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ORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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TIPIFARNIB, типифарниб , تيبيفارنيب , 替匹法尼 ,


Tipifarnib.svgDB04960.pngChemSpider 2D Image | tipifarnib | C27H22Cl2N4O

str1

TIPIFARNIB

R-115777, NSC-702818

Categories

UNIIMAT637500A

CAS number 192185-72-1 +form
192185-68-5 (racemate)
192185-69-6 (racemic; fumarate)
192185-70-9 (racemic; diHCl)

(+)-(R)-6-[1-Amino-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(1-methylimidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-methylquinolin-2(1H)-one

2(1H)-Quinolinone, 6-[(R)-amino(4-chlorophenyl)(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-

Weight Average: 489.396
Chemical Formula C27H22Cl2N4O

типифарниб [Russian] [INN]
تيبيفارنيب [Arabic] [INN]
替匹法尼 [Chinese] [INN]
(R)-(+)-R115777
(R)-6-(Amino(4-chlorophenyl)(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-2(1H)-quinolinone
(R)-6-(amino(4-chlorophenyl)(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-methylquinolin-2(1H)-one
2 (1H))-Quinolinone,6-(amino(4-chlorophenyl)(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-, 2(1H )-quinolinone
Title: Tipifarnib
CAS Registry Number: 192185-72-1; 192185-68-5 (unspecified stereo)
CAS Name: 6-[(R)-Amino(4-chlorophenyl)(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-2(1H)-quinolinone
Manufacturers’ Codes: R-115777
Trademarks: Zarnestra (Janssen)
Molecular Formula: C27H22Cl2N4O
Molecular Weight: 489.40
Percent Composition: C 66.26%, H 4.53%, Cl 14.49%, N 11.45%, O 3.27%
Literature References: Farnesyl transferase inhibitor. Prepn: M. G. Venet et al., WO 9721701eidemUS 6037350 (1997, 2000 both to Janssen). Review of syntheses: P. R. Angibaud et al., Eur. J. Org. Chem. 2004, 479-486. Inhibition of farnesyl protein transferase and antitumor effects in vivo: D. W. End et al., Cancer Res. 61, 131 (2001). Clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics: J. Zujewski et al., J. Clin. Oncol. 18, 927 (2000). Accelerator mass spec determn in biological samples: R. C. Garner et al., Drug Metab. Dispos. 30, 823 (2002). Clinical evaluation in hematologic malignancies: J. Cortes et al., Blood 101, 1692 (2003). Review of clinical experience: P. Norman, Curr. Opin. Invest. Drugs 3, 313-319 (2002).
Properties: Crystals from 2-propanol, mp 234°. [a]D20 +22.86° (c = 0.98 in methanol).
Melting point: mp 234°
Optical Rotation: [a]D20 +22.86° (c = 0.98 in methanol)
Therap-Cat: Antineoplastic.
Keywords: Antineoplastic; Farnesyl Transferase Inhibitors.

PRODUCT PATENT

WO 9721701

Tipifarnib (R-115777) is a substance that is being studied in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other types of cancer. It belongs to the family of drugs called farnesyltransferase inhibitors. It is also called Zarnestra. In June 2005, the FDA issued a Not Approvable Letter for Zarnestra.

Investigated for use/treatment in colorectal cancer, leukemia (myeloid), pancreatic cancer, and solid tumors.

Drug had been granted orphan drug designation by the FDA for the treatment of AML in 2004. In 2005, the Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) adopted a positive opinion on orphan medicinal product designation for the drug. In 2014, Eiger BioPharmaceuticals licensed the product for worldwide development for the treatment of viral diseases and Kura Oncology licensed development and commercialization rights for the treatment cancer indications.

Pharmacodynamics

R115777, a nonpeptidomimetic farnesyl transferase inhibitor, suppresses the growth of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. This growth inhibition is associated with modulation in the phosphorylation levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)

Tipifarnib (INN,[1]:213 proposed trade name Zarnestra) is a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that is being investigated in patients 65 years of age and older with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It inhibits the Ras kinase in a post-translational modification step before the kinase pathway becomes hyperactive. It inhibits prenylation of the CaaX tail motif, which allows Ras to bind to the membrane where it is active. Without this step the protein cannot function.

It is also being tested in clinical trials in patients in certain stages of breast cancer.[2] It is also investigated as a treatment for multiple myeloma.[3]

For treatment of progressive plexiform neurofibromas associated with neurofibromatosis type I, it successfully passed phase I clinical trials but was suspended (NCT00029354) in phase II.[4][5] The compound was discovered by and is under investigation by Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C, with registration number R115777.Approval process

Tipifarnib was submitted to the FDA by Johnson & Johnson for the treatment of AML in patients aged 65 and over with a new drug application (NDA) to the FDA on January 24, 2005.

In June 2005, the FDA issued a “not approvable” letter for tipifarnib.[6]Progeria

Confocal microscopy photographs of the descending aortas of two 15-month-old progeria mice, one untreated (left picture) and the other treated with the farnsyltransferase inhibitor drug tipifarnib (right picture). The microphotographs show prevention of the vascular smooth muscle cell loss that is otherwise rampant by this age. Staining was smooth muscle alpha-actin (green), lamins A/C (red) and DAPI (blue). (Original magnification, ×40)

It was shown on a mouse model of Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome that dose-dependent administration of tipifarnib can significantly prevent both the onset of the cardiovascular phenotype as well as the late progression of existing cardiovascular disease.[7]

PATENT

TIPIFARNIB BY SOLIPHARMA

WO-2018103027

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2018103027&recNum=1&maxRec=&office=&prevFilter=&sortOption=&queryString=&tab=FullText

Crystalline form (I, II, III and IV) of tipifarnib . Useful for the treatment and/or prevention of abnormal cell growth diseases such as lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, melanoma, neuroblastoma or glioma. first filing from Solipharma claiming tipifarnib which was developing by Kura Oncology , under license from Johnson & Johnson subsidiary J&JPRD (now Janssen Research & Development).

Tipifarnib is a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that acts on H-RAS or N-RAS mutant cells and has antiproliferative effects. It can block the farnesylation modification of RAS protein, thereby disturbing its localization on the inner surface of the plasma membrane and subsequent activation of downstream signaling pathways, and has an effective anti-tumor disease activity.
Tipifarny’s chemical name is (R)-(+)-6-[amino(4-chlorophenyl)(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chloro) Phenyl) 1-methyl-2(1H)-quinolinone, English name Tipifarnib; its chemical structure is shown below:
The patent document CN1101392C reports the preparation method of typrivadina, which is a racemate and does not disclose any characterization data; the patent document CN100567292C reports the preparation method of typ fenfanide, which is a mixture of certain enantiomeric excesses. Only the melting point of the mixture is mentioned; the patent document CN1246318C reports the preparation method of typifanidin and the method for the resolution and purification of tepifefene in its enantiomers. The present inventors have found that the form of typifene prepared according to the method provided by CN1246318C is in the crystalline state (herein referred to as “Form A”), but it has a defect of low crystallinity and poor stability of the crystal, and the patent The typifanibs reported in the documents CN1101392C and CN100567292C are both mixtures and lack the characteristic data accurately reflecting their physical form and cannot be fully disclosed.
PATENT

Cyclization of 3-(3-chlorophenyl)-N-phenyl-2-propenamide by means of polyphosphoric acid (PPA) at 100 °C gives 4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolin-2-one ,

Which is condensed with 4-chlorobenzoic acid by means of PPA at 140 °C to yield 6-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolin-2-one

The dehydrogenation of compound  by means of Br2 in bromobenzene at 160 °C affords 6-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)quinolin-2-one,

Which is N-alkyalted with iodomethane in the presence of BnNMe3Cl and NaOH in THF to provide 6-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-1-methylquinolin-2-one.

Condensation of compound  with 1-methylimidazole  by means of BuLi in THF gives the triaryl carbinol (N-1),

Which is finally treated with NH3 in THF to afford the target Tipifarnib, R-115777 .

Scheme SHOWING COMPLICATIONS

PATENT

WO 2005105782

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2005105782

Farnesyltransf erase inhibitors block the main post-translational modification of the Ras protein, thus interfering with its localization to the inner surface of the plasma
10 membrane and subsequent activation of the downstream effectors. Although initially developed as a strategy to target Ras in cancer, farnesyltransferase inhibitors have
subsequently been acknowledged as acting by additional and more complex
mechanisms that may extend beyond Ras involving GTP-binding proteins, kinases,
centromere-binding proteins and probably other f arnesylated proteins.
15
A particular farnesyltransferase inhibitor is described in WO 97/21701, namely (R)-(+)- 6-[amino(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l- methyl-2(liϊ)-quinolinone. The absolute stereochemical configuration of the compound was not determined in the experiments described in the above-mentioned patent
20 specification, but the compound was identified by the prefix “(B)” to indicate that it was the second compound isolated from column chromatography. The compound thus obtained has been found to have the (R)-(+)-configuration. This compound will be
referred to below by its published code number Rl 15777 and has the following formula

Rl 15777 (Tipifamib) is a potent, orally active inhibitor of f arnesylprotein transferase.
It is one of the most advanced of the farnesylprotein transferase inhibitors currently
reported to be in clinical development, being one of the agents that have progressed to phase III studies.
30 Rl 15777 has been found to have very potent activity against neoplaslic diseases.
Antineoplastic activity in solid tumors, such as breast cancer, as well as in haematological malignancies, such as leukemia, have been observed. Also combination studies have been carried out demonstrating that R 115777 can be safely combined with several highly active anticancer drugs.

In WO 01/53289, the racemates (±) (4-(3-chloro-phenyl)-6-[(6-chloro-pyridin-3-yl)-(4-methoxy-benzylamino)-(3-methyl-3-f: -imidazol-4-yl)-methyl]-l-cyclopropylmethyl-liϊ-quinolin-2-one (racemate 1) and (±) 4-(3-chloro-phenyl)-6-[(6-chloro-pyridin-3-yl)-[(4-methoxy-benzylidene)-amino]-(3-methyl-3jr7-imidazol-4-yl)-methyl]-l-cyclopropylmethyl-liϊ-quinolin-2-one (racemate 2) are prepared.

racemate 1 racemate 2

After chiral molecule separation using column chromatography, either the benzylamino or the benzilidine moiety of the resulting (+) and /or (-) enantiomers are converted to an amino group under acidic conditions.

The synthesis of Rl 15777 as originally described in WO 97/21701, is presented in scheme 1.

Herein, in step 1, the intermediate 1-methyl imidazole in tetrahydrofuran, is mixed with a solution of ra-butyllithium in a hexane solvent to which is added chlorotriethylsilane (triethylsilyl chloride), followed by a further addition of ra-butyllithium in hexane, the resulting mixture being cooled to -78°C before the addition of a solution of a compound of formula (I), i.e. 6-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(12ϊ)-quinolinone in tetrahydrofuran. The reaction mixture is subsequently brought to room temperature, and then hydrolysed, extracted with ethyl acetate and the organic layer worked up to obtain a compound of formula (II), i.e. (±)-6-[hydroxy(4-chlorophenyl) (l-methyl-liϊ-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(lia- )-quinolinone.

In step 2, the hydroxy compound of formula (II) is chlorinated with thionylchloride to form a compound of formula (III), i.e. (±)-6-[chloro(4-chlorophenyl)(l -methyl- liJ-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chloroρhenyl)-l-methyl-2(li3)-quinolinone.

In step 3, the chloro compound of formula (III) is treated, with NEaL OH in
tetrahydrofuran to form the amino compound of formula (IV), i.e. (±)-6-[amino(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-l -imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl- 2(l/J)-quinolinone.

In step 4, the amino compound of formula (IV) is separated into its enantiomers by chiral column chromatography over Chiracel OD (25 cm; eluent: 100% ethanol; flow: 0.5 ml/rnin; wavelength: 220 nm). The pure (B)-fractions are collected and recrystallised from 2-propanol resulting in Rl 15777, the compound of formula (V).

Scheme 1

However, the procedure described in WO97/21701 has a number of disadvantages. For example, during the first step, the procedure results in the undesired formation of a corresponding compound of formula (XI), i.e. 6-[hydroxy(4-chlorophenyl) (1-methyl-lJrJ-imidazol-2-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(liϊ)-quinolinone)Jn which the imidazole ring is attached to the remainder of the molecule at the 2-position of the ring, instead of the desired 5-position. At the end of the procedure, this results in the formation of a compound of formula (XII), i.e.6-[amino(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lϊJ-imidazol-2-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(lβ -quinolinone.

(XI) CXH)

The use of n-butyllithium during the conversion of a compound of formula (I) in a compound of formula (II) is also undesirable in a commercial process in view of its pyrophoric nature and the formation of butane, a flammable gas, as the by-product. Also the carrying out of this process step, at a temperature as low as -78°C, is inconvenient and costly on a commercial scale.
Finally, the purification of compound (V) using chiral chromatography is expensive and disadvantageous in view of the large amounts of solvent needed and the specialised equipment required to perform a large scale chiral chromatography.

Another process for the synthesis of Rl 15777 as described in WO 02/072574, is presented in scheme 2.

Herein, in step 1, 1-methyl imidazole in tetrahydrofuran is mixed with a solution of n-hexyllithium in a hexane solvent to which is added tri-iso-butylsilyl chloride, followed by a further addition of n-hexyllithium in hexane. The compound of formula (I) in tetrahydrofuran is then added to the reaction mixture, keeping the temperature between -5°C and 0°C. The resulting product of formula (II) is isolated by salt formation.

In step 2, the chlorination reaction is effected by treatment of the compound of formula (II) with thionyl chloride in 1 ,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone.

In step 3, the chloro compound of formula (III) is treated with a solution of ammonia in methanol. After the addition of water, the compound of formula (IV), precipitates and can be isolated.

In step 4, the compound of formula (IV) can be reacted with L-(-)-dibenzoyl tartaric acid (DBTA) to form the diastereomeric tartrate salt with formula (VI) i.e. R-(-)-6-[amino(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-ljt-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(l Z)-quinolinone [R-(R*,RH!)]-2,3-bis(benzoyloxy)butanedioate (2:3).

Finally, in step 5, the compound of formula (VI) is treated with aqueous ammonium hydroxide, to form the crude compound of formula (V) which is then purified by recrystallisation from ethanol to the pure compound (V).

(VI) (V)
Scheme 2

However, in view of the fact that water is present during the third and the fifth step of this procedure, there is significant formation of the hydroxy compound of formula (II).

This is important because the compounds of formula (II) and (V) are difficult to separate. In order to keep the quality of the final product (V) as high as possible, it is critical to limit the formation of compound (II).

The major drawback of the above described processes is the generation of large amounts of the other enantiomer that subsequently must be recycled.

Attempts were made to develop processes that solve this problem. One of the possibilities was to enter chirality in the first step of the procedure. A first study was carried out in order to determine if the conversion of an enantiomer of the hydroxy compound of formula (II) into a compound of formula (IV) could preserve chirality. Several experimental conditions have been tested starting with an enantiomer of a compound of formula (II), but racemisation always occurred.

Another possibility was to try entering chirality by adding N-methylimidazole under the reaction conditions described herein above under steps 1 of WO97/21701 and WO 02/072574, to an N-Ct-6alkyl-(S(R))-sulfinylketimine prepared from the compound of formula (I). It turned out that the resulting N-Cι-6alkyl-(S(R))-sulfinylamide of the compound of formula (I) was in the desired R-configuration and could be used for conversion into compound (V).
These results are completely unexpected, especially in view of Shaw et al.
(Tetrahedron Letters: 42, 7173-7176). Already in 2001, Shaw et al. disclosed an asymmetric synthesis process for the production of α-aryl-α-heteroaryl alkylamines using organometallic additions to N-tert-butanesulfinyl ketimines. However, the configuration and the yield of the final enantiomer formed with this process, was depending on the configuration of the N-tert-butanesulfinyl moiety of the ketimines, the composition of the aryl and/or the heteroaryl moieties of the ketimines, as well as on the organo- and the metallic moiety of the organometallic reagent. Furthermore, the use of heteroaryllithium reagents were described in this document, as being in particular disadvantageous, in view of their instability.

Thus the present invention solves the above described problems. It provides a new process for the preparation of the compound of formula (V) without the need to recycle one of the enantiomers while minimising the formation of undesired isomers and impurities and under conditions which offer economic advantages for operation on a commercial scale.

A. Preparation of intermediates

Example AJ
a) Preparation of /V-r(4-chlorophenyl)((,4- -chlorophenyl’)-l-methyl-l f-quinolin-2-one’)-6-yDmethylenel-2-methyl-2-propanesulfinamide TSfR-)! (com ound 15)


Ti(OEt) (0.0122 mol) was added to a mixture of compound (I) (0.0024 mol) and (R)-(+)-2-methyl-2-propane-sulfinamide (0.0024 mol) in DCM (15ml). The mixture was stirred and refluxed for 4 days, then cooled to room temperature. Ice water was added. The mixture was filtered over celite. Celite was washed with DCM. The organic layer was extracted with saturated sodium chloride. The organic layer was separated, dried (MgS04), filtered, and the solvent was evaporated. This fraction was purified by column chromatography over silica gel (40 μm) (eluent: DCM/MeOH 98/2). The pure fractions were collected and the solvent was evaporated, yielding 0.95g of compound 15 _ (76%), melting point: 115°C.

b) Preparation of (R)-N-r(4-chlorophenyl1((4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-lic/-quinoline- 2-one -6-ylVl-methyl-l/j-imidazole-5-yl’)methyll-2-methyl-2-propanesulfinamide rS(R)l (compound 161

(compound 16)

n-Butyllithium (1.34ml, 0.002 mol) was added dropwise at -70°C to a mixture of 1-methylimidazole (0.0021 mol) in THF (4.5ml). The mixture was stirred at -70°C for 15 minutes. Triethylsilyl chloride (0.0021 mol) was added. The mixture was stirred at -70°C for 15 minutes. n-Butyllithium (1.34ml, 0.0021 mol) was added dropwise. The mixture was stirred at -70°C for 15 minutes. A solution of compound 15 (0.0019 mol) in THF (5.5ml) was added. The mixture was stirred at -70°C for 45 minutes, poured out into ice water and extracted with EtOAc. The organic layer was separated, dried (MgS04), filtered, and the solvent was evaporated. The residue was purified by column chromatography over silica gel (15-40 m)(eluent: DCM/MeOH/ΝEUOH 95/5/0.5), yielding 0.59g (52%) of compound 16, diastereomeric excess 24%.

c) Preparation of the (B)-diastereomer (compound 18) of compound 16

(compound 18)

Compound 16 was purified by column chromatography over silica gel (15-40μm) (eluent: DCM/MeOH/NHtOH 95/5/0.5). Two fractions were collected and the solvent was evaporated, yielding 0.304g diastereomer (B) (compound 18) (27%), melting point 174°C.

Example A.2
a) Preparation of jV-r(4-chlorophenyl¥(4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-l JJ-quinolin-2-one)-6-yl)methylene1-4-methylphenylsulfιnamidesulfιnamide fS(S)l (compound 17)

(compound 17)

Ti(OEt)4 (0.0122 mol) was added to a mixture of compound (I) (0.0123 mol) and (S)-(+)-j5-toluenesulfinamide (0.0123 mol) in DCM (80ml). The mixture was stirred and refluxed for 4 days, then cooled to room temperature. Satured sodium chloride was added. The mixture was filtered over celite. Celite was washed with DCM. The organic layer was separated, dried (MgS04), filtered, and the solvent was evaporated. A fraction was purified by column chromatography over silica gel (40 μm) (eluent: DCM MeOH 98/2). The fractions were collected and the solvent was evaporated, yielding 0.65g of pure compound 17 .

The pure compound N-[(4-chlorophenyl)((4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-l-tf-quinolin-2-one)-6-yl)methylene]-2-methyl-2-propanesulfinamide [S(R)] can be obtained in an analogues way.

B. Preparation of final compounds

Example BJ
a Preparation of compound (V)

Hydrochloric acid in isopropanol was added to a solution of compound 16 (0.00003 mol) in methanol (0J ml). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 minutes. The mixture was added to potassium carbonate (10%) on ice. The organic layer was separated, washed with a solution of saturated sodium chloride, dried (MgS04), filtered, and evaporated giving 0,017 g (100%) of compound (V), enantiomeric excess 22%, content of compound (II) < 1%.

PATENT

WO 2005105783

https://encrypted.google.com/patents/WO2005105783A1?cl=en

A. Preparation of intermediates

Example A.1

a) Preparation of N-r(4-chlorophenyl’)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methylene)l-2- methyl-2-propanesulfinamide KSfl l (compound 25)

Figure imgf000016_0001

(compound 25) Ti(OEt)4 (0.0162 mol) was added to a mixture of (4-chlorophenyiχi-methyl-lH- imidazol-5-yl)methanone (0.0032 mol) and (R)-(+)-2-methyl-2-propane-sulfinamide (0.0032 mol) in DCE (7ml). The mixture was stirred and refluxed for 6 days, then cooled to room temperature. Ice water was added. The mixture was filtered over celite. Celite was washed with DCM. The organic layer was extracted with saturated sodium chloride. The organic layer was separated, dried (MgS04), filtered, and the solvent was evaporated. This fraction was purified by column chromatography over silica gel (40 μm) (eluent: DCM/MeOH/NH OH 97/3/0.5), yielding 0.475g of compound 25 (46%).

The compound N-[(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methylene)]-2-methyl- 2-propanesulfinamide [(S(S)] can be obtained in an analogous way.

b) Preparation of N-r(4-chlorophenyl)((4-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-methoχy-quinoline-6- yl l-methyl-lH-imidazole-5-yl)methyn-2-methyl-2-propanesulfinamide TS(R)1 (compound 26)

Figure imgf000017_0001

(compound 26)

n-Butyllithium (0.00081 mol) in hexane, was added dropwise at -78°C to a mixture of 6-bromo-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-methoxy-quinoline (0.00081 mol) in THF (3 ml) under nitrogen flow. The mixture was stirred at -78°C for 30 minutes. A solution of compound 25 (0.00065 mol) in THF (0.6 ml) was added . The mixture was stirred at – 78°C for 1 hour and 30 minutes, poured out into ice water and extracted with EtOAc. The organic layer was separated, dried (MgS04), filtered, and the solvent was evaporated. This fraction was purified by column chromatography over silica gel (40μm)(eluent: DCM eOH/NB OH 97/3/0.1). The pure fractions were collected and the solvent was evaporated, yielding 0.138g (36 %) of compound 26, melting point 153°C.

The compound N-[(4-chlorophenyl)((4-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-methoxy-quinoline-6-yl)(l- methyl-lH-imidazole-5-yl)methyl]-2-methyl-2-propanesulfmamide [S(S)] can be obtained in an analogous way

c) Preparation of (S)-l-,4-chlorophenylV l-r4-(3-chlorophenylV2-methoxy-quinoline-6- yll-l-(l-methyl-l/J-imidazole-5-yl)-methylamine (compound 27)

Figure imgf000017_0002

(compound 27) Hydrochloric acid in isopropanol was added to a solution of compound 26 (0.000018 mol) in methanol (4.2 ml). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 minutes. The mixture was added to potassium carbonate (10%) on ice and extracted with ethyl acetate. The organic layer was separated, washed with a solution of saturated sodium chloride, dried (MgS0 ), filtered, and evaporated giving 0,086 g (100%) of compound 27, melting point 96°C, enantiomeric excess 88%. d) Preparation of (SV6-ramino(4-chlorophenyl¥l-methyl-l #-imidazol-5-yDmethyH-4- (3-chlorophenyD-lH)-quinorin-2-one (compound 28)

Figure imgf000018_0001

(compound 28) Compound 27 (0.00038 mol) in hydrochloric acid 3N (9.25 ml) and THF (9.25 ml), was stirred at 60°C for 24 hours and evaporated, giving 0,18 g (100%) of compound 28, melting point 210°C.

Example A.2

a) Preparation of N-r(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl’)methylene)1-p-

Figure imgf000018_0002

(compound 29) Ti(OEt)4 (0.0419 mol) was added to a mixture of (4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lH- imidazol-5-yl)methanone (0.0084 mol) and (S)-(+)-p-_toluenesulfinamide (0.0084 mol) in DCE (18ml). The mixture was stirred and refluxed for 7 days, then cooled to room temperature. Ice water was added. The mixture was filtered over celite. Celite was washed with DCM. The organic layer was extracted with saturated sodium chloride. The organic layer was separated, dried (MgS04), filtered, and the solvent was evaporated. This fraction was purified by column chromatography over silica gel (40 μm) (eluent: DCM/MeOH/ΝHiOH 97/3/0.5), yielding 1.15 g of compound 29 (38%).

The compound N-[(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methylene)]-p- toluenesulfinamide [(S(R)] can be obtained in an analogues way. B. Preparation of final compounds

Example B.l a) Preparation of (S)-6-ramino(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methyll-4-

Figure imgf000019_0001

Compound 28 (0.00038 mol) was added to a solution of THF (1.8 ml) and NaOH ION (1.8 ml). BTEAC (0.0019 mol) and methyliodide (0.00076 mol) were added and the mixture was stirred for 2 hours at room temperature. EtOAc was added. The organic layer was separated, dried (MgS04), filtered, and evaporated giving 0,149 g (83%) of compound 30, enantiomeric excess 86%.

PATENT

WO 02/072574

https://encrypted.google.com/patents/WO2002072574A1?cl=en

Preparation of compound (III):

110 ml of dry tetrahydrofuran was added to 7.6 ml of 1-methylimidazole (0.0946 mole) and the resulting solution cooled to -15°C.37.8 ml of n-hexyllithium 2.5 M in n-hexane (0.0946 mole) was added, while the temperature during addition was kept between – 5°C and 0°C. After addition, the reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes, while cooling to -12°C. 26.2 ml of tri-w o-butylsilyl chloride (0.0964 mole) was added, while the temperature during addition was kept between -5° and 0°C. After addition, the reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes, while cooling to -13°C. 37.2 ml of n- hexyllithium 2.5 M in n-hexane (0.0930 mole) was added, while the temperature during addition was kept between -5°C and 0°C (some precipitation occured). After addition, the reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes, while cooling to -14°C. 128 ml of dry tetrahydrofuran was added to 26.22 g of 6-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l- methyl-2(lH)-quinolinone (compound (II)) (0.0642 mole) and stirred until dissolution. This solution was added to the reaction mixture, while the temperature during addition was kept between -5°C and 0°C. After addition, the reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes between -5°C and 0°C. 128 ml of water was added to the reaction mixture, followed by the addition of 10.6 ml of acetic acid. The mixture was then heated to 40°C and stirred for 2 hours. The layers were separated and the organic layer washed with 32 ml water. 64 ml water and 7.8 ml aqueous NaOΗ 50% were added to the organic layer which was stirred for 1 hour at ambient temperature. The layers were separated and the organic layer concentrated under reduced pressure, yielding 51.08 g of a brown oil (46.6 wt% 4-(3-chlorophenyl)-6-[(4-chlorophenyl)hydroxy(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5- yl)methyl]-l-methyl-2(lH)-quinolinone (compound HI); 75.6 % yield).

The product can be isolated via the procedures mentioned above. The resulting product was analysed by hplc using the following conditions :-

Column: Ηypersil C18-BD 3μm, 100mm x 4 mm (i.d.)

Mobile phase:

Solvent A: 0.5% NΗLjOAc

Solvent B: CΗ3CN

Gradient: Time %A %B

0 100 0

15 0 100

18 0 100 19 100 0 23 100 0 Detector: UV 254nm Solvent: DMF The product was found to have a C5:C2 ratio of 99.8:0.2. In contrast using n-butyllithium in place of n-hexyllithium, triethylsilyl chloride in place of tri-i.ro- butylsilyl chloride and conducting the process at -70°C, i.e. generally in accordance with prior art procedures discussed above, the resulting product had a C5:C2 ratio of 95:5, a significant difference in commercial terms.

Preparation of compound (IV)

A 1 liter reaction vessel was charged with 105.4 g of 4-(3-chlorophenyl)-6-[(4- chlorophenyl)hydroxy ( 1 -methyl- 1 H-imidazol-5-yl)methyl] – 1 -methyl-2( 1 H)- quinolinone hydrochloric acid salt (compound (IΗ)and 400 ml of N,N- dimethylimidazolidinone added at 22°C. The mixture was stirred vigorously for 15 minutes at 22°C and became homogeneous. 32.1 ml of thionyl chloride was added over 10 minutes to the reaction mixture, the reaction temperature rising from 22°C to 40°C. After addition of the thionyl chloride, the reaction mixture was cooled from 40°C to 22°C and stirred for three hours at the latter temperature to provide a solution of 4-(3- chlorophenyl)-6-[chloro-(4-chlorophenyl)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-l- methyl-2(lH)-quinolinone (compound (IN).

Preparation of unresolved compound (I)

429 ml of ammonia in methanol 7Ν was cooled to 5°C in a 3 liter reaction vessel and the solution of compound (IN), obtained in the previous stage, added, while stirring, over 10 minutes, with an exothermic reaction, the temperature rising from 5°C to 37°C. After the addition was complete, the reaction mixture was cooled to 22°C and stirred for 20 hours. 1000ml of water was then added over 20 minutes, the addition being slightly exothermic so the reaction mixture was cooled to keep the temperature below 30°C. The mixture was then stirred for 22 hours at 22°C, the resulting precipitate filtered off and the precipitate washed three times with 100ml of water to provide a yield of 70-75% of 6-[arnino(4-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-ylmethyl]-4-(3- chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(lH)-quinolinone. Resolution of compound (I)

a) A 3 liter reaction vessel was charged with 146.8 g of 6-[amino(4-chlorophenyl)(l- methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(lH)-quinolinone and 301.1 g of L-(-)-dibenzoyl-tartaric acid monohydrate, 1200ml of acetone was added and the reaction mixture stirred vigorously for 10 minutes at 22°C to form a solution which was seeded with lOOmg of the final tartrate salt product (obtained from previous screening experiments) and then stirred for 22 hours at 22°C. The resulting precipitate was filtered off and the precipitate was washed twice with 75 ml of acetone and the product dried at 50°C in vacuo to yield 114.7g of R-(-)-6-[amino(4-chlorophenyl)(l- methyl-lΗ-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3-chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(lΗ)-quinolinone [R- (R*,R*)]-2,3-bis(benzoyloxy)butanedioate (2:3).

b) 41.08 g of the product of stage a) and 80 ml ethanol were stirred for 15 minutes at 22°C. 12.0 ml concentrated aqueous ammonium hydroxide was added over 2 minutes, and the reaction mixture stirred for 1 hour at 25°C. 160 ml water was added over 10 minutes at 25 °C and the mixture heated to reflux and stirred at reflux for 1 hour. The reaction mixture was then cooled to 20°C and stirred for 16 hours at 20°C. The product was filtered, washed twice with 8 ml water and dried at 50°C in vacuo to yield 16.87 g of (R)-(+)-6-[amino(4-chloro-phenyl)(l-methyl-lH-imidazol-5-yl)methyl]-4-(3- chlorophenyl)-l-methyl-2(lH)-quinolinone (compound (I)).

Purification of compound (I)

265 ml of ethanol was added to 19.9g of compound (I), obtained as described in the previous stage, and the mixture warmed while stirring to reflux temperature (78 °C) and then stirred at reflux temperature for 15 minutes before cooling the solution to 75 °C. 1.0 g of activated carbon (Norit A Supra) was then added to the mixture which was stirred at reflux temperature for 1 hour, filtered while warm and the filter then washed with 20 ml warm ethanol. The filtrate and wash solvent were combined (the product spontaneously crystallizes at 48°C), and the mixture warmed to reflux temperature and concentrated by removing 203 ml of ethanol. The resulting suspension was cooled to 22°C, stirred for 18 hours at 22°C, cooled to 2°C and stirred for 5 more hours at 2°C. The precipitate was filtered and washed with 4 ml ethanol and the product dried at 50°C in vacuo to yield 17.25 g of purified compound (I) which complies with the infrared spectrum of reference material.

PAPER

Practical route to 2-quinolinones via a pd-catalyzed c-h bond Activation/C-C bond Formation/Cyclization cascade reaction
Org Lett 2015, 17(2): 222

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/ol503292p

Practical Route to 2-Quinolinones via a Pd-Catalyzed C–H Bond Activation/C–C Bond Formation/Cyclization Cascade Reaction

Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371
Org. Lett.201517 (2), pp 222–225
DOI: 10.1021/ol503292p
Publication Date (Web): December 29, 2014
Copyright © 2014 American Chemical Society
Abstract Image

Quinolinone derivatives were constructed via a Pd-catalyzed C–H bond activation/C–C bond formation/cyclization cascade process with simple anilines as the substrates. This finding provides a practical procedure for the synthesis of quinolinone-containing alkaloids and drug molecules. The utility of this method was demonstrated by a formal synthesis of Tipifarnib.

SEE https://pubs.acs.org/doi/suppl/10.1021/ol503292p/suppl_file/ol503292p_si_001.pdf

4-(3-chlorophenyl)-6-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2-quinolinone 5:

str1

0.5 mmol 4-Amino-4′-chlorodiphenylmethane 4, 1mmol acetic anhydride and 2 mL toluene were added into the Schlenk tuble. The mixture was stirred at r.t. for 5 minutes, then 0.5 mmol TsOH•H2O, 2.5 mmol (2E)-3-(3-chlorophenyl) propenoate, 1.5 mmol Na2S2O8 and 5 mmol % Pd(OAc)2 were added into the reaction system in one time. The mixture was heated at 100 oC for 36 h and cooled down to room temperature, quenched with 50 mL saturated sodium bicarbonate solution and extracted thrice with ethyl acetate (30 mL) and the combined organic phase was dried over Na2SO4. After evaporation of the solvents the residue was purified by silica gel chromatography to afford 5 as pale yellow solid (elute: hexane-EtOAc) (180 mg, 95%).

1H NMR (400 MHz, d6-DMSO) ppm: 11.87 (s, 1H), 7.59-7.52 (m, 2H), 7.50-7.47 (m, 1H), 7.42-7.37 (m, 2H), 7.35-7.28 (m, 3H), 7.19-7.14 (m, 3H), 6.41 (s, 1H), 3.92 (s, 2H).

13C NMR (100 MHz, d6-DMSO): 161.50, 150.09, 140.52, 139.13, 138.25, 134.89, 133.85, 132.04, 131.16, 130.99, 130.95, 129.17, 128.88, 128.80, 127.94, 125.84, 122.30, 118.44, 116.55, 39.92.

HRMS (ESI) Calcd. for C22H15Cl2NO: [M + H]+ , 380.0609. Found: m/z 380.0613.

4-(3-chlorophenyl)-6-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-2-quinolinone 6:1

str2

4-(3-chlorophenyl)-6-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2-quinolinone 5 (0.2 mmol), iodine (0.002 mmol), pyridine (0.002 mmol) and aqueous tert-butylhydroperoxide (70%, 0.5 ml) were sealed in a 5 mL tube, then stirred at 80 oC overnight. After cooling to room temperature, the mixture was purified by a short silica gel chromatography column to afford 6 as pale yellow solid (elute: DCM/acetone = 2/1) (77 mg, 98%).

1H NMR (400 MHz, d6-DMSO) ppm: 12.31 (s, 1H), 8.00 (dd, J = 8.40 Hz, 1.60 Hz, 1H), 7.76 (d, J = 8.40 Hz, 2H), 7.74 (d, J = 1.60 Hz, 1H) 7.68 (s, 1H), 7.60 (d, J = 8.40 Hz, 2H), 7.55-7.50 (m, 4H), 6.57 (s, 1H).

13C NMR (100MHz, d6-DMSO): 193.48, 161.83, 150.38, 143.00, 138.46, 137.74, 136.36, 133.92, 132.04, 131.85, 131.16, 130.20, 129.93, 129.57, 129.08, 128.99, 128.11, 123.01, 117.81, 116.74. HRMS (ESI) Calcd. for C22H13Cl2NO2: [M + H]+ , 394.0402. Found: m/z 394.0405.

Reference: 1. Zhang, J.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Y.; Wan, C.; Zheng, X.; Wang, Z. Green Chem. 2009, 11, 1973. 2. (a) Angibaud, P.; Venet, M.; Filliers, W.; Broeckx, R.; Ligny, Y.; Muller, P.; Poncelet, V.; End, D. Eur. J. Org. Chem. 2004, 479. (b) Filliers, W.; Broeckx, R.; Angibaud, P. U.S. patent, US7572916, 2009.

NMR SIMULATION

PREDICTED VALUES

1H NMR: δ 3.42 (3H, s), 3.63 (3H, s), 6.57 (1H, s), 6.67 (1H, d, J = 1.7 Hz), 7.27 (1H, dd, J = 8.3, 1.5 Hz), 7.36-7.59 (8H, 7.46 (ddd, J = 8.3, 1.5, 0.5 Hz), 7.41 (ddd, J = 8.1, 8.1, 0.5 Hz), 7.39 (ddd, J = 8.1, 1.6, 1.5 Hz), 7.49 (ddd, J = 8.1, 1.7, 1.5 Hz), 7.55 (ddd, J = 8.3, 1.6, 0.5 Hz), 7.58 (d, J = 1.7 Hz)), 7.66 (1H, dd, J = 8.3, 0.5 Hz), 7.71 (1H, dd, J = 1.5, 0.5 Hz), 7.84 (1H, ddd, J = 1.7, 1.6, 0.5 Hz).

13C NMR PREDICT

str1

COSY PREDICT

HSQC PREDICT

References

  1. Jump up^ “International Nonproprietary Names for Pharmaceutical Substances (INN). Recommended International Nonproprietary Names (Rec. INN): List 46” (PDF). World Health Organization. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  2. Jump up^ Sparano, JA; Moulder, S; Kazi, A; Coppola, D; Negassa, A; Vahdat, L; Li, T; Pellegrino, C; Fineberg, S; Munster, P; Malafa, M; Lee, D; Hoschander, S; Hopkins, U; Hershman, D; Wright, JJ; Kleer, C; Merajver, S; Sebti, SM (15 April 2009). “Phase II Trial of Tipifarnib plus Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin-Cyclophosphamide in Patients with Clinical Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer” (PDF). Clinical Cancer Research15 (8): 2942–48. doi:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-2658PMC 2785076Freely accessiblePMID 19351752. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  3. Jump up^ Alsina, M; Fonseca, R; Wilson, EF; Belle, AN; Gerbino, E; Price-Troska, T; Overton, RM; Ahmann, G; Bruzek, LM; Adjei, AA; Kaufmann, SH; Wright, JJ; Sullivan, D; Djulbegovic, B; Cantor, AB; Greipp, RP; Dalton, WS; Sebti, SM (1 May 2004). “Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor Tipifarnib Is Well Tolerated, Induces Stabilization of Disease, and Inhibits Farnesylation and Oncogenic/Tumor Survival Pathways in Patients with Advanced Multiple Myeloma” (PDF). Blood103 (9): 3271–7. doi:10.1182/blood-2003-08-2764PMID 14726402. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  4. Jump up^ “R115777 in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors”
  5. Jump up^ “R115777 to Treat Children With Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and Progressive Plexiform Neurofibromas”
  6. Jump up^ “Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C. Receives Not Approvable Letter From FDA for Tipifarnib Based on Phase II Data”. PR Newswire. Jun 30, 2005. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
  7. Jump up^ Capell, BC; Olive, M; Erdos, MR; Cao, K; Faddah, DA; Tavarez, UL; Conneely, KN; Qu, X; San, H; Ganesh, SK; Chen, X; Avallone, H; Kolodgie, FD; Virmani, R; Nabel, EG; Collins, FS (6 October 2008). “A Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor Prevents Both the Onset and Late Progression of Cardiovascular Disease in a Progeria Mouse Model” (PDF). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences105 (41): 15902–7. doi:10.1073/pnas.0807840105PMC 2562418Freely accessiblePMID 18838683. Retrieved 16 November 2016.
Tipifarnib
Tipifarnib.svg
Clinical data
Synonyms R115777
ATC code
  • None
Legal status
Legal status
  • Investigational
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
Formula C27H22Cl2N4O
Molar mass 489.40 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
PATENT 
Cited Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO1997021701A1 * Oct 16, 1996 Jun 19, 1997 Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V. Farnesyl protein transferase inhibiting (imidazol-5-yl)methyl-2-quinolinone derivatives
WO2001051127A1 * Jan 9, 2001 Jul 19, 2001 Merck & Co., Inc. Inhibitors of prenyl-protein transferase
WO2001053289A1 * Nov 29, 2000 Jul 26, 2001 Pfizer Products Inc. Anticancer compound and enantiomer separation method useful for synthesizing said compound
WO2002020015A1 * Aug 30, 2001 Mar 14, 2002 Merck & Co., Inc. Inhibitors of prenyl-protein transferase
WO2002072574A1 * Mar 5, 2002 Sep 19, 2002 Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V. Process for the preparation of imidazole compounds
WO2002079147A2 * Mar 26, 2002 Oct 10, 2002 Merck & Co., Inc. Inhibitors of prenyl-protein transferase
NON-PATENT CITATIONS
Reference
1 * SHAW A W ET AL: “Asymmetric synthesis of alpha,alpha-diaryl and alpha-aryl-alpha-heteroaryl alkylamines by organometallic additions to N-tert-butanesulfinyl ketimines” TETRAHEDRON LETTERS, ELSEVIER SCIENCE PUBLISHERS, AMSTERDAM, NL, vol. 42, no. 41, 8 October 2001 (2001-10-08), pages 7173-7176, XP004304959 ISSN: 0040-4039 cited in the application
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
US9707221 Nov 8, 2016 Jul 18, 2017 Kura Oncology, Inc. Methods of treating cancer patients with farnesyltransferase inhibitors

//////////////////TIPIFARNIB , R-115777, типифарниб تيبيفارنيب 替匹法尼 , NSC-702818  , phase 3, orphan drug designation, NSC 702818, R 115777, Kura Oncology, Zarnestra, Janssen

CN1C=NC=C1[C@@](N)(C1=CC=C(Cl)C=C1)C1=CC2=C(C=C1)N(C)C(=O)C=C2C1=CC(Cl)=CC=C1

FDA approves new treatment Erleada (apalutamide) for a certain type of prostate cancer using novel clinical trial endpoint


FDA approves new treatment Erleada (apalutamide) for a certain type of prostate cancer using novel clinical trial endpoint

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Erleada (apalutamide) for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer that has not spread (non-metastatic), but that continues to grow despite treatment with hormone therapy (castration-resistant). This is the first FDA-approved treatment for non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer. Continue reading.

February 14, 2018

Release

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Erleada (apalutamide) for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer that has not spread (non-metastatic), but that continues to grow despite treatment with hormone therapy (castration-resistant). This is the first FDA-approved treatment for non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

“The FDA evaluates a variety of methods that measure a drug’s effect, called endpoints, in the approval of oncology drugs. This approval is the first to use the endpoint of metastasis-free survival, measuring the length of time that tumors did not spread to other parts of the body or that death occurred after starting treatment,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the FDA’s Oncology Center of Excellence and acting director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “In the trial supporting approval, Erleada had a robust effect on this endpoint. This demonstrates the agency’s commitment to using novel endpoints to expedite important therapies to the American public.”

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institutes of Health, prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in men in the U.S.. The NCI estimates approximately 161,360 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2017, and 26,730 were expected to die of the disease. Approximately 10 to 20 percent of prostate cancer cases are castration-resistant, and up to 16 percent of these patients show no evidence that the cancer has spread at the time of the castration-resistant diagnosis.

Erleada works by blocking the effect of androgens, a type of hormone, on the tumor. These androgens, such as testosterone, can promote tumor growth.

The safety and efficacy of Erleada was based on a randomized clinical trial of 1,207 patients with non-metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer. Patients in the trial either received Erleada or a placebo. All patients were also treated with hormone therapy, either with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog therapy or with surgery to lower the amount of testosterone in their body (surgical castration). The median metastasis-free survival for patients taking Erleada was 40.5 months compared to 16.2 months for patients taking a placebo.

Common side effects of Erleada include fatigue, high blood pressure (hypertension), rash, diarrhea, nausea, weight loss, joint pain (arthralgia), falls, hot flush, decreased appetite, fractures and swelling in the limbs (peripheral edema).

Severe side effects of Erleada include falls, fractures and seizures.

This application was granted Priority Review, under which the FDA’s goal is to take action on an application within 6 months where the agency determines that the drug, if approved, would significantly improve the safety or effectiveness of treating, diagnosing or preventing a serious condition.

The sponsor for Erleada is the first participant in the FDA’s recently-announced Clinical Data Summary Pilot Program, an effort to provide stakeholders with more usable information on the clinical evidence supporting drug product approvals and more transparency into the FDA’s decision-making process. Soon after approval, certain information from the clinical summary report will post with the Erleada entry on Drugs@FDA and on the new pilot program landing page.

The FDA granted the approval of Erleada to Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies.

//////////////fda 2018, Erleada, apalutamide, Priority Review, Janssen

Janssen signs licensing agreement with PATH for development of HIV-1 drug


rilpivirine.

Janssen R&D Ireland has signed a licensing agreement with PATH for the early development of a long-acting depot formulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug rilpivirine.

Rilpivirine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), is being developed as potential pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection

 

read all at

http://www.pharmaceutical-business-review.com/news/janssen-signs-licensing-agreement-with-path-for-development-of-hiv-1-drug-250913

Rilpivirine (TMC278, trade name Edurant) is a pharmaceutical drug, developed by Tibotec, for the treatment of HIVinfection.[1][2] It is a second-generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with higher potency, longer half-lifeand reduced side-effect profile compared with older NNRTIs, such as efavirenz.[3][4]

Rilpivirine entered phase III clinical trials in April 2008,[5][6] and was approved for use in the United States in May 2011.[7] A fixed-dose drug combining rilpivirine with emtricitabine and tenofovir, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in August 2011 under the brand name Complera.[8]

Like etravirine, a second-generation NNRTI approved in 2008, rilpivirine is a diarylpyrimidine (DAPY). Rilpivirine in combination with emtricitabine and tenofovir has been shown to have higher rates of virologic failure than Atripla in patients with baseline HIV viral loads greater than 100,000 copies.

  1.  “TMC278 – A new NNRTI”. Tibotec. Retrieved 2010-03-07.
  2.  Stellbrink HJ (2007). “Antiviral drugs in the treatment of AIDS: what is in the pipeline ?”. Eur. J. Med. Res. 12 (9): 483–95.PMID 17933730.
  3.  Goebel F, Yakovlev A, Pozniak AL, Vinogradova E, Boogaerts G, Hoetelmans R, de Béthune MP, Peeters M, Woodfall B (2006).“Short-term antiviral activity of TMC278–a novel NNRTI–in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected subjects”AIDS 20 (13): 1721–6.doi:10.1097/01.aids.0000242818.65215.bdPMID 16931936.
  4.  Pozniak A, Morales-Ramirez J, Mohap L et al. 48-Week Primary Analysis of Trial TMC278-C204: TMC278 Demonstrates Potent and Sustained Efficacy in ART-naïve Patients. Oral abstract 144LB.
  5.  ClinicalTrials.gov A Clinical Trial in Treatment naïve HIV-1 Patients Comparing TMC278 to Efavirenz in Combination With Tenofovir + Emtricitabine
  6.  ClinicalTrials.gov A Clinical Trial in Treatment naïve HIV-Subjects Patients Comparing TMC278 to Efavirenz in Combination With 2 Nucleoside/Nucleotide Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
  7.  “FDA approves new HIV treatment”. FDA. Retrieved 2011-05-20.
  8.  “Approval of Complera: emtricitabine/rilpivirine/tenofovir DF fixed dose combination”. FDA. August 10, 2011.
  • Rilpivirine hydrochloride, 4-[[4-[[4-(2-Cyanoethenyl)-2,6-dimethylphenyl]amino]-2-pyrimidinyl]amino]benzonitrile monohydrochloride, is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and indicated for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in treatment-naïve adult patients in combination with other antiretroviral agents. The product received marketing approval in the US (brand name Edurant) and is represented by the following general formula (I):

    Figure imgb0001
  • [0003]
    EP1419152 B1 claims amongst others Rilpivirine base and Rilpivirinehydrochloride per se as well as pharmaceutical compositions comprising the same. However, only concrete examples for preparingRilpivirine base are given in said patent but no concrete examples describing the production of the hydrochloride salt are provided.
  • [0004]
    EP1632232 B1 claims amongst others a solid pharmaceutical composition comprising crystalline forms A, B, C or D of Rilpivirinehydrochloride. In addition said patent claims a process for the production of Rilpivirine hydrochloride by reacting Rilpivirine base with hydrochloric acid in the presence of a suitable acid, such as acetic acid.
  • [0005]
    Polymorphism is a phenomenon relating to the occurrence of different crystal forms for one molecule. There may be several different crystalline forms for the same molecule with distinct crystal structures and varying in physical properties like melting point, XRPD pattern and FTIR spectrum. These polymorphs are thus distinct solid forms which share the molecular formula of the compound from which the crystals are made up, however they may have distinct advantageous physical properties such as e.g. chemical stability, physical stability, hygroscopicity, solubility, dissolution rate, bioavailability, etc.
  • [0006]
    The bioavailability of a compound intended to be administered orally, is dependent on the compounds solubility in aqueous systems as well as the compounds permeability as mentioned in EP1632232 B1 . Hydrates are known to be less soluble in aqueous systems than anhydrous forms of the same compound. Hence anhydrous forms of Rilpivirinehydrochloride are preferred over hydrated forms. Rilpivirinehydrochloride form D of EP1632232 B1 is a hydrate and thus no suitable candidate for the preparation of an orally administered medicament, whereas form E of the present invention is an anhydrate.
  • [0007]
    The novel polymorph E of Rilpivirine hydrochloride of the present invention shows high solubility in aqueous systems e.g. a higher solubility than forms A and C of EP1632232 B1 and is thus especially suitable for the preparation of an orally administered medicament.
  • [0008]
    In addition the crystalline forms A and C of EP1632232 B1 are difficult to make in a reliable manner as these forms are obtained from the same solvent system. As the polymorphs A and C of Rilpivirinehydrochloride are obtainable from the same solvent system acetic acid/water, the production processes are especially critical and sensitive because the single crystalline forms are only obtainable in pure form in a quite narrow range of temperature as described in the concrete examples A.a) and A.c) of EP1632232 B1 . In contrast form E of the present invention is reliably obtained by crystallization from ethanol as form E is the only polymorph of Rilpivirine hydrochloride obtained from this solvent system.
  • [0009]
    According to example A.b) of EP1632232 B1 form B is obtained by recrystallizing Rilpivirine hydrochloride from propanone using an initial Rilpivirine hydrochloride concentration of 0.3 g/L. However, this concentration is not suitable for up-scaling as larger amounts of Rilpivirine hydrochloride would ask for tremendous solvent volumina and hence the usage of tremendously large reaction vessels. In contrast form E of the present invention is also obtained by applying higher initial Rilpivirine hydrochloride concentrations such as e.g. ≥10 g/L and is thus suitable for large scale production.
  • [0010]
    Hence, aim of the present invention is to circumvent the drawbacks of the known forms A, B, C and D ofEP1632232 B1 by providing an anhydrous polymorph of Rilpivirine hydrochloride, which is obtainable in an easy and reliable manner also in large scale. In addition the novel polymorph shows high solubility in aqueous systems making it especially suitable for the preparation of an orally administered medicament.

 

 

 

 

 

FDA Approves Canagliflozin, Invokana – First in New Class of Type 2 Diabetes Drugs


CANAGLIFLOZIN

FRIDAY March 29, 2013

The first in a new class of type 2 diabetes drugs was approved Friday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Invokana (canagliflozin) tablets are to be taken, in tandem with a healthy diet and exercise, to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Invokana belongs to a class of drugs called sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. It works by blocking the reabsorption of glucose (sugar) by the kidney and increasing glucose excretions in urine, the FDA said in a news release.

Canagliflozin (Invokana) is drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes developed by Johnson & Johnson.[1][2] In March 2013, canagliflozin became the first in a new class of drugs for diabetes treatment to be approved.[3] It is an inhibitor of subtype 2 sodium-glucose transport protein (SGLT2), which is responsible for at least 90% of the glucose reabsorption in the kidney. Blocking this transporter causes blood glucose to be eliminated through the urine

  1. New J&J diabetes drug effective in mid-stage study, Jun 26, 2010
  2.  Edward C. Chao (2011). “Canagliflozin”. Drugs of the Future 36 (5): 351–357. doi:10.1358/dof.2011.36.5.1590789.
  3.  “U.S. FDA approves Johnson & Johnson diabetes drug, canagliflozin”. Reuters. Mar 29, 2013. “U.S. health regulators have approved a new diabetes drug from Johnson & Johnson, making it the first in its class to be approved in the United States.”
  4. Prous Science: Molecule of the Month November 2007

The agency told drug maker Janssen Pharmaceuticals that it must conduct five post-approval studies of the drug to determine the risk of problems such as heart disease, cancer, pancreatitis, liver abnormalities and pregnancy complications.

updated

CANAGLIFLOZIN

300px
CANAGLIFLOZIN
Canagliflozin
Canagliflozin is a highly potent and selective subtype 2 sodium-glucose transport protein (SGLT2) inhibitor to CHO- hSGLT2, CHO- rSGLT2 and CHO- mSGLT2 with IC50 of 4.4 nM, 3.7 nM and 2 nM, respectively.


M.F.C24H25FO5S
M.Wt: 444.52
CAS No: 842133-18-0
(1S)-1,5-Anhydro-1-C-[3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4-methylphenyl]-D-glucitol
1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene
NMR…..http://file.selleckchem.com/downloads/nmr/S276003-Canagliflozin-HNMR-Selleck.pdf

Canagliflozin Hemihydrate
(1S)-1,5-Anhydro-1-C-[3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4-methylphenyl]-D-glucitol hydrate (2:1)
928672-86-0

Canagliflozin (INN, trade name Invokana) is a drug of the gliflozin class, used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.[1][2] It was developed by Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma and is marketed under license by Janssen, a division of Johnson & Johnson.[3]
U.S. Patent No, 7,943,788 B2 (the ‘788 patent) discloses canagliflozin or salts thereof and the process for its preparation.
U.S. Patent Nos. 7,943,582 B2 and 8,513,202 B2 discloses crystalline form of 1 -(P-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl] benzene hemihydrate and process for preparation thereof. The US ‘582 B2 and US ‘202 B2 further discloses that preparation of the crystalline form of hemi-hydrate canagliflozin typically involves dissolving in a good solvent (e.g. ketones or esters) crude or amorphous compound prepared in accordance with the procedures described in WO 2005/012326 pamphlet, and adding water and a poor solvent (e.g. alkanes or ethers) to the resulting solution, followed by filtration.
U.S. PG-Pub. No. 2013/0237487 Al (the US ‘487 Al) discloses amorphous dapagliflozin and amorphous canagliflozin. The US ‘487 Al also discloses 1:1 crystalline complex of canagliflozin with L-proline (Form CS1), ethanol solvate of a 1: 1 crystalline complex of canagliflozin with D-proline (Form CS2), 1 :1 crystalline complex of canagliflozin with L-phenylalanine (Form CS3), 1:1 crystalline complex of canagliflozin with D-proline (Form CS4).
The US ‘487 Al discloses preparation of amorphous canagliflozin by adding its heated toluene solution into n-heptane. After drying in vacuo the product was obtained as a white solid of with melting point of 54.7°C to 72.0°C. However, upon repetition of the said experiment, the obtained amorphous canagliflozin was having higher amount of residual solvents. Therefore, the amorphous canagliflozin obtained by process as disclosed in US ‘487 Al is not suitable for pharmaceutical preparations.
The US ‘487 Al further discloses that amorphous canagliflozin obtained by the above process is hygroscopic in nature which was confirmed by Dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) analysis. Further, it was observed that the amorphous form underwent a physical change between the sorption/desorption cycle, making the sorption/desorption behavior different between the two cycles. The physical change that occurred was determined to be a conversion or partial conversion from the amorphous state to a crystalline state. This change was supported by a change in the overall appearance of the sample as the humidity increased from 70% to 90% RH.
The canagliflozin assessment report EMA/718531/2013 published by EMEA discloses that Canagliflozin hemihydrate is a white to off-white powder^ practically insoluble in water and freely soluble in ethanol and non-hygroscopic. Polymorphism has been observed for canagliflozin and the manufactured Form I is a hemihydrate, and an unstable amorphous Form II. Form I is consistently produced by the proposed commercial synthesis process. Therefore, it is evident from the prior art that the reported amorphous form of canagliflozin is unstable and hygroscopic as well as not suitable for pharmaceutical preparations due to higher amount of residual solvents above the ICH acceptable limits.
Medical use

    1. Canagliflozin is an antidiabetic drug used to improve glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. In extensive clinical trials, canagliflozin produced a consistent dose-dependent reduction in HbA1c of 0.77% to 1.16% when administered as monotherapy, combination with metformin, combination with metformin & Sulfonyulrea, combination with metformin & pioglitazone and In combination with insulin from a baselines of 7.8% to 8.1%, in combination with metformin, or in combination with metformin and a sulfonylurea. When added to metformin Canagliflozin 100mg was shown to be non-inferior to both Sitagliptin 100mg and glimiperide in reductions on HbA1c at one year, whilst canagliflozin 300mg successfully demontrated statistical superiority over both Sitagliptin and glimiperide in HbA1c reductions. Secondary efficacy endpoint of superior body weight reduction and blood pressure reduction (versus Sitagliptin and glimiperide)) were observed as well. Canagliflozin produces beneficial effects on HDL cholesterol whilst increasing LDL cholesterol to produce no change in total cholesterol.[4][5]

      Contraindications

      Canagliflozin has proven to be clinically effective in people with moderate renal failure and treatment can be continued in patients with renal impairment.

      Adverse effects

      Canagliflozin, as is common with all sglt2 inhibitors, increased (generally mild) urinary tract infections, genital fungal infections, thirst,[6] LDL cholesterol, and was associated with increased urination and episodes of low blood pressure.
      There are concerns it may increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis.[7]
      Cardiovascular problems have been discussed with this class of drugs.[citation needed] The pre-specified endpoint for cardiovascular safety in the canagliflozin clinical development program was Major Cardiovascular Events Plus (MACE-Plus), defined as the occurrence of any of the following events: cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, or unstable angina leading to hospitalization. This endpoint occurred in more people in the placebo group (20.5%) than in the canagliflozin treated group (18.9%).
      Nonetheless, an FDA advisory committee expressed concern regarding the cardiovascular safety of canagliflozin. A greater number of cardiovascular events was observed during the first 30 days of treatment in canagliflozin treated people (0.45%) relative to placebo treated people (0.07%), suggesting an early period of enhanced cardiovascular risk. In addition, there was an increased risk of stroke in canagliflozin treated people. However none of these effects were seen as statistically significant. Additional cardiovascular safety data from the ongoing CANVAS trial is expected in 2015.[8]

      Interactions

      The drug may increase the risk of dehydration in combination with diuretic drugs.
      Because it increases renal excretion of glucose, treatment with canagliflozin prevents renal reabsorption of 1,5-anhydroglucitol, leading to artifactual decreases in serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol; it can therefore interfere with the use of serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol (assay trade name, GlycoMark) as a measure of postprandial glucose excursions.[9]

      Mechanism of action

      Canagliflozin is an inhibitor of subtype 2 sodium-glucose transport protein (SGLT2), which is responsible for at least 90% of the renal glucose reabsorption (SGLT1 being responsible for the remaining 10%). Blocking this transporter causes up to 119 grams of blood glucose per day to be eliminated through the urine,[10] corresponding to 476 kilocalories. Additional water is eliminated by osmotic diuresis, resulting in a lowering of blood pressure.
      This mechanism is associated with a low risk of hypoglycaemia (too low blood glucose) compared to other antidiabetic drugs such as sulfonylurea derivatives and insulin.[11]

      History

      On July 4, 2011, the European Medicines Agency approved a paediatric investigation plan and granted both a deferral and a waiver for canagliflozin (EMEA-001030-PIP01-10) in accordance with EC Regulation No.1901/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council.[12]
      In March 2013, canagliflozin became the first SGLT2 inhibitor to be approved in the United States.[13]
      SYNTHESIS

…………
CANA1CANA2

………….

Canagliflozin is an API that is an inhibitor of SGLT2 and is being developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.[0011] The IUPAC systematic name of canagliflozin is (25,,3/?,4i?,55′,6 ?)-2-{3-[5-[4-fluoro- phenyl)-thiophen-2-ylmethyl]-4-methyl-phenyl}-6-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydro-pyran-3,4,5-triol, and is also known as (15)-l,5-anhydro-l-C-[3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4- methylphenyl]-D-glucitol and l-( -D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2- thienylmethyl]benzene. Canagliflozin is a white to off-white powder with a molecular formula of C24H25F05S and a molecular weight of 444.52. The structure of canagliflozin is shown as compound B.

Compound B – Canagliflozin
[0012] In US 2008/0146515 Al, a crystalline hemihydrate form of canagliflozin (shown as Compound C) is disclosed, having the powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) pattern comprising the following 2Θ values measured using CuKa radiation: 4.36±0.2, 13.54±0.2, 16.00±0.2, 19.32±0.2, and 20.80±0.2. The XRPD pattern is shown in Figure 24. A process for the preparation of canagliflozin hemihydrate is also disclosed in US 2008/0146515 Al.

Compound C – hemihydrate form of canagliflozin
[0013] In US 2009/0233874 Al, a crystalline form of canagliflozin is disclosed.

……..

WO 2005/012326 pamphlet discloses a class of compounds that are inhibitors of sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT) and thus of therapeutic use for treatment of diabetes, obesity, diabetic complications, and the like. There is described in WO 2005/012326 pamphlet 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene of formula (I):

Example 1 Crystalline 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene hemihydrate1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene was prepared in a similar manner as described in WO 2005/012326.

(1) To a solution of 5-bromo-1-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]-2-methylbenzene (1, 28.9 g) in tetrahydrofuran (480 ml) and toluene (480 ml) was added n-butyllithium (1.6M hexane solution, 50.0 ml) dropwise at −67 to −70° C. under argon atmosphere, and the mixture was stirred for 20 minutes at the same temperature. Thereto was added a solution of 2 (34.0 g) in toluene (240 ml) dropwise at the same temperature, and the mixture was further stirred for 1 hour at the same temperature. Subsequently, thereto was added a solution of methanesulfonic acid (21.0 g) in methanol (480 ml) dropwise, and the resulting mixture was allowed to warm to room temperature and stirred for 17 hours. The mixture was cooled under ice—water cooling, and thereto was added a saturated aqueous sodium hydrogen carbonate solution. The mixture was extracted with ethyl acetate, and the combined organic layer was washed with brine and dried over magnesium sulfate. The insoluble was filtered off and the solvent was evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was triturated with toluene (100 ml)—hexane (400 ml) to give 1-(1-methoxyglucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]-benzene (3) (31.6 g). APCI-Mass m/Z 492 (M+NH4).
(2) A solution of 3 (63.1 g) and triethylsilane (46.4 g) in dichloromethane (660 ml) was cooled by dry ice-acetone bath under argon atmosphere, and thereto was added dropwise boron trifluoride•ethyl ether complex (50.0 ml), and the mixture was stirred at the same temperature. The mixture was allowed to warm to 0° C. and stirred for 2 hours. At the same temperature, a saturated aqueous sodium hydrogen carbonate solution (800 ml) was added, and the mixture was stirred for 30 minutes. The organic solvent was evaporated under reduced pressure, and the residue was poured into water and extracted with ethyl acetate twice. The organic layer was washed with water twice, dried over magnesium sulfate and treated with activated carbon. The insoluble was filtered off and the solvent was evaporated under reduced pressure. The residue was dissolved in ethyl acetate (300 ml), and thereto were added diethyl ether (600 ml) and H2O (6 ml). The mixture was stirred at room temperature overnight, and the precipitate was collected, washed with ethyl acetate-diethyl ether (1:4) and dried under reduced pressure at room temperature to give 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene hemihydrate (33.5 g) as colorless crystals.
mp 98-100° C. APCI-Mass m/Z 462 (M+NH4). 1H-NMR (DMSO-d6) δ 2.26 (3H, s), 3.13-3.28 (4H, m), 3.44 (1H, m), 3.69 (1H, m), 3.96 (1H, d, J=9.3 Hz), 4.10, 4.15 (each 1H, d, J=16.0 Hz), 4.43 (1H, t, J=5.8 Hz), 4.72 (1H, d, J=5.6 Hz), 4.92 (2H, d, J=4.8 Hz), 6.80 (1H, d, J=3.5 Hz), 7.11-7.15 (2H, m), 7.18-7.25 (3H, m), 7.28 (1H, d, J=3.5 Hz), 7.59 (2H, dd, J=8.8, 5.4 Hz).
Anal. Calcd. for C24H25FO5S.0.5H2O: C, 63.56; H, 5.78; F, 4.19; S, 7.07. Found: C, 63.52; H, 5.72; F, 4.08; S, 7.00.
1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene
Figure US07943582-20110517-C00001

Example 2An amorphous powder of 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene (1.62 g) was dissolved in acetone (15 ml), and thereto were added H2O (30 ml) and a crystalline seed. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 18 hours, and the precipitate was collected, washed with acetone—H2O (1:4, 30 ml) and dried under reduced pressure at room temperature to give 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene hemihydrate (1.52 g) as colorless crystals. mp 97-100° C.

……..

there are a significant number of other β-C-arylglucoside derived drug candidates, most of which differ only in the aglycone moiety (i.e., these compounds comprise a central 1-deoxy-glucose ring moiety that is arylated at CI). It is this fact that makes them attractive targets for a novel synthetic platform technology, since a single methodology should be able to furnish a plurality of products. Among β-C-arylglucosides that possess known SGLT2 inhibition also currently in clinical development are canagliflozin, empagliflozin, and ipragliflozin.

Dapagliflozin                             Canagliflozin

Ipragliflozin …………………Empagliflozin
[0007] A series of synthetic methods have been reported in the peer-reviewed and patent literature that can be used for the preparation of β-C-arylglucosides. These methods are described below and are referred herein as the gluconolactone method, the metalated glucal method, the glucal epoxide method and the glycosyl leaving group substitution method.
[0008] The gluconolactone method: In 1988 and 1989 a general method was reported to prepare C-arylglucosides from tetra-6>-benzyl protected gluconolactone, which is an oxidized derivative of glucose (see J. Org. Chem. 1988, 53, 752-753 and J. Org. Chem. 1989, 54, 610- 612). The method comprises: 1) addition of an aryllithium derivative to the hydroxy-protected gluconolactone to form a hemiketal (a.k.ci., a lactol), and 2) reduction of the resultant hemiketal with triethylsilane in the presence of boron trifluoride etherate. Disadvantages of this classical, but very commonly applied method for β-C-arylglucoside synthesis include:
1) poor “redox economy” (see J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 17938-17954 and Anderson, N. G. Practical Process Research & Development, 1st Ed.; Academic Press, 2000 (ISBN- 10: 0120594757); pg 38)— that is, the oxidation state of the carbon atom at CI, with respect to glucose, is oxidized in the gluconolactone and then following the arylation step is reduced to provide the requisite oxidation state of the final product. 2) due to a lack of stereospecificity, the desired β-C-arylglucoside is formed along with the undesired a-C-arylglucoside stereoisomer (this has been partially addressed by the use of hindered trialkylsilane reducing agents (see Tetrahedron: Asymmetry 2003, 14, 3243-3247) or by conversion of the hemiketal to a methyl ketal prior to reduction (see J. Org. Chem. 2007, 72, 9746-9749 and U.S. Patent 7,375,213)).
Oxidation Reduction

Glucose Gluconoloctone Hemiketal a-anomer β-anomer
R = protecting group
[0009] The metalated glucal method: U.S. Patent 7,847,074 discloses preparation of SGLT2 inhibitors that involves the coupling of a hydroxy-protected glucal that is metalated at CI with an aryl halide in the presence of a transition metal catalyst. Following the coupling step, the requisite formal addition of water to the C-arylglucal double bond to provide the desired C-aryl glucoside is effected using i) hydroboration and oxidation, or ii) epoxidation and reduction, or iii) dihydroxylation and reduction. In each case, the metalated glucal method represents poor redox economy because oxidation and reduction reactions must be conducted to establish the requisite oxidation states of the individual CI and C2 carbon atoms.
[0010] U.S. Pat. Appl. 2005/0233988 discloses the utilization of a Suzuki reaction between a CI -boronic acid or boronic ester substituted hydroxy-protected glucal and an aryl halide in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The resulting 1- C-arylglucal is then formally hydrated to provide the desired 1- C-aryl glucoside skeleton by use of a reduction step followed by an oxidation step. The synthesis of the boronic acid and its subsequent Suzuki reaction, reduction and oxidation, together, comprise a relatively long synthetic approach to C-arylglucosides and exhibits poor redox economy. Moreover, the coupling catalyst comprises palladium which is toxic and therefore should be controlled to very low levels in the drug substance.

R = protecting group; R’ = H or alkyl
[0011] The glucal epoxide method: U.S. Patent 7,847,074 discloses a method that utilizes an organometallic (derived from the requisite aglycone moiety) addition to an electrophilic epoxide located at C1-C2 of a hydroxy-protected glucose ring to furnish intermediates useful for SGLT2 inhibitor synthesis. The epoxide intermediate is prepared by the oxidation of a hydroxy- protected glucal and is not particularly stable. In Tetrahedron 2002, 58, 1997-2009 it was taught that organometallic additions to a tri-6>-benzyl protected glucal-derived epoxide can provide either the a-C-arylglucoside, mixtures of the a- and β-C-arylglucoside or the β-C-arylglucoside by selection of the appropriate counterion of the carbanionic aryl nucleophile (i.e., the
organometallic reagent). For example, carbanionic aryl groups countered with copper (i.e., cuprate reagents) or zinc (i.e., organozinc reagents) ions provide the β-C-arylglucoside, magnesium ions provide the a- and β-C-arylglucosides, and aluminum (i.e., organoaluminum reagents) ions provide the a-C-arylglucoside.

or Zn[0012] The glycosyl leaving group substitution method: U.S. Patent 7,847,074, also disclosed a method comprising the substitution of a leaving group located at CI of a hydroxy-protected glucosyl species, such as a glycosyl halide, with a metalated aryl compound to prepare SGLT2 inhibitors. U.S. Pat. Appl. 2011/0087017 disclosed a similar method to prepare the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin and preferably diarylzinc complexes are used as nucleophiles along with tetra- >-pivaloyl protected glucosylbromide.

Glucose Glucosyl bromide β-anomer
[0013] Methodology for alkynylation of 1,6-anhydroglycosides reported in Helv. Chim. Acta. 1995, 78, 242-264 describes the preparation of l,4-dideoxy-l,4-diethynyl^-D-glucopyranoses (a. La., glucopyranosyl acetylenes), that are useful for preparing but-l,3-diyne-l,4-diyl linked polysaccharides, by the ethynylating opening (alkynylation) of partially protected 4-deoxy-4-C- ethynyl-l,6-anhydroglucopyranoses. The synthesis of β-C-arylglucosides, such as could be useful as precursors for SLGT2 inhibitors, was not disclosed. The ethynylation reaction was reported to proceed with retention of configuration at the anomeric center and was rationalized (see Helv. Chim. Acta 2002, 85, 2235-2257) by the C3-hydroxyl of the 1,6- anhydroglucopyranose being deprotonated to form a C3-0-aluminium species, that coordinated with the C6-oxygen allowing delivery of the ethyne group to the β-face of the an oxycarbenium cation derivative of the glucopyranose. Three molar equivalents of the ethynylaluminium reagent was used per 1 molar equivalent of the 1,6-anhydroglucopyranose. The
ethynylaluminium reagent was prepared by the reaction of equimolar (i.e., 1:1) amounts of aluminum chloride and an ethynyllithium reagent that itself was formed by the reaction of an acetylene compound with butyllithium. This retentive ethynylating opening method was also applied (see Helv. Chim. Acta. 1998, 81, 2157-2189) to 2,4-di-<9-triethylsilyl- 1,6- anhydroglucopyranose to provide l-deoxy-l-C-ethynyl- -D-glucopyranose. In this example, 4 molar equivalents of the ethynylaluminium reagent was used per 1 molar equivalent of the 1,6- anhydroglucopyranose. The ethynylaluminium regent was prepared by the reaction of equimolar (i.e., 1: 1) amounts of aluminum chloride and an ethynyl lithium reagent that itself was formed by reaction of an acetylene compound with butyllithium.
[0014] It can be seen from the peer-reviewed and patent literature that the conventional methods that can be used to provide C-arylglucosides possess several disadvantages. These include (1) a lack of stereoselectivity during formation of the desired anomer of the C- arylglucoside, (2) poor redox economy due to oxidation and reduction reaction steps being required to change the oxidation state of CI or of CI and C2 of the carbohydrate moiety, (3) some relatively long synthetic routes, (4) the use of toxic metals such as palladium, and/or (5) atom uneconomic protection of four free hydroxyl groups. With regard to the issue of redox economy, superfluous oxidation and reduction reactions that are inherently required to allow introduction of the aryl group into the carbohydrate moiety of the previously mention synthetic methods and the subsequent synthetic steps to establish the required oxidation state, besides adding synthetic steps to the process, are particular undesirable for manufacturing processes because reductants can be difficult and dangerous to operate on large scales due to their flammability or ability to produce flammable hydrogen gas during the reaction or during workup, and because oxidants are often corrosive and require specialized handling operations (see Anderson, N. G. Practical Process Research & Development, 1st Ed.; Academic Press, 2000 (ISBN-10: 0120594757); pg 38 for discussions on this issue).
[0015] In view of the above, there remains a need for a shorter, more efficient and
stereoselective, redox economic process for the preparation of β-C-arylglucosides. A new process should be applicable to the industrial manufacture of SGLT2 inhibitors and their prodrugs,
EXAMPLE 22 – Synthesis of 2,4-di-0-feri-butyldiphenylsUyl-l-C-(3-((5-(4- fluorophenyl)thiophen-2-yl)methyl)-4-methylphenyl)- -D-glucopyranoside (2,4-di-6>-TBDPS- canagliflozin; (IVi”))

[0227] 2-(5-Bromo-2-methylbenzyl)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)thiophene (1.5 g, 4.15 mmol) and magnesium powder (0.33 g, 13.7 mmol) were placed in a suitable reactor, followed by THF (9 mL) and 1,2-dibromoethane (95 μί). The mixture was heated to reflux. After the reaction was initiated, a solution of 2-(5-bromo-2-methylbenzyl)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)thiophene (2.5 g, 6.92 mmol) in THF (15mL) was added dropwise. The mixture was stirred for another 2 hours under reflux, and was then cooled to ambient temperature and titrated to determine the concentration. The thus prepared 3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4-methylphenyl magnesium bromide (0.29 M in THF, 17 mL, 5.0 mmol) and A1C13 (0.5 M in THF, 4.0 mL, 2.0 mmol) were mixed at ambient temperature to give a black solution, which was stirred at ambient temperature for 1 hour. To a solution of l ,6-anhydro-2,4-di-6>-ieri-butyldiphenylsilyl- -D-glucopyranose (0.64 g, 1.0 mmol) in PhOMe (3.0 mL) at ambient temperature was added rc-BuLi (0.4 mL, 1.0 mmol, 2.5 M solution in Bu20). After stirring for about 5 min the solution was then added into the above prepared aluminum mixture via syringe, followed by additional PhOMe (1.0 mL) to rinse the flask. The mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure (50 torr) at 60 °C (external bath temperature) to remove low-boiling point ethereal solvents, and PhOMe (6 mL) was then added. The remaining mixture was heated at 150 °C (external bath temperature) for 5 hours at which time HPLC assay analysis indicated a 68% yield of 2,4-di-6>-ieri-butyldiphenylsilyl-l-C-(3-((5- (4-fluorophenyl)thiophen-2-yl)methyl)-4-methylphenyl)- -D-glucopyranoside. After cooling to ambient temperature, the reaction was treated with 10% aqueous NaOH (1 mL), THF (10 mL) and diatomaceous earth at ambient temperature, then the mixture was filtered and the filter cake was washed with THF. The combined filtrates were concentrated and the crude product was purified by silica gel column chromatography (eluting with 1 :20 MTBE/rc-heptane) to give the product 2,4-di-6>-ieri-butyldiphenylsilyl-l-C-(3-((5-(4-fluorophenyl)thiophen-2-yl)methyl)-4- methylphenyl)- -D-glucopyranoside (0.51 g, 56%) as a white powder.
1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) δ 7.65 (d, J= 7.2 Hz, 2H), 7.55 (d, J= 7.2 Hz, 2H), 7.48 (dd, J= 7.6, 5.6 Hz, 2H), 7.44-7.20 (m, 16H), 7.11-6.95 (m, 6H), 6.57 (d, J= 3.2 Hz, IH), 4.25 (d, J= 9.6 Hz, IH), 4.06 (s, 2H), 3.90-3.86 (m, IH), 3.81-3.76 (m, IH), 3.61-3.57 (m, IH), 3.54-3.49 (m, 2H), 3.40 (dd, J= 8.8, 8.8 Hz, IH), 2.31 (s, 3H), 1.81 (dd, J= 6.6, 6.6 Hz, IH, OH), 1.19 (d, J= 4.4 Hz, IH, OH), 1.00 (s, 9H), 0.64 (s, 9H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDC13) δ 162.1 (d, J= 246 Hz, C), 143.1 (C), 141.4 (C), 137.9 (C), 136.8 (C), 136.5 (C), 136.4 (CH x2), 136.1 (CH x2), 135.25 (C), 135.20 (CH x2), 135.0 (CH x2), 134.8 (C), 132.8 (C), 132.3 (C), 130.9 (d, J= 3.5 Hz, C), 130.5 (CH), 130.0 (CH), 129.7 (CH), 129.5 (CH), 129.4 (CH), 129.2 (CH), 127.6 (CH x4), 127.5 (CH x2), 127.2 (CH x2), 127.1 (d, J= 8.2 Hz, CH x2), 127.06 (CH), 126.0 (CH), 122.7 (CH), 115.7 (d, J= 21.8 Hz, CH x2), 82.7 (CH), 80.5 (CH), 79.4 (CH), 76.3 (CH), 72.9 (CH), 62.8 (CH2), 34.1(CH2), 27.2 (CH3 x3), 26.7 (CH3 x3), 19.6, (C), 19.3 (CH3),19.2 (C); LCMS (ESI) m/z 938 (100, [M+NH4]+), 943 (10, [M+Na]+).
EXAMPLE 23 – Synthesis of canagliflozin (l-C-(3-((5-(4-fluorophenyl)thiophen-2-yl)methyl)- 4-methylphenyl)- -D-glucopyranoside; (Ii))

[0228] A mixture of the 2,4-di-6>-ieri-butyldiphenylsilyl-l-C-(3-((5-(4-fluorophenyl)thiophen- 2-yl)methyl)-4-methylphenyl)- -D-glucopyranoside (408 mg, 0.44 mmol) and TBAF (3.5 mL, 3.5 mmol, 1.0 M in THF) was stirred at ambient temperature for 4 hours. CaC03 (0.73 g), Dowex 50WX8-400 ion exchange resin (2.2 g) and MeOH (5mL) were added to the product mixture and the suspension was stirred at ambient temperature for 1 hour and then the mixture was filtered through a pad of diatomaceous earth. The filter cake was rinsed with MeOH and the combined filtrates was evaporated under vacuum and the resulting residue was purified by column chromatography (eluting with 1 :20 MeOH/DCM) affording canagliflozin (143 mg, 73%).

1H NMR (400 MHz, DMSO-J6) δ 7.63-7.57 (m, 2H), 7.28 (d, J= 3.6 Hz, 1H), 7.23-7.18 (m, 3H), 7.17-7.12 (m, 2H), 6.80 (d, J= 3.6 Hz, 1H), 4.93 (br, 2H, OH), 4.73 (br, 1H, OH), 4.44 (br,IH, OH), 4.16 (d, J= 16 Hz, 1H), 4.10 (d, J= 16 Hz, 1H), 3.97 (d, J= 9.2 Hz, 1H), 3.71 (d, J=I I.6 Hz, 1H), 3.47-3.43 (m, 1H), 3.30-3.15 (m, 4H), 2.27 (s, 3H);

13C NMR (100 MHz, DMSO- d6) δ 161.8 (d, J= 243 Hz, C), 144.1 (C), 140.7 (C), 138.7 (C), 137.8 (C), 135.4 (C), 131.0 (d, J= 3.1 Hz, C), 130.1 (CH), 129.5 (CH), 127.4 (d, J= 8.1 Hz, CH x2), 126.8 (CH), 126.7 (CH), 123.9 (CH), 116.4 (d, J= 21.6 Hz, CH x2), 81.8 (CH), 81.7 (CH), 79.0 (CH), 75.2 (CH), 70.9 (CH), 61.9 (CH2), 33.9 (CH2), 19.3 (CH3);

LCMS (ESI) m/z 462 (100, [M+NH4]+), 467 (3, [M+Na]+).

Example 1 – Synthesis of l,6-anhydro-2,4-di-6>-ieri-butyldiphenylsilyl- -D-glucopyranose (II”)

III II”
[0206] To a suspension solution of l,6-anhydro- -D-glucopyranose (1.83 g, 11.3 mmol) and imidazole (3.07 g, 45.2 mmol) in THF (10 mL) at 0 °C was added dropwise a solution of TBDPSC1 (11.6 mL, 45.2 mmol) in THF (10 mL). After the l,6-anhydro-P-D-gJucopyranose was consumed, water (10 mL) was added and the mixture was extracted twice with EtOAc (20 mL each), washed with brine (10 mL), dried (Na2S04) and concentrated. Column
chromatography (eluting with 1 :20 EtOAc/rc-heptane) afforded 2,4-di-6>-ieri-butyldiphenylsilyl- l,6-anhydro- “D-glucopyranose (5.89 g, 81%).
1H NMR (400 MHz, CDC13) δ 7.82-7.70 (m, 8H), 7.49-7.36 (m, 12H), 5.17 (s, IH), 4.22 (d, J= 4.8 Hz, IH), 3.88-3.85 (m, IH), 3.583-3.579 (m, IH), 3.492-3.486 (m, IH), 3.47-3.45 (m, IH), 3.30 (dd, J= 7.4, 5.4 Hz, IH), 1.71 (d, J= 6.0 Hz, IH), 1.142 (s, 9H), 1.139 (s, 9H); 13C NMR (100 MHz, CDCI3) δ 135.89 (CH x2), 135.87 (CH x2), 135.85 (CH x2), 135.83 (CH x2), 133.8 (C), 133.5 (C), 133.3 (C), 133.2 (C), 129.94 (CH), 129.92 (CH), 129.90 (CH), 129.88 (CH), 127.84 (CH2 x2), 127.82 (CH2 x2), 127.77 (CH2 x4), 102.4 (CH), 76.9 (CH), 75.3 (CH), 73.9 (CH), 73.5 (CH), 65.4 (CH2), 27.0 (CH3 x6), 19.3 (C x2).

……..
FIG. 1:
X-ray powder diffraction pattern of the crystalline of hemihydrate of the compound of formula (I).
FIG. 2:
Infra-red spectrum of the crystalline of hemihydrate of the compound of formula (I).http://www.google.com/patents/US7943582
………….
FIGS. 3 and 4 provide the XRPD pattern and IR spectrum, respectively, of amorphous canagliflozin.
………………
Canagliflozin
300px
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(2S,3R,4R,5S,6R)-2-{3-[5-[4-Fluoro-phenyl)-thiophen-2-ylmethyl]-4-methyl-phenyl}-6-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydro-pyran-3,4,5-triol
Clinical data
Trade names Invokana
AHFS/Drugs.com entry
Pregnancy
category
  • US:C (Risk not ruled out)
Legal status
Routes of
administration
Oral
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 65%
Protein binding 99%
Metabolism Hepaticglucuronidation
Biological half-life 11.8 (10–13) hours
Excretion Fecal and 33% renal
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number 842133-18-0 Yes
ATC code A10BX11
PubChem CID: 24812758
IUPHAR/BPS 4582
DrugBank DB08907 Yes
ChemSpider 26333259 
UNII 6S49DGR869 
ChEBI CHEBI:73274 
ChEMBL CHEMBL2103841 
Synonyms JNJ-28431754; TA-7284; (1S)-1,5-anhydro-1-C-[3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4-methylphenyl]-D-glucitol
Chemical data
Formula C24H25FO5S
Molecular mass 444.52 g/mol

References

  1. “U.S. FDA approves Johnson & Johnson diabetes drug, canagliflozin”. Reuters. Mar 29, 2013. U.S. health regulators have approved a new diabetes drug from Johnson & Johnson, making it the first in its class to be approved in the United States.
WO2005012326A1 Jul 30, 2004 Feb 10, 2005 Tanabe Seiyaku Co Novel compounds having inhibitory activity against sodium-dependant transporter
WO2013064909A2 * Oct 30, 2012 May 10, 2013 Scinopharm Taiwan, Ltd. Crystalline and non-crystalline forms of sglt2 inhibitors
CN103655539A * Dec 13, 2013 Mar 26, 2014 重庆医药工业研究院有限责任公司 Oral solid preparation of canagliflozin and preparation method thereof
US7943582 Dec 3, 2007 May 17, 2011 Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation Crystalline form of 1-(β-D-glucopyransoyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2- thienylmethyl]benzene hemihydrate
US7943788 Jan 31, 2005 May 17, 2011 Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation Glucopyranoside compound
US8513202 May 9, 2011 Aug 20, 2013 Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation Crystalline form of 1-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-3-[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienylmethyl]benzene hemihydrate
US20130237487 Oct 30, 2012 Sep 12, 2013 Scinopharm Taiwan, Ltd. Crystalline and non-crystalline forms of sglt2 inhibitors
WO2008002824A1 * Jun 21, 2007 Jan 3, 2008 Squibb Bristol Myers Co Crystalline solvates and complexes of (is) -1, 5-anhydro-l-c- (3- ( (phenyl) methyl) phenyl) -d-glucitol derivatives with amino acids as sglt2 inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes
US6774112 * Apr 8, 2002 Aug 10, 2004 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Amino acid complexes of C-aryl glucosides for treatment of diabetes and method
US20090143316 * Apr 4, 2007 Jun 4, 2009 Astellas Pharma Inc. Cocrystal of c-glycoside derivative and l-proline
US20110087017 * Oct 14, 2010 Apr 14, 2011 Vittorio Farina Process for the preparation of compounds useful as inhibitors of sglt2
US20110098240 * Aug 15, 2008 Apr 28, 2011 Boehringer Ingelheim International Gmbh Pharmaceutical composition comprising a sglt2 inhibitor in combination with a dpp-iv inhibitor
Reference
1 * OGURA H. ET AL.: ‘5-FLUOROURACIL NUCLEOSIDES. SYNTHESIS OF A STEREO-CONTROLLED NUCLEOSIDE SYNTHESIS FROM ANHYDRO SUGARS‘ NUCLEIC ACID CHEM. vol. 4, 1991, pages 109 – 112, XP000607288
Citing Patent Filing date Publication date Applicant Title
WO2014195966A2 * May 30, 2014 Dec 11, 2014 Cadila Healthcare Limited Amorphous form of canagliflozin and process for preparing thereof
US9006188 May 23, 2014 Apr 14, 2015 Mapi Pharma Ltd. Co-crystals of dapagliflozin

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1H NMR PREDICT

  13C NMR PREDICT

  COSY PREDICT

update……..

Figure

CAS 1672658-93-3
C24 H25 F O6 S, 460.52
D-Glucopyranose, 1-C-[3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4-methylphenyl]-
str1
str1
CAS 1809403-04-0
C24 H25 F O6 S, 460.52
D-Glucose, 1-C-[3-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-thienyl]methyl]-4-methylphenyl]-
WO2017/93949

Figure

(2R,3S,4R,5R)-1-(3-((5-(4-Fluorophenyl)thiophen-2-yl)methyl)-4-methylphenyl)-2,3,4,5,6-pentahydroxyhexan-1-one    12

From the FT-IR spectra of 12 contain a signal at 1674 cm–1, this signal is strongly indicative of a carbonyl ketone being present in 12

In 13C NMR and HMBC correlations spectra, the chemical shift at 199.75 ppm was observed. Analysis of the NMR data  confirmed that the structure of 12 is a ring-opened keto form

Synthesis of (2R,3S,4R,5R)-1-(3-((5-(4-Fluorophenyl)thiophen-2-yl)methyl)-4-methylphenyl)-2,3,4,5,6-pentahydroxyhexan-1-one 12

title compound 12 (84.23% yield) and having 99.4% purity by HPLC;
DSC: 160.84–166.44 °C;
Mass: m/z 459 (M+–H);
IR (KBr, cm–1): 3313, 2982, 1674.7, 1601, 1507.5, 1232.7;
1H NMR (600 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 7.87 (s, 1H), 7.80 (dd, J = 1.8 Hz, 1H), 7.61–7.58 (m, 2H), 7.33 (d, J = 8.4 Hz, 1H), 7.29 (d, J = 3.6 Hz, 1H), 7.21–7.18 (m, 2H), 6.84 (d, J = 3.6 Hz, 1H), 5.17 (dd, J = 3.6, 3.0 Hz, 1H), 5.02 (d, J = 6.6 Hz, 1H), 4.57 (d, J = 4.8 Hz, 1H), 4.43–4.39 (m, 3H), 4.22 (s, 2H), 4.02–4.01 (m, 1H), 3.53–3.51 (m, 3H), 3.38–3.37 (m, 1H), 2.35 (s, 3H);
13C NMR (101 MHz, DMSO-d6) δ 199.7, 162.6, 160.2, 142.8, 142.1, 140.5, 138.8, 133.3, 130.5, 130.4, 130.4, 129.3, 127.2, 127.0, 127.0, 126.7, 123.5, 116.0, 115.8, 75.2, 72.3, 71.8, 71.3, 63.2, 33.2, 19.2.
HRMS (ESI): calcd m/zfor [C24H25FO6S + Na]+ = 483.1248, found m/z 483.1244.
Org. Process Res. Dev., Article ASAP
DOI: 10.1021/acs.oprd.7b00281

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