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Cefiderocol, セフィデロコル , цефидерокол , سيفيديروكول , 头孢德罗 ,

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ChemSpider 2D Image | cefiderocol | C30H34ClN7O10S2

Cefiderocol

セフィデロコル;

Formula
C30H34ClN7O10S2
CAS
1225208-94-5
Mol weight
752.2149

Antibacterial, Cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor, enicillin binding protein, Siderophore cephalosporin

Fetroja (TN)

FDA, Cefiderocol, APPROVED, 2019/11/14

(6R,7R)-7-{[(2Z)-2-(2-Amino-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)-2-{[(2-carboxy-2-propanyl)oxy]imino}acetyl]amino}-3-[(1-{2-[(2-chloro-3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)amino]ethyl}-1-pyrrolidiniumyl)methyl]-8-oxo-5-thia-1-azabicycl o[4.2.0]oct-2-ene-2-carboxylate

S-649266,  GSK 2696266D

Cefiderocol, sold under the brand name Fetroja, is an antibiotic used to treat complicated urinary tract infections when no other options are available.[2] It is indicated for the treatment of multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa.[3][4][5] It is given by injection into a vein.[6]

It is in the cephalosporin family of medications.[2][7] Cefiderocol was approved for medical use in the United States on November 14, 2019.[2][8]

Cefiderocol, also known as S-649266, is a potent siderophore cephalosporin antibiotic with a catechol moiety on the 3-position side chain. S-649266 shows potent in vitro activity against the non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, including MDR strains such as carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii and metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa. S-649266 showed potent in vitro activities against A. baumannii producing carbapenemases such as OXA-type β-lactamases, and P. aeruginosa producing metallo-β-lactamases such as IMP type and VIM type. FDA approved this drug in 11/14/2019 To treat patients with complicated urinary tract infections who have limited or no alternative treatment options

Medical uses

Cefiderocol is used to treat adults with complicated urinary tract infections, including kidney infections caused by susceptible Gram-negative microorganisms, who have limited or no alternative treatment options.[2][7]

Mechanism of action

Its mechanism of entry into bacterial cells is by binding to iron, which is actively transported into the bacterial cells along with the cefiderocol.[6][9][10][11][12] It is in a medication class known as siderophores,[6][7] and was the first siderophore antibiotic to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).[13] It bypasses the bacterial porin channels by using the bacteria’s own iron-transport system for being transported in.[14]

History

In 2019, cefiderocol was approved in the United States as an antibacterial drug for treatment of adults 18 years of age or older with complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including kidney infections caused by susceptible Gram-negative microorganisms, who have limited or no alternative treatment options.[2][8]

The safety and effectiveness of cefiderocol was demonstrated in a study of 448 patients with cUTIs.[2] Of the patients who were administered cefiderocol, 72.6% had resolution of symptoms and eradication of the bacteria approximately seven days after completing treatment, compared with 54.6% in patients who received an alternative antibiotic.[2] The clinical response rates were similar between the two treatment groups.[2]

Labeling for cefiderocol includes a warning regarding the higher all-cause mortality rate observed in cefiderocol-treated patients compared to those treated with other antibiotics in a trial in critically ill patients with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections.[2] The cause of the increase in mortality has not been established.[2] Some of the deaths were a result of worsening or complications of infection, or underlying co-morbidities.[2] The higher all-cause mortality rate was observed in patients treated for hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated pneumonia (i.e.nosocomial pneumonia), bloodstream infections, or sepsis.[2] The safety and efficacy of cefiderocol has not been established for the treatment of these types of infections.[2]

Cefiderocol received a Qualified Infectious Disease Product designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and was granted priority review.[2] The FDA granted approval of Fetroja, on November 14, 2019, to Shionogi & Co., Ltd.[2]

PATENT

WO 2010050468

WO 2016035845

WO 2016035847

PATENT

WO 2017216765,

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2017216765&tab=PCTDESCRIPTION

Bacterial infections continue to remain one of the major causes contributing towards human diseases. One of the key challenges in treatment of bacterial infections is the ability of bacteria to develop resistance to one or more antibacterial agents over time. Examples of such bacteria that have developed resistance to typical antibacterial agents include: Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci, and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The problem of emerging drug-resistance in bacteria is often tackled by switching to newer antibacterial agents, which can be more expensive and sometimes more toxic. Additionally, this may not be a permanent solution as the bacteria often develop resistance to the newer antibacterial agents as well in due course. In general, bacteria are particularly efficient in developing resistance, because of their ability to multiply very rapidly and pass on the resistance genes as they replicate. Therefore, there is a need for development of newer ways to treat infections that are becoming resistant to known therapies and methods.

Surprisingly, it has been found that the compositions comprising a compound of Formula (I) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof and at least one beta-lactamase inhibitor or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, exhibit synergistic antibacterial activity, even against resistant bacterial strains.

Formula (I)

Example 1

Synthesis of Compound of formula (I)

Step-1: Preparation of intermediate (1):

To the clear solution of (Z)-2[(2-tert-butoxycarbonyl amino-thiazol-4-yl)-carboxy-methyleneaminooxy]2-methyl-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (30 gm, 69.93 mmol) in N,N-dimethyl acetamide (300 ml) was charged triethylamine (17.68 ml, 125.87 mmol) under stirring. The reaction mixture was cooled to -15°C. Methane sulfonyl chloride (12.01 gm, 104. 89 mmol) was charged to this cooled reaction mixture via addition funnel while maintaining temperature at about -15°C. The reaction mixture was stirred for 30 minutes at -15°C after the addition. To the reaction mixture was charged (6 ?,75)-4-methoxybenzyl-7-amino-3-chloromethyl-8-oxo-5-thia-l-aza-bicyclo[4.2.0]oct-2-ene-2-carboxylate hydrochloride salt (28.25 gm, 69.93 mmol) along with N-methyl morpholine (15.5 ml, 139.86 mmol). The reaction mixture was stirred further for 1 hour at -15°C and the reaction progress was monitored using TLC. After completion of reaction, ethyl acetate (1.2 L) was charged followed by IN aqueous hydrochloric acid (1.2 L) under stirring and cooling was removed to warm up reaction mixture to room temperature. Layers were separated and organic layer was washed with saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (500 ml) followed by brine (500 ml). Organic layer was dried over sodium sulphate and was evaporated under vacuum to provide a crude mass. It was purified using silica gel column chromatography (60-120 mesh, 30% ethyl acetate in hexane) to provide 38 gm of intermediate (1).

Analysis:

1H NMR (CDCls) δ ppm: 8.29 (br s, 1H), 8.17 (d, 1H), 7.35 (d, 2H), 7.31 (s, 1H), 6.91 (d, 2H), 6.21 (dd, 1H), 5.23 (dd, 2H), 5.05 (d, 1H), 4.55 (d, 1H), 4.46 (d, 1H), 3.82 (s, 3H), 3.65 (d, 1H), 3.48 (d, 1H), 1.62 (s, 3H), 1.59 (s, 3H), 1.53 (s, 9H), 1.45 (s, 9H).

Step-2: Preparation of intermediate (2):

The solution of intermediate 1 (45 gm, 57.76 mmol) in dichloro methane (450 ml) was cooled to about -40°C and m-chloroperbenzoic acid (18 gm, 57.76 mmol) was added in three lots at -40°C under stirring. The mixture was stirred for 30 minutes and allowed to warm at -20°C. As TLC showed complete conversion, 5% aqueous sodium thiosulfate solution (1.2 L) was added at -15°C under stirring. The mixture was allowed to warm at room temperature and was charged with ethyl acetate (1.5 L) and stirred for 30 minutes and layers were separated. Organic layer was washed with saturated aqueous sodium bicarbonate solution (1 L) followed by brine (500 ml).

Organic layer was dried over sodium sulphate and evaporated under vacuum to provide 46 gm of intermediate (2).

Analysis:

1H NMR (CDC13) δ ppm: 8.48 (br s, 1H), 7.89 (d, 1H), 7.34 (d, 2H), 7.29 (s, 1H), 6.92 (d, 2H), 6.21 (dd, 1H), 5.27 (dd, 2H), 5.04 (br d, 1H), 4.58 (d, 1H), 4.23 (d, 1H), 3.83 (s, 3H), 3.82 (d, 1H), 3.43 (d, 1H), 1.60 (s, 3H), 1.58 (s, 3H), 1.53 (9H)1.42 (s, 9H).

Step-3: Preparation of intermediate (3):

Part-1: To the clear solution of intermediate 2 (35 gm, 44.02 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran (350 ml) was charged potassium iodide (14.61 gm, 88.05 mmol) under stirring at 25°C. The suspension was stirred for 5 hours at the same temperature and the reaction was monitored using mass spectroscopy. After completion of the reaction ethyl acetate (600 ml) was added to the reaction mixture followed by 5% aqueous sodium thiosulphate (600 ml). The reaction mixture was stirred for 15 minutes and layers were separated. Organic layer was washed with demineralised water (500 ml) followed by brine (500 ml). Organic layer was dried over sodium sulphate and evaporated to dryness under vacuum to provide 38 gm of corresponding iodo-methyl intermediate.

Part-2: To the iodo-methyl intermediate obtained (37.24 gm, 41.98 mmol) in N,N-dimethylformamide (35 ml) was added 2-chloro-3,4-di-(4-methoxybenzyloxy)-N-(pyrrolidin-l-ylethyl)-benzamide (22 gm, 42.98 mmol). The thick mass was stirred at 25°C for 15 hours and the reaction was monitored using mass spectroscopy. Potassium iodide (48.78 gm, 293.8 mmol) was charged to the reaction mass under stirring at 25 °C. The reaction mixture was cooled to -40°C and acetyl chloride (12 ml, 167.9 mmol) was added. After completion of the reaction ethyl acetate (1.2 L) followed by demineralised water (1.2 L) was added to the reaction mass at 0°C. Layers were separated and organic layer was washed with demineralised water (500 ml) followed by brine (500 ml). Organic layer was dried over sodium sulphate and was evaporated to dryness under vacuum to obtain quaternary intermediate (3) as iodide salt.

Step-4: Preparation compound of Formula (I):

Compound (3) (30 gm, 21.5 mmol) was dissolved in dichloro methane (300 ml) and anisole (30 gm, mmol) was added under stirring at 25°C. The mixture was cooled to -40° C and 2M aluminium chloride solution in nitromethane (150 ml) was added over 45 minutes at -40°C. As addition was completed reaction mixture was stirred for 1 hour at 0°C. To the reaction mixture 2M aqueous hydrochloric acid (750 ml) and acetonitrile (750 ml) were added and the stirring was

continued for 15 minutes. Di-isopropyl ether (1.5 L) was charged to the reaction mixture and the reaction mass was stirred for 15 minutes at 25°C, and the layers were separated. Aqueous layer was washed with additional di-isopropyl ether (500 ml). HP-21 resin (150 gm) was charged to the aqueous layer. The aqueous layer along with resin was loaded on a resin HP-21 column. The column was eluted with demineralised water till pH of eluent became neutral. Then the column was eluted with 10% acetonitrile in water mixture. Finally the column was eluted with 20% acetonitrile in water mixture. Evaporation of required fractions below 40°C under vacuum provided 5.5 gm of crude compound (I). The crude compound (I) was purified by dissolving in acetonitrile (200 ml) and demineralised water (200 ml) mixture followed by addition of HP-21 resin (200 gm).The slurry thus obtained was loaded on HP-21 resin column. The column was eluted first with demineralised water (3 L) followed by 10% acetonitrile in water mixture (2 L) then followed by 20% acetonitrile in water mixture till complete pure compound from the column is eluted. Pure fractions were collected and lyophilized under vacuum to provide titled compound (I) in pure form.

Analysis:

1H NMR (DMSO d6) δ ppm: 12.5 (br s, 2H), 9.42 (br s, 1H), 8.41 (br t, 1H), 7.28 (br s, 3H), 6.78 (s, 2H), 6.73 (s, 1H), 5.73 (dd, 1H), 5.15 (d, 1H), 5.08 (br d, 1H), 3.71-3.91 (m, 4H), 3.21-3.60 (m, 7H), 1.95-2.19 (m, 4H)1.76 (s, 3H), 1.44 (s, 3H).

HPLC purity: 90.80%

PATENT

WO 2019093450

https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2019093450&tab=FULLTEXT&_cid=P21-K4M68M-79012-1

To date, various β-lactam antibacterial drugs have been developed and have become one of the clinically important therapeutic agents for bacterial infections. On the other hand, gram-negative bacteria that have acquired resistance to β-lactam antimicrobial agents by producing β-lactamase that degrades β-lactam antimicrobial agents are increasing. According to the molecular classification method of Ambler, β-lactamases are roughly classified into four classes. That is, class A (TEM type, SHV type, CTX-M type, KPC type, etc.), class B (NDM type, IMP type, VIM type, L-1 type, etc.), class C (AmpC type, CMY type, ADC) Type) and class D (such as OXA type). Of these, classes A, C, and D are broadly classified into serine-type β-lactamases, while class B types are classified into metallo-type β-lactamases, each of which can hydrolyze β-lactam antibacterial drugs by different mechanisms. It is known (Non-Patent Document 1).
To date, several β-lactamase inhibitors have been developed to help improve the efficacy of β-lactam antimicrobial agents. However, clavulanic acid, tazobactam, and sulbactam, the most common serine-type β-lactamase inhibitors currently used in the clinic, have inhibitory activity only against specific enzymes belonging to class A. And their usefulness is limited. Avibactam mainly inhibits class A and C enzymes including Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) (Non-patent document 2), which is currently a clinical problem. Avibactam is clinically used as a combination drug (AVYCAZ) with ceftazidime, a cephem antibacterial agent, but reports a strain that has acquired resistance in some Klebsiella pneumoniae that produces KPC, a class A enzyme. (Non-Patent Document 3). It also has limited efficacy against class D enzymes. To combat severe β-lactam resistance in the future, it will broadly and potently inhibit class A, C, and D serine β-lactamases, alone or in combination with various β-lactam antibacterials, Serine-type β-lactamase inhibitor that is effective not only against existing β-lactam antibacterial drugs but also against gram-negative bacteria that are resistant to the combination of existing β-lactam antibacterial drugs / β-lactamase inhibitors Drugs are eagerly needed.

Prior art documents

Non-patent literature

[0004]
Non-Patent Document 1: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 54 (3), 969-976,2010
Non-patent Document 2: The Lancet Infrction diseases, 13 (9), 785-796,2013
Non-patent Document 3: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 61 (3), 1-11, 2017

PAPER

 European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (2018), 155, 847-868

References

  1. ^ Katsube, T.; Echols, R.; Arjona Ferreira, J. C.; et al. (2017). “Cefiderocol, a Siderophore Cephalosporin for Gram‐Negative Bacterial Infections: Pharmacokinetics and Safety in Subjects With Renal Impairment”Journal of Clinical Pharmacology57 (5): 584–591. doi:10.1002/jcph.841PMC 5412848PMID 27874971.
  2. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o “FDA approves new antibacterial drug to treat complicated urinary tract infections as part of ongoing efforts to address antimicrobial resistance”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (Press release). 14 November 2019. Archived from the original on 16 November 2019. Retrieved 15 November 2019. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ Choi, Justin J; McCarthy, Matthew W. (24 January 2018). “Cefiderocol: a novel siderophore cephalosporin”. Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs27 (2): 193–197. doi:10.1080/13543784.2018.1426745PMID 29318906.
  4. ^ Aoki, Toshiaki; Yoshizawa, Hidenori; Yamawaki, Kenji; et al. (15 July 2018). “Cefiderocol (S-649266), A new siderophore cephalosporin exhibiting potent activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other gram-negative pathogens including multi-drug resistant bacteria: Structure activity relationship”. European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry155: 847–868. doi:10.1016/j.ejmech.2018.06.014ISSN 1768-3254PMID 29960205.
  5. ^ Portsmouth, Simon; van Veenhuyzen, David; Echols, Roger; et al. (25 October 2018). “Cefiderocol versus imipenem-cilastatin for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections caused by Gram-negative uropathogens: a phase 2, randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority trial”The Lancet Infectious Diseases0 (12): 1319–1328. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30554-1ISSN 1473-3099PMID 30509675.
  6. Jump up to:a b c “Fetroja (cefiderocol) for injection, for intravenous use full prescribing information”(PDF). November 2019. Retrieved 17 November 2019. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. Jump up to:a b c Zhanel GG, Golden AR, Zelenitsky S, et al. (February 2019). “Cefiderocol: A Siderophore Cephalosporin with Activity Against Carbapenem-Resistant and Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli”. Drugs79 (3): 271–289. doi:10.1007/s40265-019-1055-2PMID 30712199.
  8. Jump up to:a b “Cefiderocol New Drug Application”U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)Archived from the original on 4 December 2019. Retrieved 22 November 2019. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  9. ^ Sato T, Yamawaki K (November 2019). “Cefiderocol: Discovery, Chemistry, and In Vivo Profiles of a Novel Siderophore Cephalosporin”Clin. Infect. Dis69 (Supplement_7): S538–S543. doi:10.1093/cid/ciz826PMC 6853759PMID 31724047.
  10. ^ Matthews-King A (26 October 2018). “Antibiotic ‘Trojan horse’ could defeat superbugs causing global medical crisis, trial finds”The Independent. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  11. ^ Newey S (26 October 2018). “New ‘Trojan horse’ drug proves effective against antibiotic resistant bacteria”The TelegraphISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 26 October 2018.
  12. ^ Simpson DH, Scott P (2017). “Antimicrobial Metallodrugs”. In Lo K (ed.). Inorganic and Organometallic Transition Metal Complexes with Biological Molecules and Living Cells. Elsevier. ISBN 9780128038871.
  13. ^ Saisho, Yutaka; Katsube, Takayuki; White, Scott; et al. (March 2018). “Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Tolerability of Cefiderocol, a Novel Siderophore Cephalosporin for Gram-Negative Bacteria, in Healthy Subjects” (PDF)Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy62 (3): 1–12. doi:10.1128/AAC.02163-17PMC 5826143PMID 29311072. Retrieved 22 November 2019.
  14. ^ Ito A, Nishikawa T, Matsumoto S, et al. (December 2016). “Siderophore Cephalosporin Cefiderocol Utilizes Ferric Iron Transporter Systems for Antibacterial Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa”Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy60 (12): 7396–7401. doi:10.1128/AAC.01405-16PMC 5119021PMID 27736756.

External links

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

S-649266 shows potent in vitro activity against the non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, including MDR strains such as carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii and metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa. MIC90s of S-649266 for A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa and S. maltophilia were 2, 1 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively, whereas MIC90s of meropenem were >16 mg/L. S-649266 showed potent in vitro activities against A. baumannii producing carbapenemases such as OXA-type β-lactamases, and P. aeruginosa producing metallo-β-lactamases such as IMP type and VIM type. MIC90 values for these A. baumannii strains and P. aeruginosa strains were 8 and 4 mg/L, respectively.

REFERENCES

1: Yamano Y. In Vitro Activity of Cefiderocol Against a Broad Range of Clinically Important Gram-negative Bacteria. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Nov 13;69(Supplement_7):S544-S551. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz827. PubMed PMID: 31724049; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6853761.

2: Echols R, Ariyasu M, Nagata TD. Pathogen-focused Clinical Development to Address Unmet Medical Need: Cefiderocol Targeting Carbapenem Resistance. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Nov 13;69(Supplement_7):S559-S564. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz829. PubMed PMID: 31724048; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6853756.

3: Sato T, Yamawaki K. Cefiderocol: Discovery, Chemistry, and In Vivo Profiles of a Novel Siderophore Cephalosporin. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Nov 13;69(Supplement_7):S538-S543. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz826. PubMed PMID: 31724047; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6853759.

4: Bonomo RA. Cefiderocol: A Novel Siderophore Cephalosporin Defeating Carbapenem-resistant Pathogens. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Nov 13;69(Supplement_7):S519-S520. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz823. PubMed PMID: 31724046; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6853757.

5: Katsube T, Echols R, Wajima T. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles of Cefiderocol, a Novel Siderophore Cephalosporin. Clin Infect Dis. 2019 Nov 13;69(Supplement_7):S552-S558. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciz828. PubMed PMID: 31724042; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6853762.

6: Kidd JM, Abdelraouf K, Nicolau DP. Efficacy of Humanized Cefiderocol Exposure is Unaltered by Host Iron Overload in the Thigh Infection Model. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2019 Oct 28. pii: AAC.01767-19. doi: 10.1128/AAC.01767-19. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31658966.

7: Chen IH, Kidd JM, Abdelraouf K, Nicolau DP. Comparative In Vivo Antibacterial Activity of Human-Simulated Exposures of Cefiderocol and Ceftazidime against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in the Murine Thigh Model. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2019 Oct 7. pii: AAC.01558-19. doi: 10.1128/AAC.01558-19. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 31591126.

8: Stevens RW, Clancy M. Compassionate Use of Cefiderocol in the Treatment of an Intraabdominal Infection Due to Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Case Report. Pharmacotherapy. 2019 Nov;39(11):1113-1118. doi: 10.1002/phar.2334. Epub 2019 Oct 22. PubMed PMID: 31550054.

9: Sanabria C, Migoya E, Mason JW, Stanworth SH, Katsube T, Machida M, Narukawa Y, Den Nagata T. Effect of Cefiderocol, a Siderophore Cephalosporin, on QT/QTc Interval in Healthy Adult Subjects. Clin Ther. 2019 Sep;41(9):1724-1736.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.clinthera.2019.07.006. Epub 2019 Aug 1. PubMed PMID: 31378318.

10: Trecarichi EM, Quirino A, Scaglione V, Longhini F, Garofalo E, Bruni A, Biamonte E, Lionello R, Serapide F, Mazzitelli M, Marascio N, Matera G, Liberto MC, Navalesi P, Torti C; IMAGES Group . Successful treatment with cefiderocol for compassionate use in a critically ill patient with XDR Acinetobacter baumannii and KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: a case report. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2019 Nov 1;74(11):3399-3401. doi: 10.1093/jac/dkz318. PubMed PMID: 31369095.

11: Nakamura R, Ito-Horiyama T, Takemura M, Toba S, Matsumoto S, Ikehara T, Tsuji M, Sato T, Yamano Y. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Study of Cefiderocol, a Novel Parenteral Siderophore Cephalosporin, in Murine Thigh and Lung Infection Models. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2019 Aug 23;63(9). pii: e02031-18. doi: 10.1128/AAC.02031-18. Print 2019 Sep. PubMed PMID: 31262762; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6709502.

12: Katsube T, Saisho Y, Shimada J, Furuie H. Intrapulmonary pharmacokinetics of cefiderocol, a novel siderophore cephalosporin, in healthy adult subjects. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2019 Jul 1;74(7):1971-1974. doi: 10.1093/jac/dkz123. PubMed PMID: 31220260; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6587409.

13: Jean SS, Hsueh SC, Lee WS, Hsueh PR. Cefiderocol: a promising antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther. 2019 May;17(5):307-309. doi: 10.1080/14787210.2019.1612240. Epub 2019 May 6. PubMed PMID: 31055983.

14: Hackel MA, Tsuji M, Yamano Y, Echols R, Karlowsky JA, Sahm DF. Reproducibility of broth microdilution MICs for the novel siderophore cephalosporin, cefiderocol, determined using iron-depleted cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2019 Aug;94(4):321-325. doi: 10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2019.03.003. Epub 2019 Mar 23. PubMed PMID: 31029489.

15: Miyazaki S, Katsube T, Shen H, Tomek C, Narukawa Y. Metabolism, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics of [(14) C]-Cefiderocol (S-649266), a Siderophore Cephalosporin, in Healthy Subjects Following Intravenous Administration. J Clin Pharmacol. 2019 Jul;59(7):958-967. doi: 10.1002/jcph.1386. Epub 2019 Feb 7. PubMed PMID: 30730562; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC6593826.

16: Zhanel GG, Golden AR, Zelenitsky S, Wiebe K, Lawrence CK, Adam HJ, Idowu T, Domalaon R, Schweizer F, Zhanel MA, Lagacé-Wiens PRS, Walkty AJ, Noreddin A, Lynch Iii JP, Karlowsky JA. Cefiderocol: A Siderophore Cephalosporin with Activity Against Carbapenem-Resistant and Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli. Drugs. 2019 Feb;79(3):271-289. doi: 10.1007/s40265-019-1055-2. Review. PubMed PMID: 30712199.

17: Huttner A. Cefiderocol for treatment of complicated urinary tract infections – Author’s reply. Lancet Infect Dis. 2019 Jan;19(1):24-25. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30728-X. PubMed PMID: 30587291.

18: Portsmouth S, Echols R, Den Nagata T. Cefiderocol for treatment of complicated urinary tract infections. Lancet Infect Dis. 2019 Jan;19(1):23-24. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30721-7. PubMed PMID: 30587290.

19: Wagenlehner FME, Naber KG. Cefiderocol for treatment of complicated urinary tract infections. Lancet Infect Dis. 2019 Jan;19(1):22-23. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30722-9. PubMed PMID: 30587289.

20: Portsmouth S, van Veenhuyzen D, Echols R, Machida M, Ferreira JCA, Ariyasu M, Tenke P, Nagata TD. Cefiderocol versus imipenem-cilastatin for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections caused by Gram-negative uropathogens: a phase 2, randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority trial. Lancet Infect Dis. 2018 Dec;18(12):1319-1328. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30554-1. Epub 2018 Oct 25. PubMed PMID: 30509675.

Cefiderocol
Cefiderocol.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Fetroja
Routes of
administration
Intravenous infusion
ATC code
  • none
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Protein binding 56–58%[1]
Elimination half-life 2.8 hours
Excretion mainly renal (60–70% unchanged)
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
Chemical and physical data
Formula C30H34ClN7O10S2
Molar mass 752.21 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

////////////Cefiderocol, セフィデロコル , FDA 2019, цефидерокол سيفيديروكول 头孢德罗 , S-649266,  GSK 2696266D


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DR ANTHONY CRASTO

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DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO, Born in Mumbai in 1964 and graduated from Mumbai University, Completed his Ph.D from ICT, 1991,Matunga, Mumbai, India, in Organic Chemistry, The thesis topic was Synthesis of Novel Pyrethroid Analogues, Currently he is working with GLENMARK PHARMACEUTICALS LTD, Research Centre as Principal Scientist, Process Research (bulk actives) at Mahape, Navi Mumbai, India. Total Industry exp 30 plus yrs, Prior to joining Glenmark, he has worked with major multinationals like Hoechst Marion Roussel, now Sanofi, Searle India Ltd, now RPG lifesciences, etc. He has worked with notable scientists like Dr K Nagarajan, Dr Ralph Stapel, Prof S Seshadri, Dr T.V. Radhakrishnan and Dr B. K. Kulkarni, etc, He did custom synthesis for major multinationals in his career like BASF, Novartis, Sanofi, etc., He has worked in Discovery, Natural products, Bulk drugs, Generics, Intermediates, Fine chemicals, Neutraceuticals, GMP, Scaleups, etc, he is now helping millions, has 9 million plus hits on Google on all Organic chemistry websites. His friends call him Open superstar worlddrugtracker. His New Drug Approvals, Green Chemistry International, All about drugs, Eurekamoments, Organic spectroscopy international, etc in organic chemistry are some most read blogs He has hands on experience in initiation and developing novel routes for drug molecules and implementation them on commercial scale over a 30 year tenure till date Dec 2017, Around 35 plus products in his career. He has good knowledge of IPM, GMP, Regulatory aspects, he has several International patents published worldwide . He has good proficiency in Technology transfer, Spectroscopy, Stereochemistry, Synthesis, Polymorphism etc., He suffered a paralytic stroke/ Acute Transverse mylitis in Dec 2007 and is 90 %Paralysed, He is bound to a wheelchair, this seems to have injected feul in him to help chemists all around the world, he is more active than before and is pushing boundaries, He has 9 million plus hits on Google, 2.5 lakh plus connections on all networking sites, 50 Lakh plus views on dozen plus blogs, He makes himself available to all, contact him on +91 9323115463, email amcrasto@gmail.com, Twitter, @amcrasto , He lives and will die for his family, 90% paralysis cannot kill his soul., Notably he has 19 lakh plus views on New Drug Approvals Blog in 216 countries......https://newdrugapprovals.wordpress.com/ , He appreciates the help he gets from one and all, Friends, Family, Glenmark, Readers, Wellwishers, Doctors, Drug authorities, His Contacts, Physiotherapist, etc

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