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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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Picropodophyllin


Picropodophyllin.png

Image result for Picropodophyllin

2D chemical structure of 477-47-4

Picropodophyllin

Picropodophyllotoxin

CAS 477-47-4

AXL1717, NSC 36407, BRN 0099161

414.4 g/mol, C22H22O8

(5R,5aR,8aS,9R)-5-hydroxy-9-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5a,6,8a,9-tetrahydro-5H-[2]benzofuro[5,6-f][1,3]benzodioxol-8-one

Furo(3′,4′:6,7)naphtho(2,3-d)-1,3-dioxol-6(5aH)-one, 5,8,8a,9-tetrahydro-9-hydroxy-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-, (5R-(5-alpha,5a-alpha,8a-alpha,9-alpha))-

5-19-10-00665 (Beilstein Handbook Reference)

Axelar is developing picropodophyllin, a small-molecule IGF-1 receptor antagonist for the treatment of cancer including NSCLC and malignant astrocytoma. In February 2019, a phase Ia study was planned to initiate for solid tumor in March 2019.

Picropodophyllin is a cyclolignan alkaloid found in the mayapple plant family (Podophyllum peltatum), and a small molecule inhibitor of the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) with potential antineoplastic activity. Picropodophyllin specifically inhibits the activity and downregulates the cellular expression of IGF1R without interfering with activities of other growth factor receptors, such as receptors for insulin, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and mast/stem cell growth factor (KIT). This agent shows potent activity in the suppression o f tumor cell proliferation and the induction of tumor cell apoptosis. IGF1R, a receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, plays a critical role in the growth and survival of many types of cancer cells.

Picropodophyllotoxin is an organic heterotetracyclic compound that has a furonaphthodioxole skeleton bearing 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl and hydroxy substituents. It has a role as an antineoplastic agent, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, an insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 antagonist and a plant metabolite. It is a lignan, a furonaphthodioxole and an organic heterotetracyclic compound.

Picropodophyllin has been investigated for the treatment of Non Small Cell Lung Cancer.

One of the largest challenges in pharmaceutical drug development is that drug compounds often are poorly soluble, or even insoluble, in aqeous media. Insufficient drug solubility means insufficient bioavailability, as well as poor plasma exposure of the drug when administered to humans and animals. Variability of plasma exposure in humans is yet a problem when developing drugs which are poorly soluble, or even insoluble, in aqeous media.

It is estimated that between 40% and 70 % of all new chemical entities identified in drug discovery programs, are insufficiently soluble in aqeous media (M. Lindenberg, S et al: European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceuticals, vol. 58, no.2, pp. 265-278, 2004). Scientists have investigated various ways of solving the problem with poor drug solubility in order to enhance bioavailability of poorly absorbed drugs, aiming at increasing their clinical efficacy when administered orally.

Technologies such as increase of the surface area and hence dissolution may sometimes solve solubility problems. Other techniques that may also solve bioavailability problems are addition of surfactants and polymers. However, each chemical compound has its own unique chemical and physical properties, and hence has its own unique challenges when being formulated into a pharmaceutical product that can exert its clinical efficacy.

Picropodophyllin is an insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor inhibitor fiGF-lR inhibitor) small-molecule compound belonging to the class of compounds denominated cyclolignans, having the chemical structure:

The patent applicant is presently entering clinical phase II development with its development compound picropodophyllin (AXL1717). However, picropodophyllin is poorly soluble in aqueous media. In a phase I clinical study performed by the applicant in 2012 (Ekman S et al; Acta Oncologica, 2016; 55: pp. 140-148), it was discovered that picropodophyllin, when administered as an oral suspension to lung cancer patients, resulted in unacceptable variability in drug exposure. A large variability in plasma exposure of the active drug picropodophyllin occurred not only within certain patients, but also between several patients.

Yet a problem with administering picropodophyllin as an aqeous solution, is that due to the poor solubility in aqueous media, it is difficult or even impossible to reach the required therapeutic doses.

The compound picropodophyllin is furthermore physically unstable, and transforms from amorphous picropodophyllin into crystalline picropodophyllin. Yet a stability problem with picropodophyllin is that it is chemically unstable in solution.

Image result for Picropodophyllin AND podophyllotoxin

Product case, WO02102804

Patent

WO-2019130194

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019130194&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION&_cid=P10-JXYAA3-53049-1

Novel amorphous forms of picropodophyllin , processes for their preparation and compositions comprising them are claimed. Also claims are their use for treating cancers, such as neurologic cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, genitourinary cancer, gynecologic cancer, hematologic cancer, musculoskeletal cancer, skin cancer, endocrine cancer, and eye cancers. , claiming picropodophyllin derivatives as modulators of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1), useful for treating cancers, assigned to Axelar AB ,

CLIP

Image result for Picropodophyllin

CLIP

https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2004/cc/b312245j/unauth#!divAbstract

Image result for Picropodophyllin

http://www.rsc.org/suppdata/cc/b3/b312245j/b312245j.pdf

dH(CDCl3; 300 MHz; Me4Si): 2.64-2.78 (1 H, m, 3-H), 3.23 (1 H, dd, J 4.4 and 8.2, 2-H), 3.81 (6 H, s, 2 x OMe), 3.85 (3 H, s, OMe), 4.09 (1 H, d, J 4.4, 1-H), 4.38–4.59 (3 H, m, 11-H2 and 4-H), 5.91 (1 H, d, J 1.5, OCH2O), 5.93 (1 H, d, J 1.5, OCH2O), 6.35 (1 H, s, 5-H/8-H), 6.46 (1 H, s, 2’-H and 6’-H) and 7.07 (1 H, s, 5-H/8-H).

CLIP

Image result for Picropodophyllin

PAPER

Organic Letters (2018), 20(6), 1651-1654

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.orglett.8b00408

Abstract Image

A nickel-catalyzed reductive cascade approach to the efficient construction of diastereodivergent cores embedded in podophyllum lignans is developed for the first time. Their gram-scale access paved the way for unified syntheses of naturally occurring podophyllotoxin and other members.

Synthesis of (−)-Podophyllotoxin (1)

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acs.orglett.8b00408/suppl_file/ol8b00408_si_001.pdf

The residue was purified by flash column chromatography (petroleum ether/EtOAc = 4 : 1 → petroleum ether/EtOAc = 2 : 1) on silica gel to afford 1 (8.6 mg, 87% yield) as a white solid; Rf = 0.23 (petroleum ether/EtOAc = 1 : 1); [α]20 D = –115.00 (c = 1.00, CHCl3) [ref.13: [α]20 D = –101.7 (c = 0.55, EtOH)]; Mp. 167–168 °C; 1H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3): δ = 7.11 (s, 1H), 6.51 (s, 1H), 6.37 (s, 2H), 5.98 (s, 1H), 5.96 (s, 1H), 4.77 (t, J = 8.4 Hz, 1H), 4.60 (t, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H), 4.59 (d, J = 4.4 Hz, 1H), 4.08 (dd, J = 9.6, 8.8 Hz, 1H), 3.81 (s, 3H), 3.75 (s, 6H), 2.84 (dd, J = 14.0, 4.4 Hz, 1H), 2.83−2.74 (m, 1H), 2.13 (d, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H, −OH) ppm; 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCl3): δ = 174.6, 152.5 (2C), 147.7, 147.6, 137.1, 135.5, 133.3, 131.0, 109.7, 108.4 (2C), 106.3, 101.4, 72.6, 71.4, 60.7, 56.2 (2C), 45.2, 44.1, 40.6 ppm.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acs.orglett.8b00408/suppl_file/ol8b00408_si_002.pdf

PAPER

Organic Letters (2017), 19(24), 6530-6533

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.orglett.7b03236

Abstract Image

he first catalytic enantioselective total synthesis of (−)-podophyllotoxin is accomplished by a challenging organocatalytic cross-aldol Heck cyclization and distal stereocontrolled transfer hydrogenation in five steps from three aldehydes. Reversal of selectivity in hydrogenation led to the syntheses of other stereoisomers from the common precursor.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/acs.orglett.7b03236/suppl_file/ol7b03236_si_001.pdf

(-)-Picropodophyllin 4. The lactone 5 (0.2 g, 0.38 mmol) was taken in 1-pentanol (5 mL) in a double neck RB flask at rt. Water (0.14 mL, 7.6 mmol) was added to above mixture and it was then degassed with argon followed by addition of Pd/C (0.04 g, 20% by wt.) and HCO2Na (0.78g, 11.4 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at 40 °C for 12 h. On completion, the reaction mixture was diluted with EtOAc (200 mL), filtered through a celite pad and solvent was removed under vacuum. This crude mixture was dissolved in THF (3.8 mL), TBAF (1.9 mL, 1.9 mmol, 1M in THF) was added and stirred for 6 h at 27 °C. On completion, EtOAc (250 mL) was added, washed with water (100 mL), brine and dried over Na2SO4. After removal of solvent, the crude product was purified by column chromatography (hexanes-EtOAc, 3:2) to get the title compound as a white solid (0.082 g, 52%): Rf 0.32 (hexanes/EtOAc, 1:1); [α]25 D = -10.6 (c = 0.4, CHCl3) [lit. -10 (c = 0.3, CHCl3), -11 (c = 0.41, CHCl3)]3a,b;

Mp 214-216 °C; 1H NMR (600 MHz, CDCl3) δ 7.05 (s, 1H), 6.47 (s, 2H), 6.41 (s, 1H), 5.95 (d, J = 14.1 Hz, 2H), 4.5 (m, 2H), 4.44 (t, J = 8.0 Hz, 1H), 4.15 (d, J = 4.1 Hz, 1H), 3.86 (s, 3H), 3.83 (s, 6H), 3.24 (dd, J = 8.7, 5.0 Hz, 1H), 2.75 (m, 1H), 2.12 (s, 1H); 13C NMR (150 MHz, CDCl3) δ 177.6, 153.7, 147.5, 147.1, 139.3, 137.4, 131.9, 130.6, 109.3, 105.9, 105.5, 101.2, 69.8, 69.6, 60.9, 56.3, 45.4, 44.1, 42.7; HRMS (ESI-TOF) m/z 437.1219 [(M+Na)+ ; calcd for C22H22O8Na+ : 437.1212].

PAPER

The Journal of organic chemistry (2000), 65(3), 847-60.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jo991582+

Abstract Image

REF

Berichte der Deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft [Abteilung] B: Abhandlungen (1932), 65B, 1846.

Justus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie (1932), 499, 59-76.

Justus Liebigs Annalen der Chemie (1932), 494, 126-42.

Journal of the American Chemical Society (1954), 76, 5890-1

Helvetica Chimica Acta (1954), 37, 190-202.

 Journal of the American Chemical Society (1988), 110(23), 7854-8.

//////////////Picropodophyllin, AXL1717, NSC 36407, BRN 0099161, Picropodophyllotoxin, AXELAR, PHASE 1, CANCER, neurologic cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, genitourinary cancer, gynecologic cancer, hematologic cancer, musculoskeletal cancer, skin cancer, endocrine cancer, eye cancers,  NSCLC, malignant astrocytoma, SOLID TUMOUR

COC1=CC(=CC(=C1OC)OC)C2C3C(COC3=O)C(C4=CC5=C(C=C24)OCO5)O

Podofilox, Podophyllotoxin, Wartec, Condyline, Condylox

J Org Chem 2000,65(3),847

The formylation of 6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxole-5-carbaldehyde dimethyl acetal (I) with BuLi and DMF gives the 6-formyl derivative (II), which is reduced with NaBH4 in ethanol to yield the corresponding carbinol (III). The cyclization of (III) with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (V) in hot acetic acid (through the nonisolated intermediate (IV)) affords dimethyl 1,4-epoxy-6,7-(methylenedioxy)naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxylate (VI), which is hydrogenated with H2 over Pd/C in ethyl acetate to give the (1R*,2S*,3R*,4S*)-tetrahydro derivative (VII). The reduction of (VII) with LiAlH4 in refluxing ethyl ether affords the corresponding bis carbinol (VIII), which is treated with acetic anhydride to afford the diacetate (IX). The enzymatic monodeacetylation of (VIII) with PPL enzyme in DMSO/buffer gives (1R,2R,3S,4S)-2-(acetoxymethyl)-1,4-epoxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)-6,7-(methylenedioxy)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (X), which is silylated with TBDMS-Cl and imidazole in DMF yielding the silyl ether (XI). The hydrolysis of the acetoxy group of (XI) with K2CO3 in methanol affords the carbinol (XII), which is oxidized with oxalyl chloride in dichloromethane affording the carbaldehyde (XIII). The exchange of the silyl protecting group of (XIII) (for stability problems) provided the triisopropylsilyl ether (XIV), which is treated with sodium methoxide in methanol to open the epoxide ring yielding the hydroxy aldehyde (XV). The protection of the hydroxy group of (XV) with 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethoxymethyl chloride and DIEA in dichloromethane provides the corresponding ether (XVI). The carbinol (III) can also be obtained directly from 6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxole-5-carbaldehyde dimethyl acetal (I) by reaction with formaldehyde and BuLi in THF.

The oxidation of the aldehyde group of (XVI) with NaClO2 in tert-butanol affords the corresponding carboxylic acid (XVII), which is condensed with 2-oxazolidinone (XVIII) by means of carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) in THF to give the acyl imidazolide (XIX). The arylation of (XIX) with 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylmagnesium bromide (XX) in THF yields the expected addition product (XXI), which is cyclized by means of TBAF in hot THF to afford the tetracyclic intermediate (XXII). Isomerization of the cis-lactone ring of (XXII) with LDA in THF affords intermediate (XXIII) with its lactone ring with the correct trans-conformation. Finally, this compound is deprotected with ethyl mercaptane and MgBr2 in ethyl ether to provide the target compound.

Synthesis 1992,719

The intermediate trans-8-oxo-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5,6,7,8-tetra-hydronaphtho[2,3-d][1,3]benzodioxole-6-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (XI) has been obtained by several different ways: (a) The condensation of benzophenone (XXXVIII) with diethyl malonate (XXXIX) by means of t-BuOK gives the alkylidenemalonate (XL), which is hydrogenated with H2 over Pd/C to the alkylmalonate hemiester (XLI). The reaction of (XLI) with acetyl chloride affords the mixed anhydride (XLII), which is finally cyclized to the target (XI) by means of SnCl4. (b) The cyclization of the malonic ester derivative (XLIII) by means of Ti(CF3–CO2)3 gives the 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphtho [2,3-d][1,3]dioxole-6,6-dicarboxylic acid dimethyl ester (XLIV), which is finally oxidized and decarboxylated with NBS and NaOH in methanol to afford the target intermediate (XI). (c) The cyclization of the benzylidenemalonate (XLV) with the aryllithium derivative (XLVI) gives the 8-methoxy-5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxole-6,6-dicarboxylic acid dimethyl ester (XLVII), which is demethylated with TFA and oxidized with CrO3 and pyridine to the target compound (XI). (d) The cyclopropanation of the chalcone (XLVIII) with (ethoxycarbonyl) (dimethylsulfonium)methylide (XLIX) gives the cyclopropanecarboxylate (L), which is finally rearranged with BF3/Et2O to the target intermediate (IX).

The cyclization of 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid ethyl ester (LI) with malonic acid ethyl ester potassium salt (LII) by means of Mn(OAc)3 gives the tetrahydrofuranone (LIII), which is acylated with 1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylcarbonyl chloride (LIV) yielding the tetrahydrofuranone (LV). Finally, this compound is rearranged and decarboxylated with SnCl4 to the target intermediate (XI).

The cyclization of 6-[1-hydroxy-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methyl]-1,3-benzodioxol-5-carbaldehyde dimethylacetal (LVI) by means of AcOH gives 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-f]isobenzofuran (LVII), which is submitted to a Diels-Alder cyclization with acetylenedicarboxylic acid dimethyl ester (LVIII) yielding the epoxy derivative (LIX). The selective reduction of (LIX) with LiBEt3H and H2 affords the carbinol (LX), which is treated with H2 over RaNi in order to open the epoxide ring to give the diol (LXI) with the wrong configuration at the secondary OH group. The treatment of (LXI) with aqueous acid isomerizes the secondary OH group to (LXII) with the suitable configuration. Finally, this compound is cyclized with DCC to the desired target compound.

The Diels-Alder cyclization of 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrano[3,4-f][1,3]benzodioxol-7-one (I) with dimethyl maleate (LXIII) gives the expected adduct (LXIV), which by thermal extrusion of CO2 yields the dihydronaphthodioxole (LXV). This compound is then converted to dihydroxycompound (X), which is finally cyclized by means of ZnCl2 to provide the target compound. The Diels-Alder cyclization of 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrano[3,4-f][1,3]benzodioxol-7-one (I) with dimethyl fumarate (LXVI) gives the expected adduct (LXVII), which by hydrogenation with H2 over Pd/C yields the tricarboxylic acid derivative (LXVIII). The reaction of (LXVIII) with Pb(OAc)4 affords the acetoxy derivative (LXIX), which is selectively reduced with LiBEt3H providing the diol (LXI) with the wrong configuration at the secondary OH group. The treatment of (LXI) with aqueous acid isomerizes the secondary OH group to give the previously described (X) with the suitable configuration.

The reaction of benzocyclobutane derivative (LXX) with isocyanate (LXXI) by means of Ph3SnOAc gives the carbamate (LXXII), which is cyclized by a thermal treatment with LiOH yielding the tetracyclic carboxylic acid (LXXIII). The opening of the oxazinone ring of (LXXIII) in basic medium affords the tricyclic amino acid (LXXIV), which is finally cyclized to the target compound by reaction with sodium nitrite in acidic medium (pH = 4).

J Chem Soc Chem Commun 1993,1200

The Diels-Alder cyclization of 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrano[3,4-f][1,3]benzodioxol-7-one (I) with the chiral dihydrofuranone (II) in hot acetonitrile gives the pentacyclic anhydride (III), which is opened with warm acetic acid yielding the carboxylic acid (IV). Hydrogenation of the benzylic double bond of (IV) with H2 over Pd/C affords (V), which is treated with lead tetraacetate and acetic acid in THF to give the acetoxy compound (VI). The hydrolysis of the acetoxy group and the menthol hemiacetal group with HCl in hot dioxane yields the diol (VII), which is treated with diazomethane in ether/methanol affording the aldehyde (VIII). The reduction of the aldehyde group of (VIII) with LiEt3BH in THF gives the diol (IX) as a diastereomeric mixture, which is treated with HCl in THF to afford the diol (X) with the right conformation. Finally, this compound is lactonized to the target compound with ZnCl2 in THF.

//////////

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HS 10340


HS-10340

CAS 2156639-66-4

MF C26 H31 N7 O5
MW 521.57
1,8-Naphthyridine-1(2H)-carboxamide, N-[5-cyano-4-[[(1R)-2-methoxy-1-methylethyl]amino]-2-pyridinyl]-7-formyl-3,4-dihydro-6-[(tetrahydro-2-oxo-1,3-oxazepin-3(2H)-yl)methyl]-
(R)-N-(5-cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-formyl-6-((2-carbonyl)-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide

CAS 2307670-65-9

Jiangsu Hansoh Pharmaceutical Group Co Ltd

Being investigated by Jiangsu Hansoh, Shanghai Hansoh Biomedical and Changzhou Hengbang Pharmaceutical ; in June 2018, the product was being developed as a class 1 chemical drug in China.

Useful for treating liver cancer, gastric cancer and prostate cancer.

Use for treating cancers, liver cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer, ovary cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, glioma and rhabdomyosarcoma

The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) belongs to the receptor tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor and includes four receptor subtypes, namely FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. FGFR regulates various functions such as cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration, and plays an important role in human development and adult body functions. FGFR is abnormal in a variety of human tumors, including gene amplification, mutation and overexpression, and is an important target for tumor-targeted therapeutic research.
FGFR4, a member of the FGFR receptor family, forms dimers on the cell membrane by binding to its ligand, fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), and the formation of these dimers can cause critical tyrosine in FGFR4’s own cells. The phosphorylation of the amino acid residue activates multiple downstream signaling pathways in the cell, and these intracellular signaling pathways play an important role in cell proliferation, survival, and anti-apoptosis. FGFR4 is overexpressed in many cancers and is a predictor of malignant invasion of tumors. Decreasing and reducing FGFR4 expression can reduce cell proliferation and promote apoptosis. Recently, more and more studies have shown that about one-third of liver cancer patients with continuous activation of FGF19/FGFR4 signaling pathway are the main carcinogenic factors leading to liver cancer in this part of patients. At the same time, FGFR4 expression or high expression is also closely related to many other tumors, such as gastric cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer and the like.
The incidence of liver cancer ranks first in the world in China, with new and dead patients accounting for about half of the total number of liver cancers worldwide each year. At present, the incidence of liver cancer in China is about 28.7/100,000. In 2012, there were 394,770 new cases, which became the third most serious malignant tumor after gastric cancer and lung cancer. The onset of primary liver cancer is a multi-factor, multi-step complex process with strong invasiveness and poor prognosis. Surgical treatments such as hepatectomy and liver transplantation can improve the survival rate of some patients, but only limited patients can undergo surgery, and most patients have a poor prognosis due to recurrence and metastasis after surgery. Sorafenib is the only liver cancer treatment drug approved on the market. It can only prolong the overall survival period of about 3 months, and the treatment effect is not satisfactory. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a liver cancer system treatment drug targeting new molecules. FGFR4 is a major carcinogenic factor in liver cancer, and its development of small molecule inhibitors has great clinical application potential.
At present, some FGFR inhibitors have entered the clinical research stage as anti-tumor drugs, but these are mainly inhibitors of FGFR1, 2 and 3, and the inhibition of FGFR4 activity is weak, and the inhibition of FGFR1-3 has hyperphosphatemia. Such as target related side effects. Highly selective inhibitor of FGFR4 can effectively treat cancer diseases caused by abnormal FGFR4 signaling pathway, and can avoid the side effects of hyperphosphatemia caused by FGFR1-3 inhibition. Highly selective small molecule inhibitors against FGFR4 in tumor targeted therapy The field has significant application prospects.
SYN

PATENT

WO2017198149

where it is claimed to be an FGFR-4 inhibitor for treating liver and prostate cancers, assigned to Jiangsu Hansoh Pharmaceutical Group Co Ltd and Shanghai Hansoh Biomedical Co Ltd .

PATENT

WO2019085860

Compound (R)-N-(5-Cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-formyl-6-((2-carbonyl-) 1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide (shown as Formula I). The compound of formula (I) is disclosed in Hausen Patent PCT/CN2017/084564, the compound of formula I is a fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor, and the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) belongs to the receptor tyrosine kinase transmembrane receptor. The body includes four receptor subtypes, namely FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. FGFR regulates various functions such as cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration, and plays an important role in human development and adult body functions. FGFR is abnormal in a variety of human tumors, including gene amplification, mutation and overexpression, and is an important target for tumor-targeted therapeutic research.

[0003]
Example 1: Preparation of a compound of formula (I)

[0048]
First step 4-(((2-(dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)amino)butane Preparation of 1-propanol

[0049]

[0050]
2-(Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-carbaldehyde (1.0 g, 4.2 mmol), 4-aminobutyl at room temperature l-ol (0.45g, 5.1mmol) was dissolved in DCE (15mL), stirred for 2 hours, followed by addition of NaBH (OAc) . 3 (1.35 g of, 6.4 mmol), stirred at room temperature overnight. The reaction was treated with CH 2 CI 2 was diluted (100 mL), the organic phase was washed with water (10mL) and saturated brine (15mL), and dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, and concentrated by column chromatography to give compound 4 – (((2- ( Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)amino)butan-1-ol (0.9 g, 69%) .

[0051]
. 1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3 . 3 ) [delta] 7.13 (S, IH), 5.17 (S, IH), 4.84 (S, IH), 3.73 (S, 2H), 3.66-3.49 (m, 2H), 3.42 ( s, 6H), 3.40-3.36 (m, 2H), 2.71 (t, J = 6.3 Hz, 2H), 2.68-2.56 (m, 2H), 1.95-1.81 (m, 2H), 1.74-1.55 (m, 4H);

[0052]
MS m/z (ESI): 310.2 [M+H] + .

[0053]
The second step is 3-((2-(dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)-1,3- Preparation of oxazepine-2 ketone

[0054]

[0055]
4-(((2-(Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)amino) in an ice water bath Butan-1-ol (0.6 g, 1.94 mmol) was dissolved in DCE (15 mL), then bis(trichloromethyl) carbonate (0.22 g, 0.76 mmol) was added and triethylamine (0.78 g, 7.76) was slowly added dropwise. Methyl) and then stirred at room temperature for 3 hours. The reaction temperature was raised to 80 ° C, and the reaction was carried out at 80 ° C for 6 hours. After the reaction was cooled to room temperature, it was diluted with CH 2 Cl 2 (100 mL), and the organic phase was washed sequentially with water (10 mL) and brine (15 mL) Drying with sodium sulfate, concentration and column chromatography to give the compound 3-((2-(dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl) )methyl)-1,3-oxazepin-2-one (0.37 g, 57%).

[0056]
MS m/z (ESI): 336.2 [M+H] + .

[0057]
The third step is phenyl 7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6-((2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1, Preparation of 8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxylate

[0058]

[0059]
3-((2-(Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)-1,3-oxan -2-one (670mg, 2mmol), diphenyl carbonate (643mg, 3mmol) mixing in of THF (15 mL), N 2 in an atmosphere, cooled to -78 deg.] C, was added dropwise LiHMDS in THF (4mL, 4mmol) was Naturally, it was allowed to react to room temperature overnight. After adding saturated aqueous NH 4 Cl (100 mL), ethyl acetate (100 mL×2), EtOAc. Methyl)-6-((3-carbonylmorpholino)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxylate (432 mg, 47%) .

[0060]
. 1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3 . 3 ) [delta] 7.56 (S, IH), 7.38 (m, 2H), 7.21 (m, 3H), 5.22 (S, IH), 4.77 (S, 2H), 4.16 (m, 2H), 3.95 (m, 2H), 3.39 (s, 6H), 3.25 (m, 2H), 2.84 (t, J = 6.5 Hz, 2H), 1.87 (m, 2H), 1.64 (m, 4H);

[0061]
MS m/z (ESI): 456.2 [M+H] + .

[0062]
The fourth step: (R)-N-(5-cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-(dimethoxymethyl) -6-((2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide synthesis

[0063]

[0064]
(R)-6-Amino-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino) nicotinenitrile (30 mg, 0.14 mmol), phenyl 7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6- ( (2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxylate (60 mg, 0.13 Methyl acetate was dissolved in THF (5 mL), cooled to -78 ° C under N 2atmosphere, and a solution of THF (0.3 mL, 0.3 mmol) of LiHMDS was added dropwise to the reaction mixture. After adding a saturated aqueous solution of NH 4 Cl (50 mL), EtOAc (EtOAc) (5-Cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6-((2-carbonyl-1) 3-oxoheptyl-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide (65 mg, 86%).

[0065]
1H NMR (400MHz, CDCl3) δ 13.70 (s, 1H), 8.18 (s, 1H), 7.60 (s, 2H), 5.41 (s, 1H), 5.12 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 4.73 (s, 2H), 4.20-4.11 (m, 2H), 4.06-3.99 (m, 2H), 3.93 (s, 1H), 3.52-3.48 (m, 7H), 3.46-3.42 (m, 1H), 3.39 (s, 3H), 3.26-3.21 (m, 2H), 2.83 (t, J = 6.2 Hz, 2H), 2.03-1.95 (m, 2H), 1.91-1.83 (m, 2H), 1.67-1.62 (m , 2H), 1.31 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 3H);

[0066]
MS m/z (ESI): 568.3 [M+H] + .

[0067]
Step 5: (R)-N-(5-Cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-formyl-6-((2) Synthesis of -carbonyl-1,3-oxoheptyl-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide

[0068]

[0069]
(R)-N-(5-Cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6-( (2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide (65 mg, 0.12 mmol) Dissolved in THF/water (volume ratio: 11/4, 4.5 mL), concentrated HCl (0.45 mL, 5.4 mmol), and allowed to react at room temperature for 2 h. Saturated NaHC03 . 3 solution (50mL), (50mL × 2 ) and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phases were combined and washed with saturated brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, and concentrated by column chromatography to give the title compound (R) -N- ( 5-cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-formyl-6-((2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine) 3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1 (2H)-carboxamide (30 mg, 51%).

[0070]
. 1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3 . 3 ) [delta] 13.57 (S, IH), 10.26 (S, IH), 8.17 (S, IH), 7.71 (S, IH), 7.63 (S, IH), 5.27 (S, 1H), 4.95 (s, 2H), 4.19-4.12 (m, 2H), 4.11-4.04 (m, 2H), 3.94 (s, 1H), 3.52 (m, 1H), 3.48-3.37 (m, 4H) , 3.33 – 3.28 (m, 2H), 2.93 (t, J = 6.3 Hz, 2H), 2.04 (m, 2H), 1.93-1.85 (m, 2H), 1.73 (m, 2H), 1.39-1.28 (m , 3H);

[0071]
MS m/z (ESI): 522.2 [M+H] + .

PATENT

WO-2019085927

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019085927&tab=FULLTEXT

Novel crystalline salt (such as hydrochloride, sulfate, methane sulfonate, mesylate, besylate, ethanesulfonate, oxalate, maleate, p-toluenesulfonate) forms of FGFR4 inhibitor, particularly N-[5-cyano-4-[[(1R)-2-methoxy-1-methyl-ethyl]amino]-2-pyridyl]-7-formyl-6-[(2-oxo-1,3-oxazepan-3-yl)methyl]-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,8-naphthyridine-1-carboxamide (designated as Forms I- IX), compositions comprising them and their use as an FGFR4 inhibitor for the treatment of cancer such as liver cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer and glioma or rhabdomyosarcoma are claimed.

Example 1: Preparation of a compound of formula (I)
First step 4-(((2-(dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)amino)butane Preparation of 1-propanol
2-(Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-carbaldehyde (1.0 g, 4.2 mmol), 4-aminobutyl at room temperature l-ol (0.45g, 5.1mmol) was dissolved in DCE (15mL), stirred for 2 hours, followed by addition of NaBH (OAc) . 3 (1.35 g of, 6.4 mmol), stirred at room temperature overnight. The reaction was treated with CH 2 CI 2 was diluted (100 mL), the organic phase was washed with water (10mL) and saturated brine (15mL), and dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, and concentrated by column chromatography to give compound 4 – (((2- ( Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)amino)butan-1-ol (0.9 g, 69%) .
. 1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3 . 3 ) [delta] 7.13 (S, IH), 5.17 (S, IH), 4.84 (S, IH), 3.73 (S, 2H), 3.66-3.49 (m, 2H), 3.42 ( s, 6H), 3.40-3.36 (m, 2H), 2.71 (t, J = 6.3 Hz, 2H), 2.68-2.56 (m, 2H), 1.95-1.81 (m, 2H), 1.74-1.55 (m, 4H);
MS m/z (ESI): 310.2 [M+H] + .
The second step is 3-((2-(dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)-1,3- Preparation of oxazepine-2 ketone
4-(((2-(Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)amino) in an ice water bath Butan-1-ol (0.6 g, 1.94 mmol) was dissolved in DCE (15 mL), then bis(trichloromethyl) carbonate (0.22 g, 0.76 mmol) was added and triethylamine (0.78 g, 7.76) was slowly added dropwise. Methyl) and then stirred at room temperature for 3 hours. The reaction temperature was raised to 80 ° C, and the reaction was carried out at 80 ° C for 6 hours. After the reaction was cooled to room temperature, it was diluted with CH 2 Cl 2 (100 mL), and the organic phase was washed sequentially with water (10 mL) and brine (15 mL) Drying with sodium sulfate, concentration and column chromatography to give the compound 3-((2-(dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl) )methyl)-1,3-oxazepin-2-one (0.37 g, 57%).
MS m/z (ESI): 336.2 [M+H] + .
The third step is phenyl 7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6-((2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1, Preparation of 8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxylate
3-((2-(Dimethoxymethyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)methyl)-1,3-oxan -2-one (670mg, 2mmol), diphenyl carbonate (643mg, 3mmol) mixing in of THF (15 mL), N 2 in an atmosphere, cooled to -78 deg.] C, was added dropwise LiHMDS in THF (4mL, 4mmol) was Naturally, it was allowed to react to room temperature overnight. After adding saturated aqueous NH 4 Cl (100 mL), ethyl acetate (100 mL×2), EtOAc. Methyl)-6-((3-carbonylmorpholino)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxylate (432 mg, 47%) .
. 1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3 . 3 ) [delta] 7.56 (S, IH), 7.38 (m, 2H), 7.21 (m, 3H), 5.22 (S, IH), 4.77 (S, 2H), 4.16 (m, 2H), 3.95 (m, 2H), 3.39 (s, 6H), 3.25 (m, 2H), 2.84 (t, J = 6.5 Hz, 2H), 1.87 (m, 2H), 1.64 (m, 4H);
MS m/z (ESI): 456.2 [M+H] + .
The fourth step: (R)-N-(5-cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-(dimethoxymethyl) -6-((2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide synthesis
(R)-6-Amino-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino) nicotinenitrile (30 mg, 0.14 mmol), phenyl 7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6- ( (2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxylate (60 mg, 0.13 Methyl acetate was dissolved in THF (5 mL), cooled to -78 ° C under N 2atmosphere, and a solution of THF (0.3 mL, 0.3 mmol) of LiHMDS was added dropwise to the reaction mixture. After adding a saturated aqueous solution of NH 4 Cl (50 mL), EtOAc (EtOAc) (5-Cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6-((2-carbonyl-1) 3-oxoheptyl-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide (65 mg, 86%).
1H NMR (400MHz, CDCl3) δ 13.70 (s, 1H), 8.18 (s, 1H), 7.60 (s, 2H), 5.41 (s, 1H), 5.12 (d, J = 7.8 Hz, 1H), 4.73 (s, 2H), 4.20-4.11 (m, 2H), 4.06-3.99 (m, 2H), 3.93 (s, 1H), 3.52-3.48 (m, 7H), 3.46-3.42 (m, 1H), 3.39 (s, 3H), 3.26-3.21 (m, 2H), 2.83 (t, J = 6.2 Hz, 2H), 2.03-1.95 (m, 2H), 1.91-1.83 (m, 2H), 1.67-1.62 (m , 2H), 1.31 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 3H);
MS m/z (ESI): 568.3 [M+H] + .
Step 5: (R)-N-(5-Cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-formyl-6-((2) Synthesis of -carbonyl-1,3-oxoheptyl-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide
(R)-N-(5-Cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-(dimethoxymethyl)-6-( (2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine-3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1(2H)-carboxamide (65 mg, 0.12 mmol) Dissolved in THF/water (volume ratio: 11/4, 4.5 mL), concentrated HCl (0.45 mL, 5.4 mmol), and allowed to react at room temperature for 2 h. Saturated NaHC03 . 3 solution (50mL), (50mL × 2 ) and extracted with ethyl acetate, the organic phases were combined and washed with saturated brine, dried over anhydrous sodium sulfate, and concentrated by column chromatography to give the title compound (R) -N- ( 5-cyano-4-((1-methoxypropan-2-yl)amino)pyridin-2-yl)-7-formyl-6-((2-carbonyl-1,3-oxazepine) 3-yl)methyl)-3,4-dihydro-1,8-naphthyridin-1 (2H)-carboxamide (30 mg, 51%).
. 1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3 . 3 ) [delta] 13.57 (S, IH), 10.26 (S, IH), 8.17 (S, IH), 7.71 (S, IH), 7.63 (S, IH), 5.27 (S, 1H), 4.95 (s, 2H), 4.19-4.12 (m, 2H), 4.11-4.04 (m, 2H), 3.94 (s, 1H), 3.52 (m, 1H), 3.48-3.37 (m, 4H) , 3.33 – 3.28 (m, 2H), 2.93 (t, J = 6.3 Hz, 2H), 2.04 (m, 2H), 1.93-1.85 (m, 2H), 1.73 (m, 2H), 1.39-1.28 (m , 3H);
MS m/z (ESI): 522.2 [M+H] + .

///////////HS-10340 , HS 10340 , HS10340, CANCER, Jiangsu Hansoh, Shanghai Hansoh Biomedical,  Changzhou Hengbang, CHINA,  liver cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer, ovary cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, glioma,  rhabdomyosarcoma

C[C@H](COC)Nc1cc(ncc1C#N)NC(=O)N4CCCc3cc(CN2CCCCOC2=O)c(C=O)nc34

CCS(=O)(=O)O.C[C@H](COC)Nc1cc(ncc1C#N)NC(=O)N4CCCc3cc(CN2CCCCOC2=O)c(C=O)nc34

EGF 816 , Nazartinib


Full-size image (4 K)

EGF 816, Nazartinib

EGF-816; EGFRmut-TKI EGF816

Novartis Ag innovator

(R,E)-N-(7-chloro-1-(1-(4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoyl)azepan-3-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide

(R,E)-N-(7-chloro-l-(l-(4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoyl)azepan-3-yl)-lH-benzo[d]imidazol-2 -yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide

NCI-H1975 (L858R/T790M): 25 nM
H3255 (L858R): 9 nM
HCC827 (Del ex19): 11 nM

M.Wt 495.02
Formula C26H31ClN6O2
CAS No 1508250-71-2

EGF816 is a novel covalent inhibitor of mutant-selective EGFR; overcomes T790M-mediated resistance in NSCLC.

Epidermal growth factor receptor antagonists; Protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  • Phase IINon-small cell lung cancer
  • Phase I/IISolid tumours
    • 01 Feb 2015Phase-II clinical trials in Non-small cell lung cancer (Late-stage disease, Combination therapy) in Singapore (PO) (NCT02323126)
    • 24 Nov 2014Phase-I/II clinical trials in Non-small cell lung cancer (Combination therapy, Late-stage disease) in Spain (PO) after November 2014 (EudraCT2014-000726-37)
    • 24 Nov 2014Phase-I/II clinical trials in Non-small cell lung cancer (Combination therapy, Late-stage disease) in Germany (PO)
Determine MTD, or recommended phase II dose in patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations, in combination with INC280 Recruiting
Phase I/II (NCT02335944)
Determine MTD, or recommended phase II dose in adult patients with EGFRm+ solid malignancies Recruiting
Phase I/II (NCT02108964)
Determine efficacy and safety in patients with previously treated NSCLC, in combination with nivolumab Recruiting
Phase II (NCT02323126)

In November 2015, FDA approved osimertinib (Tagrisso™) for the treatment of patients with metastatic EGFR T790M mutation-positive NSCLC, who have progressed on or after EGFR TKI therapy. Based on the clinical performance of the third generation EGFR drugs, more regulatory approvals can be expected.

Nazartinib, also known as EGF816, is an orally available, irreversible, third-generation, mutant-selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, with potential antineoplastic activity. EGF816 covalently binds to and inhibits the activity of mutant forms of EGFR, including the T790M EGFR mutant, thereby preventing EGFR-mediated signaling. This may both induce cell death and inhibit tumor growth in EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells. EGF816 preferentially inhibits mutated forms of EGFR including T790M, a secondarily acquired resistance mutation, and may have therapeutic benefits in tumors with T790M-mediated resistance when compared to other EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors

PATENT

WO 2016016822

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2016016822

PATENT

WO 2015081463

http://www.google.co.in/patents/WO2015081463A1?cl=en

PATENT

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015085482&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=PCTDescription

Intermediate 26

1055 (R)-tert-butyl 3-(2-amino-7-chloro- 1 H-benzo[dlimidazol- 1 -yOazepane- 1 -carboxylate

Step A: (R)-tert-butyl 3 -((2-chloro-6-nitrophenyl)amino)azepane-l -carboxylate (I-26a) was prepared following procedures analogous to 1-15, Step A, using the appropriate starting materials. JH-NMR (400MHz, CDC13): d 8.00-7.91 (m, 1H), 7.58-7.49 (m, 1H), 7.02-6.51

1060 (m, 2H), 4.31-4.03 (m, 1H), 3.84-2.98 (m, 4H), 1.98-1.60 (m, 5H), 1.46-1.39 (m, 10H); MS calculated for Ci7H25ClN304 (M+H+) 370.15, found 370.10.

Step B: A mixture of I-26a (7.5 g, 19.5 mmol) and Zn (12.8 mg, 195 mmol) in AcOH (22 mL) was stirred at room temperature for 2 h. The reaction was basified with saturated aqueous Na2C03 solution, filtered, and extracted with EtOAc (3 x 80 mL). The combined

1065 organic phase was washed with brine, dried with Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo to afford (R)-tert-butyl 3-((2-amino-6-chlorophenyl)amino)azepane-l -carboxylate (I-26b). MS calculated for Ci7H27ClN302 (M+H+) 340.17, found 340.10. The crude was used in the next step without further purification.

Step C: The title compound (Intermediate 26) was prepared from I-26b following

1070 procedures analogous to 1-15, Step C. 1H-NMR (400MHz, CDC13): d Ί .34-126 (m, 1H),

7.04-6.97 (m, 2H), 6.05-5.85 (m, 1H), 5.84-5.72 (m, 1H), 5.50-5.37 (m, 0.5H), 5.10-4.80(m, 0.5H), 4.41-4.23(m, 1H), 4.09-3.96(m, 0.5H), 3.94-3.81 (m, 1H), 3.76-3.57 (m, 1H), 3.22-3.14 (m, 0.5H), 2.84-2.63 (m, 1H), 2.34-2.17 (m, 1H), 2.07-1.84 (m, 1H), 1.82-1.64 (m, 2H), 1.53 (s, 9H), 1.48-1.37 (m, 1H); MS calculated for C18H26CIN4O2 (M+H+) 365.17,

1075 found 365.10.

Intermediate 27

(R)-N-(l-(azepan-3-yl)-7-chloro-lH-benzo[dlimidazol-2-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide hydrochloride

Intermediate 27

Step A

1080 Step A: A mixture of 2-methylisonicotinic acid (3.371 g, 24.6 mmol) and 2-(7-aza-lH- benzotriazole-l-yl)-l,l,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (9.345 g, 24.6 mmol) in CH2CI2 (120 ml) was treated at room temperature with NEt3 (4.1 mL, 29.4 mmol). The

reaction was stirred for 1 hour before it was slowly added into a CH2CI2 solution (45 ml) of 1-26 (5.98 g, 16.4 mmol). Ten minutes later, more NEt3 (4.1 mL, 29.4 mmol) was added and 1085 the mixture stirred for 2 h. The mixture was then diluted with CH2CI2 (240 mL), washed with H20 (2 x 80 mL), saturated aqueous NaHC03 solution (70 mL), and brine (70 mL). The organic phase was dried with Na2SC>4, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The crude material was purified by column chromatography (55% EtOAc/hexanes) to afford

(R)-tert-butyl

1090 3-(7-chloro-2-(2-methylisonicotinamido)-lH-benzo[d]imidazol-l-yl)azepane-l-carboxylate (I-27a) as a light yellow foam. 1H-NMR (400MHz, CDC13): d 12.81 (br s, 1H), 8.65-8.62 (m, 1H), 7.95-7.85 (m, 2H), 7.27-7.1 1 (m, 3H), 5.64 – 5.51 (m, 1H), 4.56-4.44 (m, 1H),

4.07-3.92 (m, 1H), 3.79-3.71 (m, 0.5H), 3.41-3.35 (m, 0.5H), 3.29-3.23 (m, 1H), 2.71-2.59 (m, 1H), 2.65 (s, 3H), 2.22-2.00 (m, 3H), 1.93-1.80 (m, 1H), 1.51-1.45 (m, 1H), 1.50 (s,

1095 3.5H), 1.41 (s, 5.5H); MS calculated for C25H3iClN503 (M+H+) 484.20, found 484.20.

Step B: A solution of I-27a (8.62 g, 16.4 mmol) in MeOH (67 mL) was treated with HC1 in dioxane (4M, 67 mL) and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 7 h. The mixture was then concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound (Intermediate 27). The product was used in the next step without further purification. A sample was treated

1 100 with 1M NaOH, extracted with EtOAc, dried with Na2SC>4 and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford 1-27 as a free base. 1H-NMR (400MHz, CD3CN): d 8.49 (d, J=5.0 Hz, 1H), 7.81 (s, 1H), 7.72 (d, J=4.8 Hz, 1H), 7.50 (br d, J=7.52 Hz, 1H), 7.16 – 7.09 (m, 2H), 5.66-5.59 (m, 1H), 3.77 (dd, J = 6.54, 14.3 Hz, 1H), 3.18 (dd, J = 5.3, 14.3 Hz, 1H), 3.05 – 2.98 (m, 1H), 2.76-2.69 (m, 1H), 2.63-2.53 (m, 1H), 2.47 (s, 3H), 2.10-2.03 (m, 1H),

1 105 1.96-1.93 (m, 2H), 1.86 – 1.75 (m, 2H), 1.61 – 1.54 (m, 2H); MS calculated for

C2oH23ClN50 (M+H+) 384.15, found 384.20.

(i?.E)-N-(7-chloro-l-(l-(4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoyl)azepan-3-yl)-lH-benzo[dlimidazol-2

-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide

1 1 10

A mixture of (E)-4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoic acid hydrochloride (58 mg, 0.35 mmol) and l-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (67 mg, 0.35 mmol) in DMF (2 mL) was treated with hydroxybenzotriazole (54 mg, 0.35 mmol) and stirred at room temperature for 1 h. The resulting mixture was added to a solution of 1-27 (100 mg, 0.22 1 1 15 mmol) in DMF (2 mL). Triethylamine (199 mg, 1.97 mmol) was then added and the mixture was stirred for 5 days. Water (2 mL) was added and the mixture was concentrated under

reduced pressure. The residue was diluted with IN NaOH (20 mL) and extracted with EtOAc (3 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with water (50 mL) and brine (2 x 50 mL), dried over Na2S04, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The crude was purified by

1 120 column chromatography (9: 1 :0.175N CH2Cl2/MeOH/NH3 in CH2C12, 0% to 100%) to afford the title compound. JH NM (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.59 (d, J= 4.8 Hz, 1H), 7.89 (s, 1H), 7.79 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1H), 7.60 (d, J = 7.5 Hz, 1H), 7.30-7.22 (m, 2H), 6.71-6.65 (m, 1H), 6.57-6.54 (m, 1H), 5.54 (br. s, 1H), 4.54 (br. s, 1H), 4.20 (br s, 1H), 3.95 (br s, 1H), 3.48 (br s, 1H), 2.98 (br s, 2H), 2.72 (d, J = 12.0 Hz, 1H), 2.58 (s, 3H), 2.14 (br s, 6H), 2.05 (d, J =

1 125 6.7 Hz, 3H), 1.88 (br s, 1H), 1.46 (d, J=l 1.3 Hz, 1H); MS calculated for C26H32C1N602

(M+H+) 495.22, found 495.10. Melting point (1 14.6 °C).

 

WO 2015083059

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2015083059A1?cl=en

 

Intermediate 26

(RVtert-butyl 3-(2-amino-7-chloro-lH-benzo[dlimidazol-l-vf)azepane-l-carboxylate

Step A: (R)-tert- butyl 3-((2-chloro-6-nitrophenyl)amino)azepane-l-carboxylate (I-26a) was prepared following procedures analogous to 1-15, Step A, using the appropriate starting materials. 1H-NMR (400MHz, CDC13): d 8.00-7.91 (m, 1H), 7.58-7.49 (m, 1H), 7.02-6.51 (m, 2H), 4.31-4.03 (m, 1H), 3.84-2.98 (m, 4H), 1.98-1.60 (m, 5H), 1.46-1.39 (m, 10H); MS calculated for Ci7H25ClN304 (M+H+) 370.15, found 370.10.

Step B: A mixture of I-26a (7.5 g, 19.5 mmol) and Zn (12.8 mg, 195 mmol) in AcOH

(22 mL) was stirred at room temperature for 2 h. The reaction was basified with saturated aqueous Na2CC>3 solution, filtered, and extracted with EtOAc (3 x 80 mL). The combined organic phase was washed with brine, dried with Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuum to afford (R)-tert-butyl 3-((2-amino-6-chlorophenyl)amino)azepane-l-carboxylate (I-26b). MS calculated for C17H27CIN3O2 (M+H+) 340.17, found 340.10. The crude was used in the next step without further purification.

Step C: The title compound (Intermediate 26) was prepared from I-26b following procedures analogous to 1-15, Step C. ‘H-NMR (400MHZ, CDCI3): d 7.34-7.26 (m, 1H), 7.04-6.97 (m, 2H), 6.05-5.85 (m, 1H), 5.84-5.72 (m, 1H), 5.50-5.37 (m, 0.5H), 5.10-4.80(m, 0.5H), 4.41-4.23(m, 1H), 4.09-3.96(m, 0.5H), 3.94-3.81 (m, 1H), 3.76-3.57 (m, 1H), 3.22-3.14 (m, 0.5H), 2.84-2.63 (m, 1H), 2.34-2.17 (m, 1H), 2.07-1.84 (m, 1H), 1.82-1.64 (m, 2H), 1.53 (s, 9H), 1.48-1.37 (m, 1H); MS calculated for Ci8H26ClN402(M+H+) 365.17, found 365.10.

Intermediate 27

(R)-N-(l-(azepan-3-yl)-7-chloro-lH-benzo[dlimidazol-2-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide hydrochloride

5-26 step A l~27a intermediate 27

Step A: A mixture of 2-methylisonicotinic acid (3.371 g, 24.6 mmol) and 2-(7-aza-lH-benzotriazole-l-yl)-l,l,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (9.345 g, 24.6 mmol) in CH2C12 (120 ml) was treated at room temperature with NEt3 (4.1 mL, 29.4 mmol). The reaction was stirred for 1 hour before it was slowly added into a CH2C12solution (45 ml) of 1-26 (5.98 g, 16.4 mmol). Ten minutes later, more NEt3 (4.1 mL, 29.4 mmol) was added and the mixture stirred for 2 h. The mixture was then diluted with CH2C12 (240 mL), washed with H20 (2 x 80 mL), saturated aqueous NaHCC solution (70 mL), and brine (70 mL). The organic phase was dried with Na2S04, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The crude material was purified by column chromatography (55% EtOAc/hexanes) to afford

(R)-tert-butyl

3-(7-chloro-2-(2-methylisonicotinamido)-lH-benzo[d]imidazol-l-yl)azepane-l-carboxylate (I-27a) as a light yellow foam. 1H-NMR (400MHz, CDCI3): d 12.81 (br s, 1H), 8.65-8.62 (m, 1H), 7.95-7.85 (m, 2H), 7.27-7.11 (m, 3H), 5.64 – 5.51 (m, 1H), 4.56-4.44 (m, 1H),

4.07-3.92 (m, 1H), 3.79-3.71 (m, 0.5H), 3.41-3.35 (m, 0.5H), 3.29-3.23 (m, 1H), 2.71-2.59 (m, 1H), 2.65 (s, 3H), 2.22-2.00 (m, 3H), 1.93-1.80 (m, 1H), 1.51-1.45 (m, 1H), 1.50 (s, 3.5H), 1.41 (s, 5.5H); MS calculated for C25H3iClN503 (M+H+) 484.20, found 484.20.

Step B: A solution of I-27a (8.62 g, 16.4 mmol) in MeOH (67 mL) was treated with HCI in dioxane (4M, 67 mL) and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 7 h. The mixture was then concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound (Intermediate 27). The product was used in the next step without further purification. A sample was treated with 1M NaOH, extracted with EtOAc, dried with Na2S04 and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford 1-27 as a free base. ‘H-NMR (400MHZ, CD3CN): d 8.49 (d, J=5.0 Hz, 1H), 7.81 (s, 1H), 7.72 (d, J=4.8 Hz, 1H), 7.50 (br d, J=7.52 Hz, 1H), 7.16 – 7.09 (m, 2H), 5.66-5.59 (m, 1H), 3.77 (dd, J = 6.54, 14.3 Hz, 1H), 3.18 (dd, J = 5.3, 14.3 Hz, 1H), 3.05 -2.98 (m, 1H), 2.76-2.69 (m, 1H), 2.63-2.53 (m, 1H), 2.47 (s, 3H), 2.10-2.03 (m, 1H), 1.96-1.93 (m, 2H), 1.86 – 1.75 (m, 2H), 1.61 – 1.54 (m, 2H); MS calculated for

C20H23CIN5O (M+H+) 384.15, found 384.20.

(i?,£,)-N-(7-chloro-l-(l-(4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoyl)azepan-3-yl)-lH-benzo[dlimidazol-2

-νΠ-2-methylisonicotinamide

A mixture of (E)-4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoic acid hydrochloride (58 mg, 0.35 mmol) and l -ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (67 mg, 0.35 mmol) in DMF (2 mL) was treated with hydroxybenzotriazole (54 mg, 0.35 mmol) and stirred at room temperature for 1 h. The resulting mixture was added to a solution of 1-27 (100 mg, 0.22 mmol) in DMF (2 mL). Triethylamine (199 mg, 1.97 mmol) was then added and the mixture was stirred for 5 days. Water (2 mL) was added and the mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was diluted with IN NaOH (20 mL) and extracted with EtOAc (3 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with water (50 mL) and brine (2 x 50 mL), dried over Na2S04, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The crude was purified by column chromatography (9: 1 :0.175N CH2Cl2/MeOH/NH3 in CH2C12, 0% to 100%) to afford the title compound. 1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.59 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1H), 7.89 (s, 1H), 7.79 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1H), 7.60 (d, J = 7.5 Hz, 1H), 7.30-7.22 (m, 2H), 6.71-6.65 (m, 1H), 6.57-6.54 (m, 1H), 5.54 (br. s, 1H), 4.54 (br. s, 1H), 4.20 (br s, 1H), 3.95 (br s, 1H), 3.48 (br s, 1H), 2.98 (br s, 2H), 2.72 (d, J = 12.0 Hz, 1H), 2.58 (s, 3H), 2.14 (br s, 6H), 2.05 (d, J = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 1.88 (br s, 1H), 1.46 (d, J=11.3 Hz, 1H); MS calculated for C26H32C1N602 (M+H+) 495.22, found 495.10. Melting point (114.6 °C).

 

PATENT

WO 2015112705

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2015112705

 

PATENT

WO 2013184757

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2013184757A1?cl=en

Intermediate 26

(R)-tert-butyl 3 -(2-amino-7-chloro- 1 H-benzo Tdlimidazol- 1 – vDazepane- 1 – carboxylate

Figure imgf000092_0003

Intermediate 26

Step A: (R)-tert-butyl 3-((2-chloro-6-nitrophenyl)amino)azepane-l-carboxylate (I- 26a) was prepared following procedures analogous to 1-15, Step A, using the appropriate starting materials. 1 H-NMR (400MHz, CDC13): d 8.00-7.91 (m, 1H), 7.58-7.49 (m, 1H), 7.02-6.51 (m, 2H), 4.31-4.03 (m, 1H), 3.84-2.98 (m, 4H), 1.98-1.60 (m, 5H), 1.46-1.39 (m, 10H); MS calculated for C17H25CIN3O4 (M+H+) 370.15, found 370.10. Step B: A mixture of I-26a (7.5 g, 19.5 mmol) and Zn (12.8 mg, 195 mmol) in AcOH (22 mL) was stirred at room temperature for 2 h. The reaction was basified with saturated aqueous Na2CC>3 solution, filtered, and extracted with EtOAc (3 x 80 mL). The combined organic phase was washed with brine, dried with Na2S04 and concentrated in vacuo to afford (R)-tert-butyl 3-((2-amino-6-chlorophenyl)amino)azepane-l-carboxylate (I-26b). MS calculated for Ci7H27ClN302 (M+H+) 340.17, found 340.10. The crude was used in the next step without further purification.

Step C: The title compound (Intermediate 26) was prepared from I-26b following procedures analogous to 1-15, Step C. ]H-NMR (400MHz, CDC13): d 7. ,34-7.26 (m, 1H), 7.04-6.97 (m, 2H), 6.05-5.85 (m, 1H), 5.84-5.72 (m, 1H), 5.50-5.37 (m, 0.5H), 5.10- 4.80(m, 0.5H), 4.41-4.23(m, 1H), 4.09-3.96(m, 0.5H), 3.94-3.81 (m, 1H), 3.76-3.57 (m, 1H), 3.22-3.14 (m, 0.5H), 2.84-2.63 (m, 1H), 2.34-2.17 (m, 1H), 2.07-1.84 (m, 1H), 1.82- 1.64 (m, 2H), 1.53 (s, 9H), 1.48-1.37 (m, 1H); MS calculated for Ci8H26ClN402 (M+H+) 365.17, found 365.10.

Intermediate 27

(R)-N-(l-(azepan-3-yl)-7-chloro-lH-benzordlimidazol-2-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide hydrochloride

Figure imgf000093_0001

l-27a Intermediate 27

Step A: A mixture of 2-methylisonicotinic acid (3.371 g, 24.6 mmol) and 2-(7-aza- 1H- benzotriazole-l-yl)-l,l,3,3-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (9.345 g, 24.6 mmol) in CH2C12 (120 ml) was treated at room temperature with NEt3 (4.1 mL, 29.4 mmol). The reaction was stirred for 1 hour before it was slowly added into a CH2C12 solution (45 ml) of 1-26 (5.98 g, 16.4 mmol). Ten minutes later, more NEt3 (4.1 mL, 29.4 mmol) was added and the mixture stirred for 2 h. The mixture was then diluted with CH2C12 (240 mL), washed with H20 (2 x 80 mL), saturated aqueous NaHC03 solution (70 mL), and brine (70 mL). The organic phase was dried with Na2S04, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The crude material was purified by column chromatography (55% EtOAc/hexanes) to afford (R)-tert-butyl 3-(7-chloro-2-(2-methylisonicotinamido)- lH-benzo[d]imidazol-l-yl)azepane-l-carboxylate (I-27a) as a light yellow foam. ]H- NMR (400MHz, CDC13): d 12.81 (br s, IH), 8.65-8.62 (m, IH), 7.95-7.85 (m, 2H), 7.27- 7.11 (m, 3H), 5.64 – 5.51 (m, IH), 4.56-4.44 (m, IH), 4.07-3.92 (m, IH), 3.79-3.71 (m, 0.5H), 3.41-3.35 (m, 0.5H), 3.29-3.23 (m, IH), 2.71-2.59 (m, IH), 2.65 (s, 3H), 2.22-2.00 (m, 3H), 1.93-1.80 (m, IH), 1.51-1.45 (m, IH), 1.50 (s, 3.5H), 1.41 (s, 5.5H); MS calculated for C25H31CIN5O3 (M+H+) 484.20, found 484.20.

Step B: A solution of I-27a (8.62 g, 16.4 mmol) in MeOH (67 mL) was treated with HCl in dioxane (4M, 67 mL) and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 7 h. The mixture was then concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound

(Intermediate 27). The product was used in the next step without further purification. A sample was treated with 1M NaOH, extracted with EtOAc, dried with Na2S04 and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford 1-27 as a free base. ]H-NMR (400MHz, CD3CN): d 8.49 (d, J=5.0 Hz, IH), 7.81 (s, IH), 7.72 (d, J=4.8 Hz, IH), 7.50 (br d, J=7.52 Hz, IH), 7.16 – 7.09 (m, 2H), 5.66-5.59 (m, IH), 3.77 (dd, J = 6.54, 14.3 Hz, IH), 3.18 (dd, J = 5.3, 14.3 Hz, IH), 3.05 – 2.98 (m, IH), 2.76-2.69 (m, IH), 2.63-2.53 (m, IH), 2.47 (s, 3H), 2.10-2.03 (m, IH), 1.96-1.93 (m, 2H), 1.86 – 1.75 (m, 2H), 1.61 – 1.54 (m, 2H); MS calculated for C20H23CIN5O (M+H+) 384.15, found 384.20.

Example 5

(/?,£,)-N-(7-chloro-l-(l-(4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoyl)azepan-3-yl)- lH- benzordlimidazol-2-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide

Figure imgf000126_0001

A mixture of (E)-4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoic acid hydrochloride (58 mg, 0.35 mmol) and l-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (67 mg, 0.35 mmol) in DMF (2 mL) was treated with hydroxybenzotriazole (54 mg, 0.35 mmol) and stirred at room temperature for 1 h. The resulting mixture was added to a solution of 1-27 (100 mg, 0.22 mmol) in DMF (2 mL). Triethylamine (199 mg, 1.97 mmol) was then added and the mixture was stirred for 5 days. Water (2 mL) was added and the mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was diluted with IN NaOH (20 mL) and extracted with EtOAc (3 x 50 mL). The combined organic layers were washed with water (50 mL) and brine (2 x 50 mL), dried over Na2SC>4, and concentrated under reduced pressure. The crude was purified by column chromatography (9: 1 :0.175N CH2Cl2/MeOH/NH3 in CH2C12, 0% to 100%) to afford the title compound (Example 5). ]H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 8.59 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, IH), 7.89 (s, IH), 7.79 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, IH), 7.60 (d, / = 7.5 Hz, IH), 7.30-7.22 (m, 2H), 6.71-6.65 (m, IH), 6.57-6.54 (m, IH), 5.54 (br. s, IH), 4.54 (br. s, IH), 4.20 (br s, IH), 3.95 (br s, IH), 3.48 (br s, IH), 2.98 (br s, 2H), 2.72 (d, / = 12.0 Hz, IH), 2.58 (s, 3H), 2.14 (br s, 6H), 2.05 (d, / = 6.7 Hz, 3H), 1.88 (br s, IH), 1.46 (d, 7=11.3 Hz, IH); MS calculated for C26H32CIN6O2 (M+H+) 495.22, found 495.10. Melting point (114.6 °C).

(/?,E)-N-(7-chloro- l-(l-(4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoyl)azepan-3-yl)-lH- benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide (1.0 g) was dissolved in acetone (30 mL) by heating to 55°C to form a solution. Methanesulfonic acid (325 μί) was added to acetone (50 mL), and the methanesulfonic acid/acetone (22.2 mL) was added to the solution at 0.05ml/min. Following precipitation, the resulting suspension was cooled to room temperature at 0.5 °C/min, and crystals were collected by filtration, and dried for 4 hours at 40°C under vacuum. The collected crystals (300 mg) were suspended in acetone/H20 (6 mL; v/v=95/5) by heating to 50°C. The suspension was kept slurrying for 16 hours, and cooled to room temperature at 0.5 °C/min. The crystal was collected by filtration and dried for 4 hours at 40°C under vacuum.

The structure of (7?,£)-N-(7-chloro-l-(l-(4-(dimethylamino)but-2-enoyl)azepan-3-yl)- lH-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-2-methylisonicotinamide mesylate was confirmed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, X-Ray Powder Diffraction, and Elemental Analyses. Melting point (170.1 °C). Theoretical calculated: C (54.8); H (5.9); N (14.2); 0 (13.5); %S (5.4); and C1 (6.0); C:N ratio: 3.86. Found: C (52.0); H (5.8); N (13.3); C1 (5.9); C:N ratio: 3.91. Stoichiometry: 1.01.

References

AACR Annual Meeting 2014; April 5-9, 2014; San Diego, CA.

nmr http://www.medchemexpress.com/product_pdf/HY-12872/EGF816-NMR-HY-12872-17795-2015.pdf

/////EGF 816, EGF816, EGFR, Covalent inhibitor, T790M, Oncogenic mutation, Lung cancer, NSCLC, SBDD, Drug resistance, EGF-816,  EGFRmut-TKI EGF816, Nazartinib

O=C(NC1=NC2=CC=CC(Cl)=C2N1[C@H]3CN(C(/C=C/CN(C)C)=O)CCCC3)C4=CC=NC(C)=C4

Chi-Med Says Fruquintinib Successful in Lung Cancer Trial


Fruquintinib

Phase 3…cancer

Hutchison Medipharma Enterprises Limited

Hutchison MediPharma for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

 C21H19N3O5
Exact Mass: 393.1325

cas 1194506-26-7, 6 ((6,7-dimethoxyquinazolin-4-yl) oxy) – N, 2-dimethylbenzofuran-3-carboxamide,

3-​Benzofurancarboxamid​e, 6-​[(6,​7-​dimethoxy-​4-​quinazolinyl)​oxy]​-​N,​2-​dimethyl-

Synonym: Fruquintinib; HMPL-013; HMPL 013; HMPL013.

HPLC.http://www.medkoo.com/Product-Data/Fruquintinib/QC-Fruquintinib-CRB50706web.pdf

Fruquintinib, also known as HMPL-013, is an orally available, small molecule inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs), with potential anti-angiogenic and antineoplastic activities.

HMPL-013, a novel small molecule compound that selectively inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), is in phase III clinical studies at Hutchison MediPharma for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. Phase II clinical trials are also ongoing for the treatment of non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

Early clinical development is under way at the company for the treatment of gastric cancer in combination with paclitaxel.

Fruquintinib’s mechanism of action is the inhibition of all three forms of VEGF receptors (VEGFR-1, 2, 3). Competitive advantages over currently marketed therapies are the compound’s unique kinase profile, a highly potent efficacy and excellent kinase selectivity, large safety margin, a broad spectrum antitumor activity and a low cost of goods.
Upon oral administration, fruquintinib inhibits VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFRs 1, 2, and 3 which may result in the inhibition of migration, proliferation and survival of endothelial cells, microvessel formation, the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, and tumor cell death. Expression of VEGFRs may be upregulated in a variety of tumor cell types.

In 2013, the company entered into a licensing, co-development, and commercialization agreement in China with Eli Lilly.

Angiogenesis is a physiological process of growing new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. It takes place in a healthy subject to heal wounds, i.e., restoring blood flow to tissues after injury or insult.

Excessive angiogenesis may be triggered by certain pathological conditions such as cancer, age-related macular degeneration, and chronic inflammatory disease. As a result, new blood vessels feed diseased tissues and destroy normal tissues. In cancer, new blood vessels also allow tumor cells to escape into the circulation and lodge in other organs.

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a homodimeric glycoprotein, and its receptors, e.g., kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), constitute an important angiogenic pathway. Studies have shown that inhibition of KDR resulted in endothelial cell apoptosis and, thus, suppression of angiogenesis. See Rubin M. Tuder, Chest, 2000; 117: 281. KDR inhibitors are therefore potential candidates for treating an angiogenesis-related disorder.

Chi-Med Says Fruquintinib Successful in Lung Cancer Trial

Written by Richard Daverman, PhD, Executive Editor, Greg B. Scott.

Hutchison MediPharma, a division of Chi-Med reported that fruquintinib met its primary endpoint in a second proof-of-concept China trial, this time as a treatment for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer. The company said fruquintinib “clearly” met its primary endpoint of  progression-free survival, though specific data are being held for a scientific meeting. In 2013, Hutchison out-licensed China rights for the drug to Lilly. In May, the first proof-of-concept trial triggered two payments from Lilly to HMP totaling $18 million. More details…. http://www.chinabiotoday.com/articles/20150904

………….

Patent

US 20090281130

https://www.google.com.ar/patents/US20090281130

EXAMPLE 1 Synthesis of 6-(6,7-dimethoxyquinazolin-4-yloxy)-N,2-dimethylbenzofuran-3-carboxamide:

Figure US20090281130A1-20091112-C00009

To a solution of 4-chloro-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline (1 equiv.) in 2 ml CH3CN were added 6-hydroxy-N,2-dimethylbenzofuran-3-carboxamide (1 equiv.) and K2CO3 (1.5 equiv.). The mixture was refluxed under stirring for 10 hr. After the solvent was evaporated, the residue was washed with water, dried over MgSO4, filtered, concentrated, and purified by column chromatography to give the title compound in a yield of 85%.

1H NMR (DMSO-d6, 400 MHz) δ: 2.49 (s, 3H), 2.81 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 3H,10), 3.97 (s, 3H), 3.98 (s, 3H), 7.24 (dd, J=2.0, 8.4 Hz, 1H), 7.38 (s, 1H), 7.58 (s, 1H), 7.61 (d, J=2.0 Hz, 1H), 7.79 (d, J=8.4 Hz, 1H), 7.96 (m, 1H), 8.52 (s, 1H).

MS(m/e): 394.1 (M+1).

 

………………

WO 2009137797

https://www.google.com/patents/WO2009137797A2

……………….

CN 101575333

Example a: 6- (6,7-dimethoxy-quinazolin-4-oxo) -N, 2- dimethyl-benzofuran-3-carboxamide

[0048]

Figure CN101575333BD00111

[0049] 4-Chloro-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline (1 mmol) was dissolved in 2 ml of acetonitrile, followed by addition of 6-hydroxy -N, 2- dimethyl-benzofuran-3- amide (1 mmol) and potassium carbonate (1.5 mmol). The reaction mixture was heated at reflux for 10 hours, concentrated to dryness, washed with water, and purified to give the desired product, yield 85%.

[0050] 1H NMR (DMS0-d6,400MHz) δ ppm:. 2 49 (s, 3H); 2.81 (d, J = 8. 4Hz; 3H, 10); 3.97 (s; 3H); 3.98 (s, 3H);. 7 24 (dd, J = 2. 0,8 4Hz;. 1H);. 7 38 (s, lH);. 7 58 (s, lH); 7.61 (d, J = 2. OHz; 1H);. 7 79 (d, J = 8. 4Hz; 1H);. 7 96 (m, 1H);. 8 52 (s, 1H).

[0051] MS (m / e)::. 394 1 (M + l).

………..

 

EP1265874A2 * Jan 23, 2001 Dec 18, 2002 Gödecke Gmbh Method for the simplified production of (3-chloro-4-fluoro-phenyl)- 7-(3-morpholino-4-yl-propoxy)-6-nitro-quinazoline-4-yl]-amine or (3-chloro-4-fluoro-phenyl)- 7-(3-morpholino-4-yl-propoxy)-6-amino-quinazoline-4-yl]-amine
US20070208056 * Jan 23, 2007 Sep 6, 2007 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Piperidinyl derivatives as modulators of chemokine receptor activity
US20080033000 * May 15, 2007 Feb 7, 2008 Senex Biotechnology, Inc. Identification of CDKI pathway inhibitors
2 See also references of EP2297115A2
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
US8212033 * Sep 29, 2010 Jul 3, 2012 Hutchison Medipharma Enterprises Limited Use of substituted quinazoline compounds in treating angiogenesis-related diseases
US8497372 Jun 4, 2012 Jul 30, 2013 Hutchison Medipharma Enterprises Limited Use of substituted quinazoline compounds in treating age-related macular degeneration
US8575184 Sep 1, 2010 Nov 5, 2013 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Quinazolines as potassium ion channel inhibitors

Hutchison Medipharma Enterprises Limited

 

Simon To, M.B.A.
Chairman

Simon To

Mr To has been a Director since 2000 and an Executive Director and Chairman since 2006. He is also Chairman of the Remuneration Committee and a member of the Technical Committee of the Company. He is managing director of Hutchison Whampoa (China) Limited (“Hutchison China”) and has been with Hutchison China for over thirty years, building its business from a small trading company to a billion dollar investment group. He has negotiated major transactions with multinationals such as Procter & Gamble, Lockheed, Pirelli, Beiersdorf, United Airlines and British Airways.

Mr To’s career in China spans more than thirty years and he is well known to many of the top Government leaders in China. Mr To is the original founder of Hutchison Whampoa Limited’s healthcare business and has been instrumental in the acquisitions made to date. He received a First Class Honours Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Imperial College, London and an MBA from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business.

Christian Hogg, M.B.A.
Chief Executive Officer, Hutchison China MediTech Limited and Director, Hutchison MediPharma Holdings Limited

Christian Hogg

Mr Hogg has been an Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer since 2006. He is also a member of the Technical Committee of the Company. He joined Hutchison Whampoa (China) Limited in 2000 and has since led all aspects of the creation, implementation and management of the Company’s strategy, business and listing. This includes the creation of the Company’s start-up businesses and the acquisition and operational integration of assets that led to the formation of the Company’s China joint ventures.

Prior to joining Hutchison China, Mr Hogg spent ten years with Procter & Gamble starting in the US in Finance and then Brand Management in the Laundry and Cleaning Products Division. Mr Hogg then moved to China to manage P&G’s detergent business followed by a move to Brussels to run P&G’s global bleach business. Mr Hogg received a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Edinburgh and an MBA from the University of Tennessee.

Weiguo Su, Ph.D.
Executive Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer

Weiguo Su

Dr. Su has headed all drug discovery and research since he joined, including creating our R&D strategy, the formation and growth of research platform, and the research and discovery of each and every small molecule drug candidate in the Company’s portfolio.

Prior to joining in 2005, Dr. Su spent 15 years with Pfizer’s US R&D organization. Dr. Su delivered several high quality new drug candidates during his time with Pfizer, most recently as a director in the Medicinal Chemistry Department.

He received his Ph.D. and post-doctoral fellowship in Chemistry from Harvard University under the guidance of Nobel Laureate Professor E. J. Corey, and his Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Ba

R & D Center Address (A):
Building 4, 720 Cailun Road
Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park
Pudong, Shanghai, China
Postal Code: 201203, China
Head Office Address (B):
Building 4, 917 Halei Road
Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park
Pudong, Shanghai, China
Postal Code: 201203, China
Tel:     +86 21 2067 3000 Email: BD@hmplglobal.com

Addresses in Chinese:

R & D Center ( A): Chinese Cai Lun Road, Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park in Pudong New Area, Shanghai, Lane 720 (intermediate哈雷路爱迪way out), Building 4

Head Office (B): Harley Road, Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, Pudong New Area, China, Shanghai, Lane 917, Building 4

HMP location

 


 

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Motesanib (AMG-706)


Motesanib (AMG-706)

Amgen Inc.

 

Motesanib.svg

Motesanib (AMG 706) is an experimental drug candidate originally developed by Amgen[1] but is now being investigated by theTakeda Pharmaceutical Company. It is an orally administered small molecule belonging to angiokinase inhibitor class which acts as an antagonist of VEGF receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and stem cell factor receptors.[2] It is used as thephosphatesalt motesanib diphosphate.

Motesanib, also known as AMG-706, is an orally administered multikinase inhibitor that selectively targets VEGF receptors, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and Kit receptors.

Clinical trials

Motesanib was originally investigated for effectiveness against advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), withPhase II trials indicating an effectiveness comparable to bevacizumab when they were both used in combination withpaclitaxel/carboplatin.[3] However a later and more detailed Phase III trial failed to show any benefit for the treatment of NSCLC.[2][4]A second Phase III trial was started in 2012,[5] which focused on patients from Asian backgrounds (performed on the bases ofsubgroup analysis)[6] however this also failed to meet its primary endpoint.[7]

The drug has undergone a Phase II evaluation as first-line therapy for breast cancer[2] however this study found no evidence to support further investigation.[8] Phase II testing against persistent or recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal carcinomas was also unsuccessful.[9]

There have also been 2 separate Phase II clinical trials for thyroid cancer which have both shown promising results.[10][11][12]

Developed at Amgen, the compound is also being evaluated as both monotherapy and in combination with other agents in the treatment of breast, colorectal, lung, thyroid and ovarian cancers. Clinical trials for the treatment of bladder cancer have been terminated.

The National Cancer Institute had been evaluating the potential of the drug in patients with low-grade neuroendocrine tumors; however, no recent development has been reported for this research. The FDA awarded fast track status to motesanib in 2004. In 2008, the compound was licensed to Takeda in Japan.

AMG-706 is synthesized as follows: 1-Acetyl-3,3-dimethyl-6-nitroindoline (I) is reduced by catalytic hydrogenation over Pd/C, giving the aminoindoline (II), which is then coupled with 2-chloronicotinoyl chloride (III) in the presence of DIEA to yield the corresponding nicotinamide (IV). Subsequent condensation of (IV) with neat 4-(aminomethyl)pyridine (V) at 120 °C affords the 2-aminonicotinamide derivative (VI). The N-acetyl group of (VI) is finally removed by acidic hydrolysis to furnish the title compound (1,2).

,………………………………………

US 2003125339

http://www.google.com/patents/US20030125339

………………………………………………….

US 2003225106

https://www.google.com/patents/US20030225106

EXAMPLE 133

[2295]

Figure US20030225106A1-20031204-C00230

N-(3,3-Dimethylindolin-6-yl){2-[(4-pyridylmethyl)amino](3-pyridyl)}carboxamide

Step A—Preparation of 1-acetyl-6-amino-3,3-dimethylindoline

1-Acetyl-3,3-dimethyl-6-nitroindoline (250 mg) was dissolved in MeOH (20 mL), the mixture was bubbled with H2 for 10 min. 10% Pd/C (50 mg) was added and the mixture was stirred under H2 overnight. The mixture was filtered through Celite® and concentrated in vacuo. The crude material was purified by flash chromatography on silica gel with 1:1 EtOAc:CH2Cl2 to afford the title compound as a white crystalline material. MS: 205 (M+1). Calc’d. for C12H16N2O—204.27.

Step B—Preparation of N-(1-acetyl-3,3-dimethylindolin-6-yl){2-[(4-pyridylmethyl)amino](3-pyridyl)}carboxamide

The titled compound was prepared from 1-acetyl-6-amino-3,3-dimethylindoline (Step A) by the method described in Example 82.

Step C—Preparation of N-(3,3-dimethylindolin-6-yl){2-[(4-pyridylmethyl)amino](3-pyridyl)}carboxamide

The titled compound was prepared from N-(1-acetyl-3,3-dimethylindolin-6-yl){2-[(4-pyridylmethyl)amino](3-pyridyl)}carboxamide (Step B) by the deacylation method described in Example 993. MS: 374 (M+1). Calc’d. for C22H23N5O—373.45.

…………………….

http://www.google.com/patents/WO2012063085A3?cl=en

Example 133

N- (3, 3-Dimethy1indolin-6-yl) {2- [ (4-pyridylmethyl) amino] (3- pyridyl) }carboxamide Step A – Preparation of l-acetyl-6-amino-3 , 3- dimethylindoline l-Acetyl-3 , 3-dimethyl-6-nitroindoline (250 mg) was dissolved in MeOH (20 mL) , the mixture was bubbled with H2 for 10 min. 10% Pd/C (50 mg) was added and the mixture was stirred under H2 overnight. The mixture was filtered through Celite® and concentrated in vacuo. The crude material was purified by flash chromatography on silica gel with 1:1 EtOAc :CH2C12 to afford the title compound as a white crystalline material. MS: 205 (M+1). Calc’d. for C12H16N2O-204.27.

Step B – Preparation of N-(l-acetyl- 3 , 3-dimethylindolin-6- yl) (2-[ (4-pyridylmethyl) amino] (3-pyridyl) } carboxamide The titled compound was prepared from l-acetyl-6- amino-3 , 3-dimethylindoline (Step A) by the method described in Example 82.

Step C – Preparation of N- (3 , 3-dimethylindolin-6-yl) {2- [ (4- pyridylmethyl) amino] (3-pyridyl) }carboxamide

The titled compound was prepared from N-(l-acetyl- 3 , 3-dimethylindolin-6-yl) {2- [ (4-pyridylmethyl) amino] (3- pyridyl) } carboxamide (Step B) by the deacylation method described in Example 993. MS: 374 (M+1). Calc’d. for C22H23N50-373.45.

References

  1. Stafford, edited by Rongshi Li, Jeffrey A. (2009). “Chapter 5. Discovery of Motesanib”. Kinase inhibitor drugs. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley. pp. 113–130. ISBN 978-0-470-27829-1.
  2. “Amgen and Takeda’s NSCLC Drug Fails in Phase III Study”. 30 Mar 2011.
  3. Blumenschein Jr, G. R.; Kabbinavar, F.; Menon, H.; Mok, T. S. K.; Stephenson, J.; Beck, J. T.; Lakshmaiah, K.; Reckamp, K.; Hei, Y.- J.; Kracht, K.; Sun, Y.- N.; Sikorski, R.; Schwartzberg, L. (14 February 2011). “A phase II, multicenter, open-label randomized study of motesanib or bevacizumab in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin for advanced nonsquamous non-small-cell lung cancer”. Annals of Oncology 22 (9): 2057–2067. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdq731.
  4. Jump up^ Scagliotti, G. V.; Vynnychenko, I.; Park, K.; Ichinose, Y.; Kubota, K.; Blackhall, F.; Pirker, R.; Galiulin, R.; Ciuleanu, T.-E.; Sydorenko, O.; Dediu, M.; Papai-Szekely, Z.; Banaclocha, N. M.; McCoy, S.; Yao, B.; Hei, Y.-j.; Galimi, F.; Spigel, D. R. (2 July 2012). “International, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Phase III Study of Motesanib Plus Carboplatin/Paclitaxel in Patients With Advanced Nonsquamous Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: MONET1”. Journal of Clinical Oncology 30 (23): 2829–2836. doi:10.1200/JCO.2011.41.4987. PMID 22753922.
  5. “Takeda Initiates Phase 3 Trial of Motesanib in Japan and Additional Asian Countries”. Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
  6. Kubota, K.; Ichinose, Y.; Scagliotti, G.; Spigel, D.; Kim, J. H.; Shinkai, T.; Takeda, K.; Kim, S.- W.; Hsia, T.- C.; Li, R. K.; Tiangco, B. J.; Yau, S.; Lim, W.- T.; Yao, B.; Hei, Y.- J.; Park, K. (13 January 2014). “Phase III study (MONET1) of motesanib plus carboplatin/paclitaxel in patients with advanced nonsquamous nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Asian subgroup analysis”.Annals of Oncology 25 (2): 529–536. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdt552.
  7. Jump up^ “Takeda Announces Phase 3 MONET-A Study Evaluating Motesanib (AMG 706) in Patients with Advanced Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Meet Primary Endpoint”. Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
  8.  Martin, Miguel; Roche, Henri; Pinter, Tamas; Crown, John; Kennedy, M John; Provencher, Louise; Priou, Frank; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Adrover, Encarna; Lang, Istvan; Ramos, Manuel; Latreille, Jean; Jagiełło-Gruszfeld, Agnieszka; Pienkowski, Tadeusz; Alba, Emilio; Snyder, Raymond; Almel, Sachin; Rolski, Janusz; Munoz, Montserrat; Moroose, Rebecca; Hurvitz, Sara; Baños, Ana; Adewoye, Henry; Hei, Yong-Jiang; Lindsay, Mary-Ann; Rupin, Matthieu; Cabaribere, David; Lemmerick, Yasmin; Mackey, John R (April 2011). “Motesanib, or open-label bevacizumab, in combination with paclitaxel, as first-line treatment for HER2-negative locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: a phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study”. The Lancet Oncology 12 (4): 369–376. doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(11)70037-7. PMID 21429799.
  9. Schilder, R.J.; Sill, M.W.; Lankes, H.A.; Gold, M.A.; Mannel, R.S.; Modesitt, S.C.; Hanjani, P.; Bonebrake, A.J.; Sood, A.K.; Godwin, A.K.; Hu, W.; Alpaugh, R.K. (April 2013). “A phase II evaluation of motesanib (AMG 706) in the treatment of persistent or recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal carcinomas: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study”. Gynecologic Oncology 129 (1): 86–91. doi:10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.01.006. PMID 23321064.
  10. Motesanib Diphosphate Provides Anticancer Activity Among Patients with Progressive Thyroid Cancer, CancerConnect.com
  11. Jump up^ Schlumberger, M. J.; Elisei, R.; Bastholt, L.; Wirth, L. J.; Martins, R. G.; Locati, L. D.; Jarzab, B.; Pacini, F.; Daumerie, C.; Droz, J.-P.; Eschenberg, M. J.; Sun, Y.-N.; Juan, T.; Stepan, D. E.; Sherman, S. I. (29 June 2009). “Phase II Study of Safety and Efficacy of Motesanib in Patients With Progressive or Symptomatic, Advanced or Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer”.Journal of Clinical Oncology 27 (23): 3794–3801. doi:10.1200/JCO.2008.18.7815. PMID 19564535.
  12. Sherman, Steven I.; Wirth, Lori J.; Droz, Jean-Pierre; Hofmann, Michael; Bastholt, Lars; Martins, Renato G.; Licitra, Lisa; Eschenberg, Michael J.; Sun, Yu-Nien; Juan, Todd; Stepan, Daniel E.; Schlumberger, Martin J. (3 July 2008). “Motesanib Diphosphate in Progressive Differentiated Thyroid Cancer”. New England Journal of Medicine 359 (1): 31–42.doi:10.1056/NEJMoa075853. PMID 18596272.

External links

 

 

Motesanib Diphosphate (AMG-706)

857876-30-3 diphosphate
453562-69-1 (free base)

N-(2,3-Dihydro-3,3-dimethyl-1H-indol-6-yl)-2-[(4-pyridinylmethyl)amino]-3-pyridinecarboxamide diphosphate

3-​Pyridinecarboxamide, N-​(2,​3-​dihydro-​3,​3-​dimethyl-​1H-​indol-​6-​yl)​-​2-​[(4-​pyridinylmethyl)​amino]​-​, phosphate (1:2)

N-(3,3-Dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-6-yl)-2-(pyridin-4-ylmethylamino)pyridine-3-carboxamide diphosphate

569.4
Formula C22H23N5O.2H3PO4

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TAKEDA, JAPAN

 

TOKYO HO

Takeda Pharmaceutical CEO Yasuchika Hasegawa

Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. President Christophe Weber is interviewed recently in Tokyo.

Christophe Weber (L), the new president of Takeda Pharmaceutical Co., and CEO Yasuchika Hasegawa pose

 

 

Dr. Paul Chapman of Takeda Pharmaceuticals colors in the eye…

Map of osaka japan

 

OSAKA

 

Dotonbori, Osaka, Japan

OSAKA

 

Japan First to Approve Alectinib アレクチニブ 塩酸塩 (AF 802) for ALK+ NSCLC


 

Alectinib (AF802, CH5424802, RG7853, RO5424802)

CAS 1256580-46-7 FREE

1256589-74-8 (Alectinib Hydrochloride)

9-Ethyl-6,11-dihydro-6,6-dimethyl-8-[4-(4-morpholinyl)-1-piperidinyl]-11-oxo-5H-benzo[b]carbazole-3-carbonitrile

Formula: C30H34N4O2
M.Wt: 482.62

Mechanism of Action:ALK inhibitor
Indication:Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Current Status:Phase II (US,EU,UK), NDA(Japan)
Company:中外製薬株式会社 (Chugai), Roche

Japan First to Approve Alectinib for ALK+ NSCLC

http://www.dddmag.com/news/2014/07/japan-first-approve-alectinib-alk-nsclc?et_cid=4034150&et_rid=523035093&type=headline

Roche announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) has approved alectinib for the treatment of people living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that is anaplastic lymphoma kinase fusion gene-positive (ALK+). The approval was based on results from a Japanese Phase 1/2 clinical study (AF-001JP) for people whose tumors were advanced, recurrent or could not be removed completely through surgery (unresectable).

 

Company Chugai Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.
Description Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor
Molecular Target Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)
Mechanism of Action Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Ki-1) (ALK) inhibitor
Therapeutic Modality Small molecule
Latest Stage of Development Registration
Standard Indication Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Indication Details Treat advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); Treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); Treat unresectable progressive or recurrent ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Regulatory Designation

U.S. – Breakthrough Therapy (Treat advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC));
Japan – Orphan Drug (Treat advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC));
Japan – Orphan Drug (Treat unresectable progressive or recurrent ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC));
Japan – Standard Review (Treat advanced ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC))

Partner

Roche

 

Alectinib (also known as CH5424802,RO5424802), a second generation oral inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), is being developed by Chugai and Roche for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has progressed on Xalkori (Crizotinib).

Alectinib was discovered by Chugai Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. Chugai became a subsidiary of Roche in 2002 and the Swiss group currently owns 59.9 percent of the company.

On October 8, 2013, Chugai Pharmaceutical announced that it has filed a new drug application to Japan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) for alectinib hydrochloride for the treatment of ALK fusion gene positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

IT  is a potent and selective ALK inhibitor with IC50 of 1.9 nM.Alterations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene have been implicated in human cancers. Among these findings, the fusion gene comprising EML4 and ALK has been identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and fusion of ALK to NPM1 has been observed in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). The possibility of targeting ALK in human cancer was advanced with the launch of crizotinib for NSCLC in the U.S. in 2011. The development of resistance to crizotinib in tumors, however, has led to the need for second-generation ALK inhibitors. One of these, alectinib hydrochloride, has been found to be an orally active, potent and highly selective ALK inhibitor with activity in ALK-driven tumor models. Alectinib has shown preclinical activity against cancers with ALK gene alterations, including NSCLC cells expressing the EML4-ALK fusion and ALCL cells expressing the NPM-ALK fusion. Alectinib was well tolerated and active in a phase I/II study conducted in Japan in patients with ALK-rearranged advanced NSCLC and in patients with ALK-positive NSCLC who had progressed on crizotinib. Alectinib has been submitted for approval in Japan for the treatment of ALK fusion gene-positive NSCLC and is in phase I/II development for ALK-rearranged NSCLC in the U.S.


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WO2012023597

http://www.google.fm/patents/WO2012023597A1?cl=en

(Preparation 30)
Compound F6-20
9 – ethyl-6, 6 – dimethyl-8 – (4 – morpholin-4 – yl – piperidin-1 – yl) -11 – oxo-6 ,11 – dihydro-5H-benzo [b] carbazol-3 – carbonitrile

Figure JPOXMLDOC01-appb-C000043

Under the same conditions as the synthesis of the compound B3-13-1, and the title compound was synthesized from compound F5-49.
1 H-NMR (400MHz, DMSO-D 6) δ: 12.70 (1H, s), 8.32 (1H, d, J = 7.9 Hz), 8.04 (1H, s), 8.00 (1H, s), 7.61 (1H , d, J = 8.5 Hz), 7.34 (1H, s), 3.64-3.57 (4H, m), 3.27-3.18 (2H, m), 2.82-2.66 (4H, m), 2.39-2.28 (1H, m ), 1.96-1.87 (2H, m), 1.76 (6H, s), 1.69-1.53 ​​(2H, m), 1.29 (3H, t, J = 7.3 Hz)
LCMS: m / z 483 [M + H] +
HPLC retention time: 1.98 minutes (analysis conditions U)

Hydrochloride 9 of compound F6-20 – ethyl-6, 6 – dimethyl-8 – (4 – morpholin-4 – yl – piperidin-1 – yl) -11 – oxo-6 ,11 – dihydro-5H-benzo [b I was dissolved at 60 ℃ in a mixture of 10 volumes of methyl ethyl ketone, 3 volumes of water and acetic acid volume 4-carbonitrile -] carbazol-3. I was dropped hydrochloric acid (2N) 1 volume of solution. After stirring for 30 minutes at 60 ℃, and the precipitated solid was filtered and added dropwise to 25 volume ethanol, 9 – Dry ethyl -6,6 – dimethyl-8 – (4 – morpholin-4 – yl – piperidin-1 – yl) I got a one-carbonitrile hydrochloride – 11 – oxo-6 ,11 – dihydro-5H-benzo [b] carbazol-3. Ethyl-6, 6 – 9 – obtained dimethyl-8 – (4 – morpholin-4 – yl – piperidin-1 – yl) -11 – oxo-6 ,11 – dihydro-5H-benzo [b] carbazol-3 – I was pulverized with a jet mill carbonitrile monohydrochloride.
1 H-NMR (400MHz, DMSO-D 6) δ: 12.78 (1H, s), 10.57 (1H, br.s), 8.30 (1H, J = 8.4 Hz), 8.05 (1H, s), 7.99 (1H , s), 7.59 (1H, d, J = 7.9 Hz), 7.36 (1H, s) ,4.02-3 .99 (2H, m) ,3.84-3 .78 (2H, m) ,3.51-3 .48 (2H, m), 3.15-3.13 (1H, s) ,2.83-2 .73 (2H, s) ,2.71-2 .67 (2H, s) ,2.23-2 .20 (2H, m) ,1.94-1 .83 (2H, m), 1.75 (6H, s ), 1.27 (3H, t, J = 7.5 Hz)
FABMS: m / z 483 [M + H] +

I was dissolved at 90 ℃ to 33 volume dimethylacetamide F6-20 F6-20 mesylate. Was added to 168 volumes mesylate solution (2 N) 1.2 volume, ethyl acetate solution was stirred for 4 hours. The filtered crystals were precipitated, and dried to obtain a F6-20 one mesylate. I was milled in a jet mill F6-20 one mesylate salt was obtained.

……………………

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 54(18), 6286-6294; 2011

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jm200652u

 

 

WO2002043704A1 * 30 Nov 2001 6 Jun 2002 Yasuki Kato Composition improved in solubility or oral absorbability
WO2008051547A1 * 23 Oct 2007 2 May 2008 Cephalon Inc Fused bicyclic derivatives of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine as alk and c-met inhibitors
WO2009073620A2 * 1 Dec 2008 11 Jun 2009 Newlink Genetics Ido inhibitors
WO2010143664A1 * 9 Jun 2010 16 Dec 2010 Chugai Seiyaku Kabushiki Kaisha Tetracyclic compound
JP2008280352A Title not available
JP2009100783A Title not available
JPH0892090A * Title not available

 

 

References

1: Ignatius Ou SH, Azada M, Hsiang DJ, Herman JM, Kain TS, Siwak-Tapp C, Casey C, He J, Ali SM, Klempner SJ, Miller VA. Next-generation sequencing reveals a Novel NSCLC ALK F1174V mutation and confirms ALK G1202R mutation confers high-level resistance to alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802) in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients who progressed on crizotinib. J Thorac Oncol. 2014 Apr;9(4):549-53. doi: 10.1097/JTO.0000000000000094. PubMed PMID: 24736079.

2: Gouji T, Takashi S, Mitsuhiro T, Yukito I. Crizotinib can overcome acquired resistance to CH5424802: is amplification of the MET gene a key factor? J Thorac Oncol. 2014 Mar;9(3):e27-8. doi: 10.1097/JTO.0000000000000113. PubMed PMID: 24518097.

3: Latif M, Saeed A, Kim SH. Journey of the ALK-inhibitor CH5424802 to phase II clinical trial. Arch Pharm Res. 2013 Sep;36(9):1051-4. doi: 10.1007/s12272-013-0157-8. Epub 2013 May 23. Review. PubMed PMID: 23700294.

4: Seto T, Kiura K, Nishio M, Nakagawa K, Maemondo M, Inoue A, Hida T, Yamamoto N, Yoshioka H, Harada M, Ohe Y, Nogami N, Takeuchi K, Shimada T, Tanaka T, Tamura T. CH5424802 (RO5424802) for patients with ALK-rearranged advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (AF-001JP study): a single-arm, open-label, phase 1-2 study. Lancet Oncol. 2013 Jun;14(7):590-8. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(13)70142-6. Epub 2013 Apr 30. PubMed PMID: 23639470.

5: Kinoshita K, Asoh K, Furuichi N, Ito T, Kawada H, Hara S, Ohwada J, Miyagi T, Kobayashi T, Takanashi K, Tsukaguchi T, Sakamoto H, Tsukuda T, Oikawa N. Design and synthesis of a highly selective, orally active and potent anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor (CH5424802). Bioorg Med Chem. 2012 Feb 1;20(3):1271-80. doi: 10.1016/j.bmc.2011.12.021. Epub 2011 Dec 22. PubMed PMID: 22225917.

6: Sakamoto H, Tsukaguchi T, Hiroshima S, Kodama T, Kobayashi T, Fukami TA, Oikawa N, Tsukuda T, Ishii N, Aoki Y. CH5424802, a selective ALK inhibitor capable of blocking the resistant gatekeeper mutant. Cancer Cell. 2011 May 17;19(5):679-90. doi: 10.1016/j.ccr.2011.04.004. PubMed PMID: 21575866.

Gadgeel S, Ou SH, Chiappori A, et al: A phase I dose escalation study of a new ALK inhibitor, CH542480202, in ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer patients who have failed crizotinib. Abstract O16.06. Presented at the 15th World Conference on Lung Cancer, Sydney, Australia, October 29, 2013.

Ou SH, Gadgeel S, Chiappori AA, et al: Consistent therapeutic efficacy of CH5424802/RO5424802 in brain metastases among crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients in an ongoing phase I/II study. Abstract O16.07. Presented at the 15th World Conference on Lung Cancer, Sydney, Australia, October 29, 2013.

Kinoshita, Kazuhiro et al,Preparation of tetracyclic compounds such as 11-oxo-5,6-dihydrobenzo[b]carbazole-3-carbonitrile derivatives as anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors,Jpn. Kokai Tokkyo Koho, 2012126711, 05 Jul 2012

Furumoto, Kentaro et al, Composition containing tetracyclic compound and dissolution aid (4環性化合物を含む組成物), PCT Int. Appl., WO2012023597, 23 Feb 2012, Also published as CA2808210A1, CN103052386A, EP2606886A1, EP2606886A4, US20130143877

Kinoshita, Kazutomo et al,Design and synthesis of a highly selective, orally active and potent anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor (CH5424802), Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, 20(3), 1271-1280; 2012

Kinoshita, Kazutomo et al,9-Substituted 6,6-Dimethyl-11-oxo-6,11-dihydro-5H-benzo[b]carbazoles as Highly Selective and Potent Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Inhibitors, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 54(18), 6286-6294; 2011

Kinoshita, Kazuhiro et al, Preparation of tetracyclic compounds such as 11-oxo-5,6-dihydrobenzo[b]carbazole-3-carbonitrile derivatives as anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors,Jpn. Tokkyo Koho, 4588121, 24 Nov 2010

Japan approves world’s first PD-1 drug, nivolumab


 

 

Japan approves world's first PD-1 drug, nivolumab

Ono Pharmaceutical Co has become the first company in the world to get an approval for a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor, as regulators in Japan gave the green light to nivolumab, developed with Bristol-Myers Squibb, as a treatment for melanoma.

http://www.pharmatimes.com/Article/14-07-07/Japan_approves_world_s_first_PD-1_drug_nivolumab.aspx

 

 

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NIVOLUMAB

Anti-PD-1;BMS-936558; ONO-4538

PRONUNCIATION nye vol’ ue mab
THERAPEUTIC CLAIM Treatment of cancer
CHEMICAL DESCRIPTION
A fully human IgG4 antibody blocking the programmed cell death-1 receptor (Medarex/Ono Pharmaceuticals/Bristol-Myers Squibb)
MOLECULAR FORMULA C6362H9862N1712O1995S42
MOLECULAR WEIGHT 143.6 kDa

SPONSOR Bristol-Myers Squibb
CODE DESIGNATION MDX-1106, BMS-936558
CAS REGISTRY NUMBER 946414-94-4

Bristol-Myers Squibb announced promising results from an expanded phase 1 dose-ranging study of its lung cancer drug nivolumab

Nivolumab (nye vol’ ue mab) is a fully human IgG4 monoclonal antibody designed for the treatment of cancer. Nivolumab was developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and is also known as BMS-936558 and MDX1106.[1] Nivolumab acts as an immunomodulator by blocking ligand activation of the Programmed cell death 1 receptor.

A Phase 1 clinical trial [2] tested nivolumab at doses ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 mg per kilogram of body weight, every 2 weeks. Response was assessed after each 8-week treatment cycle, and were evaluable for 236 of 296 patients. Study authors concluded that:”Anti-PD-1 antibody produced objective responses in approximately one in four to one in five patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, melanoma, or renal-cell cancer; the adverse-event profile does not appear to preclude its use.”[3]

Phase III clinical trials of nivolumab are recruiting in the US and EU.[4]

  1.  Statement On A Nonproprietary Name Adopted By The USAN Council – Nivolumab, American Medical Association.
  2.  A Phase 1b Study of MDX-1106 in Subjects With Advanced or Recurrent Malignancies (MDX1106-03), NIH.
  3.  Topalian SL, et al. (June 2012). “Safety, Activity, and Immune Correlates of Anti–PD-1 Antibody in Cancer”. New England Journal of Medicine 366. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1200690. Lay summaryNew York Times.
  4.  Nivolumab at ClinicalTrials.gov, A service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

The PD-1 blocking antibody nivolumab continues to demonstrate sustained clinical activity in previously treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to updated long-term survival data from a phase I trial.

Survival rates at one year with nivolumab were 42% and reached 24% at two years, according to the median 20.3-month follow up. Additionally, the objective response rate (ORR) with nivolumab, defined as complete or partial responses by standard RECIST criteria, was 17% for patients with NSCLC. Results from the updated analysis will be presented during the 2013 World Conference on Lung Cancer on October 29.

“Lung cancer is very difficult to treat and there continues to be a high unmet medical need for these patients, especially those who have received multiple treatments,” David R. Spigel, MD, the program director of Lung Cancer Research at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute and one of the authors of the updated analysis, said in a statement.

“With nivolumab, we are investigating an approach to treating lung cancer that is designed to work with the body’s own immune system, and these are encouraging phase I results that support further investigation in larger scale trials.”

In the phase I trial, 306 patients received intravenous nivolumab at 0.1–10 mg/kg every-other-week for ≤12 cycles (4 doses/8 week cycle). In all, the trial enrolled patients with NSCLC, melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and prostate cancer.

The long-term follow up focused specifically on the 129 patients with NSCLC. In this subgroup, patients treated with nivolumab showed encouraging clinical activity. The participants had a median age of 65 years and good performance status scores, and more than half had received three or more prior therapies. Across all doses of nivolumab, the median overall survival was 9.9 months, based on Kaplan-Meier estimates.

In a previous update of the full trial results presented at the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting, drug-related adverse events of all grades occurred in 72% of patients and grade 3/4 events occurred in 15%. Grade 3/4 pneumonitis related to treatment with nivolumab emerged early in the trial, resulting in 3 deaths. As a result, a treatment algorithm for early detection and management was developed to prevent this serious side effect.

Nivolumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that blocks the PD-1 receptor from binding to both of its known ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2. This mechanism, along with early data, suggested an associated between PD-L1 expression and response to treatment.

In separate analysis presented at the 2013 World Conference on Lung Cancer, the association of tumor PD-L1 expression and clinical activity in patients with NSCLC treated with nivolumab was further explored. Of the 129 patients with NSCLC treated with nivolumab in the phase I trial, 63 with NSCLC were tested for PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (29 squamous; 34 non-squamous).

Kyowa Hakko Kirin Korea begins patient recruitment in phase I/II study of BIW-8962 in lung cancer


Kyowa Hakko Kirin Korea begins patient recruitment in phase I/II study of BIW-8962 in lung cancer

http://www.kyowa-kirin.com/news_releases/2011/pdf/e20110802_04.pdf

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01898156

Kyowa Hakko Kirin Korea Co., Ltd

This Phase 1/2 study is designed to assess the following: safety and tolerability of BIW-8962, Dose Limiting Toxicities (DLTs), Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD), Recommended Phase 2 Dose (RP2D) in Phase 1 and preliminary efficacy in Phase 2 in subjects with advanced/recurrent lung cancer or mesothelioma.

http://www.myeloma.org.uk/patient-information/drug-development/hcp-drug-scanner/biw-8962/

Novartis investigational drug LDK378, a selective inhibitor of (ALK), shows a marked clinical response ….49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) on June 3, 2013


Formula Image

LDK378

J. Med. Chem. 2013, DOI:10.1021/jm400402q).

CAS Number:
1032900-25-6
Mol. Formula:
C28H36ClN5O3S
MW:
558.13
LDK378 is a highly selective, orally bioavailable and ATP-competitive small molecule inhibitor of ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase), a receptor tyrosine kinase considered to be an important lung cancer drug target. LDK378 displays enhanced potency over Crizotinib and noteworthy antitumor activity for ALK-activated, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
Alessandro Riva
Alessandro Riva, MD, Global Head of Oncology Development & Medical Affairs for Novartis Oncology,
The FDA recently designated LDK378 as a breakthrough therapy based on encouraging results from early clinical trials in patients with ALK-positive, non-small-cell lung cancer.

Novartis investigational drug LDK378, a selective inhibitor of the cancer target anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), shows a marked clinical response in patients with ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) on June 3, 2013.

Doctors and patients are clamoring for more ways to fight lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., of which NSCLC is the most common form. In March, LDK378 received Breakthrough Therapy designation from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The designation is intended to expedite the development and review of drugs that treat life-threatening conditions and show improvement over available therapies.

Currently, two Phase II clinical trials are actively recruiting patients worldwide. One study focuses on patients with ALK+ NSCLC who were previously treated with chemotherapy and crizotinib (NCT01685060). The second study examines LDK378 in patients who are crizotinib-naive (NCT01685138). In addition, Phase III clinical trials are planned to begin in the coming months, aiming to enroll more than 1,100 patients with ALK+ NSCLC at sites worldwide. Novartis plans to file for approval the drug in early 2014.

Chemical Name of LDK378

5-chloro-N2-(2-isopropoxy-5-methyl-4-(piperidin-4-yl)phenyl)-N4-(2-(isopropylsulfonyl)phenyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine

Chemical Synthesis of LDK378

Chemical Synthesis of LDK378-ALK inhibitor-Lung Cancer-Novartis

Technical Data of LDK378
1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-d6 + trace D2O) δ 8.32 (s,1H), 8.27 (d, 1H), 7.88 (d, 1H), 7.67 (dd, 1H), 7.45 (dd, 1H), 7.42 (s, 1H), 6.79 (s, 1H), 4.56 – 4.48(m, 1H), 3.49 – 3.32 (m, 3H), 3.10 - 2.91 (m, 3H), 2.09 (s, 3H), 1.89 – 1.77 (m, 4H), 1.22 (d, 6H), 1.13 (d, 6H); ESMS m/z 558.1 (M + H+).

The compound LDK378, a highly selective inhibitor of ALK, has been granted “Breakthrough Therapy Designation” by the FDA for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have already received treatment with crizotinib (Xalkori).

ClinicalTrials.gov. A Dose Finding Study With Oral LDK378 in Patients With Tumors Characterized by Genetic Abnormalities in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) (Phase 1). http://www.http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01283516; Accessed June 7, 2013; currently recruiting participants.

ClinicalTrials.gov. LDK378 in crizotinib naïve adult patients with ALK-activated non-small cell lung cancer (Phase 2). http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01685138; Accessed June 7, 2013; currently recruiting participants.

ClinicalTrials.gov. LDK378 in adult patients with ALK-activated NSCLC previously treated with chemotherapy and crizotinib (phase 2) http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01685060; Accessed June 7,2013; currently recruiting participants.

Mehra R, Camidge DR, Sharma S, et al. First-in-human phase I study of the ALK inhibitor LDK378 in advanced solid tumors. J Clin Oncol 30, 2012 (suppl; abstr 3007).

Alice Tsang Shaw, et al., Clinical activity of the ALK inhibitor LDK378 in advanced, ALK-positive NSCLC; 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting; Abstract Number: 8010; Citation: J Clin Oncol 31, 2013 (suppl; abstr 8010)

Tom H. Marsilje, Wei Pei, Bei Chen, Wenshuo Lu, Tetsuo Uno, Yunho Jin, Tao Jiang, Sungjoon Kim, Nanxin Li, Markus Warmuth, Yelena Sarkisova, Fangxian Sun, Auzon Steffy, AnneMarie C. Pferdekamper, Sean B Joseph, Young Kim, Tove Tuntland, Xiaoming Cui, Nathanael S Gray, Ruo Steensma, Yongqin Wan, Jiqing Jiang, Jie Li, Greg Chopiuck, W. Perry Gordon, Allen G Li, Wendy Richmond, Johathan Chang, Todd Groessl, You-Qun He, Bo Liu, Andrew Phimister, Alex Aycinena, Badry Bursulaya, Christian Lee, Donald S Karanewsky, H Martin Seidel, Jennifer L Harris, and Pierre-Yves Michellys, Synthesis, Structure-Activity Relationships and In Vivo Efficacy of the Novel Potent and Selective Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Inhibitor LDK378 Currently In Phase 1 and 2 Clinical Trials, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 2013

Carlos Garcia-Echeverria, Takanori Kanazawa, Eiji Kawahara, Keiichi Masuya, Naoko Matsuura, Takahiro Miyake, Osamu Ohmori, Ichiro Umemura; 2, 4- di (phenylamino) pyrimidines useful in the treatment of neoplastic diseases, inflammatory and immune system disorders; WO2004080980 A1

Greg Chopiuk, Qiang Ding, Carlos Garcia-Echeverria, Nathanael Schiander Gray, Jiqing Jiang, Takanori Kanazawa, Donald Karanewsky, Eiji Kawahara, Keiichi Masuya, Naoko Matsuura, Takahiro Miyake, Osamu Ohmori, Ruo Steensma, Ichiro Umemura, Yongqin Wan, Qiong Zhang; 2, 4-pyrimidinediamines useful in the treatment of neoplastic diseases, inflammatory and immune system disorders; WO2005016894 A1

SPOTLIGHT-Ganetespib Shows Potency Against Lung Cancer


Ganetespib

http://www.ama-assn.org/resources/doc/usan/ganetespib.pdf

A drug that indirectly impairs the function of several cancer-driving proteins, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase, may be an effective new treatment for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

The drug, ganetespib, may also be effective for treating patients who have become resistant to the only FDA-approved targeted therapy for this disease, crizotinib, according to data published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

“Lung cancer, a leading cause of death, is no longer thought of as a single disease, but rather as a group of diseases, each with a distinct genetic profile,” according to David Proia, Ph.D., associate director of cancer biology at Synta Pharmaceuticals Corporation, the company that funded the research. “This realization has paved the way for the design of new treatments tailored to the specific biological characteristics of a patient’s tumor.

“For example, patients with lung cancer caused by alterations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein typically respond well to crizotinib, which blocks that activity of the modified ALK and consequently kills off the cancer cells,” said Proia. “However, as is the case for many cancer drugs, most patients treated with crizotinib eventually become resistant to the drug.”

Proia and colleagues investigated ganetespib as an alternative treatment for ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ganetespib targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone for many different proteins, including ALK, to ensure proper functioning. When Hsp90 is blocked, ALK can no longer work properly and is destroyed by the cell. Once ALK is lost, the cancer cells die and the tumors shrink.

Ganetespib had 30 times greater potency than crizotinib against a cultured ALK-positive NSCLC cell line, resulting in the complete loss of ALK protein expression. In addition, the drug was active against ALK-positive lung cancer cell lines that had become resistant to the effects of crizotinib.

The researchers then compared ganetespib and crizotinib in mice xenografted with human ALK-positive NSCLC cancer cells. Ganetespib displayed greater antitumor activity and prolonged animal survival as compared to crizotinib. It was also shown that ganetespib had meaningful activity in a patient with ALK-driven NSCLC who had responded to, and then progressed, following crizotinib therapy.

“Ganetespib therapy represents a new option for treating ALK-dependent lung cancer in sequence with direct ALK inhibitors and/or for treating patients who relapse following direct ALK inhibitor therapy,” said Proia.

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