuer et al., Neoplasia 2004, 6:736-43; Lu et al., Cancer Res. 2007, 67:1757-1768; Ougolkov et al., Clin. Cancer Res. 2008, 14:6790-6796; Varambally et al., Nature 2002, 419:624-629; Wagener et al., Int. J. Cancer 2008, 123:1545-1550; and Weikert et al., Int. J. Mol. Med. 2005, 16:349-353.
    Recurring somatic mutations in EZH2 have been identified in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphomas (FL). Mutations altering EZH2 tyrosine 641 (e.g., Y641C, Y641F, Y641N, Y641S, and Y641H) were reportedly observed in up to 22% of germinal center B-cell DLBCL and 7% of FL. Morin et al. Nat. Genetics 2010 February; 42(2):181-185. Mutations of alanine 677 (A677) and alanine 687 (A687) have also been reported. McCabe et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2012, 109:2989-2994; Majer et al. FEBS Letters 2012, 586:3448-3451. EZH2 activating mutations have been suggested to alter substrate specificity resulting in elevated levels of trimethylated H3K27 (H3K27me3).
    Accordingly, compounds that inhibit the activity of wild type and/or mutant forms of EZH2 may be of interest for the treatment of cancer.

SYNTHESIS

Steps

1 COUPLING, Ag2CO3

2 Alkylation, K2CO3

3 LiAlH4 REDUCTION

4 THIONYL CHLORIDE

5 N-Alkylation of Amides, t-BuOK

6 A GRIGNARD REACTION

7 AN ALKYLATION , METHYL IODIDE, t-BuOK

8 HYDROGENATION, DE BENZYLATION,  PLATINUM OXIDE

9 LAST STEP separation by chiral preparative, SFC on (R,R) Whelk O1 column, TO GET PF 06821497

PATENT

US 20150361067

///////////////PF 06821497, 1844849-11-1, PFIZER, lymphoma, Pei-Pei Kung,  @pfizer, #ACSSanFran, Michael Raymond Collins, Robert Steven Kania, Robert Arnold Kumpf, Pei-Pei Kung, Daniel Tyler Richter, Scott Channing Sutton, Martin James Wythes

Next up in #MEDI 1st time disclosures Pei-Pei Kung from @pfizer presenting a molecule designed to treat lymphoma #ACSSanFran

str0

CO[C@H](c2cc(Cl)c3CCN(CC1=C(OC)C=C(C)NC1=O)C(=O)c3c2Cl)C4COC4

CC1=CC(=C(C(=O)N1)CN2CCC3=C(C=C(C(=C3C2=O)Cl)C(C4COC4)OC)Cl)OC

CTI BioPharma receives Israeli approval for aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma therapy


Chemical structure for CTK0H5262

 

 

Pixantrone.svg

Pixantrone

BBR-2778 , CTK0H5262

 

  • Pixolti
  • Pixuvri
  • UNII-P0R64C4CR9

 

An immunosuppressant.

144510-96-3 [RN]

5,8-Bis((2-aminoethyl)amino)-2-aza-anthracene-9,10-dione

6,9-Bis((2-aminoethyl)amino)benz(g)isoquinoline-5,10-dione

5,8-Bis((2-aminoethyl)amino)-2-aza-anthracene-9,10-dione

6,9-Bis((2-aminoethyl)amino)benz(g)isoquinoline-5,10-dione

CTI BioPharma receives Israeli approval for aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma therapy

CTI BioPharma has obtained Israeli Ministry of Health’s approval for Pixuvri (pixantrone), as a monotherapy to treat adult patients with multiply relapsed or refractory aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma who have received up to three previous courses of treatment.

The company also announced that the Dutch Healthcare Authority and the College voor zorgverzekeringen of the Netherlands have approved funding for Pixuvri as an add-on drug for patients who need a third or fourth-line treatment option for aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

Tel Aviv University faculty of medicine Dr Abraham Avigdor said: “The approval of PIXUVRI in Israel provides patients with aggressive B-cell NHL who have failed second or third-line therapy a new approved option, where none existed before, that can effectively treat their disease with manageable side-effects.

 

read at

http://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/news/newscti-biopharma-receives-israeli-approval-aggressive-b-cell-non-hodgkins-lymphoma-therapy-4321986?WT.mc_id=DN_News

 

Pixantrone
Pixantrone.svg
Identifiers
CAS number  144510-96-3
PubChem 134019
ChemSpider 118174 Yes
KEGG D05522 Yes
ChEMBL CHEMBL167731 Yes
ATC code L01DB11
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C17H19N5O2
Molar mass 325.365 g/mol
Appearance Blue solid
Pharmacology
Routes of
administration
Intravenous
Elimination
half-life
9.5–17.5 hours
Excretion Fecal (main route of excretion) and renal (4–9%)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)

Pixantrone dimaleate [USAN]

CAS  144675-97-8

Molecular Formula

  • C17-H19-N5-O2.2C4-H4-O4

Molecular Weight

  • 441.4417
  • Benz(g)isoquinoline-5,10-dione, 6,9-bis((2-aminoethyl)amino)-, (2Z)-2-butenedioate (1:2)

On May 10, 2012, the European Commission issued a conditional marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for pixantrone for the treatment of adult patients with multiply relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma (NHL). Pixantrone is a cytotoxic aza-anthracenedione that directly alkylates DNA-forming stable DNA adducts and cross-strand breaks. The recommended dose of pixantrone is 50 mg/m2 administered on days 1, 8, and 15 of each 28-day cycle for up to 6 cycles. In the main study submitted for this application, a significant difference in response rate (proportion of complete responses and unconfirmed complete responses) was observed in favor of pixantrone (20.0% vs. 5.7% for pixantrone and physician’s best choice, respectively), supported by the results of secondary endpoints of median progression-free and overall survival times (increase of 2.7 and 2.6 months, respectively). The most common side effects with pixantrone were bone marrow suppression (particularly of the neutrophil lineage) nausea, vomiting, and asthenia. This article summarizes the scientific review of the application leading to approval in the European Union. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website (http://www.ema.europa.eu).

 

 

Pixantrone (rINN; trade name Pixuvri) is an experimental antineoplastic (anti-cancer) drug, an analogue of mitoxantrone with fewertoxic effects on cardiac tissue.[1] It acts as a topoisomerase II poison and intercalating agent.[2][3] The code name BBR 2778 refers topixantrone dimaleate, the actual substance commonly used in clinical trials.[4]

 

 

History

Anthracyclines are important chemotherapy agents. However, their use is associated with irreversible and cumulative heart damage. Investigators have attempted to design related drugs that maintain the biological activity, but do not possess the cardiotoxicity of the anthracyclines.[5] Pixantrone was developed to reduce heart damage related to treatment while retaining efficacy.[1]

Random screening at the US National Cancer Institute of a vast number of compounds provided by the Allied Chemical Company led to the discovery of ametantrone as having significant anti-tumor activity. Further investigation regarding the rational development of analogs of ametantrone led to the synthesis of mitoxantrone, which also exhibited marked anti-tumor activity[5] Mitoxantrone was considered as an analog of doxorubicin with less structural complexity but with a similar mode of action. In clinical studies, mitoxantrone was shown to be effective against numerous types of tumors with less toxic side effects than those resulting from doxorubicin therapy. However, mitoxantrone was not totally free of cardiotoxicity. A number of structurally modified analogs of mitoxantrone were synthesized and structure-activity relationship studies made.[5] BBR 2778 was originally synthesized by University of Vermont researchers Miles P. Hacker and Paul A. Krapcho[5] and initially characterized in vitro for tumor cell cytotoxicity and mechanism of action by studies at the Boehringer Mannheim Italia Research Center, Monza, and University of VermontBurlington.[4]Other studies have been completed at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, the Istituto Nazionale Tumori,Milan, and the University of Padua.[2][6][4] In the search for novel heteroanalogs of anthracenediones, it was selected as the most promising compound. Toxicological studies indicated that BBR 2778 was not cardiotoxic, and US patents are held by the University of Vermont. An additional US patent application was completed in June 1995 by Boehringer Mannheim, Italy.[5]

Novuspharma, an Italian company, was established in 1998 following the merger of Boehringer Mannheim and Hoffmann-La Roche, and BBR 2778 was developed as Novuspharma’s leading anti-cancer drug, pixantrone.[7] A patent application for the injectable preparation was filed in May 2003.[8]

In 2003, Cell Therapeutics, a Seattle biotechnology company, acquired pixantrone through a merger with Novuspharma.[9]

Clinical trials

Pixantrone is a substance that is being studied in the treatment of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called antitumor antibiotics.[10] phase III clinical trials of pixantrone have been completed.[11][12] Pixantrone is being studied as an antineoplastic for different kinds of cancer, including solid tumors and hematological malignancies such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

Animal studies demonstrated that pixantrone does not worsen pre-existing heart muscle damage, suggesting that pixantrone may be useful in patients pretreated with anthracyclines. While only minimal cardiac changes are observed in mice given repeated cycles of pixantrone, 2 cycles of traditional anthracyclines doxorubicin or mitoxantrone result in marked or severe heart muscle degeneragion.[1]

Clinical trials substituting pixantrone for doxorubicin in standard first-line treatment of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, had a reduction in severe side effects when compared to patients treated with standard doxorubicin-based therapy. Despite pixantrone patients receiving more treatment cycles, a three-fold reduction in the incidence of severe heart damage was seen as well as clinically significant reductions in infections and thrombocytopenia, and a significant reduction in febrile neutropenia. These findings could have major implications for treating patients with breast cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia, where debilitating cardiac damage from doxorubicin might be prevented.[13]Previous treatment options for multiply relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma had disappointing response rates.[14]

The completed phase II RAPID trial compared the CHOP-R regimen of Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, Prednisone, and Rituximab to the same regimen, but substituting Doxorubicin with Pixantrone. The objective was to show that Pixantrone was not inferior to Doxorubicin and less toxic to the heart.[15]

Pixantrone was shown to have potentially reduced cardiotoxicity and demonstrated promising clinical activity in these phase II studies in heavily pretreated non-Hodgkin lymphomapatients.[14]

The pivotal phase III EXTEND (PIX301) randomized clinical trial studied pixantrone to see how well it works compared to other chemotherapy drugs in treating patients with relapsed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.[16] The complete response rate in patients treated with pixantrone has been significantly higher than in those receiving other chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of relapsed/refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.[14]

Administration

It can be administered through a peripheral vein rather than a central implanted catheter as required for other similar drugs.[8][14]

Regulatory approval

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

The FDA granted fast track designation for pixantrone in patients who had previously been treated two or more times for relapsed or refractory aggressive NHL. Study sponsor Cell Therapeutics announced that Pixantrone achieved the primary efficacy endpoint. The minutes of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee meeting of March 22, 2010[17]show that this had not in fact been achieved with statistical significance and this combined with major safety concerns lead to the conclusion that the trial was not sufficient to support approval. In April 2010 the FDA asked for an additional trial.[18]

European Medicines Agency

On May 5, 2009, Pixantrone became available in Europe on a Named-Patient Basis. A named-patient program is a compassionate use drug supply program under which physicians can legally supply investigational drugs to qualifying patients. Under a named-patient program, investigational drugs can be administered to patients who are suffering from serious illnesses prior to the drug being approved by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency. “Named-patient” distribution refers to the distribution or sale of a product to a specific healthcare professional for the treatment of an individual patient. In Europe, under the named-patient program the drug is most often purchased through the national health system.[19] In 2012 pixantrone received conditional marketing authorization in the European Union as Monotherapy to Treat Adult Patients with Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin B-Cell Lymphomas.

Research

Pixantrone is as potent as mitoxantrone in animal models of multiple sclerosis.[20] Pixantrone has a similar mechanism of action as mitoxantrone on the effector function of lymphomonocyte B and T cells in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis but with lower cardiotoxicity. Pixantrone inhibits antigen specific and mitogen induced lymphomononuclear cell proliferation, as well as IFN-gamma production.[21] Clinical trials are currently ongoing in Europe.

Pixantrone also reduces the severity of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in Lewis rats,[22] and in vitro cell viability experiments indicated that Pixantrone significantly reduces amyloid beta (A beta(1-42)) neurotoxicity, a mechanism implicated in Alzheimer’s disease.[23]

 

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3,4-Pyridinedicarboxylic acid (I) was converted to the cyclic anhydride (II) upon heating with acetic anhydride. Friedel-Crafts condensation of anhydride (II) with p-difluorobenzene (III) in the presence of AlCl3 gave rise to a mixture of two regioisomeric keto acids, (IV) and (V). Cyclization of this mixture in fuming sulfuric acid at 140 C generated the benzoisoquinoline (VI) (1,2). Subsequent displacement of the fluorine atoms of (VI) with ethylenediamine ( VII) in pyridine provided the target bis (2-aminoethylamino) derivative, which was finally converted to the stable dimaleate salt. Alternatively, ethylenediamine (VII) was protected as the mono-N-Boc derivative (VIII) by treatment with Boc2O. Condensation of the difluoro compound (VI) with the protected ethylenediamine (VIII) furnished (IX). The Boc groups of (IX) were then removed by treatment with trifluoroacetic acid. After adjustment of the pH to 4.2 with KOH, treatment with maleic acid provided BBR-2778.

J Med Chem1994,37, (6): 828

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References

  1.  Cavalletti E, Crippa L, Mainardi P, Oggioni N, Cavagnoli R, Bellini O, Sala F. (2007). “Pixantrone (BBR 2778) has reduced cardiotoxic potential in mice pretreated with doxorubicin: comparative studies against doxorubicin and mitoxantrone”. Invest New Drugs. 25 (3): 187–95. doi:10.1007/s10637-007-9037-8PMID 17285358.
  2. De Isabella P, Palumbo M, Sissi C, Capranico G, Carenini N, Menta E, Oliva A, Spinelli S, Krapcho AP, Giuliani FC, Zunino F. (1995). “Topoisomerase II DNA cleavage stimulation, DNA binding activity, cytotoxicity, and physico-chemical properties of 2-aza- and 2-aza-oxide-anthracenedione derivatives”. Mol Pharmacol. 48 (1): 30–8.PMID 7623772.
  3.  Evison BJ, Mansour OC, Menta E, Phillips DR, Cutts SM (2007). “Pixantrone can be activated by formaldehyde to generate a potent DNA adduct forming agent”Nucleic Acids Res. 35 (11): 3581–9. doi:10.1093/nar/gkm285PMC 1920253.PMID 17483512.
  4.  Krapcho AP, Petry ME, Getahun Z, Landi JJ Jr, Stallman J, Polsenberg JF, Gallagher CE, Maresch MJ, Hacker MP, Giuliani FC, Beggiolin G, Pezzoni G, Menta E, Manzotti C, Oliva A, Spinelli S, Tognella S (1994). “6,9-Bis[(aminoalkyl)amino]benzo[g]isoquinoline-5,10-diones. A novel class of chromophore-modified antitumor anthracene-9,10-diones: synthesis and antitumor evaluations”. J Med Chem. 37 (6): 828–37. doi:10.1021/jm00032a018PMID 8145234.
  5.  US patent 5587382, Krapcho AP, Hacker MP, Cavalletti E, Giuliani FC, “6,9-bis[(2-aminoethyl) amino]benzo [g]isoquinoline-5,10- dione dimaleate; an aza-anthracenedione with reduced cardiotoxicity”, issued 1996-12-24, assigned to Boehringer Mannheim Italia, SpA
  6.  Zwelling LA, Mayes J, Altschuler E, Satitpunwaycha P, Tritton TR, Hacker MP. (1993). “Activity of two novel anthracene-9,10-diones against human leukemia cells containing intercalator-sensitive or -resistant forms of topoisomerase II”. Biochem Pharmacol. 46 (2): 265–71. doi:10.1016/0006-2952(93)90413-QPMID 8394077.
  7.  Borchmann P, Reiser M (May 2003). “Pixantrone (Novuspharma)”. IDrugs 6 (5): 486–90. PMID 12789604.
  8.  EP patent 1503797, Bernareggi A, Livi V, “Injectable Pharmaceutical Compositions of an Anthracenedione Derivative with Anti-Tumoral Activity”, published 2003-11-27, issued 2008-09-29, assigned to Cell Therapeutics Europe S.R.L.
  9.  Pollack, Andrew (2003-06-17). “Company News; Cell Therapeutics Announces Plan To Buy Novuspharma”The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-22.
  10. Jump up^ Mosby’s Medical Dictionary, 8th edition. © 2009, Elsevier. “definition of antineoplastic antibiotic”. Free Online Medical Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  11. Jump up^ “NCT00088530”BBR 2778 for Relapsed, Aggressive Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL). ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  12.  “NCT00551239”Fludarabine and Rituximab With or Without Pixantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. ClinicalTrials.gov. 2012-01-31. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  13. “Pixantrone Combination Therapy for First-line Treatment of Aggressive Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Results in Reduction in Severe Toxicities Including Heart Damage When Compared to Doxorubicin-based Therapy”Press Release. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  14. Jump up to:a b c d Engert A, Herbrecht R, Santoro A, Zinzani PL, Gorbatchevsky I (September 2006). “EXTEND PIX301: a phase III randomized trial of pixantrone versus other chemotherapeutic agents as third-line monotherapy in patients with relapsed, aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma”. Clin Lymphoma Myeloma 7 (2): 152–4.doi:10.3816/CLM.2006.n.055PMID 17026830.
  15. Jump up^ “NCT00268853”A Trial in Patients With Diffuse Large-B-cell Lymphoma Comparing Pixantrone Against Doxorubicin. ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  16. Jump up^ “NCT00101049”BBR 2778 for Relapsed, Aggressive Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL). ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  17. Jump up^ Vesely N, Eckhardt SG (2010-03-22). “NDA 022-481 PIXUVRI (pixantrone dimaleate) injection” (pdf). Summary Minutes of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee. United States Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  18. Jump up^ “Cell Therapeutics Formally Appeals FDA’s Nonapprovable Ruling for Pixantrone”. GEN News. 2010-12-03.
  19. Jump up^ “Pixantrone Now Available in Europe on a Named-Patient Basis”. Retrieved 2012-01-31.
  20. Jump up^ Gonsette RE, Dubois B (August 2004). “Pixantrone (BBR2778): a new immunosuppressant in multiple sclerosis with a low cardiotoxicity”. J. Neurol. Sci. 223(1): 81–6. doi:10.1016/j.jns.2004.04.024PMID 15261566.
  21. Jump up^ Mazzanti B, Biagioli T, Aldinucci A, Cavaletti G, Cavalletti E, Oggioni N, Frigo M, Rota S, Tagliabue E, Ballerini C, Massacesi L, Riccio P, Lolli F (November 2005). “Effects of pixantrone on immune-cell function in the course of acute rat experimental allergic encephalomyelitis”. J. Neuroimmunol. 168 (1-2): 111–7.doi:10.1016/j.jneuroim.2005.07.010PMID 16120465.
  22. Jump up^ Ubiali F, Nava S, Nessi V, Longhi R, Pezzoni G, Capobianco R, Mantegazza R, Antozzi C, Baggi F (February 2008). “Pixantrone (BBR2778) reduces the severity of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in Lewis rats”. J. Immunol. 180 (4): 2696–703. PMID 18250482.
  23. Jump up^ Colombo R, Carotti A, Catto M, Racchi M, Lanni C, Verga L, Caccialanza G, De Lorenzi E (April 2009). “CE can identify small molecules that selectively target soluble oligomers of amyloid beta protein and display antifibrillogenic activity”. Electrophoresis 30(8): 1418–29. doi:10.1002/elps.200800377PMID 19306269.

 

 

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